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Structured football coaching for hearing impaired groups

Supported by the Premier League & BT disability fund, our Hearing Impaired Soccer Skill Centre caters for children and adults and gives participants the chance to play football against players with similar disabilities. 

The sessions are designed to improve footballing skills whilst strengthening social skills, self-esteem and confidence. 

Ages 6+ 

Friday 5pm – 6pm 

Click Here To Find Out More

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We are hosting three ParaNetball championships for deaf players, players with a learning disability and children with special education needs (SEN). The three events, which take place at the Lee Westwood Sports Centre at Nottingham Trent University, will give deaf and disabled people the opportunity to engage in a competitive running team sport.

Officials will be on hand during each competition to educate and guide people through the game and the rules and to inspire them to continue to engage with this wonderful sport.

The winning teams in each three divisions will be presented with a prestigious trophy!

ParaNetball Deaf Championship

If you have a hearing impairment, wear a hearing aid or implant you are eligible to enter the inaugural ParaNetball Deaf Championship, which is held on 15th June from 10am-4pm.

You can enter an individual, a group of people or a team for this competitive and engaging competition. Please complete the entry form and return it to compevents@englandnetball.co.uk to register your interest.

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UK Deaf Sport are supporting UK Anti-Doping’s third Clean Sport Week (20-26 May), which launches today. UK Deaf Sport is a Sport England-funded UK wide organisation, dedicated to getting every Deaf person active and inspired by sport and physical activity.

UK Anti-Doping is responsible for ensuring sports bodies in the UK are compliant with the World Anti-doping Code through implementation and management of the UK’s National Anti-Doping Policy. 

This year’s Clean Sport Week campaign, which will again have the support of a range of National Governing Bodies (NGBs), sports organisations and UK sports stars, will celebrate clean athletes and their success, and promote the work of the anti-doping community in the fight for clean sport.

The campaign will also have a strong focus on Image and Performance Enhancing Drugs (IPEDs), and particularly the attitudes towards, and motivations for use of, IPEDs in the gym environment. New research is set to be revealed during the week to encourage a wider public debate on the issue.

UK Deaf Sport firmly believes athletes have the right to compete in sport knowing they and their competitors are competing clean. As part of this, we are dedicated to ensuring all athletes and coaches representing Great Britain in the Deaflympics and other International tournaments understand their responsibilities and have access to information about Clean Sport. Image and Performance Enhancing Drugs not only corrupt the integrity of sport, but can have serious health consequences for athletes, and we want to ensure athletes can enjoy lifelong participation in sport.

More information about clean sport can be found here our anti-doping page, and both athletes and coaches can contact us at any time for advice or guidance.

Piers Martin, Executive Chair of UK Deaf Sport, said:

“Promoting clean sport in deaf sport is fundamental to UK Deaf Sport. We will continue to raise the level of awareness and debate around this topic and make sure our deaf athletes, volunteers and coaches are supported and educated in this area. We believe everyone has the right to have a positive experience competing and that they are also competing on a equal level alongside their peers.”

A number of events will take place between 20-26 May to help raise awareness of clean sport and anti-doping programmes led by UKAD, NGBs and sporting bodies across the UK. The campaign will also feature social media videos from a number of UK athletes showing their support for clean sport, through a series called ‘Feat of Strength’.

Nicole Sapstead, UKAD’s Chief Executive, said:

“This year’s Clean Sport Week focuses on Image and Performance Enhancing Drugs (IPEDs), particularly in the gym environment.

“Following a number of media reports in recent months, concerns are growing around the use of IPEDs in this area, particularly with trends like the ‘Love Island look’, and the possibility of this seeping into the sporting arena.

“Last year’s Clean Sport Week was a huge success and hope this year’s event can drive the debate around IPEDs, as well as celebrate the successes of clean athletes and the excellent work done by National Governing Bodies and sporting partners to keep sport clean.”

UK Anti-Doping’s functions include an education and information programme, athlete testing across more than 40 Olympic, Paralympic and professional sports, intelligence management and exclusive results management authority for the determination of anti-doping rule violations.

For more information on what UK Ant-Doping do, please visit UKAD website.

Find out more about Clean Sport Week or join in the conversation using #CleanSportWeek. Find us on Twitter @DeafSport
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We’ve teamed up with Women in Sport to celebrate Deaf Awareness Week from 6-12 May 2019. We’ll be sharing case studies from female sporting role models, who are doing great work in their communities to improve opportunities for deaf and hard of hearing people to be more active. 

First up is Jane Cosgrove, a Level 3 British Gymnastics coach from Maidenhead. Jane teaches women’s artistic gymnastics, pre-school gymnastics and trampolining, she works at Phoenix Gymnastics Club. 

Jane says: 

“Deaf Awareness week means a lot to me. Now that I have first hand experience of teaching a young deaf child it has shown me how much of a difference we can make. While teaching at one particular school I was glad to see that the children are now learning Makaton as part of their year 2 studies. I believe learning sign language should be more widely promoted within the curriculum.

“Just over a year ago a parent of one of our squad members expressed her sadness at the fact that her youngest child couldn’t take part in our pre school gym classes due to a profound hearing impairment. Although Ellie has cochlear implants, they make little difference to her hearing as she also suffers with auditory neuropathy. Ellie had just turned 3 and seeing how talented her sister is, I felt that it would be such a shame to not give Ellie a try in our classes.

“Initially I asked her mother to be our interpreter during classes. However it quickly became evident that we really didn’t need her. Ellie is very good at watching and copying, which is they key to picking up those basic skills in a pre school environment. Then using the Sign BSL mobile application I began to learn basic sign language. Delighted that I had started to sign with her, Ellie started to sign back and rapidly exhausted my BSL vocabulary!

“Ellie came along for a trampolining trial with me, which she loved. Knowing that she would be having classes with me made me realise that using an app for ad hoc words was not going to be enough. I felt that I owed it to Ellie to take things a little further so I signed up for the BSL level 1 course. My colleague Sarah, who also coaches Ellie, decided that she would like to do the same. We have both started the course. It is tough, especially when the only person we can really practice on is Ellie and we only see her once a week.

“In the gym we have the BSL alphabet on the wall along with laminates showing common words. For trampolining I have laminates with some of the basic trampolining moves that I can use in conjunction with signing.

“Teaching someone a hearing impairment can be a challenge, but I’m so pleased that we have chosen to do so. Making a difference to someone’s life, who would have been otherwise excluded. That’s job satisfaction.

“You never know when a deaf child/individual will enter our lives. See it as an opportunity to enhance not just their lives but also your own. By learning even just a few simple sign language words, that individual will know that you care.”

Find out more about Deaf Awareness Week 2019 on UK Council on Deafness website.

Join us in celebrating Deaf Awareness Week on Twitter, follow us @DeafSport and use hashtag #DeafSport and #DeafAwarenessWeek. 
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UK Deaf Sport (UKDS) and the British Kickboxing Council (BKC) are delighted to announce that they will be working in partnership over the next two years to support more deaf people to have the opportunities to engage with, try and stay in the sport. The two organisations will focus on interventions to increase participation and develop more inclusion opportunities for deaf children, young people and adults.

UK Deaf Sport is a Sport England funded UK wide organisation, dedicated to getting every Deaf person active and inspired by physical activity and sport. The British Kickboxing Council exists to encourage and support individuals and communities to experience the benefits of the sport. Together their partnership will engage Kickboxing within deaf communities across UK.

Through this exciting partnership we will identify opportunities to support our workforce of coaches, referees and officials through guidance and deaf awareness training and support. We will look to increase the number of opportunities for deaf children, young people and adults, engaging with existing deaf athletes already participating in kickboxing to inspire and encourage others.

Valerie Copenhagen, UK Deaf Sport Head of Participation said:

“We are extremely pleased to be joining forces with the British Kickboxing Council for the next two years and know that this partnership will bring exciting opportunities and benefits to members of the Deaf community. We know that participation rates amongst Deaf people in sport are one of the lowest across all disability groups so this partnership will only seek to encourage, support and grow these rates.

“There are exciting times ahead and we would like to thank Sport England for their continued support of UK Deaf Sport’s work around the Disability agenda in sport and physical activity across England.”

David Jenkins, BKC Secretary said:

“We are absolutely delighted to have formed this partnership with UK Deaf Sport. Their knowledge and expertise will be invaluable in helping us to achieve our goal of making Kickboxing a more deaf friendly sport. We are excited to be bringing the amazing benefits of Kickboxing to even more people around the UK and cannot wait to see how much of an impact this relationship will have on the Kickboxing landscape.

“The resources and training we aim to create will lay the foundation for making our already inclusive and diverse sport that much more accessible, not just at a participation level, but for the next generation of coaches, athletes and officials.”

For more information contact UK Deaf Sport at info@ukds.org.uk or take a look at www.the-bkc.com.
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Deaf Awareness Week runs from 6-12 May 2019. Promoted the UK Council on Deafness, this weeklong campaign provides a much-needed opportunity to raise awareness that one in six people in the UK have some form of hearing loss; and to celebrate the year-round projects, activities and support that makes a difference to deaf people’s lives on a daily basis.

As the national charity that supports and encourages deaf and hard of hearing people take part in sport and physical activity, UK Deaf Sport is proud to support Deaf Awareness Week 2019.

Celebrating Role Models

This year’s theme for the week is Celebrating Role Models. Throughout the week, UK Council on Deafness is encouraging organisations to celebrate role models at all levels, who raise awareness of hearing loss, promote social inclusion and make a positive difference to deaf people’s lives.

Each day this week will celebrate role models from different sectors that make up our communities. The theme days are:

Monday – Education and employment

Tuesday – Health

Wednesday – Sport

Thursday – Entertainment

Friday – Family and youth

Saturday – Technology

Sunday – Politics

Find out more on UK Council on Deafness website.

UK Deaf Sport’s vision is ‘Every deaf person active and inspired by sport and physical activity’. Our mission is to create more accessible opportunities for deaf people to enjoy an active lifestyle and have fun taking part in sport.

Action on Hearing Loss reports that around 11 million people in the UK have some form of hearing loss, and this number is expected to rise to 15.6 million by 2035. Previous research from Sport England’s Active People survey has shown that people who are deaf or hard of hearing are most likely to be physically inactive.

At UK Deaf Sport, our work to improve participation levels focuses on encouraging more deaf children, young people and adults to take part in sport throughout their lives. We are committed to ensuring our work connects the sport and physical activity sector together with members of the Deaf community to share expert knowledge and promote better practice in order to deliver change.

Understanding the motivations and barriers towards sport and physical activity for deaf people is vital to our work. Please get in touch with us if you would like to share your experiences of being active, or if you would like more information and guidance on how to make your activities more inclusive for deaf people.

Email us at participation@ukds.org.uk

Join us in celebrating Deaf Awareness Week on Twitter, follow us @DeafSport and use hashtag #DeafSport and #DeafAwarenessWeek.
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Activity Alliance releases short feature film for healthcare professionals on supporting disabled people to be more active. 

Disabled people are currently the least active group in society, and twice as likely as non-disabled people to be physically inactive. Healthcare professionals are an important point of contact, and system of referral, for disabled people looking to be active. Evidence shows that one in four patients would be more active if advised by a healthcare professional[i]. Ahead of World Health Day, Activity Alliance releases a short feature film for healthcare professionals on supporting disabled people to be active.

Highlighting how health and sport organisations can work together effectively to break down barriers, the national charity hopes it leads to more local and national collaboration. In partnership with Public Health England and supported by Sport England, the film introduces the urgent case for change so more disabled people can reap physical and mental health benefits.

As well as highlighting excellent examples, the film contributors give advice on ways others can embed sport and activity into their work. It compliments the Moving Healthcare Professionals programme, led by Sport England and Public Health England. In the film, leaders from Public Health England and the Royal College of Occupational Therapists outline how greater health outcomes can come through an active lifestyle. With support from healthcare professionals, disabled people and people with long-term health conditions can take part in more opportunities.

One of the contributors, Dr Mike Brannan, National Lead for Physical Activity at Public Health England said:

“There are 11.5 million disabled people in England[ii] but they are twice as likely to be inactive than non-disabled people[iii]. This highlights a continued barrier that prevents disabled people from being active.

“It is important that disabled people do not miss out on the benefits of being active and there is great work being undertaken in England to address these inequalities. Activity Alliance’s new health video highlights the significant potential in the health and sport sector working to support disabled people being more active.”

Genevieve Smyth, Professional Advisor at Royal College of Occupational Therapists, said:

“Supporting people to take part in their chosen sport or other physical activity should be everybody’s business in health care. Making personalised care a reality means focusing on people’s strengths, balancing choice and risk. It’s too easy to think sport is risky or too difficult. Many of the barriers disabled people face to physical activity are attitudinal and healthcare professionals need to recognise that physical activity as a clinically effective intervention. Environments can be adapted and activities can be changed to make them accessible, but this only works if we initiate and then consistently build physical activity into health interventions.”

Sport for Confidence is one initiative featured in the new film. A social enterprise that runs throughout Essex, the team supports people who face barriers to participation to get involved in a variety of sporting activities in mainstream settings.

Representatives from Yorkshire Sport Foundation’s Creating Connections programme talk about their success at a regional level. This referral programme operates across South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire. They aim to change lives by supporting local people to get involved in community sport and activity. We hear from visually impaired bowls player, Leanne, on how Creating Connections has supported her to be active again and how it benefits her health.

Barry Horne, Activity Alliance Chief Executive, said:

“Our research shows that seven in ten disabled people want to be more active[iv], but participation is not growing at the rate it needs to. There is significant work to do and we cannot do it alone. Collaboration, especially with disabled people, is key to changing the status quo. We are delighted to work with key leaders in health and sport to ensure more disabled people have access to and enjoy opportunities to be active. This film is a starting point for thousands of healthcare professionals.”

Sarah Ruane, Strategic lead – health at Sport England said:

“We know that healthcare professionals play a hugely influential role in advising their patients to get active. That’s why we are equipping them with practical information that they need to have supportive conversations through the Moving Healthcare Professional programme. These conversations are even more important if an individual feels daunted by the prospect of getting active due to a health diagnosis, injury or disability. The film released today highlights the impact we can have by overcoming these barriers through bridging the gap between the health and sport sectors.”

To coincide with the film release and in recognition of World Health Day (Sunday 7 April 2019), Activity Alliance will be hosting an hour Twitter chat between 1pm – 2pm on Friday 5 April to talk about health, inclusion and sport. Join in the conversation with @AllForActivity and hashtag #InclusiveActivity.

If you are a healthcare professional looking for more information and guidance then please visit www.activityalliance.org.uk/health or call 01509 227750.

Healthcare professionals making active lives possible - YouTube

[i] Source: NHS Digital. Health Survey for England – 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge, attitudes and behaviour

[ii] Source: DWP Family Resources Survey 2015-2016

[iii] Source: Sport England, Active Lives 1 2015-16

[iv] Activity Alliance lifestyle report from September 2013

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UK Deaf Sport by Ado Media - 2M ago

Join a community of Deaf athletes, clubs, organisations and professionals supporting and encouraging all deaf children, young people and adults to be active and inspired by sport and physical activity. Register today to become a member of UK Deaf Sport – we’re here for you.

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On Tuesday 5 March, Deaf footballer, Claire Stancliffe was honoured by the Prime Minister for her voluntary work. Claire became the 1,135th winners of the Points of Light award which recognises outstanding individual volunteers who are making a change in their community. 

Claire Stancliffe from Wellingborough in Northamptonshire, is captain of the GB Deaf Women’s Football Squad, and successful led a campaign to raise over £100,000 to take both the men’s and women’s teams to the 2017 Deaflympics in Samsun, Turkey. 

Claire has been involved in deaf sports since 2007 and visits local schools to encourage young children to engage in sport. She has competed in international competitions for a decade and has won medals at Deaf World Championships in 2008 and 2016, the Deaf European Championships in 2011 and at the Deaflympics in 2013. As the team receives no official funding, Claire took it upon herself to raise the necessary money through online auctions, fundraising events and writing to companies to offer in-kind donations.

Unfortunately Claire suffered a major knee injury in 2017, however she continues to inspire people through her social media channels, sharing videos of her recovery and rehabilitation with her online following alongside posts about in which she teaches sign language.

In a personal letter to Claire, Prime Minister Theresa May said:

“You should feel incredibly proud of how your fundraising has enabled Deaf Football teams to take part in international competitions. I wish you well as you continue to inspire young deaf people and share your passion for sport.”

Claire said:

“It’s a huge honour to be recognised by the Prime Minister for a Points of Light award. Deaf football has played a huge part in my life and given me many difficult challenges but also many fantastic life experiences. It has been very rewarding to play a part and see deaf football grow over the last decade.

“I have been incredibly lucky to have a large amount of support by the public especially after my injury. I believe that everybody has the ability to inspire others in some way and hope that what I do at least helps someone in some way. I will continue to fight for recognition for DeaflympicsGB in the hope that athletes can concentrate on their preparations.”

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Thousands of young people will take part in a nationwide series of inclusive sport festivals in the run up to the 2020 Paralympic Games. The Inclusion 2020 project will see 50 primary, secondary and special schools across England organise inclusive countywide ‘Learning and Discovery’ sport festivals ahead of summer 2020.

At the events, 3,000 pupils of all abilities will experience a variety of Parasports and get the opportunity to compete. They will be supported by a team of Youth Sport Trust athlete mentors including ParalympicsGB swimmer Kate Grey.

The Youth Sport Trust will support 50 Lead Inclusion Schools – hubs of expertise on inclusive PE and sport – to act as champions in their local areas. As well as staging festivals, they will be responsible for training staff and sharing best practice with other schools to improve the provision of PE, school sport and physical activity for young people with SEND.

With funding from the Department for Education, Inclusion 2020 will aim to reach tens of thousands of pupils, 2,800 schools and train 6,000 teachers and coaches ahead of the 2020 Games. The consortium of organisations led by the Youth Sport Trust includes Activity Alliance, the British Paralympic Association, Nasen (National Association of Special Educational Needs) and Swim England.

In addition to inclusive sport festivals, the Inclusion 2020 project will also see:

  • Locally-led reviews of swimming provision for young people with SEND, with new opportunities created for them to learn to swim and develop water confidence
  • Teachers trained to adapt curriculum PE to place a greater focus on using the subject to teach life skills, using the Youth Sport Trust’s My Personal Best programme
  • Pupils supported to become young ambassadors who advocate for inclusion within their schools and support others to achieve their daily 30 active minutes of physical activity during the school day

Minister for Children and Families, Nadhim Zahawi said:

“With excitement already building for Tokyo 2020, we are delighted to be funding this project which is a great opportunity to make sure all pupils can enjoy the benefits of staying active – let’s hope it may even inspire some future Olympic and Paralympic stars.

“We want every child – including those with special educational needs and disabilities – to have the opportunity to find a sport they love, and this funding will build on the £320 million we are providing through the PE and Sport Premium to help primary schools encourage all of their pupils to lead active lives.”

Youth Sport Trust Chief Executive, Ali Oliver said:

“Schools have come a long way in improving the provision of sport and play for young disabled people, but we know there is still more we can do.

“Taking part in fun and inclusive sport and play unlocks so many other life benefits. It improves wellbeing, increases confidence and helps build relationships and a sense of belonging. It can help forge friendships and foster inclusive and respectful environments within schools.

“Ahead of Tokyo 2020, we want to build excitement and inspire children and young people. Inclusion 2020 offers a fantastic opportunity to work with schools, teachers and parents to ensure that having special educational needs or a disability is no barrier when it comes to benefitting from high-quality PE, sport and physical activity.”

For more information about Inclusion 2020 and the Youth Sport Trust’s Lead Inclusion Schools, please visit Youth Sport Trust website. Or contact Vicci Wells, National Manager, or call 01509 226600.

Photo credit: Youth Sport Trust 

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