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First stop: shopping. Next stop: wrapping everything up. Need help wrapping your supplies? Well, that should be the fun part. Before bust out your ribbon and bows this holiday, here are seriously impressive gift wrapping ideas for inspiration.

 

Gift Toppers

 

These colorful creations add wow factor to humble brown paper packages.

Honeycomb Ornaments: Cut 1 ½" and 2 ½" half circles from honeycomb paper. Hot-glue one side of folded half circle to package; unfold and glue other side of sphere to box. Use a silver paint pen to draw ornament hangers.

Paper Straw Christmas Tree: Use a pencil to draw a triangle on the top of package. Cut paper straws in graduated lengths to fit horizontally within triangle. Adhere with hot-glue. Cut two 1" pieces of straw and glue vertically at base to form a trunk. Weave a piece of string down the length of tree, adhering with dots of hot-glue along the way. Glue small buttons along length of string.

Yarn Pom-Pom Twirl yarn around four fingers 50 times. Cut excess yarn and slide loop off fingers, making sure that it doesn't unravel. Cinch at middle with yarn. Use scissors to cut loops and fluff with fingers. Wrap package with coordinating yarn, using ends to tie on pom-pom.

 

Paper Gift Packets

 

Making packaging to be proud of requires little more than thread and scrap paper. Let soft goods shine—sans box—by layering two pieces of kraft paper together and drawing your chosen shape (star, stocking, or other Yuletide symbol) on the top piece. Cut through both layers of paper, then sandwich a gift between the two shapes and stitch along the edges using contrasting thread.

 

Mix Tape

 

Graphic designer Joy D. Cho dresses up Kraft paper with festive masking tape, alternating horizontal and vertical strips to mimic ribbon. A snowflake fashioned from frayed candy cane colored paper straws becomes the crowning glory.

 

Road Map

 

Freebie road maps and atlas pages serve as great graphic gift wrap. Instead of tying a bow on top, thread thin cord through a vintage button and knot tightly to secure.

 

Artistic

Got a box of crayons? Then you can replicate printmaker/graphic designer Adrienne Wong's abstract print. The designer channeled her inner grade-schooler by sandwiching colorful wax shavings between layers of tissue paper (three on the top and three on the bottom) and ironing them until the wax melted. After wrapping, she adorned the gift with an asymmetrically placed satin ribbon and a cluster of tissue dahlias.

 

 

Ready-to-Wear


Infuse new life into a thrift-store shirt and brooch. Not only is the result eco-friendly, but, as gift wrap designer Jenn Playford points out when you remove the brooch and unpin the shirt, you've got three gifts in one.

 

 

Ball Ornament String Wrapping

 

This technique is an easy way to keep gift wrapping clean and classy this holiday season. To personalize your gift tag, add a small letter sticker to the ball ornament.

Get the tutorial at SallyJShim.

 

 

Black Tree Garland and Stamped Wrapping Paper

 

For this patterned ode to Christmas trees, you'll need paper card stock, scissors, a sewing machine, 2-inch rubber eraser, and a black ink stamp pad.

Get the tutorial at Hello Glow.

 

  

Christmas Light Wrapping Paper

 

Why stop at your tree when decorating with Christmas lights? Print and cut out colorful bulbs, fold each in half, and use a glue pen to attach to twine. Then, simply wrap around your package and secure with tape.

Get the tutorial at Boxwood Avenue.

 

 

Craft Paper and Boxwood Wreath Gift Wrap

 

This beautiful wreath and craft paper design is a definite go-to. It makes plain brown wrapping paper a whole lot prettier.

Get the tutorial at Craftberry Bush.

 

 

Gingerbread Gift Tags and Garlands

 

Dress your presents in edible details this year. And don't worry, these gingerbread biscuits will hold up until Christmas morning—everyone will need a snack to fuel them for the rest of the holiday festivities.

Get the tutorial at Decorator's Notebook.

 

 

Snowflake Wrapping and Wood Tape

 

Wrap wood tape—vertically and horizontally—around the winter-inspired paper. Finish with twine and a wood snowflake.

Get the tutorial at Inspired by Charm.

 

 

Santa's Belt

 

Bring the North Pole to your home for the holidays with the spirit of Santa Claus right in your wrapping paper.

Get the tutorial at No Biggie.

If you haven't decided what to get yet check out Unimak's collection for some ideas.

 

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A tablet paired with a stylus can take the place of a sketchbook or a notebook for jotting down ideas, scribbling notes, and doodling as soon as inspiration strikes.  Still, there's something that feels more organic when you're bending over to put pen to paper, which is why some people still opt for stringing a notebook and a pen along.  My biggest beef with notebooks?  Fill one up and you'll have to buy another, a problem that doesn't exist with digital solutions.  Well, the Wipebook sorts of evens things out on that end.

At first glance, it looks like a regular spiral-bound notebook.  But, alas, it isn't.  Each page is made from a whiteboard-like material that allows it to be erased and written over multiple times.  Basically, it's a notebook with pages you can use many times over just like a regular whiteboard.  Very clever.

 This is isn't the first product by Wipebook, the original one had a few problems, most notably a slightly rough-textured surface that left subtle ghosting on the pages when you use dry erase and correctable markers instead of water-soluble ones. 

Re-write, re-draw, and re-do anywhere. The Wipebook Pro Notebook is the ultimate reusable whiteboard notebook with the new hypergloss film that makes erasing and reusing better than ever. It is the perfect tool for anyone who loves brainstorming on the go in style. Avoid paper waste by using the whiteboard notebook.

You can get one here.

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If you’re going to set up home security, the inside of your house isn’t the only place that requires a camera – the exterior sections, like the lawn and the backyard, probably need the same amount of vigilance, too (which is why there's now an outdoor-grade Nest Cam). And while there are many solutions for outdoor security cameras, the Maximus Camera Floodlight offers some features that make it quite an enticing choice.

A security camera with an integrated floodlight, the device can automatically fill the outside of your house with a bright light when it detects potential intrusion, providing an element of deterrence that can discourage intruders from proceeding with any of their plans. It can do that whether you’re home or not, too, so this gives you a way of preventing potential break-ins even when you’re in another part of the world.

The Maximus Camera Floodlight has a sensor that captures 1080p video, with a 155-degree field of view, so you can see a wide section of your home’s exterior. Make sure to position it at an angle where you can see the entire area, since the camera position can’t be adjusted from the app (you can manually adjust it by 40 degrees both vertically and horizontally during set up, though). It pairs the camera with a 2400-lumen floodlight that serves as a potential deterrent apart from giving you the ability to clearly see what’s been detected by simply looking at the live feed from the companion app. You can set the floodlight to switch on as soon as an event is detected or you can opt to have it controlled manually through the app, in case you want to avoid disturbing the neighbors with a bright light in the event of a false alarm. The light is dimmable, too, so you can lower it down to a soft light in case there doesn’t appear to be any danger.

A passive infrared motion sensor detects any potential movement within the perimeter, which triggers the camera to automatically immediately begin recording. It can detect movement within 70 feet, which should be enough to serve most common households. If the movement continues being detected for the next 10 seconds, it’s flagged as an event, at which point the homeowner gets an alert on their phone.

Aside from the floodlight, the Maximus Camera Floodlight comes with a two-way intercom that allows you to talk to whoever’s on the property, making it possible to have a conversation if it’s people you actually know. In case it’s actual intruders you find on the feed, you can activate the integrated siren (which, according to the outfit, is louder than a motorcycle), as well as have it play pre-recorded deterrent messages.

All recorded videos are saved on the outfit’s servers, so you can get access to them whenever you need to provide authorities with footage from your property. Of course, it’s fully weatherproof, with an IP44 rating, so you don’t have to worry about the darn thing giving out in the event of inclement weather.

The Maximus Camera Floodlight is coming soon to Unimak and will be priced at $250.

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We’ve seen a number of folding helmet designs before, such as the Overade Plixi and the Carrera Foldable. So far, the Morpher just might be the most convenient of the lot. Designed to collapse into a genuinely flat pile, the darn thing is able to compact into a rig measuring just 2.5 inches thick, making it easy to slip into a backpack, messenger, or whatever bag you’re carrying for the day.

That’s right, this helmet collapses to no more than 2.5 inches thick, which would make carrying one similar to bringing along a rather thick book. Yes, carrying a thick book isn’t exactly great, either (I mean, this isn’t the 90s anymore), but compared to carrying an awkward and bulbous helmet, the difference feels like night and day.

Despite packing into a flat-packed form factor, the Morpher is a full-size cycling helmet that’s rated to fit any head with a circumference between 20.5 to 22.8 inches. According to the outfit, the integral fit system will allow it to accommodate larger heads, too, as it’s been used by customers with heads up to 24.4 inches in size. They only make one size for now, although they do plan to expand going forward, so expect both larger helmets and children’s sizes in the future.

It’s made from expanded polystyrene (EPS), which is rigid and strong enough to protect heads from direct impact, all while using nylon hinges to enable the unique folding capability. Designed to be as safe as any standard cycling helmet, it has received both CSPC and CE 1078 certification, which means you can use it anywhere it in the world other than Australia. That’s right, those living Down Under won’t quite be able to legally rock this while getting around in their bicycles.

The Morpher, basically, folds in right down the middle, then folds out slightly at two separate sections on each half of that fold. This design enables it to take on the flat form factor whenever it collapses, making for a truly unique design even among the current crop of foldable helmets. It also folds and unfolds easily, while staying locked in the whole time courtesy of strong magnets, ensuring there’s little chance it folds in while you’re still on the bike or it unfolds while sitting in your bag.

When collapsed, it’s compact enough to fit in larger pouches on backpacks, as well as most any size of a laptop bag, giving cyclists no excuse not to bring one along. It’s also small enough to keep in a drawer at work, as well as on the glove compartment of a car, making it easy to have a helmet within reach whenever the need for one comes up. The same flat design also makes it ideal for being stacked in kiosks and vending machines – something the team behind it is hoping will be a potential distribution method for the helmet going forward.

The Morpher is currently available in three colors: white, black, and red.

You can get one here.

Morpher Helmet - YouTube
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