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We really loved Brussels sprouts (yes, it is 'Brussels' sprouts, not 'Brussel', who knew? Although this may be a British thing?) so we wanted to create a new dish that featured them – we also love the versatility of cauliflower, so after a bit of experimenting and testing it out on our friend Daisy (she runs awesome vegan events in the UK!), we created have our creamy vegan Alfredo tagliatelle!

Cauliflower is great, isn't it?

Cauliflower is the hero vegans deserve – rice, steaks, sauces – it does it all! A truly versatile ingredient, it easily takes on the flavour of marinades and sauces, and adds a certain 'bite' to dishes when cooked correctly.

So, what is vegan alfredo?

Absolutely delicious, that's what! But traditionally, the dish is made with butter and parmesan – two ingredients that aren't very vegan-friendly! Back in 1941, Alfredo di Lelio, a Roman restaurateur created the dish for his pregnant wife, who was struggling with her appetite.

It became famous when two American tourists tried his 'simple pasta' when on holiday in Rome and they ate in Alfredo's restaurant. They took the recipe back to the US, and the rest – as they say – is history.

The dish isn't as well-known here in the UK, so here's to hoping our UK readers will love our creamy vegan Alfredo as much as it's loved in the US.

To our American readers – how does it compare? We'd love to know!

Overview

Serves: 4
Time: ~ 30 minutes

Ingredients
  • 1 large cauliflower – trimmed into florets (keep the core and leaves for roasting – they're delicious)
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 6 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 1 cup unsweetened non-dairy milk
  • 300g Brussels sprouts – halved
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 400g tagliatelle
  • Olive oil
  • Salt & pepper
Method
  1. Pre-heat your oven to gas mark 5/190c and put a pan of water on to boil.
  2. Add the cauliflower, reduce to a simmer and cook for 5-7 minutes until it starts to soften.
  3. While the cauliflower is cooking, toss the sprouts in a splash of olive oil, salt and pepper. Place them face-down on a roasting tray along with the garlic cloves and cook for 10 minutes. You could roast the cauliflower leaves and core at the same time!
  4. Once the cauliflower is cooked, drain it but reserve the water it was cooked in – this will be used to water down the sauce, and cook the pasta in – to save water and washing up!
  5. Set aside a cup (or so) of the cauliflower cooking water just in case you need it for the sauce, then bring the rest back up to a boil and cook the tagliatelle – follow the instructions on the packet for how long to cook it for. It's usually around 10 minutes.
  6. Put the cauliflower, Dijon mustard, nutritional yeast, milk and a good helping of salt and black pepper in a blender.
  7. Peel the roasted garlic and chuck it in the blender too, then blend everything until smooth – if it's looking a bit thick, add some of the water that the cauliflower was cooked in a little bit at a time. The sauce should be pretty thick so that it clings to the pasta, but still be somewhat runny.
  8. When the pasta is cooked, drain it and add it back to the empty pan.
  9. Add the sprouts, then pour the sauce over and give everything a good stir so that everything is coated in the sauce.
  10. That's it – get stuck in to your vegan Alfredo and let us know what you think!

Have you made this? We love seeing our recipes come to life - tag us on Instagram using @vegan_punks and we'll feature you in our stories.

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This year, we've been exploring fermented foods. We first feremented cabbage to make sauerkraut for our Vegan Oktoberfest event, and it was a big hit. We really enjoyed the process, so moved on to what seemed like a bigger challenge – kimchi! It's spicy, sour, crunchy and even a little fizzy (if you let it ferment for long enough!).

We learnt everything we know about fermenting from the very talented Erin Baker, of the wonderful Natural Cookery School (check her out if you haven't already as she's awesome), when Jess attended one of her fermentation cookery classes. We're looking forward to making more fermented foods in the coming months!

So, what is kimchi anyway?

Kimchi is a traditional Korean condiment made from Chinese cabbage, spring onions, white onions, garlic, ginger and spices including Korean chilli flakes – gochugaru. It usually takes around 10 days to ferment.

In Korea, kimchi is served with almost every meal – it's the ultimate condiment. And in our opinion, it makes everything better! A traditional kimchi is usually made with fish sauce or shrimp paste, so if you're buying some from a shop, just make sure to check the ingredients.

We've tested this vegan kimchi fried rice rigorously, so know how delicious it is – and we're confident you'll love it!

Top tip: taste the dish before you add chilli flakes as well as kimchi. Our kimchi packs a punch so it may not need the extra chilli hit – go with whatever floats your boat.

Overview

Serves: 4
Time: ~50 minutes

Top tip: If you pre-cook your rice, the rest of this dish will come together in the space of about 20 minutes!

Ingredients

For the stir fry:

  • 2 cloves garlic - finely chopped
  • 1 cup kimchi - roughly chopped (especially if there's some if your some larger pieces in it)
  • 200g mushrooms - we often use a selection of Asian mushrooms like king oyster, enoki and shimejii
  • 400g vegetables – like carrots, tenderstem broccoli and green beans – we're trying to be more 'seasonal' with the veg we use and want to encourage others to do the same.
  • 300g brown rice
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • Optional: spring onion, sesame seeds and strips of nori (seaweed) are all great as garnishes for this dish

For the sauce:

  • 1 tbsp Korean chilli paste (gochujang) – this has a pretty unique flavour so you won't get quite the same result if you use another type of chilli paste, but it'll still be good.
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp vegan honey or maple syrup
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tsp rice vinegar
  • Optional: 1 tbsp Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) – this really depends on how spicy your kimchi is and how spicy you want your food! It's worth nothing that gochugaru is a little sweeter and less spicy than regular chilli flakes, in case you're substituting.
Method
  1. If you haven't pre-cooked your rice, get that on to cook now – the brown rice we buy usually takes 25-30 minutes to cook and the rest of the dish is only going to take around 20 minutes.
  2. Mix all the sauce ingredients in a bowl and set to one side for later.
  3. In a large wok, add the sesame oil and bring up to a medium heat.
  4. Fry the garlic for a minute, being careful not to burn it, then chuck in your mushrooms and cook for a few minutes until they've softened up. If you're using enoki mushrooms (the really thin ones), don't add those until you add the rice to heat through.
  5. Add the kimchi and the rest of your vegetables and fry for around 5 minutes – meaning the veg will be hot but still fresh and crunchy.
  6. Pop the rice in the pan, give everything a quick stir, then pour the sauce over and give everything a more thorough stir – you only need to heat the rice up at this point, so as soon as that's done, it's ready!
  7. Serve up into some big bowls, garnish with sesame seeds, nori and spring onions (if using) – that's it – your spicy, rich and delicious vegan kimchi stir fry is ready to eat!

Have you made this? We love seeing our recipes come to life - tag us on Instagram using @vegan_punks and we'll feature you in our stories.

We're on Facebook too – give us a like to never miss a new recipe.

We'd also be stoked if you left us a review using the form below!

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Being curry fiends, sometimes we like to incorporate those spicy flavours into less typical dishes (see: our Thai green curry pie). When Jess was growing up, she remembers a curry-based pasta dish with a big hit of orange that her dad used to cook up regularly, so we decided to recreate it – that's the story behind our curried orange pasta recipe! We won't go into too much detail...

We tried various different ingredients and quantities to get the falvours just right in this curried orange pasta. Ultimately, we found we achieved the freshest, zestiest orangey flavour by using both orange peel and zest – it really is a delicious combination and complements the curry paste and crunchy peppers wonderfully.

This makes a great dinner but also works perfectly as a big batch for lunches – we've made it quite a few times now and had it over the course of a few days for lunches, either hot or cold. It will last around three days in the fridge.

Overview

Serves: 4
Time: ~ 1 hour

Ingredients
  • 1 onion - chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic – finely chopped
  • 1" piece of ginger – finely chopped
  • Zest of one orange – finely grated – roughly 2 tbsp
  • 250g mushrooms – sliced
  • 4 tbsp madras curry paste – homemade or you can use shop bought if you're in a rush
  • 4 peppers – thinly sliced – yellow, orange and red look great in this dish, but any mixed peppers work
  • 400g tin chopped tomatoes
  • 1 cup (250ml) orange juice
  • 360g pasta – we like farfalle for this one but any pasta will work!
  • Groundnut oil
  • Salt & black pepper
Method
  1. Cook and drain your pasta first or at some point throughout the rest of the cooking process - you just add the cooked and drained pasta at the end so as long as it's ready before then you're good.
  2. In a large pan, add a splash of groundnut oil and bring it up to a medium-high heat, chuck the onion in and cook until soft.
  3. Add the garlic, ginger and orange zest and fry for a couple of minutes, making sure not to burn the garlic.
  4. Get the mushrooms in and cook down a bit until they've released some water, then add the curry paste and stir everything up and cook for another minute.
  5. Pour the tomatoes and orange juice in, stir, bring to a boil then immediately reduce to a simmer.
  6. Simmer for around 15 minutes to cook the sauce down, season with salt & pepper, then give it a taste – add a bit more salt, pepper or orange juice to taste, and if it's looking pretty runny you could add a bit of cornflour to thicken.
  7. Add the peppers and cook for 5 more minutes, then add the pasta and stir everything really well to make sure it's all covered in the delicious sauce.
  8. Serve it up with a bit of extra orange peel on top if you fancy, and that's it – curried orange pasta!

Have you made this? We love seeing our recipes come to life - tag us on Instagram using @vegan_punks and we'll feature you in our stories.

We're on Facebook too – give us a like to never miss a new recipe.

We'd also be stoked if you left us a review using the form below!

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These jerk jackfruit wraps are our current favourite lunch! Perfect for at your desk or on the go, and really tasty and filling too.

You can make the individual parts in bulk and then make the wraps up either in the morning, or the night before you want it for lunch. It will keep in the fridge for around five days.

To keep things simple we've just used one tin of young jackfruit (in water – not syrup!) marinated in jerk spice and cooked with red kidney beans, roasted a sweet potato and created a simple lime mayonnaise to set it all off. And not to forget the crunchy ruby gem lettuce. Hope you love this one!

Overview

Serves: 6
Time: < 30 minutes

Ingredients
  • 1 large sweet potato - peeled and cut into wedges
  • 400g tin of young jackfruit in water - drained and rinsed
  • 2-3 teaspoons of jerk seasoning
  • 400g tin of kidney beans
  • 1 little gem lettuce - roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons of vegan mayo
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 6 roti (paratha roti also work)
  • Salt & pepper
  • Olive oil
Method
  1. Pre-heat your oven to gas mark 5/190c.
  2. Toss the sweet potato wedges in a good glug of olive oil with a pinch of salt and black pepper.
  3. Put the wedges on a baking tray and chuck in the oven for 15-20 minutes - turn them halfway through.
  4. While the wedges are in the oven, toss the jackfruit in 2 tsp of jerk seasoning.
  5. Heat up 1 tbsp of olive oil in a frying pan to a low-medium heat.
  6. Add the jackfruit to the pan and cook for around 5 minutes, giving it the occasional stir.
  7. Once the 5 minutes is up, grab a couple of forks and gently pull apart the jackfruit until it's shredded - if it's a bit tough still, give it a couple more minutes to soften up before you pull it.
  8. Add the kidney beans to the jackfruit and gently heat for a couple of minutes while stirring.
  9. Give it a quick taste and add more jerk seasoning or salt if needed.
  10. In a bowl mix the mayo with the juice of half the lime and a good helping of black pepper - give it a taste and add more lime juice if necessary.
  11. When everything is ready, you can start putting the wraps together - add a good dollop of mayo, a couple of sweet potato wedges, 1/6 of the jackfruit mix and a handful of lettuce to each roti and wrap them up like a burrito.
  12. Get stuck in! Your jerk jackfruit wraps are done. Everything will last a couple of days in the fridge too - there's only two of us and we have this over a few days during the week.

Have you made this? We love seeing our recipes come to life - tag us on Instagram using @vegan_punks and we'll feature you in our stories.

We're on Facebook too – give us a like to never miss a new recipe.

We'd also be stoked if you left us a review using the form below!

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What makes a good vegan stir fry?

That's what we asked ourselves when we decided to create a new stir fry recipe.  We wanted something classic - and we came to the conclusion that it should be quick, filling, versatile, tasty (obviously) and in this case, seasonal too – to try and keep our carbon footprint down. That's why it's called a seasonal vegan stir fry! Who else is trying to keep their carbon footprint down?

Traditional Chinese flavours

We took a bit of inspiration from Chinese stir fry flavours for our spin on a seasonal vegan stir fry, so it features soy sauce, red wine vinegar and a bit of hot sauce too.

In terms of vegetables, that's where the versatility comes in - we created this one in spring in England, so there are lots of seasonal veg in there like spring greens, cabbage and purple sprouting broccoli.

Get passionate about seasonal eating

You can substitute anything you don't like out, or pick something else that's seasonal, which we're trying really hard to do. You can reduce your impact massively by picking up veg that's been grown in its natural climate and therefore, not travelled far, so also keeping food miles to a minimum.

Where do vegans get their protein though?

If you're looking for a protein kick we suggest making a little extra of the sauce and marinating some tofu in it for a about 10-15 minutes, then frying it off and chucking in to your vegan stir fry right near the end to heat it through.

Overview

Serves: 2
Time: < 30 minutes

Ingredients

For the sauce:

  • 2 tbsp soy sauce (or tamari for gluten-free)
  • 1 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 2 tbsp hot sauce - Sriracha works pretty well for this but if you're into your spice, there are loads of independent hot sauce brands out there!
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 2 tbsp cornflour mixed with a splash of water to form a paste

For the stir fry:

  • 100g rice noodles
  • 1 large red onion - cut into slices
  • 3 cloves garlic - minced/finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup cashews
  • 1 red pepper - cut into slices
  • 120g purple sprouting broccoli
  • 100g red cabbage - sliced
  • 250g pak choi - trimmed and rinsed
  • 150g portabellini mushrooms - sliced
  • Optional - 200g tofu - cut into cubes, marinated in a bit of extra sauce and fried
Method
  1. Mix all of the sauce ingredients together in a bowl and set to one side.
  2. Add a splash of oil to a wok and bring up to a medium-high heat.
  3. Chuck the onion in and fry until it softens and starts to brown, then add the garlic and cashews and fry for another 30 seconds or so - making sure to not burn the garlic.
  4. Put your noodles on to cook - with rice noodles we find that you can usually just pour hot water over them and leave them to soak for 5 minutes, instead of boiling them on the hob.
  5. Get all the veg (and tofu if you're using it) into the wok, pour over the sauce and cook for 5 minutes - you should end up with piping hot veg that's that still curnchy and fresh.
  6. Drain the noodles and add them to the wok, give everything a good mix and immediately serve up your delicious, seasonal vegan stir fry.

Have you made this? We love seeing our recipes come to life - tag us on Instagram using @vegan_punks and we'll feature you in our stories.

We're on Facebook too – give us a like to never miss a new recipe.

We'd also be stoked if you left us a review using the form below!

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This beauty is our vegan Caesar salad - not something you'd normally see as a plant-based option, but we're really pleased with how it's come out and the dressing tastes like the real deal.

We've used a cashew base, along with nutritional yeast, lemon and mustard, then to replace the anchovies we've used capers to get that tangy and salty flavour.

For the bulk of the salad we've kept it classic with romaine lettuce, croutons and a vegan chicken alternative (we'll share the recipe for that very soon) - with some bonus avocado and chickpeas, because why not?

The whole thing works really well together - the sauce is rich and creamy, and the combination of the vegetables, croutons and vegan chicken make it a really filling, satisfying lunch (or even a light dinner/side dish).

Overview

Serves: 4
Time: < 30 minutes

Ingredients

For the salad:

  • 2 romaine lettuce hearts - roughly chopped
  • 4 thick slices of bread - cut into bite-size chunks
  • 1 avocado - cut into chunks
  • A couple of handfuls of a vegan chicken alternative or tofu - we use some homemade chicken-style seitan
  • Half a tin of chickpeas
  • Olive oil
  • Salt & pepper

For the dressing:

  • 1/2 cup cashews - soaked in water overnight (or in hot water for as long as you can if you're in a rush)
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 4 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tsp capers
  • 1 clove garlic
Method
  1. Pre-heat your oven to gas mark 5/190c.
  2. Chuck the bread and chickpeas in a large bowl, pour over a good glug of olive oil, salt and pepper, and toss to give everything a good cover.
  3. Put in a roasting pan and roast in the oven for around 10 minutes or until the bread is nicely toasted all over - check regularly to make sure you don't burn the croutons.
  4. While the bread and chickpeas are in the oven, add all the ingredients for your sauce into a blender along with a generous amount of black pepper. Blend until it's completely smooth - give it a taste and add salt, black pepper, nutritional yeast or lemon to taste.
  5. Once everything is ready, layer up the lettuce, avocado, croutons, chickpeas and vegan chicken. Top with the dressing (and give it a mix to coat everything if you want to) and that's it - vegan Caesar salad!

Have you made this? We love seeing our recipes come to life - tag us on Instagram using @vegan_punks and we'll feature you in our stories.

We're on Facebook too – give us a like to never miss a new recipe.

We'd also be stoked if you left us a review using the form below!

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We got our hands on some vegan fudge made by Johnson's toffee & fudge and we wanted to write up a review (because, spoiler: it's awesome, and, disclaimer: they sent us some to try)...we also used it to create a recipe for some vegan fudge brownies because you know we love experimenting with new ingredients!

What's in vegan fudge?

Only six ingredients! We're never sure what to expect when a new vegan product launches - there's often some odd sounding ingredients in there, or (dare we say it) palm oil. Not here though!

Sugar, almond milk, glucose syrup, vegetable oil, salt and flavourings - done. That's actually fewer ingredients than most dairy-based fudges.

How does vegan fudge compare to dairy fudge?

Really, really good! Like we couldn't tell the difference between this and dairy-based fudge (which we haven't eaten for a few years, but we have good memories!) - it's crumbly, rich and melts in your mouth.

Neither of us have had fudge since going vegan so getting to try this was a real treat.

Would you buy it again?

Most definitely. It was a delicious sweet treat and it's perfect to take to a friend's house as a gift or to make all your omni family and friends jealous at Christmas. This vegan fudge defeats those boring variety boxes of chocolates.

Try Johnson's Vegan Fudge for yourself and let us know what you think in the comments section below. Or even make your own vegan fudge brownies with our delicious recipe.

The post Johnson’s Vegan Fudge appeared first on Vegan Punks.

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We don't make a lot of desserts - you can probably tell from the lack of them on our blog, we'll sort that, we promise - but we recently got our hands on some vegan fudge and we knew we had to use it in some baking!

So, what better than to use it to make some vegan fudge brownies? We knew they needed to be chocolatey, gooey, fudgey and a little bit salty.

We used the new vegan fudge from Johnson's Toffee & Fudge and we couldn't recommend it enough!

Anyway, this is what we came up with! We hope you like these vegan fudge brownies.

Overview

Serves: 9 slices
Time: ~ 45mins

Ingredients
  • 100g vegan fudge – chopped into small pieces
  • 1 cup coconut sugar
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt (we use Himalayan pink salt)
  • 3/4 cup plain flour
  • 2 tsps vanilla extract
  • 200g dark vegan chocolate
  • 2 tbsp ground flaxseed
  • 6 tbsps water
Method
  1. Mix the ground flaxseed with the water and set aside for around ten minutes, until it becomes gel-like.
  2. Preheat the oven to gas mark 4 / 180c and line an 8-inch baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. Chop all of the chocolate into small pieces and set half aside ready for it to be melted.
  4. Melt the vegan butter in a pan.
  5. Melt the chocolate in a bainmarie (or in the microwave).
  6. In a mixing bowl, mix the melted butter with the coconut sugar – it should turn into a paste-like mixture.
  7. Sift in the the flour, cocoa powder, baking powder and salt, then fold the mixture in until it's all combined. Don't over mix.
  8. Stir in the rest of the chocolate pieces.
  9. Pour the mixture into the baking sheet, and place half of the fudge on top of the batter.
  10. Bake for 30-35 minutes.
  11. Let the vegan brownies cool for about twenty minutes, then place the rest of the vegan fudge on top of the brownies, and push them into any crack that may've formed.
  12. Slice into 9 squares and enjoy!

Have you made this? We love seeing our recipes come to life - tag us on Instagram using @vegan_punks and we'll feature you in our stories.

We're on Facebook too – give us a like to never miss a new recipe.

We'd also be stoked if you left us a review using the form below!

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We often see commments like 'why do vegans make their food look like meat or egg?' – we find this a really interesting concept.

I think this type of 'argument' is from non-vegans trying to get 'one-over' on vegans – but we're not really on board with this type of thinking, because we think veganism should be inclusive for everyone, and we want to break down barriers like this.

The reason vegan food often emulates non-vegan food is two-fold (in our opinion):

  1. No one said that people who choose to be vegan didn't like the food they ate before – they're just now choosing a more compassionate lifestyle, for the planet, the animals and their own health.
  2. Mimicking non-vegan food like meat and egg is often an easy way of getting non-vegans to try vegan food. If it looks like something you already recognise, it can't be that scary, right?

Would you agree? We'd love to know your thoughts on this! Let us know in the comments below.

This recipe only uses 9 ingredients and they're mostly vegan staples! The one thing you might not already have is Kala Namak – it's now a staple for us because it takes anything that's trying to replicate an eggy flavour to the next level, like our Tofu Scramble.

What is kala namak?

Kala namak, Indian black salt or even Himalayan black salt is an ingredient thats's gaining popularity in vegan recipes because of its ability to create an 'eggy' flavour. The salt starts out as Himalayan pink salt, and is heated to a very high heat and mixed with Indian spices, as well as harad fruit which contains sulfur, and this is the ingredient that gives it the egg flavour.

There are two main things to note – it's not usually black, more of a pink colour, and it smells pretty bad. Try not to let this put you off!

Additionally, go careful with the amount you use. You can add more but you can't take it away! This ingredient has a powerful flavour, that's why we only use a quarter of a teaspoon in this recipe.

What you'll need:
  • A big mixing bowl
  • Spoon
  • Teaspoon and tablespoon measurer
Overview

Serves: 4
Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients
  • 150g silken tofu
  • 280g firm tofu
  • 2 tbsp vegan mayo
  • 1/4 tsp kala namak
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric powder
  • Black pepper (to taste)
  • Handful of cress (optional but recommended)
  • Bread of your choice
Method
  1. Crumble both types of tofu into a bowl and mix together
  2. Add the remaining ingredients (not the bread!)
  3. Mix well
  4. Butter your bread (with vegan butter, naturally), and spread a quarter of the mix into each sandwich
  5. Add the cress (if using) and close up the sandwich with the other slice of bread and pack for your lunch or tuck in! Really tried to get the instructions to stretch into five steps...think it worked?

Have you made this? We love seeing our recipes come to life - tag us on Instagram using @vegan_punks and we'll feature you in our stories.

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Welcome to the Vegan Punks guide to eating vegan in Manchester – we took on the challenge of eating our way around the top vegan hot spots in our favourite Northern city, so you don’t have to!

We've teamed up with the friendly team over at Manchester Punk Festival to produce this guide, so if you're going to the festival look out for it in the programme too. We're super excited!

Here’s what we found...

Pie & Ale

A popular bar in the Northern Quarter, Pie & Ale offer an extensive menu of homemade pies inspired by global cuisines. They even offer a roast dinner pie on Sundays! We tried the Mushroom Stroganoff and Moussaka pies and would definitely eat again, along with their creamy mash (which is vegan as standard). They also offer an extensive list of ales – and most are vegan. Just ask their staff which other drinks are vegan, they’re very helpful.

Perfect for: quick eats, beers, great vegan options and hearty food.

Bundobust

We first visited Bundobust during Manchester Punk Festival 2018, and we loved it. They offer up vibrant veggie and vegan Indian street food served with craft beer from local and international breweries in a friendly communal space. Located in a basement on Piccadilly, Bundobust is a stone’s throw from the city’s independent Northern Quarter. We’d highly recommend the tarka dal, masala dosa and the idli sambar. Order a couple of dishes each and share, tapas-style! That’s what we do anyway.

Perfect for: curry fiends, vegan and vegetarian options, craft beer lovers

V-Rev

V-Rev need no introduction – from what we can tell, they’re Manchester vegan royalty. If you’re looking for a quick bite or a junk food hit, this is the place to go. Set in the heart of the Northern Quarter, their junk food menu stacks up – literally. Try the ‘Donut have a cow, man’ for a burger set between two donuts or the ‘Barbecute without the “e”’ to get a hit of their vegan ‘beef’, and not to forget their ‘chik’n’ – it’s perfectly spiced and would give London’s Temple of Seitan a run for their money! We’ve gone back here each time we’ve been in Manchester and would go again. Just don’t expect to feel healthy afterwards.

Perfect for: vegan junk food, quick eats, best named dishes

Vertigo

Newly opened in January 2019, Vertigo are putting healthy and hearty plant-based food on the map. The cafe decor itself is very Instagrammable – think indoor plants, geometrics and a general relaxing vibe. Go here if you need to treat your body to something nourishing. We went for the full English breakfast and can confirm – it’s hangover busting. If you’re looking for something a little lighter, they offer sweet breakfasts, vegan sausage sandwiches and bowls too. Also open for lunch and dinner, and serve great coffee all day long, with a range of plant milks.

Perfect for: hangover busting breakfasts, caffeine hit, superfood boost, all vegan

Pasta Factory

The Pasta Factory might be the friendliest restaurant in Manchester. Upon arrival you’ll be greeted by their lovely staff and they ask everyone if they have allergies or dietary requirements before ordering. They’ve created hearty and authentic Italian dishes that you can tell they’re proud of. We’d recommend the Panelle to start – it’s reminiscent of a chip, but square and made of chickpeas – light and crispy on the outside, soft on the inside and served with a delicious salsa. They make their own range of vegan cheese and even bring you vegan parmesan so you’re not left out! All drinks are vegan and staff are very knowledgeable.

Perfect for: carb loading, great vegan options, sit-down meal

The Eighth Day Cafe

Eighth Day Vegetarian Café and shop is one of the longest running worker co-operatives in the North West. It’s another top spot for breakfast but they also offer a full menu – Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner inspired by foods from every continent, and is very affordable. If you get a chance, pop into their vegan and vegetarian grocery store – they have nutritionists, natural beauty experts, foodies and wine buffs on hand to share their knowledge.

Perfect for: cheap eats, hearty comfort food, vegan full English

Trof

Trof might me the trendiest eatery in Manchester – think exposed brick work and industrial lighting. Great for breakfast and cocktails, and breakfast cocktails. We had a hearty hangover curing full English here – they even offer vegan black pudding. We’ve never seen anywhere offering that down south! One of the best happy hours around – £5 cocktails, £3.50 G&Ts and £3.50 lagers, 4-8pm everyday. Exceptional espresso martinis and an extensive bourbon menu. Would recommend booking a table as their three floors of seating fill up quick.

Perfect for: brunch, cocktails, hangover breakfasts, happy hour, vegan options

The Deaf Institute

The Deaf Institute is Trof’s cooler, rough around the edges, younger Brother. 80% of their menu is vegan so there’s something for everyone’s taste, as well as offering daily plant-based specials. The menu is made up of a range of mostly American themed junk food, with a few healthier options thrown in, from loaded hot dogs and nachos, to mac & cheese, quinoa bowls, and even vegan ice cream for pudding! All set to a soundtrack of surf, garage, hiphop, underground and breaking bands. And don’t forget about The Vegan Hangover on Sundays, where their entire menu is dedicated to curing your hangover, vegan-style.

Perfect for: fun times, cask ales, American junk food, lots of vegan options

Manchester Vegan Cafe and Wellbeing Centre

Located on the ground floor of what might be the most famous alternative landmark in Manchester, Afflecks Palace, the centre is accessible to all. They make affordable plant-based grub that’s catered for all diets. Their breakfast menu starts from £3.70 for a Full English and is served until midday. Lunch features hearty mains like shepherd’s pie or bean burgers, through to lighter options like naked burritos or healthy Buddha bowls. We especially love their fresh juice – orange, ginger and carrot wins us over every time.

Perfect for: cheap eats, breakfast and lunch, chilling, all vegan menu, gluten free options

GRUB

GRUB has to be the coolest place for casual dining in Manchester, located just a stone’s throw away from Manchester Piccadilly train station. They pop up in the Fairfield Social Club every Friday-Sunday. On Fridays and Saturdays they offer all types of food and traders are strongly encouraged to offer a great vegan option, and every Sunday is entirely plant-powered! Their bar is 100% vegan and takes card payments only. It offers a super trendy vibe, especially in their ‘snug zone’ decorated with fairy lights, vintage sofas and lamp shades.

Perfect for: street food, vegan options, vegan Sundays, vegan booze, chilling

Lucky Cat (inside Rockers)

We can’t visit Manchester without popping into Rockers and the Lucky Cat. The coolest alternative shop in central Manchester, just around the corner from Afflecks Palace. Grab a quick burrito or sos roll from the Lucky Cat counter, and check out the punk rock patches, pin-up outfits or 50’s style hair accessories on offer in the shop – all under one roof. If you need an afternoon pick-me up, check out their cake counter – all vegan and truly delicious. We can never resist. Treat yo’self.

Perfect for: quick and cheap eats, vegan cakes, 50s style clothes, punk rock patches

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