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WADA List of Prohibited Substances and Methods comes into force

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) 2019 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods published in October came into force on January 1, 2019. Whether you’re an athlete, coach, physio or doctor, it’s vital you are aware of the changes, so you don’t get caught out and end up with a ban from sport.

The full List can be quite dry to read unless you’re into chemistry, but it contains vital information you need to know when training, competing or working with athletes. Fortunately, there are no major changes for 2019, however several of the changes relate to supplements or ingredients commonly found in them.

In the UK the UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) agency advises athletes to take a food-first approach to nutrition where possible, as no guarantees can ever be made that a supplement is free from banned substances. UKAD has outlined the key things you need to know about the 2019 WADA Prohibited List:

Check your supplements carefully

  • Epiandrosterone has been added as an example of a steroid, which can be found in some dietary supplements.
  • The examples of metabolites of steroids which the body does not naturally produce has been simplified. It now only includes those known to be found in supplements or used as masking agents.
  • More examples of substances which were already prohibited have been added, and these can be found in some supplements, so don’t get caught out. 4-methylpentan-2-amine has been included as another name for DMBA, while 5-methylhexan-2-amine (1,4-dimethylpentylamine) and 3-methylhexan-2-amine (1,2-dimethylpentylamine) were added as examples of substances related to methylhexaneamine.

Don’t let strange names catch you out

The following names for substances which were already on the Prohibited List (in brackets below) have been added, so please check ingredients carefully as these may crop up.

  • Dimetamfetamine (dimethylamphetamine)
  • Enobosarm (ostarine)
  • Examorelin (hexarelin)
  • Lenomorelin (ghrelin)

More examples of prohibited substances have also been added.

  • Daprodustat (GSK1278863) and vadadustat (AKB-6548) – examples of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) activating agents.
  • BAY 85-3934 – reference name of molidustat, a HIF activating agent.
  • Macimorelin – example of a growth hormone secretagogue.
  • Tretoquinol (trimetoquinol) – example of a beta-2 agonist.
  • 2-Androstenol, 3-Androstenol and 3-Androstenone – examples of substances related to 2-Androstenone.

Know your agents

The title of section 4.4 has changed from “Agents modifying myostatin function(s) including, but not limited, to: myostatin inhibitors” to “Agents preventing Activin receptor IIB activation”.

The following examples of prohibited substances have been added to reflect the ways in which the Activin receptor can be affected:

  • activin A-neutralizing antibodies
  • activin receptor IIB competitors such as decoy activin receptors (e.g. ACE-031)
  • anti-activin receptor IIB antibodies (e.g. bimagrumab)
  • myostatin inhibitors such as:
  • agents reducing or ablating myostatin expression
  • myostatin-binding proteins (e.g. follistatin, myostatin propeptide)
  • myostatin-neutralizing antibodies (e.g. domagrozumab, landogrozumab, stamulumab)

Gene doping clarified

‘Gene Doping’ has been changed to ‘Gene and Cell Doping’.

The definition of gene doping has changed to include the term ‘post-transcriptional’ to clearly define the processes that can be modified by gene editing.

Stem cells are not prohibited for treating injuries if their use restores normal function of the affected area, rather than enhancing function.

Cyclists: Be aware of tramadol

While WADA has elected to keep tramadol on the Monitoring List, rather than move it to the Prohibited List, the International Cycling Union (UCI) has announced plans to start testing athletes for tramadol from January. We are awaiting further information from UCI on this, but current reports indicate cyclists will have a finger pinprick before a race, which detects the presence, or not, of tramadol and its level of concentration. This could lead to cyclists being banned from starting a race if they have used tramadol, primarily due to health concerns. We will update you when we know more.

More information

If you’re in any doubt about any medications or their ingredients, you can check them on the Global DRO website. Supplements can be checked on the Informed Sport website, but please be aware this only minimises the risk, no guarantee can be given that any particular supplement is free from prohibited substances.

If you’re still uncertain, you can contact substanceenquiry@ukad.org.uk.

Athletes who have a legitimate medical reason for using a prohibited substance or method which is on the List, can apply for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).

The full 2019 Prohibited List can be viewed here.

A summary of the major modifications and explanatory notes can be viewed here.

The post WADA List of Prohibited Substances and Methods comes into force appeared first on WEROW.

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Plan your school holidays with an Oxford Junior Rowing Course

At this time of year, parents are starting to plan activities for the kids during the school holidays. It’s not easy to find activity courses that are engaging, educational and well supervised. The Oxford Junior Rowing Course offers rowing courses for young people and WEROW asked course director, Amelia Wright, to outline what they have in store for 2019.

The Oxford Junior Rowing Course (OJRC) run non-residential courses in Oxford and Kent.  These unique courses not only introduce 9-16 year olds to the ultimate team sport of rowing, but also deliver an often ignored set of practical skills that will, quite simply, help them to navigate life. The OJRC team believe that with the right tools, along with an understanding of their wellbeing and development, all children can flourish and ultimately reach their potential.

School holiday fun & skills

Even for just a few days or a week, an activity as fulfilling and challenging as learning to row can inspire young people to develop vital life skills. No-one can thrive in life without the ability to communicate, be resilient, lead, work as a team, be creative and resourceful, make decisions, manage time and of course…build a powerful network.

It’s widely understood that the people who are going to give you your ‘first break’ as professionals are looking for a lot more than just your education. Qualifications help us to get noticed, but our experiences, character, and life skills are the real key. These skills simply aren’t formally taught at schools but are often an add-on activity dependant on the resources available. When life skills are shared with children, they have a tangible effect on their ability to make the leap from education to adult life, employment, and personal fulfilment.

A skills session on the Oxford Junior Rowing Course

Young people who sign on to OJRC rowing courses develop a new ‘hard skill’, rowing, while also developing confidence and competence in the life skills most valued by employers and influencers.  During a week with the expert OJRC team they will also guide you through life hacks on looking after wellbeing, including mindfulness, yoga and nutrition.  Alongside this they engage in practical coaching sessions with experts in their fields. The result is that OJRC ‘graduates’ leave with a much greater understanding of what it takes to look after mind, body and soul.

Phones down and hands up for yoga on the Oxford Junior Rowing Course

Not only is the course a big win for parents seeking a fun and fulfilling school holiday activity for their children, but it’s also a fantastic experience for those who take part.  OJRC rowing courses are leaving young people with a memorable experience, a love for rowing and a new confidence in coping with life’s everyday challenges.

The OJRC will be running Easter and summer courses in Oxford and a summer course in Kent.  For more information and to find out how to book visit their rowing courses website www.oxfordjuniorrowingcourse.co.uk.

The post Plan your school holidays with an Oxford Junior Rowing Course appeared first on WEROW.

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Looking after your mental health at Christmas

The Christmas holidays are upon us. A chance to have a break from your rowing training and to spend time with friends and family. However, for some rowers, this is a time of dread, a period away from the familiar & routine and quite possibly a time amongst people they spent all year trying to avoid.

Whilst this might seem a pessimistic outlook to those who revel in reunions, for some Christmas can trigger anxiety and a gloomy mood, likely fulled by excessive alcohol, lack of sleep and the weight of expectation.

Here are some tips to help lift your mood during the holidays should you find yourself low on festive cheer:-

1. Listen to music – Research by the Mind Lab found that listening to the album Weightless by Marconi Union, specifically crafted to promote relaxation can reduce stress by up to 85%.

2. Get some sun – if the clouds should part over the break get your wellies on and get into the sunlight, breath some fresh air and get some space.

3. Drink some coffee – coffee in moderation has been shown to boost mood. If you are already anxious caffeine should be treated with caution as this can accentuate your symptoms but if you’re simply looking for a pick-me-up caffeine can help.

4. Get out of yourself – turn your thoughts outwards towards someone else – call someone or speak to someone. Turn your actions outward – being of service is one of the best ways of getting some self-esteem in those low moments but is also a fail-safe way of taking your thinking off of you.

5. Drink water – chances are the heating’s up, the alcohol is still in the system and you over-ate foods you don’t usually indulge in. Drinking fresh water can help hydrate and flush the system.

6. Breath deeply – a few minutes of deep breathing can give your body and mind a much-needed timeout. Use the 4-7-8 breathing technique when you are anxious to rebalance the oxygen/carbon-dioxide levels which underly the anxious state.

7. Recite an affirmation – this study published in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience found that participants who practised affirmations had greater activity in areas of the brain responsible for reward than participants who did not. The positivity that is generated by the reward led to more positive imaging related to future events.

8. Tapping – tapping of emotional freedom technique (EFT) can be one of the greatest tools for reducing stress, social anxiety and has been repeatedly shown to be effective in a range of situations. Start on the Mercola site and incorporate in your daily life beyond Christmas.

9. Call a friend – make time to step outside and call a friend to tell them how you are feeling. Christmas can be a time for feeling trapped and isolated so stay connected with friends.

10. Reach out – if things really do feel desperate remember there are plenty of people to turn to in times of needs. The Samaritans run a 24-hour crisis line as do the Campaign Against Living Miserably.

Remember Christmas really is just for Christmas but if it’s all getting a bit too much hopefully some of the above tips can go some way to making for a happy Christmas.

The post Looking after your mental health at Christmas  appeared first on WEROW.

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Alice Baatz – British Indoor Rowing Champion 2018

The GB senior rowers are currently in a cycle of weekly testing and camps. No doubt they will all be looking forward to the Christmas break before heading off to camp again in the first week of January. It was great to see so many of the female athletes compete individually at the British Rowing Indoor Championships (BRIC) last weekend, especially as the women only entered the relay events last year.

Alice Baatz, aged 25, won the women’s event in a time of 06:44.0 with team-mates Harriet Taylor, Rebecca Shorten and Karen Bennett taking silver and bronze. The winning time may be some way off Ukranian rower Olena Buryak’s record of 06:22.08 set earlier this year, but the GB senior women took the top 14 places with 16 seconds separating them, all significantly ahead of the rest of the field.

Alice Baatz told WEROW that the long sessions earlier in the season had paid off on the day. “In the week leading up to BRIC, I did some pieces on the ergo every day. These got shorter and sharper as we got closer to the event. Before that it was maybe a couple of sessions a week of long, endurance stuff. It might seem a bit odd to do so many miles in order to race a 2k, but you’ll only realise how important that engine is when you’re in the middle of your test and able to push on in the second half… or not! “

Alice Baatz experiences the pain of winning the British Rowing Indoor Championships 2018

Baatz, who has a degree in psychology from Bangor University, says she knew beforehand that she wasn’t on for a PB. She was happy that she came into the competition with that knowledge and was relieved to get the win. “I was just racing to try and get the best score I was capable of getting on the day. I said beforehand I’d be between 6:41 and 6:45, so 6:44 was meeting my own gold medal standard for that week.”

“A couple of the others had been pulling some really good stuff in the week leading up to BRIC and I was sure I wasn’t going to end up at the top to be quite honest. Even with about 250m to go I still wasn’t sure I’d make it in time.”

Josh Bugajski, who came third in the men’s competition, told WEROW before BRIC how he’s now comfortable on the erg. Baatz says she’s also made peace with the machine but admits to swinging between love and hate. “I’ve come to realise it’s not only a machine I want to rip apart come testing but it’s a hugely useful training tool; not only to build on your own endurance and fitness but also to give you feedback and show you when something might not be quite right.”

Alice Baatz on the erg at BRIC18

“If you’re pulling at what feel like a normal intensity and the numbers aren’t what you’re used to, it may indicate you need a little more recovery and rest. This is just as useful and important as good training itself. Having said that, if you are going well it will make you feel so strong and that’s motivating in itself.”

For many women, indoor rowing is an activity where they can exercise with freedom, without fear of being bothered or being given advice by “well-meaning” gym rats. Because there are so many metrics available, it’s relatively easy to make progress and to exercise alone at home. Baatz says, “My mum started using the ergo for a little while and she loved it – her first comment was how powerful it made her feel.”

Away from the water, Baatz, who was educated at The Godolphin School, Salisbury, does some psychology tutoring with A-Level students to support herself. “I try to make sure my attitude to my own training comes across there too – do what you need to do, not what you don’t. Know the content for your exam, don’t go crazy and learn a whole bunch of extra stuff for the sake of it. Have a great time being 18 and at college with your friends.”

Karen Bennett, Rebecca Shorten, Harriet Taylor and Alice Baatz at BRIC

Heading into the Christmas break before January training camp in Aviz, we asked Baatz what motivates her to train every day at this intensity. “I really enjoy training, and feeling like the strongest and most powerful version of me. It’s also great to take that confidence into racing; if you know you’ve been training well and stepping up consistently then you feel great on the start line and believe in what you’re capable of.”

Baatz is eager to succeed and build on her fourth place in the W4x at the European Rowing Championships in Glasgow. Her aunt, Fiona Freckleton broke new ground for women’s rowing in 1991 winning bronze at the World Rowing Championships in Vienna, and she is keen to follow in her footsteps. There will no doubt be a lot more time to be spent on the erg for Baatz before the first World Rowing Cup 1 in Plovdiv on May 10, 2019.

The post Alice Baatz – British Indoor Rowing Champion 2018 appeared first on WEROW.

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Olympic rowing giant Hamish Bond breaking pursuit cycling records in New Zealand

Olympic champion rower Hamish Bond only started cycling on the velodrome three weeks ago but already he’s proven he has what it takes. At the weekend’s Waikato Bay of Plenty Centre Track Champs the 32-year old broke the national resident record for the 4000m men’s individual pursuit with a time of 4:15.816.

The previous mark of 4:16.139 was set by Olympic bronze medal-winning cyclist Jesse Sergent in 2011 at the Oceania Track Championships in Invercargill, New Zealand.

Since the Rio Olympics Hamish Bond has been focussing on road cycling and in particular the time trial event. This year he claimed a bronze medal at the Commonwealth Games and finished 26th at the World Championships but as he looks towards the Tokyo 2020 Games Bond decided to give track cycling a go.

Watch the interview with Hamish Bond

“It’s a good start point” the high achieving athlete told 1 NEWS. Cycling New Zealand High-Performance Director Martin Barras revealed it was unlikely Bond would be ready to compete at the World Cup in Cambridge next month but his performance at the weekend would surely strengthen the case to add him to the team.

Watch the video interview for the full story.

The post Olympic rowing giant Hamish Bond breaking pursuit cycling records in New Zealand appeared first on WEROW.

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Paul Thompson leaves British Rowing after 18 years

British Rowing announced today that Paul Thompson has stepped down as chief women’s coach after nearly 18 years with the organisation.

As lead coach for women and subsequently chief coach for women and lightweights, Thompson has overseen or coached 14 Olympic medal-winning crews for Great Britain. He coached Dame Katherine Grainger for 15 years, as she went on to win five Olympic medals making her Great Britain’s most decorated female Olympian.

Paul Thompson said: “It has been the most incredible 18 years of my life. It has been challenging and extremely rewarding, as well as a team effort. It is such an honour and privilege to lead, coach and work with the most phenomenal group of talented athletes, incredibly gifted coaches, outstanding support staff and dedicated administrators of the GB Rowing Team; I owe them so much. However, for me, it feels like this is the right time to move on and look for my next challenge.”

“This gives me the chance to spend more time with the family and the opportunity to focus on the next chapter in my career, including my work with GB Hockey and the new UK Performance Coaches Association.”

Paul Thompson

Brendan Purcell, director of performance at British Rowing said: “Paul has overseen remarkable success during his time with the GB Rowing Team. He has worked tirelessly to support so many athletes achieve their dreams on the international stage.

“We have worked through this decision together and we are both confident that the squad and the coaches are in the best possible place at this stage in the cycle as we head towards Tokyo 2020. With Paul moving on, we will take this opportunity to review the set-up of the women’s squad to ensure we have the right structure in place for Paris 2024 and beyond.”

Andy Parkinson, CEO of British Rowing said: “Under Paul’s leadership, the women’s squad have delivered many world-leading and memorable performances on the water at the biggest competitions, inspiring many to take their first step into rowing.

“On behalf of all the staff, I’m hugely grateful for the contribution Paul has made to both the GB Rowing Team and, more widely, the development of women’s rowing in this country and we wish him all the best for the future.”

Thompson was awarded an MBE in the 2013 New Year’s Honours for his services to rowing and the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games; he is a recipient of an Australian Sports Medal and was World Rowing’s Coach of the Year in 2007. Thompson recently begun his post as Independent Non-Executive Director at GB Hockey.

Jess Eddie, who won silver in the women’s eight at Rio 2016 said: “Paul has been a fundamental driving force within the British women’s team for the entirety of my international career. He expects a lot from his athletes, and he certainly challenged me to get the most out of myself; something I will be eternally grateful for. I wish Paul the very best for his future career.”

The post Paul Thompson leaves British Rowing after 18 years appeared first on WEROW.

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Olivia Coffey tops USRowing Fan’s Choice Awards

Olivia Coffey has topped off an amazing year after being voted National Team Athlete of the Year in the 2018 USRowing Fan’s Choice Awards.

Coffey, 29, was the topped the vote from a shortlist of four athletes – Glenn Ochal, Allie Reilly and Emily Schmieg. A total of 42,153 votes were cast online in seven categories, with four athletes and three coaches winning awards. Coffey stroked the United States W8+ to a gold medal at the 2018 World Rowing Championships in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, in September. The gold was the fourth of Coffey’s career at World Championship events, and the third at the senior level. She has won medals in all seven World Rowing Championships she has competed in either as an U23 or senior athlete.

Olivia Coffey and Team USA at the World Rowing Championships 2018

Coffey, a graduate of Harvard, completed a one year MBA program at Homerton College, Cambridge earlier in the year. She stroked the light blues to a comprehensive Boat Race win in March 2018.

Other Fan’s Choice winners were Richard Reid of Oakland Strokes as Junior Athlete of the Year, Emily Kallfelz of Princeton as Collegiate Athlete of the Year, Susan Morgan Hooten of Capital Crew as Masters Athlete of the Year, Jeremy Michalitsianos of Montclair (New Jersey) High School as Junior Coach of the Year, Becky Cramer of the University of Central Florida as Collegiate Coach of the Year, and Patrick Kington of San Diego Rowing Club as Masters Coach of the Year.

The post Olivia Coffey tops USRowing Fan’s Choice Awards appeared first on WEROW.

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Josh Bugajski on his relationship with the erg and looking ahead to BRIC

In March 2018 Josh Bugajski was selected to compete in his third Boat Race. The weekend before the event he was abruptly taken out of the crew, the Oxford coaches citing health reasons. Sean Bowden, chief coach subsequently told the press Bugajski was “quite a strong character”. Bugajski was seen a few days later on social media completing a 2k erg test in a world-class time at Caversham. Ahead of the Mizuno British Rowing Indoor Championships, we asked Bugajski about his relationship with the erg.

Josh Bugajski was educated at a Stockport state school and by his own account raised by a phenomenal mother. He is a Henley Royal Regatta winner with Oxford Brookes and has secured a seat in the most famous rowing event in the world on three occasions, racing twice and winning once. He is now a member of the GB Senior rowing squad based at Caversham having recently finished his degree in oncology at Oxford University.

Josh Bugajski

I first started rowing in my second year at Cardiff University where I was studying for a degree in pharmacy. It was actually the day after my 20th birthday, so I was very tired from celebrating that and suffering from Freshers flu when I first tried out. Cardiff Uni Rowing Club was running a rowing taster session and my first go on the erg was a rate 24, 1K test which went pretty well. I did a 3:07 which for a first time on an Erg was pretty good. I was already a bit of a gym monkey and I had tried every sport under the sun by that point, so I already had a lot of fitness and strength training behind me. I was picked up by Welsh Rowing and it all went from there.

When on the erg I am usually kind of half-conscious, somewhere in a daydream. I rarely think about rowing or racing, it’s usually something miles away from what I am actually doing. Occasionally when we do something that is very hard then my personal strategy is to do mental maths in my head. Say I’d set a target time for certain piece, I go out at whatever speed I go out at and once I’ve covered some distance I figure out what average split I need to hold over the rest of the piece to achieve my target time, and by the time I have calculated the average split to hold I will have covered more distance and therefore need to re-calculate it. I usually do this again and again, until the piece is over.

Josh Bugajski on the Concept2 erg at Oxford University Boat Club before the Boat Race

I’ve got a good relationship with the erg, It’s not something that hurts my body and for the last 3-4years, I haven’t picked up any injuries from it. I feel like I have smoothed out the motion enough to the point where I can happily erg for a very long time. In the past I have done a lot of static Watt biking as well, usually more in the offseason – although I have had to be careful not to overuse it as it can cause tightening of some muscles in my legs which lead to problems when returning to rowing

When I have a bit more time on my hands I’d love to talk to and advise people who might be interested in rowing who are from backgrounds which would not be typical to the sport. It’s a sport which requires expensive equipment and access to a river or lake, so it’s important that we continue to think and talk about how the it can be made to fit into a wider society. Getting more children from state schools into rowing early would be a great place to start, However, at a time when schools are dealing with cuts in funding it would be impossible for them to justify spending thousands of pounds on rowing shells whilst they are still figuring out how to cover all the necessities.

I am realistic about how fast or far rowing can expand. But there are solutions and the rowing community is working to find them. Organisations such as London Youth Rowing and Future Blues are great examples of this – maybe one day when I’m not training full time I will see if I can work to make a Manchester equivalent to take on the southern softies!

I’m feeling strong ahead of BRIC – I’ve just got back from my first Sierra Nevada training camp with the GB senior team, so I’m keen to see the benefits of the altitude training on show this weekend. The competition is hot this year with no doubt that the standard will be the strongest there’s ever been – but I am keeping my eyes firmly on a podium spot.

If I want to take home the gold then there’s a good chance that I’ll have to push my body into unknown territory, which is both exciting and frightening. This is my first time at BRIC – I love competing on a public stage and can’t wait to see what surprises might await us. I know there are a lot of very serious indoor rowers out there so it’s impossible to predict what might happen.

You can see Bugajski in action at this weekend’s Mizuno British Rowing Indoor Rowing Championships being held at the Lee Valley Velodrome. WEROW was speaking to Josh Bugajski in March 2018 with the addition of pre-BRIC comment.

The post Josh Bugajski on his relationship with the erg and looking ahead to BRIC appeared first on WEROW.

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Henley Royal Regatta announces new rules and new stewards

Henley Royal Regatta has announced the election of three new Stewards and a new general rule covering unsporting conduct.

The three new Stewards are Alison Faiers, British Rowing multi-lane umpire who has volunteered at the regatta for many years; Australian rower and former World Champion, Sarah Cook who has been contributing to the commentary team at the regatta for over five years and Luke Dillon who rowed at Henley Royal Regatta in six different crews from 2005 to 2011 and became an assistant to the regatta’s chairman in 2016.

Sir Steve Redgrave, chairman of the regatta’s Committee of Management and Chinese high-performance director, said: “We’re delighted to have Alison, Luke and Sarah in their new posts. They’ve all played integral roles at the Regatta in recent years. The Stewards are a tribute to the long-standing history of the Regatta; we look forward to seeing them all in their new roles at next year’s event.”

Rules, rules, rules….

Rules, rules, rules….

Henley Royal Regatta has also announced a new rule and amendments to the event’s current expansive regulations to ensure “the highest level of sportsmanship at next year’s Regatta”.

New General Rule

The Stewards added a new General Rule under Unsporting Conduct which states:

42. (a) “The Committee shall have the power in response to acts of unsporting conduct to impose the penalties in Rule 38, and in addition the exclusion of competitors, crews or a club from an event or from all events at the Regatta.”

(b) “Unsporting conduct means behaviour deemed by the Committee and/or race officials to be unsporting and/or likely to cause offence which is displayed before, during or after a race by competitors, crews, coaches, club members or supporters.”

Notes and Instructions for Competitors and Coaches

To support the new Rule, the Stewards have amended the Notes and Instructions for Competitors and Coaches to:

35. (c) “All coaches, competitors and clubs are reminded of the possible sanctions imposed by the Qualification and General Rules in respect of unsporting conduct.”

Sadly there was nothing in this new announcement about hospitality for crews at qualifiers.

The post Henley Royal Regatta announces new rules and new stewards appeared first on WEROW.

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British Rowing issues statement regarding U23 World Rowing Champion Anna Thornton

British rower Anna Thornton was hurt in the fall earlier this month in Seattle, Washington where she is in her third year studying public health. British Rowing issued a statement confirming she was in a “stable but serious condition” and that they are supporting her and her family. Thornton, 21 and from Nottingham, won gold at the U23 World Rowing Championships in the double scull with Charlotte Hodgkins-Byrne and the Stonor Cup at Henley Royal Regatta.

In a statement, the University of Washington said: “We have been closely monitoring the condition of Anna Thornton, a member of the UW women’s rowing programme who is in a stable but serious condition with injuries resulting from an accident earlier this month. At this time our focus is on supporting her, her family and teammates in any way possible. Anna’s family has requested for their privacy to be respected at this time.”

Anna Thornton and Charlotte Hodgkins Byrne heading to the start at Henley Royal Regatta 2018

Yaz Farooq, the university’s head women’s rowing coach, said: “The thoughts and prayers of the Washington rowing community have been with Anna since her accident. Our team, staff and administrators are focused on doing everything we can to ensure she receives the best possible care. We all miss her dearly at the boathouse and every single one of us is pulling for her.”

Anna Thornton and Charlotte Hodgkins Byrne winning the Stonor Cup at Henley Royal Regatta 2018

The statement from British Rowing said: “We are aware that Anna was involved in an accident in Seattle, USA in early November. Anna is currently studying at the University of Washington and is in a stable but serious condition. At this time our focus is on supporting her and her family in any way possible. Anna’s family has requested for their privacy to be respected at this time and further information will be provided when it is available.”

The post British Rowing issues statement regarding U23 World Rowing Champion Anna Thornton appeared first on WEROW.

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