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Did Billy the Kid serve as an interpreter for Irish immigrants?

Marcil d’Hirson Garron
Newhall, California

Being of Irish ancestry on both sides of my family, I don’t get why the Irish would need an interpreter unless it was to have somebody translate Spanish for them. And Billy spoke Spanish.

I asked award-winning author Michael Wallis, an expert on the Kid, and he says, “Like you, I never heard of the Kid acting as an ‘interpreter.’ I agree with your theory, but even that is dubious.”

Marshall Trimble is Arizona’s official historian and vice president of the Wild West History Association. His latest book is Arizona Outlaws and Lawmen; The History Press, 2015. If you have a question, write: Ask the Marshall, P.O. Box 8008, Cave Creek, AZ 85327 or email him at marshall.trimble@scottsdalecc.edu.

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The post Did Billy the Kid Serve as an Interpreter for Irish Immigrants? appeared first on True West Magazine by Marshall Trimble. Only the True West!

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John Selman, Jr.

The relationship between John Wesley Hardin killer John Selman and his son, John
Marion Selman (photo), was not very close. Old John abandoned the family in 1879,
when his boy was four, although he retrieved Junior two years later. A new stepmother
raised him for the next several years.

The family moved to El Paso. Senior remarried—to a 15-year-old girl, younger than
Junior, who found himself breaking up fights between his “parents.” He soon moved
uptown to get away from his father, who he was ashamed of. The two still weren’t close
when Senior died in 1896.

Mark Boardman is the features editor at True West and editor of The Tombstone Epitaph.

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The post Father and Son—Not So Close appeared first on True West Magazine by Mark Boardman. Only the True West!

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True West Magazine by Bob Boze Bell - 2d ago
Sentenced to hang for the death of William Brady, Billy Bonney is delivered to Sheriff Pat Garrett on April 21, 1881.
— All images courtesy True West archives unless otherwise noted —

Godfrey Gauss and Sam Wortley live behind the Lincoln Courthouse. Gauss lights his pipe and leaves his room, crossing the yard toward the main building. As he walks, he hears a shot, a “tussle upstairs” and “somebody hurrying downstairs, and deputy-sheriff Bell emerging from the door running toward me. He ran right into my arms, expired the same moment, and I laid him down, dead. That I was in a hurry to secure assistance, or perhaps to save myself, everybody will believe.”

Gauss runs around to the east side of the building. He later remembers: “When I arrived at the garden gate leading to the street, in front of the courthouse, I saw the other deputy sheriff, Olinger, coming out of the hotel [The Wortley] opposite, with the other four or five county prisoners where they had taken their dinner. I called to him to come quick. He did so, leaving his prisoners in front of the hotel. When he had come close up to me, and while standing not more than a yard apart, I told him that I was just after laying Bell dead on the ground in the yard behind, and before he could reply, he was struck by a well directed shot fired from a window above us, and fell dead at my feet.

Billy look-alike William H. Cox poses at the top of the stairs in the Lincoln County Courthouse where the real Billy the Kid shot Deputy Bell.
– Photo by Bob Boze Bell –

“I ran for my life to reach my room and safety, when Billy the Kid called to me: ‘Don’t run, I wouldn’t hurt you—I am alone, and master not only of the courthouse, but also of the town, for I will allow nobody to come near us. You go,’ he said, ‘and saddle one of Judge Leonard’s horses, and I will clear out as soon as I can have the shackles loosened from my legs.’ With a little prospecting pick I had thrown him through the window, he was working for at least an hour, and could not accomplish more than to free one leg, and he came to the conclusion to wait a better chance, tie one shackle to his waistbelt, and start out. Meanwhile I had saddled a small skittish pony belonging to Billy Burt as there was no other horse available, and had also, by Billy’s command, tied a pair of red blankets behind the saddle. I came near forgetting to say that whilst I was busy saddling, and Mr. Billy Kid trying hard to get his shackles off, my partner, Mr. Sam Wortley, appeared in the door leading from the garden where he had been at work, into the yard, and that when he saw the two sheriffs lying dead he did not know whether to go in or retreat, but on the assurance of Billy the Kid that he would not hurt him, he went in and made generally useful.

“When Billy went downstairs at last, on passing the body of Bell, he said, ‘I’m sorry I had to kill but couldn’t help it.’

“On passing the body of Olinger he gave him a tip with his boot, saying, ‘You are not going to round me up again.’

“We went out together where I had tied up the pony, and he told me to tell the owner of same, Billy Burt, that he would send it back the next day. I, for my part, didn’t much believe in his promise…”

Aligned Against The Kid Jimmy Dolan (far left) and Robert Olinger.

One of the leaders of the Irish faction that opposed Tunstall and McSween in the Lincoln County War, Jimmy Dolan and Robert Olinger have their photo taken in Santa Fe, New Mexico Territory, in 1879 by Bennett & Brown. Olinger is killed by the Kid in his escape and is described as being six feet tall, weighing around 240 pounds, having a red complexion and dark eyes. He also answers to “Pecos Bob” and “Big Indian.”

The “House” The Kid Escapes From “The House.”

The large, two-story building at center, below, and in blowup, is the Murphy-Dolan store, known locally as “The House,” which later did duty as the Lincoln County Courthouse. Bonney was held on the second floor, chained to the floor and guarded by Deputy J.W. Bell and Robert Olinger (Sheriff Garrett was in White Oaks “to meet engagement” and tradition says he was there to buy lumber for the gallows to hang the Kid). Billy turned the tables on Bell when they were returning from the privy (somewhere at bottom right in the blowup). The Kid told Bell not to run, but the deputy ran down the stairs and was shot twice by Bonney and collapsed.

Scene of The Escape Lincoln County Courthouse.
— Special Collections, University of Arizona Library —

This is the earliest known photo of the Lincoln County Courthouse, taken circa 1887. The nearest upstairs window (behind the men) is the room where Billy was held. This window and the gate at the right end of the fence figured prominently in the events of April 28, 1881.

Slipping The Cuff Off His Small Hand

At six o’clock on the evening of April 28, Deputy Robert Olinger took the five other prisoners across the street to the Wortley Hotel for their dinner. He left his shotgun in Garrett’s office right next to the room the Kid was being held in. With Olinger gone, Billy asked deputy J.W. Bell to take him out back to the privy. On the way back, going up the stairway the Kid slipped off one of his handcuffs. Turning in the narrow space the Kid used the cuff as a weapon, striking Bell across the head. As the deputy stumbled backwards the Kid leapt upon him and wrestled away his pistol. As the stunned Bell turned to flee, the Kid shot him in the back. This is just one version of the killing of Bell. There are other theories; see below.

Where Did Billy Get the Gun?

There have been numerous hypotheses as to just how the Kid turned the tables on his guard, James Bell. Some theories may have been encouraged by Billy himself, to protect his friends.

One theory (advanced by Walter Noble Burns) is that during a card game, Billy slipped his hands out of his cuffs and seized Bell’s pistol, and then shot him when he tried to escape. This version was discredited by Judge Lucius Dills, whose investigation revealed that Bell’s pistol was still in its holster, fully loaded, when his body was removed.

Garrett’s theory is that after Bell had taken the Kid downstairs and out back to the privy, the Kid got considerably ahead of his guard on the return. Disappearing up the staircase, Billy leaped up the steps and threw his shoulder into the door of a room where weapons and ammunition were stored. The Kid grabbed a pistol, came back to the head of the stairs and confronted Bell, who was just coming up. When Bell panicked and turned, the Kid fired, realizing the guard would shout for help if he reached the door. Tradition in Lincoln has it that a pistol was planted in the outhouse by a boy, José Aguayo, who was related to the Bacas. The youngster was a “devoted admirer of William Bonney” and simply carried the gun in a newspaper (a common item to carry to an outhouse) and placed it where the Kid could find it. Sam Corbet, who visited the Kid every day, then slipped a piece of paper in the Kid’s hand without being observed by the guards. It bore one word—“privy,” but Billy understood immediately.

“Hello, Bob”

After the killing of Bell, the Kid retrieved Olinger’s shotgun and hobbled to the window, upstairs, to command a view of the Wortley Hotel across the street, where Olinger
had gone to feed the prisoners. When Olinger heard the shot, he came back across the street and entered the gate (see opposite page) and as he approached the building,
the Kid leaned out the window and shot Olinger with his own 10-gauge Whitney
shotgun (above). Tradition says that Kid gave Olinger the cryptic greeting,
“Hello, Bob,” but it is doubtful Billy said anything.

– Fred Nolan –

The Courthouse Window

Billy was kept upstairs, shackled to the floor in the northeast room of the house. The sheriff ordered that at least one armed guard was to be with the Kid at all times. A large window lit the room from the east wall. This photo was taken sometime after the turn of the last century. From this window the Kid would be able to see the gallows as they were built. It was a view to a kill, but not the
one Lincoln and all of New Mexico Territory expected.

– Carrell Collection, LCHT –

Aftermath: Odds & Ends

Sheriff Pat Garrett returns to Lincoln from buying lumber for the gallows to be built to hang the Kid and mounts a posse to search for Bonney, but he is unsuccessful.

In Santa Fe, Governor Wallace receives a one-line telegram telling of the escape, and he posts a $500 reward for the Kid’s capture. A month later, Wallace is appointed minister to Turkey and he leaves New Mexico Territory.

A week or so after his escape, Bonney walks into Fort Sumner, steals another horse and hides out at a sheep camp, 35 miles east of Sumner.

Tipped off by Pete Maxwell that the Kid is hiding out around Fort Sumner, Garrett leaves Roswell at night accompanied by John Poe and “Kip” McKinney. They ride all night and stay off the main roads.

Garrett shoots down the Kid in Pete Maxwell’s bedroom in Fort Sumner, July 14, 1881.

Recommended: The Illustrated Life & Times of Billy the Kid by Bob Boze Bell.

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The post The Deadly Escape appeared first on True West Magazine by Bob Boze Bell. Only the True West!

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In the book Roughing It, Mark Twain refers to gunfighters as “long-tailed heroes.” What does that mean?

Paul Gortarez
Phoenix, Arizona

Twain was referring to the frock-coat-wearing gunfighters who prowled the streets of Virginia City. Let’s let Mr. Twain tell the story: “The deference that was paid to a desperado of wide reputation, and who ‘kept his favorite graveyard,’ as the phrase went, was marked, and cheerfully accorded. When he moved along the sidewalks in his excessively long-tailed frock-coat, shiny, stump-toed boots, and with the dainty little slouch hat tipped over left eye, the small fry roughs made room for his majesty.

Mark Twain.

“The best known names in the Territory of Nevada were those belonging to these long-tailed heroes of the revolver. Orators, Governors, capitalists and leaders of the legislature enjoyed a degree of fame but it seemed local and meager when contrasted with the fame of such men as Sam Brown, Jack Williams, Billy Mulligan, Farmer Pease, Sugarfoot Mike, Pock-Marked Jake, El Dorado Johnny, Jack McNabb, Joe McGee, Jack Harris, Six-finger Pete, etc., etc. There was a long list of them. They were brave, reckless men, and traveled with their lives in their hands.”

Marshall Trimble is Arizona’s official historian and vice president of the Wild West History Association. His latest book is Arizona Outlaws and Lawmen; The History Press, 2015. If you have a question, write: Ask the Marshall, P.O. Box 8008, Cave Creek, AZ 85327 or email him at marshall.trimble@scottsdalecc.edu.

What do you think?

The post What are “long-tailed heroes”? appeared first on True West Magazine by Marshall Trimble. Only the True West!

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True West Magazine by Henry C. Parke - 3d ago
Mariette Hartley (above, center) made her cinematic debut as bride-to-be Elsa Knudsen in director Sam Peckinpah’s 1962 Western classic Ride the High Country, filmed on location in California’s Sierra Nevada. Hartley co-starred with (l.-r.) Ron Starr, Randolph Scott, Joel McCrea and R.G. Armstrong.
— Courtesy MGM —

“I knew that it was something special; Sam (Peckinpah) was terrific, everybody was terrific, especially Randolph Scott and Joel McCrea—who I’d never heard of.” Before Mariette Hartley made her film debut as the female lead in Peckinpah’s 1962 masterpiece, Ride the High Country, she had no expectation of becoming “Queen of the West.” “We only had one movie house in Westport,” she said. “The first movie I ever saw was The Red Shoes, as a young ballet dancer. Then Olivier’s Hamlet and Henry V. I didn’t know anything about Westerns. My next-door neighbor had horses, and I would ride bareback.”

One day, “a wonderful, crazy directress, Claire Olsen, from Chicago rounded up the kids from Westport, and made us actors and actresses.” Four years with her led to two “with Eva Le Gallienne, who taught me Ibsen and Chekov.” At 15, “she handed me off to John Houseman of the Shakespeare Festival. So, I was passed on from one really great theatre person to another.”

Surprisingly, what led Hartley to Hollywood was not the film business, “but a bad marriage. He wanted more than anything to go to California; and I hated California.” The father of an actress friend steered her toward the William Morris Agency. In four days, she was meeting at MGM with Peckinpah. Three days later, the studio set up a screen test, she recalls, “and I said, what’s that? I tested with Wayne Rogers, Ben Cooper, Richard Jaeckel and Ron Starr” in the scene where Elsa washes dishes with her romantic interest, Heck Longtree. Starr would win the role.

Elsa runs away to marry James Drury, and learns to her horror that she will in effect also be marrying his three brothers—Warren Oates, L.Q. Jones, John Davis Chandler—and father, John Anderson. “The time I got really scared was the dancing during the wedding. Sam wasn’t soft on that: he wanted it to look the way it looks. Those guys pulled me into it, and I was terrified.” She liked them, and would work with them all again. “But Johnny Chandler terrified me! I mean, he was that guy.”

Hartley’s first role in a classic TV Western was in 1963 as Clarey on Gunsmoke’s “Cotter’s Girl” opposite leading man James Arness (right).
— Courtesy CBS —

Hartley frequently catches Scott’s and McCrea’s films on TCM. “I asked Joel, is there anything that you do to prepare? He said, ‘Because we never do things in sequence, and have to know where we are emotionally, I read the scene before the scene I’m doing right now, get prepared for that. Then I suck in my gut and go on.’ He was a dream to work with; both of them were.”

Ride the High Country was an international hit, and Hartley was in demand in all genres. Although she did a great deal of Western television, she did only two more Western features, both co-starring Lee Van Cleef. In 1970’s Barquero, Warren Oates and his gang are fleeing the Army after a robbery, and Van Cleef’s barge is their only means of escape. As the townspeople panic, the voluptuous bad-girl and the “virtuous” married Hartley, make plays for Van Cleef. “I called me and Maria Gomez the concave and the convex of his life. Lee covered himself with Coppertone. He looked really greasy and sexy, he thought. One time, he takes me in his arms and I slipped out and landed on the ground. Not one of my best experiences.”

Still, it was better than The Magnificent 7 Ride! “You mean The Magnificent 7 Ride for 24 pages? Until I got raped and killed. That was a juicy role.”

Her TV work was much more satisfying. “I did two Virginians, and four Bonanzas. I just adored Gunsmoke. “Cotter’s Girl” was my very first television show, written by the great Kathleen Hite.” A man forces Matt Dillon to kill him, so Matt will be responsible for the daughter he’s kept hidden on his farm. “It was Pygmalion! I just loved it. I loved Jimmy [Arness]—he made me laugh harder than anybody except maybe Hoss [Bonanza’s Dan Blocker]. And Michael Landon.

“The nice thing about Bonanza was, you could stretch yourself a bit. I mean, from playing an Indian to playing a famous actress. I went through the whole Cartwright family, one brother at a time. And then I dated Ben.” After which, one irate fan wrote to complain about Ben’s foolishness, “Didn’t [you] recognize her as the Indian a year and a half ago?!”

There were rewards even working on the lower-budget shows, like Death Valley Days, “where I had to bring my own red shawl, and the name of the episode was “The Red Shawl.” But I worked with Robert Taylor, for crying out loud!”

“I’d like to keep working. I’d love to do comedy again.” Or a Western? “Sure, if it’s a good script, and as long as I don’t have to ride too much—you know, my bones are getting a little bit brittle.”

What do you think?

The post Hartley of the West appeared first on True West Magazine by Henry C. Parke. Only the True West!

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From taking care of the incredible caliber of artwork from the Hurd-Wyeth family, as well as overseeing the ranch, guest homes and winery, Shelly Buffalo Calf’s need for challenges is satisfied.
— Courtesy Shelly Buffalo Calf Yeager —

My favorite Old West location in the world is Lincoln, New Mexico, which is why I moved here as soon as I could.

Most people don’t know I met Robert Duvall. Okay, I didn’t actually meet him but we met eyes across a room and waved at each other. That counts, right?

Don’t get me started on old Western movies that show saguaros in “Texas.” Ugh!

I can’t stand it when historians claim they know the REAL events of the Old West and nobody else does.

For me nothing is better than staying at the Occidental Hotel in Buffalo, Wyoming, and hanging out in the bar counting the bullet holes.

History has taught me that things are NEVER as they seem!

My favorite Western is Open Range. I love great chocolate and a goooood smoke.

The problem with most museums is there’s never enough outlaw photos or paraphernalia; that’s why it’s just better to go to Bob McCubbin’s house.

I got my Old West nickname when Linda Pardo and I were on a road trip. We had left Prescott heading south, and after re-enacting Billy shooting Cahill at Camp Grant, we decided my name was Shootem’ Shel and hers was Loca Linda! Then there’s Dead Lori but that’s a whole other story.

When I worked at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming, I was fortunate to be able to work in many different departments from the McCracken Research Library to the five museums to The Papers of William F. Cody. My favorite position was as a registrar because I was handling, researching, housing and displaying historical objects every day.

While getting my master’s degree in Museum Studies my favorite experience was my internship in the conservation lab at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Since there are five museums, I learned to clean and repair many different types of objects from oil paintings to beadwork and textiles to pottery.

I appreciate all the work that goes into historic research because I have seen it firsthand. I worked at the McCracken Research Library and helped historians/authors go through all the primary sources we had on various historic topics. They would spend many hours, weeks, months poring over every possible connection to their topic of study. Their enthusiasm for their subject matter was contagious.

I am so connected to the Kid because he was a free spirit, a straight-shooter and was totally himself with no apologies.

My favorite pastime is riding or hiking around the hills in Lincoln County, imagining how easily outlaws could evade capture considering the topography of the land and the height of the trees being just tall enough to cover a man on a horse.

Working in retail has taught me that wine is of the utmost importance! If you don’t already drink, retail will drive you to it!

Of all the places in the West that I am drawn to it’s the wide open spaces of Wyoming, New Mexico and Arizona.

I hate it when movies start out with the dramatic Indian massacre. Enough already!

When I’m on the road I love to explore any location where a significant (or not so) historical event took place in the Old West. I once “acquired” an old broken-down bookshelf from an abandoned copper mine in Montana, a particularly good score during my wanderings.

I always strive to have courage, which according to John Wayne is being scared to death but saddling up anyway!

Shelly was born and raised in Michigan, where she began riding horses at age five. She moved to Wyoming at age 21 and worked on a 250,000-acre cattle ranch north of Cody. She was adopted into a Crow family in Montana shortly thereafter and received her name, Bishe Daga (Buffalo Calf). She has a B.A. from the University of Montana and a master’s in Museum Studies from the University of Oklahoma. After working at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming, she moved to Lincoln, New Mexico, to become the director of the Hurd La Rinconada Gallery and Guest Homes, and soon-to-be Sentinel Ranch Winery in San Patricio, New Mexico.

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The post What History Has Taught Me: Shelley Buffalo Calf appeared first on True West Magazine by Shelley Buffalo Calf. Only the True West!

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True West Magazine by Mark Boardman - 4d ago
El Paso, Texas, circa 1880.

On August 6, 1895, gunman John Wesley Hardin nearly got into a strange shootout. He
and his lover Helen Beulah Mrose were in an El Paso (photo) lodging house. Their
relationship, often fueled by alcohol, had been getting more and more violent.

Mrs. Mrose pulled a pistol and threatened to kill Wes, whose own gun was on a table across the room. The house proprietor walked in and defused the situation—although
Mrs. Mrose threatened to shoot Hardin in the head while he slept. That didn’t happen;
Hardin was killed by John Selman three weeks later.

Mark Boardman is the features editor at True West and editor of The Tombstone Epitaph.

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The post A Stormy Affair appeared first on True West Magazine by Mark Boardman. Only the True West!

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True West Magazine by Mark Boardman - 4d ago
John Wesley Hardin.

By the time he died in August 1895, John Wesley Hardin had finished about 200 pages of
his autobiography, up to the year 1889. Researchers Chuck Parsons and Norman Wayne
Brown believe his paramour, Helen Beulah Mrose, probably wrote the work as Wes sank into alcoholism and inertia (outside of gambling).

When he died, Hardin’s three children went to court and won the rights to the manuscript, which they finished and published in 1896. It likely made very little money. Mrs. Mrose was left with nothing, not even the credit for her work on the book.

Mark Boardman is the features editor at True West and editor of The Tombstone Epitaph.

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The post Losing Control appeared first on True West Magazine by Mark Boardman. Only the True West!

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True West Magazine by Marshall Trimble - 4d ago
Trapper camp.

Basically there were only two types of trappers, the engage, or lowly company employee who worked for wages and the enterprising aristocrat of the trade, the free trapper. He went where he pleased, trapped wherever and whenever he pleased and could sell his pelts to the highest bidder. If the situation warranted it he would band up other free trappers voluntarily. Others like Old Bill Williams preferred to go alone.

When the free trappers banded together for self-preservation usually elected a partisan, or captain, to act as leader. He was always a veteran of the trade and a proven leader. Like the Indians choosing a war chief, his most important attribute was the ability to keep his men alive.

The partisan had nearly as much authority as did the captain of a ship. One of the greatest of these in the Southwest is today, a little-known man named Ewing Young. Young was one of the first Americans to enter Santa Fe, making the trek down the trail with William Becknell in 1822. He would lead several parties of trappers into the dangerous Gila River country that is today, Arizona.

He was also leader of the first American group that viewed the Grand Canyon. Young also served as mentor for a youngster who was a runaway from his job in a saddle maker’s shop where he’d been indentured at the age of sixteen.

Like many, he also come down the Santa Fe Trail in search of adventure. His employer had offered a reward of one penny for his return.

Trapper, trailblazer, scout, wilderness guide, Indian agent, pathfinder for John C. Fremont “The Great Pathfinder” and Civil War general, Kit Carson, would prove to be worth a lot more to his country in many ways before he cashed in his chips in 1868.

Marshall Trimble is Arizona’s official historian and vice president of the Wild West History Association. His latest book is Arizona Outlaws and Lawmen; The History Press, 2015. If you have a question, write: Ask the Marshall, P.O. Box 8008, Cave Creek, AZ 85327 or email him at marshall.trimble@scottsdalecc.edu.

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The post Free Trappers appeared first on True West Magazine by Marshall Trimble. Only the True West!

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True West Magazine by Marshall Trimble - 5d ago

Like gold dust on the mining frontier, beaver pelts acted as the medium of exchange in the mountains. Unique to the American experience was the rendezvous system, dreamed and schemed in 1825 by William Ashley.

The procedure was simple; the trader would purchase his supplies in St. Louis and transport them out to the trappers in the mountains. This would save the trappers from having to make the long trip east for supplies. Like modern-day mail-order by computers the merchants took the goods to the customers. It was extremely profitable for the merchants and convenient for the trappers.

The prices charged were exorbitant, as much as a 2,000% markup. The trappers and Indians had two choices; pay the price or go without. Alcohol purchased in St. Louis for fifteen cents a gallon was sold in a diluted form for five dollars a pint. Coffee went for fifteen cents a pound and sold for two dollars a pound. Tobacco was three dollars a pound
and blankets sold for fifteen to twenty dollars.

The trappers gathered at their annual rendezvous, a location chosen the previous year and proceeded to barter and sell. In exchange for the pelts, necessities for the coming year were obtained. The trappers eagerly bought up various gewgaw’s which they purchased for their Indian wives or female companions. They vied with one another to see who could adorn his lady with the finest assortment of shawls, fabrics, beads and ornaments.

When the trading was finished, out came the whiskey and the fun and frolic began. For the next several days they drank, held shooting and wrestling matches, ran races and made love to their wives and girlfriends until it was time to head back into the wilderness for the fall hunt. Arizona because of its remoteness never hosted a rendezvous.

Instead, the trappers went to Santa Fe or Taos that were every bit as eventful as any mountain rendezvous. Also, during the heyday of the fur trade what would one day be Arizona was still a part of the Mexican Republic.

Marshall Trimble is Arizona’s official historian and vice president of the Wild West History Association. His latest book is Arizona Outlaws and Lawmen; The History Press, 2015. If you have a question, write: Ask the Marshall, P.O. Box 8008, Cave Creek, AZ 85327 or email him at marshall.trimble@scottsdalecc.edu.

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The post The Rendezvous appeared first on True West Magazine by Marshall Trimble. Only the True West!

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