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Why and How We Live Rhythmically at Two Dreams

The chains of habit are generally too small to be felt until they are too strong to be broken

- Samuel Johnson

Every living organism has a natural rhythm. These rhythms are disrupted by illness, particularly drug and alcohol use. A drug can create false sleep. A drug can stimulate alertness. A drug can suppress appetite. Another can stimulate appetite.

The science behind living rhythmically, strategies that promote and restore natural rhythms, and the role of sleep, nutrition, meditation, and exercise in the 21st century approach to healing oneself in recovery are all important aspects of your journey at Two Dreams.

At Two Dreams the concept of living in the NOW (No Other Way) is central to living a life in recovery. Similarly, mindfulness is a state of active, open, non-judgmental attention on the present. Many treatment programs and practitioners are employing mindfulness in the care and management of patients with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders- diseases and symptoms which tend to cluster together.

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Dr. Andrea Barthwell is one of the most highly respected and well recognized names in all of addiction treatment. After all, she’s served as president of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, received the Betty Ford Award from the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse, and has been named one of the “Best Doctors in America” in addiction medicine.

Read more about her as InRecovery Magazine celebrates her as their luminary of the month.

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Special Event

Advancing Women Leaders in Behavioral Health: Masterclass in Leadership Development

Ponte Vedra, Florida
March 4, 2018
1:00 - 4:00 PM

  

The Willow Institute in collaboration with C4 Recovery Foundation, proudly presents the Advancing Women Leaders in Behavioral Health Series. This will be an ongoing series that will be presented at the WCSAD, CORE, and CCSAD C4 events. The relative shortage of female leadership presents an urgent challenge to the behavioral health sector. Technological, financial, legislative, and other factors are advancing and furthering the industry, making gender equality advances paramount. As a group representing half of the targeted treatment population, women should be strategically involved at the highest level in terms of creating new structures, modalities, and paradigms for how treatment is defined, delivered, regulated, and compensated. 

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What Are The First Steps When Looking For Addiction Treatment?

When it is time to start searching for an addiction treatment center, you may have many questions. In fact, the whole process may seem overwhelming to you right now. Whether the treatment center is for you or a loved one, when you don't know very much about the treatment process or even finding a good treatment center, it can feel daunting.

 

 

 

Rest assured that though it may require some time and effort, finding a suitable treatment center for you or your loved one is certainly possible. It's alright not to fully understand the process right now. Continue to do your homework and don't be afraid to ask professionals any questions that you have.

Today, let's discuss the first steps that you can take when you are beginning your search for an addiction treatment center.

 
Learn about the types of treatment

Your first step is to learn about the various types of addiction treatment. There are inpatient and outpatient treatment programs that cater to a variety of folks. Learning about the differences between the two can help you make an informed decision as to what will be the best course of action for you.

 
Inpatient Addiction Treatment

An inpatient or residential treatment center is a facility that houses clients or patients 24 hours a day for a certain amount of days. These are the treatment centers where you pack up your bags and take between 30 and 90 days to live at the facility receiving treatment for the disease of addiction.

 
Outpatient Addiction Treatment

An outpatient treatment center is a facility where you do not physically relocate to the facility. Rather, you attend the center perhaps two or three days a week in order to receive treatment. These tend to work well for those who cannot leave their home due to a job or family obligations.

 
Consider detox options

Once you decide what type of treatment center will work best for you, your next step is to learn a little bit about the treatment that goes on in the facility. When you're ready to give up alcohol or drugs, the first stage is the detox stage. You've probably heard of this and perhaps have even heard horror stories of people feeling absolutely terrible while their body detoxes from alcohol or drugs.

 

 

Many inpatient rehabs will offer detox at their facility, while others will expect you to enter a detox center before attending the rehab. If you are opting for outpatient rehab, then you may want to check out a detox center before heading off to treatment. Some people are able to detox at home safely, but this is something that you may want to talk to a substance abuse professional about. Some treatment centers have a detox center on location and some do not.

If the center you are seeking offers detox, you will go through a period of detox from your drug of choice under their care, usually a few days up to a week depending on your needs. Depending on your addiction, symptoms will vary, but it is wise to be in a safe environment with staff that can help you get through withdrawal.

Substance abuse professionals will tell you that you should detox under medical supervision preferably in a treatment facility. There are professionals there that can help you get through the withdrawal symptoms and may even be able to give you certain medications to decrease the intensity of symptoms.

 

 
Search for the right facility for you

Now that you know whether you're attending an inpatient or outpatient rehab, it's time to start doing your homework and researching the various options for you. If you want to stay local, make some calls to your local rehab centers and set up an appointment to talk to a professional. If you want to attend a rehab that is not local, the internet is a wonderful place to begin your research. There are various rehab liaisons online that will connect you with a rehab center that is right for you.

It may feel overwhelming to sift through the various treatment centers, but it is part of the process. Come up with some questions that you'd like to ask concerning the facility and treatment.

Ask them:

  1. Are you taking new patients at the moment? If not, how long is the waiting list?
  2. Do you take insurance? What is the cost?
  3. When can I get in to have a consultation?
  4. On average, how many people attend treatment there at one time?
  5. Do you offer individual counseling? Group counseling?
  6. Is family allowed to call while I’m at treatment?

When you sit down with a staff member, be sure to ask any questions you have and don’t be afraid to state that you don’t understand something. You want to go into treatment fully informed.

 
Treatment

It may be a bit anxiety provoking to make your final decision, but remember that this can be the start of a beautiful life free from alcohol and drugs. If you’re having trouble deciding, take some time to sit with it and talk to a few trusted friends or a mentor. You want to feel comfortable with your decision.

Most people entering an inpatient treatment opt to stay at the treatment center for a period of time, usually up to 28 days. The length of time depends on individual needs and desires. For those who cannot reside at the treatment center for the duration, most offer an intensive outpatient program that allows them to attend to their jobs and come to treatment on their off time. An initial assessment and evaluation will be done upon arrival and a treatment plan created as well. Many treatment centers have a holistic approach to recovery and include the mind, body, and spirit in treatment.

Plenty of men and women have found treatment centers to be helpful in getting free from alcohol and drugs. If you are struggling with such, take the first step to recovery today and reach out for help. There is a beautiful life waiting for you on the other side of addiction.

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As a parent, you want the absolute best for your children. You spend quite a bit of time teaching them how to make decisions that will benefit them now and down the road as an adult.

When it comes to drinking, you certainly want to educate your children about alcohol and encourage them to steer clear from the substance.

At the very least, you don’t want your children to try drinking at a young age. Maybe you can be on board if they want to have a social drink when they are adults, but as teenagers, you may be inclined to believe that they are not old enough to handle the responsibility.

As such, just how do you set strong boundaries with children about drinking? What if you and/or your spouse drink? Does this make a difference in what you should expect from your children? Will teens be more apt to rebel or sneak off and drink if you set strong boundaries?

These are all great questions. Today, let’s discuss a bit about setting strong boundaries when it comes to alcohol and your children.

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When you give up drinking it can seem like all of the fun things you used to do go with it. Most of our social lives revolve around alcohol, which not only is unhealthy but can lead to the slippery slope of addiction.

Choosing to live alcohol-free may seem like a daunting task, but all you need to do is find things that can replace drinking.

 
Why You Can Still Have Fun and Be Sober

While it can feel lonely being one of the only of your friends that is sober, it’s more likely than not that someone around is going through the same situation as you. Almost one-third of adult Americans don’t drink at all and another third have less than one alcoholic drink a week. People who don’t drink have reported several benefits like better skin, more focus, and a deeper connection with themselves and those around them.

Just because you’re sober doesn’t mean that you can’t have a little fun. There are plenty of ways for you to have a great time alcohol-free. Don’t believe us? We’ve put together a list of 30 things you can do instead of drinking. An entire month’s worth of activities that you can do without alcohol, with friends, or by yourself. The next time you’re tempted to pick up a drink or just can’t think of anything fun to do sober, check out these 30 options you have to choose from.

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Hanging out with your friends is always a good time. You guys make each other laugh, talk about the things that matter, and are always there for each other when you need them the most.

If you have a truly supportive group of friends, they will understand the struggles you’ve overcome in rehab and will want to support you in any way they can. Even if that means not involving alcohol when you hang out together.

Once you get out of rehab and you’re ready to start seeing your friends again, you may notice that a lot of the things you use to enjoy doing together revolved around alcohol. You may have found it easier to stay away from alcohol in a controlled environment like rehab or group therapy sessions. Now that you’re out in the real world, there’s nothing to worry about. You can still have plenty of fun with your friends without the help of alcohol. Below are twenty ideas you can use the next time you need a sober way to have fun.

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According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 23.5 million persons aged 12 or older needed treatment for an illicit drug or alcohol abuse problem. That’s a large portion of the population who are either in need of treatment or are seeking some form of treatment for substance abuse like rehab. While millions of people are admitted into rehab every year, the success rate for each facility varies ranging anywhere from 5 to 10 percent.

In order to have a successful recovery and benefit from rehab’s effects, it’s important that you put in the necessary work that it takes to get the most out of a rehab program. Whether it’s focusing on the long term goals, making a commitment to yourself, or surrounding yourself with love and support, there are several ways you can make drug rehab more effective. Below are twelve ways you can start to build on your rehab treatment and work towards a successful recovery.

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Getting sober is not easy task. It comes with its ups and downs and a lot of hard work. With almost 60 percent of sober people experiencing relapse, it’s no wonder that people are afraid of getting sober. Understanding your fear of getting sober is the first step to conquering it. Once you get a hold on the fears that are driving your hesitation and procrastination, you can begin to see clearly the benefits of getting sober. Below are ten reasons why people are afraid to get sober and how to overcome them.

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Navigating the road to recovery can be tricky sometimes, especially with the reality of relapse always looming overhead. Nearly 40 to 60 percent of people in recovery will relapse at some point. While relapse is a reality that all addicts have to face, it doesn’t necessarily have to happen to everyone. With a little bit of hard work and motivation, you can take the necessary steps to prevent a relapse and have a successful recovery. Below are ten relapse prevention strategies that can be a great addition to your recovery journey.

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