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Happy Friday! Today is a quick post, because it was a really quick project! I’m sharing a refashion that I’ve been wanting to do for OVER A YEAR. Yes, this piece was thrifted a year ago and sat in my refashioning closet because I was too scared to cut into it. I picked this dress up because I loved it – the print, the style – everything about this dress screamed “ME”, except I don’t really were dresses that often. As soon as I saw this on the rack, I said “romper”. It immediately clicked that this dress should become a romper and I bought it (I can’t even remember the price!). The reason why it sat in my closet for so long…I didn’t want to mess it up. I was so scared to cut into this dress because I envisioned it so perfectly as a romper that I was scared to cut it.

I usually get nervous to cut into a garment when it’s a special piece, like one from my Grandma, but this one put a huge hold on my scissors. Maybe because the dress already fit pretty well so I didn’t have as much fabric to work with, or because I know that shorts refashions don’t always turn out perfectly.

But a few weeks ago I finally got the courage to cut into it. Probably because I really want to take it on vacation to Florida soon! I loved the floral print in the border of the skirt and knew I wanted to keep that detail. There are quite a few tutorials online for turning dresses into rompers without cutting the waist at all, but since I wanted to keep the bottom band, I needed to cut the shorts from the bottom.

While I dreaded the initial cut, this was a very simple refashion – and I made a video on Instagram documenting the process! You can watch it here!

Here’s a short breakdown of what I did.

First, remove the elastic waist, which leaves the top and skirt separated. Seam rip one skirt side seam to open the skirt. Fold each newly ripped seam into the center of the skirt, creating a fold on both ends of the fabric. Using a pair of shorts folded in half, trace the pattern on the fold of the fabric, adding seam allowance. I chose to make my shorts a little longer, so my inseam measured to 5″. I also left extra material on top. On each leg, with right sides together sew the leg seam together. Now that there are two short legs, sew them together at the crotch seam. Then attach the shorts back to the top, and add elastic.

I made a belt with the extra fabric to complete the look!

The key to making the shorts fit properly was adding in extra allowance in the leg and crotch areas. I made my inseam about 6″ – and later altered it to 5″. I also added a lot of length to the crotch area to ensure that the fit wasn’t too tight. While I added a lot of extra material, this was what I needed to make a comfortable fit. When it comes to refashioning, I always say it’s better to give yourself more allowance and make something smaller- even if that means altering it a few times to get the fit just right.

(I did add a snap close to the wrap neckline just to keep it from flying open!)

My big takeaway from this project is to just go for it! It’s ok to be nervous, but I don’t want my nerves to prevent me from creating. While I’ve been refashioning for over 10 years, I definitely have my failed projects and it can really halt my creativity and my motivation. But I never want my nerves to stop me from refashioning. After all, it’s just a dress and if I mess up, I mess up.

There are so many dress to romper tutorials online – ones where you don’t even have to remove the waistband!

Cotton & Curls has a great tutorial showing you how to do this refashion! See it HERE.

Paper Michey also has a great tutorial that you can see HERE.

Have you made romper out of a dress before? This is my second one (first one here) and I really love how easy the process is. I’m definitely on the look out for more dresses that can become rompers. Maybe a solid color next!

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Happy Friday! I am so excited because it is Fashion Revolution Week! I really love this week because it’s a time for everyone to come out and ask the fashion industry about what they are doing. For those that don’t know what Fashion Revolution Week is, you can read about it on their website!

To be honest, I like to believe like every week is Fashion Revolution week, and one of my goals with refashioning projects is to educate others about reusing resources we already have, whether that be through clothing in our own closets or thrifting items. I’ve found my best solution to the messed up world of fashion is through my sewing. Over my 13 years of learning to sew, I’ve become much more aware of the textiles I’ve been bringing in, and the waste I accumulate. My sewing has become much more mindful, and I’m really honing in on my style, and the quality of my makes.

That being said, I have a new refashion to share today! I’ve had this dress in my refashioning pile for months, waiting for the right idea. Since the silhouette was almost identical to my denim dress refashion, I wanted to be sure to try something new with the style. I went onto Pinterest and started searching around for denim dresses, and one style that popped up was a shirt dress. I don’t have a casual shirt dress in my wardrobe and I thought it would be a fun, easy going style to carry me into summer.

The one thing I really wanted out of this shirt dress was a longer sleeve, but because of the limited amount of fabric, chances were that I wouldn’t be able to get the full sleeve – and I needed a pattern for it. That’s when I remembered I had a pattern in my library for a shirt dress- and I already made it once before! I was able to take a few of the pattern pieces from Mimi G for Simplicity 8084 for this refashion.

One of the reasons I bought this dress in the thrift store was because it had a lot of stains, and I knew most people wouldn’t want it. It sat around for so long because I was trying to figure out ways to work around the stains. But after washing it, quite a few of the front spots came out so it wasn’t that big of a concern anymore. There were a few large stains I could work around, but two smaller ones that I couldn’t do anything about.

The first stain was right next to the side seam- a nice bleach stain that was easily cover-able. The second stain was on the sleeve, and thankfully I had enough hem left over to make a new upper sleeve! There is still a small stain on the bodice that you can’t see unless you are right on top of it, and one more that’s on the button placket but it gets covered by a button.

The first step was to remove the skirt gathering. It was just a detail I didn’t want, and it allowed me to use some of the extra fabric in other places. I really wanted to keep the side pockets so I had to remove fabric from the center of the front skirt pieces, since I also wanted to keep the front button placket in tact. I did the same with the back skirt, removing material from the center. Since I wanted to make this look intentional, rather than just having two seams down the front skirt, I added some stitching on both sides of the seam line for detail. This was just a little trick that can go a long way for refashioning.

I didn’t want to mess with the top bodice at all. I remember from my denim dress refashion that removing the pockets left deep holes in the fabric that have to be covered, so while I think this dress would be cuter with smaller pockets, they will be staying in place!

I absolutely love how the sleeves turned out! At first I thought I would get rid of the hem, but decided to play around with it instead! With the seamlines in the skirt, having more exposed seams just made more sense, and added cute detail. I cut sleeve bottoms from the dress hem and attached them to the original sleeve bottoms. I made some tabs from leftover scraps and added buttons from my stash to complete the sleeves.

The final step to making this look into more of a shirt dress was adding in the curved hemline. Again, I used my pattern pieces to get the curve. You really don’t need a pattern for this step, but it was easier since I already had it on hand!

Overall, this refashion required way more steps than I thought it would take because as much as I love the “oversized” look, it does not work on my body. I love the boxy style, and have made several pieces in the past with this style in mind only to remember that I don’t look good in it. I originally left the back bodice in tact – figuring the original size would give that over-sized look, but after trying it on several times, I had to face the fact that I looked like I was drowning. I wound up taking an extra two inches out of the entire back, then adding a back tie to pull in ever so slightly.

I LOVE how this piece turned out. There were so many times throughout this refashion when I didn’t like it. It wasn’t looking right, wasn’t feeling right, but as soon as the sleeves were put in, the whole piece was brought together. It is going to be the perfect spring/summer casual dress to throw on to go out to the grocery store, or run errands, and go out with friends. This is the type of wardrobe piece I’ve been needing to add. Every summer I want cute casual dresses but I never wind up making them. So hopefully this will be the kick I need to keep going with sewing this kind of wardrobe staple!

I do have the video footage, and will be working on a youtube video showing the entire process. Coming soon! If you want to be notified, be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel!

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Have you been following along with Fashion Revolution this week? I’ve talked a lot in past years about Fashion Revolution and things we can do to during the week and beyond, but today I’m talking about how my general sewing has changed.

When I first started sewing, I would go to JoAnn Fabrics often, and after college, I bought from Fabric.com about twice a month. I spent a lot of money on fabric, fabric that I didn’t think about buying, I just wanted to make and make and make. I was on this path for a few years, buying new fabric whenever I wanted, trying to finish a project a week to have something new to write a blog post about, but it wasn’t a sustainable path.

Since I now don’t have a consistent income, I don’t have as much money to spend on fabric like I used to. But it has also made me incredibly aware of the quality of fabrics I’ve been purchasing. Now I only want fabrics I truly love and want in my wardrobe – not just because it’s on sale. What I love even more is getting to work with companies I really believe in, and want to work with.

I am so proud to work with Measure Fabric. Their quality and collection is beautiful and getting to work with these gorgeous fabrics is so special. I saw this striped fabric on their website, and was intrigued. I’ve been falling in love with stripes, but have no stripes in my wardrobe! I thought this was a perfect stripe to get into the Spring Spirit, and try out a new silhouette. This dress was a total experiment for my body and my sewing, but I am so proud of the result!

This dress was inspired by one from Kate Spade. I used a pattern already in my collection (Simplicity 8086) with many, many changes. I really only used the bodice pieces in view A, and added a gathered skirt and an additional hem band.

I don’t have a lot of experience working with stripes, so this project was a little new to me. I had to re-do the zipper about three times to get the stripes right. The first time wasn’t bad, but what I really want out of my sewing projects now is a more professional look. I want to re-do steps to get things right even if it takes longer. My favorite pieces are ones that I took extra time to complete. (and as I say that I know I have to add a hook and eye to the top of the zipper!) I was so happy with how the stripe matching came out, and definitely took time to get them to match up!

Now, lets talk about this fabric for a minute. The colors in this stripe pattern are beautiful. A light pink and olive-y tan on a cream background. It is a beautiful mix to ease my way into more stripes. The fabric is a really cool cotton twill, that gives it a more casual feel. I can see this fabric going into a number of different projects (my mind is still on dresses) including apparel and home projects. After washing, it became much more comfortable, and relaxed. I was a little nervous that it would be too stiff for apparel, but I have no problem with it against my skin! The bodice is lined with regular cotton, and even though the skirt is unlined, it’s comfortable.

This silhouette is definitely different for me, since it is a much longer skirt than I normally wear! I’m still not positive where a “midi” length is supposed to be, and I think taking this up just about an inch will make it perfect. (sometimes you have to see the length through a lens to get the full picture). But overall, it feels like a classic design for a dress that will do well for me throughout summer.

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If you guys follow me over on Instagram (@trishstitched), you may have seen I did a huge closet clean out earlier this week. I had a bunch of handmade and store bought pieces that I was saving for no reason. They weren’t getting worn, but I just couldn’t part with them until now.

I really went over my wardrobe and looked at what I need and decided to do a little shopping to fill in the gaps. I need more basics, but don’t have time to make everything for the upcoming spring/summer, so I thought I would try a little second-hand shopping! I shopped with ThredUp and at my local Salvation Army. Of course, I didn’t find everything I need, but I found a few great pieces to add to my wardrobe!

You can watch my entire haul here:

Second Hand Thrift Haul- Try on Haul with ThredUp & Local Thrift Store! - YouTube

ThredUp is such a wonderful resource for shopping second hand online, and I will definitely be shopping there again! (This haul was my second order from them, I’ve also sent in a few closet clean out bags in the past) I truly believe the company is doing amazing things and if you want to do some second hand shopping of your own, you can get $10 off by using the code below! (I also get $10 if you use this code, but this post is not affiliated with ThredUp, I just really love this site!)

Shop ThredUp!

And we are rapidly coming up to Fashion Revolution Week! So if you are looking for a more sustainable way to shop- check your local stores, online sources like ThredUp, Ebay & Poshmark before hitting the mall!

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Happy Friday! I have a whole list of sewing projects to get to, and with Spring finally peaking out from the winter weather, I’m so motivated to tackle some new projects!

I picked this skirt up a few weeks ago, while filming my thrifting trip for my Simplicity takeover. I originally wasn’t going to buy it, but it looked like it would actually fit me ‘as is’ and that excited me. It was also this gorgeous golden color, and looked to be of really great quality.

I got the skirt home, tried it on, and had to suck it in for it to button! Thankfully it was a button close and I had plenty of room to move the buttons over for a more relaxing fit. The skirt looked very frumpy on me, as most maxi skirts do. Originally, I was considering making a knee length skirt and calling it a day, but about 5 minutes later, I had the idea to create a pinafore. Maybe it was because I kept seeing the #SewBibs challenge on instagram, but the thought of a pinafore just clicked! Since I wasn’t sure just how often I would wear a pinafore, I thought I would take this project a step further and make the bib removable.

Overall this project was a simple transformation, and I was able to use my Turia Dungaree pattern from Pauline Alice to help with the top.

I will have a video tutorial coming up, and will update the post once it’s completed! But for right now, I’ll break down some of the steps.

First, chop the bottom off. Mark where you would like a hem to go – and add in some seam allowance. The more you cut off, the longer your bib can be. Since my skirt fell on my high waist, that meant my bib could be shorter, and I chopped about 9″ off the bottom.

My favorite trick with this refashion was using the original skirt hem in two different places! I used it as the finished top of my bib and I was able to use the rest in the straps. The original hem was pretty wide, so by adding some extra seam allowance, I was able to keep the original fold.

To make the top removable, I added buttonholes to the bottom of the bib and the ends of the straps. Buttons were sewn onto the skirt itself, so the pieces could easily be attached and removed.

During the making of this refashion, I was getting really annoyed. About halfway through, I looked at the piece and it reminded me of an apron. I stepped away for a bit, but even after returning, I couldn’t get the apron vibes out of my head. Before quitting for the night, I took out a pack of dungaree metal strap pieces and pinned them to the straps. Adding in the overall straps and separating the straps from the top made a huge difference and I no longer saw an apron!

That wasn’t part of the original plan, but it was definitely a detail I was happy to add.

After the top was finished, I completed the project by hemming the skirt! I was so happy with how this refashion turned out, and it was made so much easier by using a pattern I already had! There are so many dungaree and pinafore patterns in the sewing world, here’s so inspo to make your own!

Tilly & the Buttons Cleo

and Tilly & the Buttons Mila 

Closet Case Patterns Jenny Overalls

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Hello, hello! I feel like I haven’t blogged in so long! I have an exciting project to share that I finished a few weeks ago. I feel like I have so much to share that I’ve been sharing over on Instagram but not here.

The first thing: I’m a Measure Maker! For the next few months, I will be sharing a project made with fabric from Measure: A Fabric Parlor. My first project with them is something on my Make Nine! I chose to work with this amazing White and Grey Abstract Double Knit Ponte. It has this beautiful feel, the white part is slightly risen and super soft. It’s very stretchy, but thick, as ponte typically is. What I really love, besides the unique print of this fabric, is that the wrong side is the perfect contrast and it helped me in making the details on my new lounge wear.

I’ve been seeing these lounge wear sets just about everywhere I look lately. First I thought they were a trend with teens, but when Anthropologie came out with their sets, I knew I had to try it out. It felt like this project magically came together. I got the perfect fabric from Measure, and I had a lounge wear pattern on my Make Nine: the Hudson Pants. For this look, I made my first pair of Hudson Pants, and a hacked version of Seamwork Skipper.

I can’t believe it took me this long to make Hudson. When they first came out, I was seeing them everywhere, and I thought they were cute, but not my style. After seeing the different variations over the years, they really grew on me and I needed to try them out.

I made all the pant details out of the “wrong side” of the fabric, the pant cuffs, the waistband and pocket edges. I really love how the look of it came out. These pants are so comfortable and they are perfect for an after workout look, or just a great pair to lounge around in.

The matching top is made from a very cropped Seamwork Skipper! I was actually hoping to make the hood, which is why I chose Skipper, but wound up not having enough fabric for it. I wanted to follow through and use the wrong side of the fabric for the details on the sweatshirt as well, so the cuffs, bottom band and neck band are all made from the wrong side.

I loooove the set together. It is so comfortable and fun. I can wear the pieces separately or together, but I probably wouldn’t wear the sweatshirt without the pants unless I get some high waisted pants (which is another item on my make list!)

Details on my makes:

Hudson Pants: Size 0, View A, no changes

Seamwork Skipper: Size XS, Cropped.

Fabric: Abstract Grain Double Knit Ponte from Measure. 

I will definitely be making another pair of Hudson’s, I already have the fabric. I want to make another Skipper, hopefully one with a hood!

Second piece of news, that I totally forgot to post about last week: I did a Simplicity Instagram Takeover! Simplicity reached out to me a few months back about working together, and I took over their Instagram for the week talking about Refashioning!

I do have all the videos saved and I’m hoping to put them together so anyone can watch it whenever. I talked about my tips for refashioning. Where I get inspiration from, how I find pieces in thrift stores to refashion, etc. I also shared a new refashion! I’ll be doing a whole blog post about this hopefully soon, but here’s the final look!

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I am so excited to be writing this post right now! You guys know I love my activewear, so I’m so happy to share another workout outfit with you! A super special thank you to Pine Crest Fabric for the most beautiful fabrics!

When Pine Crest Fabric first reached out to me and I did my research on the company, I saw a section on their site about recycled fabrics (you may remember me mentioning this in my floral workout wear post: here). Well, a few months ago, Molly from Pine Crest reached back out to me about the recycled fabrics and I am so excited to review them for you! You guys. I’m freaking out. In the best way possible!

Activewear is a huge passion of mine, and since I love running (and now cycling), I love workout wear. But my eco-friendly mindset has struggled with creating activewear. Good workout gear is not eco friendly, and to be honest, I can’t workout in cotton – or other natural fibers because I sweat A LOT. (Sorry, a little too much info, but it’s the truth). So I need strong clothes that can take a beating through wash and wear.

While I’ve tried buying second hand workout wear, I still don’t get the same satisfaction as making my clothing. So when Pine Crest came out with their Repreve Collection, I was so happy. Repreve fabrics are made with recycled water bottles!

And, in terms of creating the fabric, Pine Crest says this about Repreve, “Compared to the virgin fiber creation process, these eco-friendly fabrics have fibers using new petroleum. This allows for lower greenhouse gas emissions and the ability to conserve water and energy in the process.” We are getting closer and closer to being able to enjoy better fabric options- sustain-ably!

While I certainly have tried to limit my plastic waste over the years, and have done a pretty good job with it, the reality is that not everyone controls their amount of plastic waste. There are so many plastic bottles in the world, just like waste in general. While the sustainable movement is definitely growing, plastic use also grows, and this is a great product to re-use the waste.

You guys know I love my colors and prints, but I have dreamed about a pair of sustainable black leggings for the longest time, and now was my chance! I got 2 yards of black Valor, 2 yards of Virtue in the most beautiful color, Cosmo, and a yard of their Olympus galaxy printed fabric (not recycled), to put together the perfect workout outfit. (Scroll down to get links!)

I decided on making all new patterns for this project, and turned to Greenstyle Creations Patterns. I’ve never sewn these patterns but have been seeing them all over the place and had to try them out.

I’m wearing the Power Sports Bra, Peg Leg Leggings, and the Tie Back Tank.

Power Sports Bra: oh my god. If you are looking for a good sports bra pattern- this is it. Not only are all the options great, but the construction is so much cleaner than other bras I’ve made. I decided on the strappy back, and LOVE how the straps were made. I also made this bra with removable cups, and a mesh lining. I was between sizes and sized down because I wanted a tighter fit. It’s perfect!

I’ve already talked about Olympus fabric from Pine Crest, and how much I love it, and again, it did not disappoint. This fabric is such a great weight for active wear – and for sports bras, it’s got a great stretch while being secure enough to do some serious activity.

The tie back tank was a quick and easy make. I did the binding option with the racer back. It was an easy make, and the fit is very nice. Again, another pattern with a number of options, which is always nice to have! I made a size XS. (Shown here without being tied in front, and below once tied)

The leggings were a free pattern from Patterns for Pirates – the Peg Leg Leggings. I also downloaded the free add-ons offered by the company and made the leggings high waisted, with a side pocket. I really love the fit of these, but wanted to add elastic to the top of the waistband to make these extra secure for running.

When it comes to black leggings, I always get nervous they will still be see through, but I have not had a single issue with these! I do have a little bit left that I’m hoping to make a pair of shorts from. I am so impressed by this fabric.

The leggings and bra are both great for running, and I love having the top to throw on after working out or for hopping on the bike! I did a short run so far with the leggings and bra and both were successful in terms of wear and feel. I didn’t hit maximum “sweat-age” just yet, but they did feel great during my run.

I still can’t believe I have a source for recycled active fabrics. And now you do too! Fabric.com is stocking these materials, so no need for a wholesale account through Pine Crest. Although, if you did want to start an active wear apparel brand – I totally recommend using Pine Crest for your fabric source!

Here’s more detail:

Virtue is a lighter weight fabric created in an array of colors that’s perfect for swimwear or active tops. Virtue is the material I used for my top, in Cosmo. Click the Fabric.com link below to get this fabric!

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Trish Stitched by Trishstitched - 3M ago

Do you ever get cravings? Usually the kind of cravings I get are food related and involve diet coke or french fries. But for the last few months I’ve had a craving to make an Ebony Tee by Closet Case Patterns. It’s a pretty peculiar craving for me, because usually I find a pattern I want to make and just make it. But I could not find the right fabric to make my Ebony. After multiple trips to JoAnn’s, and constantly looking in my own stash, I thought I would come across something that would fill my desire for a new Ebony. Thankfully, I finally came across a piece of fabric to fit the bill.

A few weeks ago, my mom and I went to TexWorld, which is a fabric show at the Javits Center in New York. I went to search for fabric for a new project, but it just so happened that my favorite fabric “store” had a booth with fabric for sale! I was able to pick up five different fabric cuts from Fab Scrap– one perfect for an ebony tee!

I’ve talked about Fab Scrap before, but for those who don’t know, Fab Scrap is a company that retrieves unwanted materials and fabric scraps from fashion companies who are looking for a more economical way to recycle them. They sell yardage and larger scraps to individuals like you and me, or to small companies who are looking to be more sustainable in their production! They have a warehouse in Brooklyn, where you can shop all their fabric, or volunteer to sort fabrics, and they do small pop-ups around the New York/New Jersey area. And… not saying it’s official but… they are looking into opening up an LA location! But in the meantime – you can shop online!

Anyway, back to Ebony. It’s the perfect pattern for me. I’ve actually made 4 versions now- two unblogged, and love this pattern more each time I make it. This is my third cropped Ebony. I usually add between 1.5″ – 2″ to the cropped version, to make it the perfect length.

The piece I got from Fab Scrap is similar in weight to a scuba knit, without the scuba texture. It has this beautiful floral burnout that was what really gave me all the “heart eyes” for this material.

Since the fabric was reclaimed, it wasn’t a clean cut, so I had to do a little tweaking to fit the pattern pieces just right. I had to take out a little bit of the body from both the front and back, and 1/4″ from the 3/4″ sleeves. Since I cut a size larger than I typically cut in patterns, taking a little of the angle out of the sides didn’t change the shape much.

Specs for this top:

I made View A, Cropped, with 3/4″ sleeves and an added 1.5″ in length. I made size 4. The sleeves are a little tight because I couldn’t cut them on grain properly, so the stretch is going the wrong way, but it doesn’t bother me.

(You can get the pattern here)

Here’s my total haul from Fab Scrap – and a close up of this mustard!

This top is the epitome of my style- and a great basic to add to my wardrobe (yes, I consider it a basic because it is a solid color!). I love wearing skinny jeans and a flowy, or larger, top. I feel put together, and comfortable at the same time, and I am so happy to have another Ebony to add to my collection.

Have you had any pattern cravings? What have you been dying to make?

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Happy Friday! The refashioning world has been on fire for some time and it is so awesome to see other people taking clothing and making it into something new! I am so happy to see other people watching their apparel intake and re-using things they already own, or buying second hand instead of new!

I have a few links from around the web to share:

1. A mall in Sweden is 100% committed to recycled and upcycled goods. A small mall featuring 14 specialty shops sell their goods, and teach others to upcycle! I would love for a mall like this in New Jersey, and would most definitely have a store! Read about it HERE.

2. Looking to get paid for your old t-shirts? Send them to this company! Marine Layer will pay you $5 for your old tee (up to $25) and re-spin it into a new tee! Order a kit or shop their collection HERE. I am super curious about this myself and have to go through Drew’s closet to get rid of some of his tees!

3. I’ve been a fan of ThredUp for years, and they recently released a clothing line geared towards sustainability! Their collection Remade was created with the garments second life in mind. It is a collection of basics that ThredUp guarantees to take back and pay out 40% of original cost when you are finished with the item. I absolutely love the idea, but do wish it was taken a step further and that the items were created with sustainable fabrics. There isn’t much info on the creation of the line, but the clothes are fairly inexpensive so production lines are still a little blurred. But I’m happy to say it is a step in the right direction! Shop Remade HERE.

Whew!

So much good recycling happening in the world! Now it’s time to share my own!

I love a huge refashioning challenge. I can’t do them too often because the ideas just don’t come all the time, but when I get hit in the head with a crazy idea, I have to try it out. I really wanted to sew something floral. It’s been awhile since my wardrobe has seen a new floral piece and I miss my colorful apparel. I had this blazer hanging in my refashioning closet for months – probably purchased last summer – and was trying to figure out what to turn it into.

Then pinterest did it’s magical work and I saw a motorcycle jacket online and thought “how cool would it be to turn a blazer into a moto jacket. I wonder if that’s possible”…. and down the rabbit hole I went to see if it has been done before and gather inspiration photos!

Over-sized blazers have been in and out of fashion for years. This particular one had a lot of length, and that was the first thing to go. Since it was longer, I was able to cut the pockets right off and not have to worry about them.

I thought the hardest part of this refashion was going to be the zipper. But it actually turned out to be pretty easy. I was able to open the lapel seam directly on one side to insert the zipper. The second side was also easy to put in. My blazer had an interior facing that I was able to trace, then used that line to put in the zipper.

The next step was adding in the zippered welt pockets. I have a moto jacket with zippered pockets, so I took similar measurements for my jacket.  After inserting the pockets I created a lining for the sides. The back of the blazer already had a lining so I just had to add the sides.

The hardest part of this refashion was the sleeves. And I’m still not 100% thrilled with them, but until I decide what to do, they work well!

I originally wanted to take the same fabric I took for the lining to make the sleeves but after shaping, the fabric was too rough for a comfortable sleeve. I’m not sure if I want to get a new sleeve fabric, or leave the sleeves as is. I am also curious about adding sleeve zippers, but instead of throwing this to the side waiting until I decided, I wanted to have a finished product. So I re-sized the sleeves and put them back in!

I took some video of the process, but I’m not really sure how it came out. There were a few steps I did, then un-did, so it’s going to take awhile to make a video – if I look enough to explain the process! Now that I know how to do it, I really want to find another blazer to do this with. Fingers crossed I can find the perfect one to replicate!

Inspiration:

There were several cool blazer refashions after The Refashioners suit competition last year including this one from Heather over at Closet Case Patterns :

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Happy Friday! Here is New Jersey, we are prepping for a snow storm – which in Jersey could be a dusting or a full on blizzard. There’s really no telling what we are going to get, but I’m hunkered down with a bunch of sewing projects and wedding planning!

After lengthy refashions, I like to do something easy – and after the jumpsuit, I wanted something a little more wearable in my wardrobe. Enter my love of athleisure. I absolutely love being comfortable. I think everyone does, right?

When I’m working from home, my every day look in winter is jeans and a sweatshirt. I rotate three pairs of jeans, and about 5 different sweatshirts. Comfort, but still put together enough if someone knocks on my door. But sweatshirts can get a little boring, and I had this cardigan just sitting around so a new refashion it is!

I haven’t worked with knits in awhile, and Janome sent over their new AirThreader a few weeks ago that I wanted to test out! I personally own the Janome New Home 8002D serger that I’ve been using for a few years, and love it to pieces, but the part I dislike most about serging, threading! The Janome AirThreader is so easy to thread, I thought it was too good to be true. But after one quick video on youtube, I was threading in no time! I can’t believe how easy it is, and it will be a sad day when this machine goes back to Janome!

Onto the refashion!

For this refashion, all you need is an old cardigan! This one came from my dad’s closet, (which came from my Grandpa’s closet!) and at a size Large, it was more material than I needed, but this refashion would work best with something a little bigger than your size. The trick to this refashion is turning the back into the front! I have a youtube video showing the process, and to break it down, here are the steps!

#RefashionFriday Cardigan to Open Back Sweater by Trish Stitched - YouTube

1- Cut off button placket.

2- On the back of the cardigan (which will become the new front) cut a scoop neck, about 2″ down in the center front.

3- Cut off bottom ribbing, save for later. If you have front pockets, cut right above taking pockets off.

4- Using a serger (or zig zag stitch on your sewing machine) finish raw edges, and re-attach ribbing to new hemline.

5- On the new back of the cardigan, fold “neckline” 1/2″ and stitch, giving you a clean edge.

6- To finish bottom of sweater, overlap one edge over the other, about 3″, or however tight you wish to make your sweater.

7- Stitch the overlap, and stitch as far up as you want your back to overlap. I stitched until the natural curve of the neckline, but for more drape, stitch less, for more coverage, stitch more. You may need to pin and try on for this step, to get the fit even.

8- If needed, hem the sleeves. I wanted to keep the original wristband, so I measured how much of the sleeve I would need to take out to sew the wristband back on. I took out 3″.

9- Cut off wristband and extra sleeve length. Re-attach wristband, making sure to spread fabric evenly.

10- Optional: Using one of the cut off sleeve portions, create your back band. Fold fabric right sides together, lengthwise and stitch long edge creating a tube. Turn right side out and press.

11- Try your sweater on to determine where to pin back band. Stitch down and you are done!

I decided not to re-size the full sleeve because I like my athleisure larger and comfier, and didn’t see the need to make the arms skinnier.

It even looks cute with a sports bra!

Open back sweaters are a huge trend in athleisure right now, and there are so many cute versions!

{All images from Pinterest, links are either broken or spam sites, but look up ‘open back cardigan’ for even more inspo!}

I’ll be talking more about the Janome AirThreader in the coming months, but for my first into project, it was a breeze!

And here’s a quick tip for sewing with lighter weight knits- turn your presser foot tension down to keep the knits from getting wavy! The lighter the presser foot, the easier the fabric feeds through!

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