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Presentation and Panel Discussion

The Centre for Policy Futures-UQ and UQ International Development invite you to engage with leading Disaster Risk Management (DRM) practitioners with experience in emergency response, strategic planning and policy advice in Nepal and the broader Indo-Pacific region. Learn more about the importance of DRM in the context of achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Consider how international organisations are ensuring Accountability to Affected Populations (AAP) drawing on recent field experience with Rohingya refugees.

When: Tuesday 28th May; 14:00-15:30pm

Where: Chamberlain building (building 35) room 519, University of Queensland, St. Lucia.

Registration through this link (RSVP only, no cost)

Panel members are: Ratindra Khatri (Nepali Crisis Management expert), Ian Mackenzie (Queensland Inspector General – Emergency Management), Dr Claire Brolan (Centre for Policy Futures) and Alessia Anabaldi (UQ – International Development).

The Panel is organised by Dr Paul Schmidt.

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The fourth paper in the series is out! This paper documents Shanghai’s morphological transformations during the five ‘classic’ periods in modern Chinese urban history and theory: (a) pre-1911, the period leading to the demise of Imperialism; (b) 1912-1948, the pre-communist Republic of China established though the Xinhai Revolution; (c) 1949-1978, People’s Republic of China under Mao Zedong’s leadership; (d) 1979-1990, the first stage of the ‘reform and opening-up’ initiated by Deng Xiaoping; and (e) post-1990, the current neo-liberal era. Nine morphological maps are used as a main analytical tool.

Title: Shanghai: A history in morphological maps

Authors:

  • Wenjun Linghu
  • Dorina Pojani
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OOPS will co-host with GEMS the annual ‘Employability Night’ on Tuesday 21 May, 6pm-8pm, at Steele Building, Room 309. Participating will be incredibly beneficial to planning students. Planning staff will be there too to support our students.

This year OOPS plan to have two guest speakers from the BRTP class of 2012 (Nathan Bambling & Caroline Chinchen) who have excelled in their respective public and private sector fields. Nathan and Caroline, in the six years since graduating, have acquired key information and advice that would assist many planning students who are in the stages of applying for jobs. The first half of the night will be presentations while the second half will be both casual mixing and Q&A Panel Discussion.

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Dr. Sebastien Darchen will present a paper entitled “Governance Innovation for Urban Regeneration: A focus on Nantes (France)” at the Transformative Urban Governance Conference, hosted by RMIT in Melbourne.

The paper focuses on the Ile de Nantes regeneration project. This is one of the largest regeneration initiative in Europe: 330 hectares of former industrial land located in the heart of the city.

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Our regional population is growing. How do we ensure new developments are more liveable, efficient, sustainable, resilient and resource efficient? How do we integrate water and energy systems into existing infrastructure while taking advantage of the benefits distributed systems offer? Your multidisciplinary team will work on a case study to solve this problem!

  • Register as a team before 24 May 2019.

For more information, download: Water and Energy Systems Design Challenge Winter School 24-28 June 2019

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The UQ|UP course on Exploring Development Complexities (PLAN3200/7200, coordinated by Sonia Roitman, Ron Johnstone and Karen McNamara) has won a major international award for curriculum innovation.

The award honours excellence in teaching and design of learning experiences that are accessible, engaging, and effective for all students. It recognises educators who develop and implement courses to help prepare future planners to solve economic, social, and environmental challenges facing communities worldwide, with measurable student success. The award is given by the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy (USA) and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (USA).

PLAN3200/7200 is a field trip course in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. UQ students spend two weeks in the field working with Planning students from Universitas Gadjah Mada and learning from urban and rural communities on real-life development problems. The innovative aspect of the course is the ‘hands-on’ experience provided to students, and the involvement of several key strategic partners in Yogyakarta: Department of Architecture and Planning (Universitas Gadjah Mada), ArkomJogja, Kalijawi community, Lingkar Association, Yogyakarta municipal government, Sleman Regency, Yogyakarta Provincial government, Habitat for Humanity Yogyakarta, Sukunan village, Kampung Code community, and urban and rural communities in Yogyakarta. The course has run annually since 2015 for students in planning, environmental management, geography, social science, development, and project management.

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The decarbonisation of the economy would bring multiple benefits but also costs. In particular, some of the costs will be focused on regions that economically rely on industries linked to high carbon footprints. To underpin informed decision making for future transitions, we propose an ‘economic vulnerability to decarbonisation’ (EVD) index that aims to describe how different regions could fare as the economy changes. The EVD index captures both sides of the coin: the risk of high carbon economic exposure and the carbon economic resilience of employment sectors across regions. We find that 3% to 6% of local economies (SA2 regions) in Queensland face significant risks from decarbonisation. Vulnerable regions will need strategies to manage the transition towards a less carbon-intensive economy.

Dr David Fleming is an applied economist with work experience in Chile, the United States, New Zealand and Australia. His main research area is applied microeconomics with an emphasis on regional and resource economics. His interests also include energy futures, agricultural and development economics, and public policy. David has published in a range of top economics/social science journals and is currently Editor-in-Chief of the journal Resources Policy and Senior Economist at the CSIRO.

When: 14 May 2019 2:00pm–3:00pm

Where: Room 262, Steele Building (#03)

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This year’s PIA Launch of the 33rd Queensland Awards for Planning Excellence will be held at Parliament House on 29 May. Several UQ|UP students are getting awards! UQ|UP staff will be there to support our brilliant students and to meet up with old friends too.

For more information: www.planning.org.au/events/event/QLD-Awards-Launch-2019. RSVP.

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This study maps and models the effect of weather on cycling in New York whilst controlling for several built and natural environment characteristics and temporal factors. To this end, we draw on 12 months of disaggregate trip data from the Citibike public bicycle sharing scheme (PBSP) in New York, currently the largest public bicycle sharing system in the United States, and spatially integrate these data with information on land use, bicycle infrastructure, topography, calendar events and weather. Overall, we find that weather impacts cycling rates more than topography, infrastructure, land use mix, calendar events, and peaks. The policy implication is that, in northern latitudes which experience inclement weather for extended periods, creating state-of-the-art cycling infrastructure – sheltered, promptly cleared from snow, and potentially heated – may be much more important than in warm and sunny places if planners are to succeed in “getting people out of their cars.”

Title: Weather and cycling in New York: The case of Citibike

Authors:

  • Ran An
  • Renee Zahnow
  • Dorina Pojani
  • Jonathan Corcoran

Download the full text from Journal of Transport Geography.

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