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This episode features a panel that I moderated in front of a standing-room-only crowd at the Milken Institute’s Global Conference 2019. It includes a great overview of psychedelic science, investing opportunities, anecdotal personal benefits, legal challenges, and much more. I think it’s one of the more comprehensive panels ever done on the subject. Here are the participants:

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Castbox, or on your favorite podcast platform.

#377: Psychedelics — Microdosing, Mind-Enhancing Methods, and More
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/7fd077cc-c8f5-4dfc-b87a-46933d9769bd.mp3Download

Want to hear another podcast discussing psychedelics? — Listen to my conversation with James Fadiman, who has been called “America’s wisest and most respected authority on psychedelics and their use.” Stream below or right-click here to download.

Ep 66: The Psychedelic Explorer's Guide - Risks, Micro-Dosing, Ibogaine, and More
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/ae1b609a-106c-486e-a62b-2f4b410b33da.mp3Download

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What was your favorite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

SELECTED LINKS FROM THE EPISODE
  • Connect with Matthew Johnson:

Johns Hopkins Psychedelic Research Unit | Twitter

  • Connect with Ayelet Waldman:

Website | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook

  • Connect with Robin Carhart-Harris:

Centre for Psychedelic Research, Imperial College London | Twitter | Facebook

  • Connect with Christian Angermayer:

Apeiron Investment Group | ATAI Life Sciences | Twitter

SHOW NOTES
  • An encouraging story about how well-funded research can change lives for the better. [03:25]
  • Matthew Johnson stresses how understanding the downsides and risks of psychedelics is key to their responsible use in research. (The slides by Matthew Johnson can be found by clicking here.) [06:02]
  • Matthew Johnson lays out the benefits, as we currently understand them, of psychedelics on mental health and addiction. [07:21]
  • How did Ayelet Waldman begin her experiences with microdosing, and in what ways did the practice affect her depression and productivity? [12:17]
  • Robin Carhart-Harris explains our current understanding of why these compounds do what they do — even beyond the duration of their physical presence — in what he describes as the entropic brain. [16:48]
  • Christian Angermayer tells us why his biotech company, ATAI Life Sciences, is currently one of the largest global investors in bringing psychedelics — including psilocybin — back into the legal realm. [21:37]
  • Treating PTSD with MDMA, how Ayelet and her husband use MDMA to process “the mundane PTSD of a long marriage,” and the risks involved. [28:16]
  • Matthew speaks to the potential toxicity of some of these compounds. [31:41]
  • Matthew takes us through current studies applying psychedelics to opiate and opioid addiction, and Ayelet weighs in on why traditional methods have not proven successful thus far, and why we need to reclassify some schedule one psychedelics to schedule four. [37:33]
  • Robin explains the context-shifting power psychedelics have over certain diagnostic categories, the problem with diagnostic categories as they traditionally stand, and current thinking around the default mode network. [40:45]
  • Why Christian believes psychedelics should be used in a strictly controlled environment by prescription rather than provided over the counter. [45:48]
  • Ayelet’s ideal paradigm for psychedelic decriminalization: the psychedelic spa. [47:04]
  • Christian points to The Netherlands as an example of a place where psychedelics are available recreationally, but not applied in a way that puts a dent in that country’s mental health crisis. [47:59]
  • How does Christian envision a sustainable business model for single-dose psychedelic therapies?..
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Greetings!

This is a quick public service announcement: I will be stopping the fan-supported podcast experiment and moving back to an ad-supported podcast. This post will explain a few of the reasons.

Let’s kick off with some housekeeping notes:

  • Huge thanks to everyone who became supporters. I’ll have more to share with y’all via email soon.
  • As part of that thank you, I will be refunding every supporter 100% of what they’ve paid to date. Doing this for thousands of people will take 1-2 weeks, so thank you for being patient.
  • All support subscriptions have been stopped, so you will not be charged again.
  • Just for kicks, I will do another live video Q&A just for supporters on August 2nd, 2019, most likely 8-9pm ET (5-6pm PT), so you can pencil that in. More details will be sent via email once finalized.
  • If you think your company/product/service could be a good fit for the podcast, I’m interested in a few new sponsors to keep things fresh. Most sponsor spots for Q3 and Q4 are already full, but if interested, please click here for more information.

Now, back to this stopping of the experiment…

You might be thinking “Well, that was fast!”, and you’d be right.

The feedback and data have been overwhelmingly clear. Given the size of the audience — the podcast passed 400 million downloads a month ago — experiments can sometimes yield conclusions much more quickly than expected.

So, what did I learn?

The entire experience has been very surprising. For one, many of my assumptions were totally off.

It turns out that most of my listeners have a strong preference for an ad-supported model compared to other options. Many folks have come to use the podcast and 5-Bullet Friday for discovering new products and services, and that has been reflected in the comments since launch. After weeks of consistent feedback from my audience, it’s now loud and clear that my vetting and sharing of sponsors is better received and a better fit.

Below is just one of many blog comments left after the initial switch to no ads/fan-supported:

“Tim, just feedback about the no-sponsor thing– I don’t mind hearing your sponsored adverts because I believe you’ve considered them carefully and only tell us about great products. That’s why I have a closet full of Mizzen & Main shirts and drink Four Sigmatic. Not sure I would have known about those without you. I would rather hear your ads for you to get paid than to offer up my own money; those companies have more money than I do. Just my $.02. Thanks!”

Here are a few more, out of hundreds:

Screenshot 1: https://i.imgur.com/ImJlcFr.jpg

Screenshot 2: https://i.imgur.com/vYH9Ute.jpg 

Live tweet example.

The really comical part is that I should have known, and I could have known. Actually, one could argue that I did know.

Pre-launch polling on social media almost perfectly predicted the outcome. Here’s the tweet I used to test the waters, which had nearly 18,000 respondents. The results were:

72% – No, I wouldn’t donate.

24% – I would give $5 per month.

4% – I would give $10 or more per month.

The comments on this post are really worth reading. The feedback was almost entirely positive towards ads and almost entirely “meh” about fan-supported.

In other words, the answer to my question was clear from the outset: 99% of my listeners are totally OK with ads, and many of them look forward to finding new products and services through my sponsor reads. It’s industry standard for high-download podcasts to have ads, anyone who wants to skip over ads can skip ahead, and people generally do not want to support multiple podcasters by paying for them à la carte.

I may very well write an in-depth blog post about the data and findings another time, but here are a few teasers:

  • Did anyone actually decide to contribute at the $1,000-per-month level I added perhaps 10 days into testing? Short answer: yes. That ended up comprising roughly 13.4% of total monthly recurring revenue (MRR).
  • What percentage of converted visitors to the sign-up page chose the lowest-priced option, no matter the dollar amount ($9.95, $19.95, etc.)? Across all of our split tests, approximately 83%. Keep in mind that this is 83% of total supporters, not 83% of total revenue.
  • The customer service was incredibly low labor. This was shocking. Even with thousands of paying supporters, there were very few inquiries and very few issues (great people, I tell you!). The self-serve portal worked. That’s the good news. The bad news is that, without adding bonuses and incentives for various tiers — something that would create 10x more labor than the ad-supported model, defeating the purpose — the upside wasn’t enough for most listeners to subscribe/support.

So, we are going back to what worked.

The short conclusion to this experiment seems to be “Don’t fix it if it ain’t broken.” My sincerest thanks to everyone who provided support, advice, and feedback. It’s been a great learning experience, and I’m lucky that I can do these types of tests at all.

Onward and upward!

All the best to you and yours,

Tim

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“From my perspective, the goal is unobstructed self-expression.”
— Josh Waitzkin

Josh Waitzkin, author of The Art of Learning, is an eight-time US National Chess Champion, a two-time World Champion in Tai Chi Chuan Push Hands, and the first Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Black Belt under nine-time World Champion Marcelo Garcia.

For the past 12 years, Josh has been channeling his passion for the outer limits of the learning process toward training elite mental performers in business and finance, and to revolutionizing the education system through his nonprofit foundation, The Art of Learning Project. Josh is currently in the process of taking on his fourth and fifth disciplines, paddle surfing and foiling, and is an all-in father and husband.

The audio and video were recorded at The Sohn Investment Conference in the David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

The Sohn Conference Foundation is dedicated to supporting innovative initiatives to cure and treat pediatric cancer. The Sohn Conference Foundation raises its funds through a unique strategy: Wall Street’s most successful investors offer their expertise on stage and inspire large audiences to give to the foundation’s cause. You can learn more about it at sohnconference.org.

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Castbox, or on your favorite podcast platform.

Watch the interview on YouTube.

#375: Josh Waitzkin — How to Cram 2 Months of Learning into 1 Day
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/c656791d-c44b-4b05-b6c5-d0ab0fe8afaa.mp3Download

Josh Waitzkin — How to Cram 2 Months of Learning into 1 Day | The Tim Ferriss Show - YouTube

Want to hear another conversation with Josh Waitzkin?In this episode (the second ever on The Tim Ferriss Show), we discuss The Art of Learning, what separates elite performers, and strategies for peak productivity. (Stream below or right-click here to download):

If you’d like to get exclusive access to me and a small tribe of like-minded people, you can contribute a few dollars a month (or more) to support the podcast. 

Here’s what you get:

1. Once per month, I’ll do an hour-long, live video Q&A… just for this much smaller group of supporters. You can ask me anything. Only supporters get to participate and ask questions. The first one will be on July 1st, 2019, and you’ll be notified via e-mail. If you can’t make it live, each session will be available to supporters right afterward as a recording. And if the audio is ever shared on the podcast, it will be delayed by at least a month.

2. Each time you hear a podcast episode (or see anything from me) that you consider impactful and want to share with friends, you can smile, knowing that you helped make it possible.

I’d really love a more direct relationship with my most dedicated listeners, readers, and fans. This is a great way to test it out. And since the podcast has become the engine that fuels everything else, if this experiment doesn’t work, we’ll just go back to sponsors. Easy.

Please only contribute what you feel great about contributing. This is zero pressure, and I’m not mailing out any beer koozies or other crap you don’t want. I’ll just do the private monthly Q&A for supporters, and I’ll share more good stuff. Think of it as a monthly gym membership for your mind and career.

To contribute, please visit tim.blog/support.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What was your favorite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

SELECTED LINKS FROM THE EPISODE
  • Connect with Josh Waitzkin:

Website | The Art of Learning Project

SHOW NOTES
  • What song makes Josh ready to fight 10 dudes, and how did it become such a powerful trigger? [05:18]
  • Why — and how — does Josh lately feel like he’s cramming two months of learning into each day? It all started with a desire to surf in New York City. [06:45]
  • How foiling allows Josh to deliberately practice surfing in ways regular surfing can’t. [10:09]
  • Deliberate practice and the harnessing of unconscious learning: what did Olympic skier Billy Kidd consider the three most important turns of a ski run — and why? [12:15]
  • What types of biomarkers does Josh track in his coaching clients? [14:01]
  • What is a resonant frequency? [16:00]
  • What is trigger work, and how did has it helped Josh enter peak performance in the space of a breath? [16:43]
  • What tools does Josh use for tracking HRV? [18:04]
  • How might HRV training help someone attune their senses in a non-athletic capacity? [18:39]
  • Though he tailors his coaching for each individual, Josh has these suggestions for people who are looking to better structure their days looking toward higher performance. [21:05]
  • How do people identify their peak energy? Josh details one of his most important activities for ending the day and beginning the next. [24:29]
  • How might this exercise differ between individuals for more personalized results? [25:55]
  • One of the most important things a decision-maker can do. [26:58]
  • How can someone find their MIQ (most important question) if they’re struggling to identify one? How might an otherwise great thinker use this tool to move through something that gets them stuck? [28:45]
  • What Ernest Hemingway’s writing process and Marcelo Garcia’s pre-match naps can teach us about the timely art of letting go. [30:50]
  • Why being able to go from a relaxed zero to an intense 10 is better than existing at a constant, simmering six. [32:40]
  • As someone who’s moved his family away from the city noises of bustling Manhattan to a remote, coastal jungle in Latin America, how would Josh convince an always-on, FOMO-addled client of the benefits to similarly unplugging and learning to say no? [34:18]
  • Josh says your ability to determine what matters most is affected by your ability to identify your zone of genius. How does he recommend finding that zone? [38:00]
  • Final thoughts and thanks. [41:52]
PEOPLE MENTIONED
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“The question would be: ‘What mastery can you offer?’ So have a friend of yours ask that question of you five times, and you’ll be sort of surprised at, by the fifth time you get asked that question, and you’ve had to come up with four other answers before that, what kind of revelation you may have in this archaeological dig.”
— Chip Conley

At age 52, after selling the company he founded and ran as CEO for 24 years, rebel boutique hotelier Chip Conley (@chipconley) was looking for a new chapter in life. Then he received a call from the young founders of Airbnb, asking him to help grow their disruptive start-up into a global hospitality giant. He became their head of global hospitality and strategy.

Chip is a leading authority at the intersection of psychology and business. He is a New York Times bestselling author, and his latest, Wisdom @ Work: The Making of a Modern Elder, inspired him to build the world’s first midlife wisdom school. Located in Baja California Sur, the Modern Elder Academy provides the place and the tools to start reframing a lifetime of experience for what comes next.

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Castbox, or on your favorite podcast platform.

Watch the interview on YouTube.

#374: Chip Conley — Building Empires, Tackling Cancer, and Surfing the Liminal
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/3663faf7-3d3a-4288-acb8-f2661ae51dec.mp3Download

Chip Conley — Building Empires, Tackling Cancer, and Surfing the Liminal | The Tim Ferriss Show - YouTube

Want to hear another interview with an incredible boutique hotelier? — Listen to my interview with hospitality mogul Liz Lambert, in which she talks about balancing the desire to be an artist with the desire to be a business tycoon. (Stream below or right-click here to download):

#320: The Art of Hospitality: An Interview With Entrepreneur and Hotelier Liz Lambert
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/85a66b23-4f0c-4531-9816-758b62d6b57c.mp3Download

If you’d like to get exclusive access to me and a small tribe of like-minded people, you can contribute a few dollars a month (or more) to support the podcast. 

Here’s what you get:

1. Once per month, I’ll do an hour-long, live video Q&A… just for this much smaller group of supporters. You can ask me anything. Only supporters get to participate and ask questions. The first one will be on July 1st, 2019, and you’ll be notified via e-mail. If you can’t make it live, each session will be available to supporters right afterward as a recording. And if the audio is ever shared on the podcast, it will be delayed by at least a month.

2. Each time you hear a podcast episode (or see anything from me) that you consider impactful and want to share with friends, you can smile, knowing that you helped make it possible.

I’d really love a more direct relationship with my most dedicated listeners, readers, and fans. This is a great way to test it out. And since the podcast has become the engine that fuels everything else, if this experiment doesn’t work, we’ll just go back to sponsors. Easy.

Please only contribute what you feel great about contributing. This is zero pressure, and I’m not mailing out any beer koozies or other crap you don’t want. I’ll just do the private monthly Q&A for supporters, and I’ll share more good stuff. Think of it as a monthly gym membership for your mind and career.

To contribute, please visit tim.blog/support.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What was your favorite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

SELECTED LINKS FROM THE EPISODE
  • Connect with Chip Conley:

Modern Elder Academy | Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

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Hello, my lovelies! This is an important announcement.

From June – Dec, 2019, I’m removing ads and sponsors from the podcast for a six-month test. The podcast will continue to be 100% free for everyone. There will be no paywall, and no one has to pay for anything.

If interested, you can contribute a few (or more) dollars a month to support me doing more crazy experiments and initiatives, or to simply say “thank you” if any of my books, nearly 400 free podcasts, or 1,000+ free blog posts have had a positive impact on you or your loved ones.

Visit tim.blog/support to find out more and support.

Since the podcast has become the engine that fuels everything else, if this experiment doesn’t work out after six months, we’ll go back to sponsors. If it works, we’ll stay with fan-supported. Easy peasy.

So, why am I doing this? Two main reasons:

#1 – Sponsors and ads chew up a TON of time that I’d rather spend finding and doing cool things I can share with you. To be clear, I don’t think all advertising is evil. I turn away 90-plus percent of inquiries, personally test everything remaining, and then share the best. I feel good about that, BUT it consumes a lot of my time and energy. I would rather focus on finding, doing, and making cool things that I can share with you. That’s what I love, it’s what I’m good at, and it’s why many of you ended up reading my books or listening to the podcast in the first place.

#2 – Over the years, thousands of readers and fans have asked me, “How can I thank you?” Aside from the books, I’ve never sold any products, courses, or otherwise, nor do I plan to. Fan-supported subscriptions allow people to say “Thank you, and please do more.” If you want to help fuel more experiments, science, and exciting discoveries, you can easily sign up below and contribute to the cause. Think of it as a monthly gym membership for your mind and career. How much would you gladly pay for that?

Then, each time you hear a podcast episode (or see anything from me) that you consider life-changing and want to share with friends, you can smile, knowing that you helped to make it possible.

Please only contribute what you feel great about contributing. This is zero pressure, and I’m not mailing out any beer koozies or other crap you don’t want. I’ll just do and share more good stuff.

Visit tim.blog/support to check it out.

Sending much love to you and yours,

Tim

If you prefer, you can listen to this announcement in an audio format on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Castbox, or on your favorite podcast platform.

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“There is no elevator to success; you have to take the stairs.”
— Julie Rice

Julie Rice (@julierice_) is an entrepreneur best known for co-founding the fitness phenomenon SoulCycle. Julie served as Co-CEO at SoulCycle from 2006 to 2015 before joining WeWork in November 2017.

Julie’s life’s work has been about building community, and these days she brings that focus to her new role at WeWork. At WeWork, Julie is approaching everything through the lens of community—she is focusing on WeWork’s brand and the experience WeWork provides its members, and seeking new and innovative ways to grow and share the WeWork experience around the globe.

Julie lives in NYC with her husband Spencer and their two daughters, Phoebe and Parker. She is a board member of The Public Theater and Weight Watchers, as well as an advisor to the women’s club The Wing.

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Castbox, or on your favorite podcast platform.

#372: Julie Rice — Co-Founding SoulCycle, Taming Anxiety, and Mastering Difficult Conversations
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/1e4cab11-c8ce-41bd-8b49-4ad6d76f07cc.mp3Download

Want to hear another episode with someone who knows how to build an enticing atmosphere into a business model? — Listen to my interview with hospitality mogul Liz Lambert, in which she talks about balancing the desire to be an artist with the desire to be a business tycoon. (Stream below or right-click here to download):

#320: The Art of Hospitality: An Interview With Entrepreneur and Hotelier Liz Lambert
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/85a66b23-4f0c-4531-9816-758b62d6b57c.mp3Download

Important announcement from Tim below:

Hello, my lovelies!

From June – Dec, 2019, I’m removing ads and sponsors from the podcast for a six-month test. The podcast will continue to be 100% free for everyone. There will be no paywall, and no one has to pay for anything.

If interested, you can contribute a few dollars a month to support me doing more crazy experiments and initiatives, or to simply say “thank you” if any of my books, nearly 400 free podcasts, or 1,000+ free blog posts have had a positive impact on you or your loved ones.

Visit tim.blog/support to find out more and support.

Since the podcast has become the engine that fuels everything else, if this experiment doesn’t work out after six months, we’ll go back to sponsors. If it works, we’ll stay with fan-supported. Easy peasy.

So, why am I doing this? Two main reasons:

#1 – Sponsors and ads chew up a TON of time that I’d rather spend finding and doing cool things I can share with you. To be clear, I don’t think all advertising is evil. I turn away 90-plus percent of inquiries, personally test everything remaining, and then share the best. I feel good about that, BUT it consumes a lot of my time and energy. I would rather focus on finding, doing, and making cool things that I can share with you. That’s what I love, it’s what I’m good at, and it’s why many of you ended up reading my books or listening to the podcast in the first place.

#2 – Over the years, thousands of readers and fans have asked me, “How can I thank you?” Aside from the books, I’ve never sold any products, courses, or otherwise, nor do I plan to. Fan-supported subscriptions allow people to say “Thank you, and please do more.” If you want to help fuel more experiments, science, and exciting discoveries, you can easily sign up below and contribute to the cause. Think of it as a monthly gym membership for your mind and career. How much would you gladly pay for that?

Then, each time you hear a podcast episode (or see anything from me) that you consider life-changing and want to share with friends, you can smile, knowing that you helped to make it possible.

Please only contribute what you feel great about contributing. This is zero pressure, and I’m not mailing out any beer koozies or other crap you don’t want. I’ll just do and share more good stuff.

The lower tiers of support are roughly equal to four Starbucks cappuccinos per month, or one decent bottle of wine per month. The higher tiers of support are roughly equal to a gym membership, or a single dinner for two per month.

Visit tim.blog/support to find out more and support.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What was your favorite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

SELECTED LINKS FROM THE EPISODE
  • Connect with Julie Rice:

 Instagram | LinkedIn

SHOW NOTES
  • Julie was a nerdishly well-behaved child…except for this one time. [06:35]
  • What was Julie’s life like the year before cofounding SoulCycle? [09:28]
  • What were Julie’s duties as a talent manager in her former life, and what were some of her better decisions in that role? [13:37]
  • One of Julie’s better skills in life: people picker. [15:03]
  • How many clients does a successful talent manager usually have under their wing? [17:22]
  • What did Julie see in Ellen Pompeo that made her pursue her as a client, and how does it tie in with what she looks for in people who work for her in different capacities today? [19:04]
  • How did SoulCycle formulate as a concept and become something real in just four months? [20:49]
  • The Sunday $200 ATM ritual and how money was handled in the early days of SoulCycle. [23:44]
  • How did the name “SoulCycle” come about, and were there any serious alternatives in the running? [29:01]
  • How did Julie and Elizabeth decide on the business model that made SoulCycle stand out from its big box gym contemporaries at the time? [29:42]
  • Early good decisions. [31:35]
  • How lack of space in the first SoulCycle room created an accidentally positive environment for human connection and moving meditation. [33:08]
  • What value did Julie and Elizabeth find in having a life coach help them at this stage in the business? [34:48]
  • While initially skeptical about seeing a coach, what sold Julie on the deal at the first meeting? [41:26]
  • What Julie has learned about fostering a company culture and a family life (thanks to some help from Hendrix and Hunt’s Getting the Love You Want) that make conflict resolution go smoothly and constructively. [44:31]
  • Why Julie considers Simon Sinek’s Start with Why so helpful for people trying to communicate in the workplace. [52:18]
  • How SoulCycle’s investment in the careers of its instructors engendered true loyalty and made the company stand out as an innovator in the fitness industry. [55:24]
  • Why did Julie and Elizabeth resist the urge to take outside investment money early on, and how did it shape the way business — particularly marketing — was done? [57:27]
  • How a little creativity gave a marketing experiment in Bridgehampton much better ROI than a $75,000 magazine ad ever could have — and turned SoulCycle from a scrappy startup into a bona fide sensation. [1:05:14]
  • Why finally accepting outside cash infusion from Equinox was seen as a good idea for the business at this time. [1:08:49]
  • Bad uses of time and money and rolling with the consequences. [1:10:45]
  • Think you don’t have time to meditate? Here’s how Julie does her daily meditation in 16 seconds. [1:16:15]
  • The number one thing that keeps Julie from buckling under stress and anxiety. [1:17:54]
  • A new weekly ritual that helps reframe Julie’s family life and bring everyone closer together. [1:21:50]
  • What SoulCycle’s eight-week training program strives to instill in its instructors, and what this brings to the overall SoulCycle experience. [1:26:27]
  • What does a curriculum designed around developing spiritual, emotional leaders look like? [1:29:30]
  • Books Julie recommends and gifts frequently. [1:31:39]
  • What is Julie currently most excited about — professionally, personally, or in-between? [1:32:43]
  • What would Julie’s billboard say? [1:35:20]
  • Closing thoughts. [1:36:50]
PEOPLE MENTIONED
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Photo by Norman Chan

“A true creator knows that you follow the thing to where it’s going, not to where you think it ought to go.”
— Adam Savage

Adam Savage (TW: @donttrythis IG: @therealadamsavage FB: therealadamsavage) has spent his life gathering skills that allow him to take what’s in his brain and make it real. He’s built everything from ancient Buddhas and futuristic weapons to fine-art sculptures and dancing vegetables.

The son of a filmmaker/painter and a psychotherapist, Adam’s previous positions include projectionist, animator, graphic designer, carpenter, interior and stage designer, toy designer, welder, and scenic painter. And he’s worked with every material and in every medium he could fathom—metal, paper, glass, plastic, rubber, foam, plaster, pneumatics, hydraulics, animatronics, neon, glassblowing, moldmaking, and injection molding, to name just a few.

In 1993, Adam began concentrating his career on the special-effects industry, honing his skills through more than 100 television commercials and a dozen feature films, including Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace and Episode II – Attack of the ClonesGalaxy Quest, and the Matrix sequels.

A decade later, Adam was chosen, along with Jamie Hyneman, to host MythBusters, which premiered on Discovery Channel in January 2003. 14 years; 1,015 myths; 2,950 experiments; eight Emmy nominations; and 83 miles of duct tape later, that version of the series ended in March 2016.

Today, Adam hosts and executive produces MythBusters Jr., as well as a brand-new series, Savage Builds, which premieres on Science Channel in June 2019. He also stars in and produces content for Tested.com, including behind-the-scenes dives into multiple blockbuster films (including Alien CovenantMortal Combat, and Blade Runner).

In addition, after a lifetime of hunting for the perfect bag, Adam launched Savage Industries and began manufacturing his own, along with MAFIA BAGS. Made in the United States and constructed primarily from recycled sailcloth, every bag is not only durable and lightweight but unique, as well. The current line (available at AdamSavage.com) includes two sizes of the EDC (“Everyday Carry”) and pouches, with more product both available on the site and on the way.

Finally, in 2019 Adam wrote his first book, Every Tool’s a Hammer, which is, in Adam’s words, “…a chronicle of my life as a maker. It’s an exploration of making and of my own productive obsessions, but it’s also a permission slip of sorts from me to you. Permission to grab hold of the things you’re interested in, that fascinate you, and to dive deeper into them to see where they lead you.”

More information about the book is available at AdamSavageBook.com.

Watch the interview on YouTube.

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Castbox, or on your favorite podcast platform.

#370: Adam Savage on Great Tools, Great Projects, and Great Lessons
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Adam Savage on Great Tools, Great Projects, and Great Lessons | The Tim Ferriss Show - YouTube

Want to hear another episode with someone who’s not afraid to let their geek flag fly? — Listen to my conversation with Aisha Tyler in which we discuss optimism, free-range parenting, aggressive failure, heckler stories, and much more. (Stream below or right-click here to download.):

#327: Aisha Tyler — How to Use Pain, Comedy, and Practice for Creativity
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This episode of the Tim Ferriss Show is brought to you by Theo Chocolate, which is the first organic and fair-trade chocolate company in North America. The folks there reached out to me because they spotted some neatly stacked bars of their dark chocolate coconut in a recent Instagram photo of my fridge (see it here).

This is a brand that does everything from scratch, and the difference shows. It’s why Theo is one of my favorite chocolates. It offers tons of different bars, little snacks like coconut bites, and also imaginative creations like a cinnamon horchata bar, beer and scotch chocolates, and its signature s’mores bite — The Big Daddy. My personal favorite: Salted Almond Butter Cups, which are ridiculous.

Theo is helping drive its industry forward by working with communities in the Congo and Peru to make the economics of the cocoa trade fair for farmers, and by using sustainable farming practices. Whether you want to feel better about where you buy your goodies or you just want a really unique and delicious gift for yourself or someone else, they’re available in Whole Foods and other grocery stores across the U.S. For listeners of this podcast, Theo is offering 15% off your online purchase at TheoChocolate.com. Use code Tim15, or visit TheoChocolate.com/Tim for more details.

This podcast is also brought to you by Athletic Greens. I get asked all the time, “If you could only use one supplement, what would it be?” My answer is, inevitably, Athletic Greens. It is my all-in-one nutritional insurance. I recommended it in The 4-Hour Body and did not get paid to do so.

As a listener of The Tim Ferriss Show, you’ll get a free 20-count travel pack (valued at $79) with your first order at AthleticGreens.com/tim.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What was your favorite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

SELECTED LINKS FROM THE EPISODE
  • Connect with Adam Savage:

Website | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook

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“I’m just so fundamentally optimistic, and I barrel forth in life with this attitude that everything is going to be absolutely fine and go my way.”
— Amanda Palmer

Amanda Palmer (@amandapalmer) is a singer, songwriter, playwright, pianist, author, director, blogger, and ukulele enthusiast who simultaneously embraces and explodes traditional frameworks of music, theatre, and art. She first came to prominence as one half of the Boston-based punk cabaret duo The Dresden Dolls, earning global applause for their inventive songcraft and wide-ranging theatricality.

Her solo career has proven equally brave and boundless, featuring such groundbreaking works as the fan-funded Theatre Is Evil, which made a top 10 debut on the SoundScan/Billboard 200 upon its release in 2012 and remains the top-funded original music project on Kickstarter. In 2013 she presented The Art of Asking at the annual TED conference, which has since been viewed over 20 million times worldwide. The following year saw Palmer expand her philosophy into the New York Times best-selling memoir and manual, The Art of Asking: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Let People Help.

Since 2015 Palmer has used the patronage subscription crowdfunding platform Patreon to fund the creation of her artwork. This has enabled her to collaborate with artists all over the world with over 14,000 patrons supporting her creations each month. Palmer released her new solo piano album and accompanying book of photographs and essays, There Will Be No Intermission, on March 8, 2019, followed by a global tour. Recorded in late 2018 with grammy-winning Theatre Is Evil producer/engineer John Congleton at the helm, the album is a masterwork that includes life, death, abortion, and miscarriage among its tentpole themes.

Watch the interview on YouTube.

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Castbox, or on your favorite podcast platform.

The Tim Ferriss Show | Amanda Palmer on Creativity, Pain, and Art - YouTube

Want to hear an episode with Amanda’s husband? — Listen to my conversation with author and world treasure Neil Gaiman, in which we discuss the writing process, first drafts, artistic collaboration, daily routines, and the merits of fountain pens. Stream below or right-click here to download.

#366: Neil Gaiman — The Interview I've Waited 20 Years To Do
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/c23f9079-1e14-4b4c-93cc-5dbe8684d06f.mp3Download

This podcast is brought to you by Peloton, which has become a staple of my daily routine. I picked up this bike after seeing the success of my friend Kevin Rose, and I’ve been enjoying it more than I ever imagined. Peloton is an indoor cycling bike that brings live studio classes right to your home. No worrying about fitting classes into your busy schedule or making it to a studio with a crazy commute.

New classes are added every day, and this includes options led by elite NYC instructors in your own living room. You can even live stream studio classes taught by the world’s best instructors, or find your favorite class on demand.

Peloton is offering listeners to this show a special offer. Visit onepeloton.com and enter the code TIM at checkout to receive $100 off accessories with your Peloton bike purchase. This is a great way to get in your workouts, or an incredible gift. Again, that’s onepeloton.com and enter the code TIM.

This episode is also brought to you by LinkedIn Marketing Solutions, the go-to tool for B2B marketers and advertisers who want to drive brand awareness, generate leads, or build long-term relationships that result in real business impact.

With a community of more than 575 million professionals, LinkedIn is gigantic, but it can be hyper-specific. LinkedIn has the marketing tools to help you target your customers with precision, right down to job title, company name, industry, etc. Why spray and pray with your marketing dollars when you can be surgical? To redeem your free $100 LinkedIn ad credit and launch your first campaign, go to LinkedIn.com/TFS!

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What was your favorite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

SELECTED LINKS FROM THE EPISODE
  • Connect with Amanda Palmer:

Website | Patreon | Twitter | Instagram

SHOW NOTES
  • Books are heavy. Amanda shares one of her favorites that she lifts and gifts most often, and explains how it got her through that one time she was arrested outside an Adelaide Woolworths. [08:02]
  • Amanda’s current book obsession and musings about humanity’s uneven relationship with knowledge, understanding, compassion, and sleep. [15:41]
  • Reflecting on profound interviews and the nature of Amanda’s most recent project — what she considers to be her most personal to date. [21:10]
  • The metric Amanda is using to gauge the success of this record. [23:10]
  • How baring one’s pain and vulnerability can be a generous act. [23:47]
  • “Ladies and gentlemen, please take your seats. This performance will last seven years.” [28:01]
  • How Amanda met her mentor Anthony, the difference he made in her life, and how she coped with the pain of losing him to a rare form of leukemia, sitting at his deathbed, and the mourning process. [30:33]
  • Amanda takes us through her heartbreaking — and empowering — Christmas miscarriage. [41:46]
  • Why people — women, especially — should be encouraged to talk more openly about trauma, loss, and grief. [52:48]
  • “What are you unwilling to feel?” Amanda talks about an early fear she’s mostly overcome and what she considers to be her current Achilles’ heel. [55:50]
  • The first time Amanda remembers feeling not okay — which likely contributed to her deep-seated fear of feeling unbelieved. [1:01:37]
  • Amanda addresses the “tyrannical and destructive” myth of everlasting pain being a necessary component of the creative process. [1:06:03]
  • On understanding and harnessing one’s pain to make it useful to others, the difference between the pain of childbirth and the pain of imminent danger, and pain as a metaphor for our society. [1:12:46]
  • What we risk when pain becomes our primary motivator. [1:18:22]
  • What we risk as a society when we marginalize the pain of others or monopolize it as a proving ground, and why recognizing that we’re all suffering from some kind of pain — whether it’s physiological or psychological — should be a shame-free part of the cultural conversation. [1:20:33]
  • What is the knock-on effect? [1:29:30]
  • How has moving to a fan-supported model changed Amanda and her art? [1:31:09]
  • What was the boiling point that proved crowdfunding to be an ideal business model for the way Amanda creates? [1:36:04]
  • An example of how crowdfunding helped an artist get his book out to the world when the traditional publishing model failed — and its community offered unconditional support when the worst imaginable thing happened to the creator. [1:37:32]
  • What Amanda especially likes about her community at Patreon. [1:39:53]
  • Crowdfunding platforms may change and evolve, but the current iterations prove that people can come together to ensure their favorite artists don’t have to starve for their art (or deal with a marketing department’s tampering to make said art more appealing to the masses). [1:41:12]
  • Parting thoughts and how you can seek out and support Amanda’s efforts and offerings in the Palmerverse. [1:44:10]
PEOPLE MENTIONED
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“You can systematize innovation even if you can’t completely predict it.”
— Eric Schmidt

Eric Schmidt (@ericschmidt) is Technical Advisor and Board Member to Alphabet Inc., where he advises its leaders on technology, business and policy issues. Eric joined Google in 2001 and helped grow the company from a Silicon Valley startup to a global leader in technology. He served as Google’s Chief Executive Officer from 2001-2011, and Executive Chairman 2011-2018, alongside founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page.

Eric serves on the boards of The Mayo Clinic and The Broad Institute, among others. His philanthropic efforts through The Schmidt Family Foundation focus on climate change, including support of ocean and marine life studies at sea, as well as education, specifically cutting-edge research and technology in the natural sciences and engineering. He is the founder of Schmidt Futures, which works to improve societal outcomes through the development of emerging science and technology.

He is the co-author of The New Digital Age, How Google Works, and the new book, Trillion Dollar Coach: The Leadership Playbook of Silicon Valley’s Bill Campbell, which he co-authored with fellow Google leaders Jonathan Rosenberg (@jjrosenberg) and Alan Eagle (@aeaglejr).

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Castbox, or on your favorite podcast platform.

#367: Eric Schmidt — Lessons from a Trillion-Dollar Coach
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/d26d7aad-bb59-4032-93d5-2c0c57544da5.mp3Download

Want to hear an episode with Silicon Valley’s most feared and well-liked journalist? — Listen to my conversation with Kara Swisher, in which we discuss war stories, missed opportunities, optimistic pessimism, and the art and craft of good questions. (Stream below or right-click here to download.)

#218: The Most Feared and Well-Liked Journalist in Silicon Valley - Kara Swisher
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/c56aa13c-13b2-4a55-89d6-433240f3ee73.mp3Download

This episode is brought to you by Inktel. Ever since I wrote The 4-Hour Workweek, I’ve been frequently asked about how I choose to delegate tasks. At the root of many of my decisions is a simple question: “How can I invest money to improve my quality of life?” Or “how can I spend moderate money to save significant time?”

Inktel is one of those investments. They are a turnkey solution for all of your customer care needs. Their team answers more than 1 million customer service requests each year. They can also interact with your customers across all platforms, including email, phone, social media, text, and chat.

Inktel removes the logistics and headache of customer communication, allowing you to grow your business by focusing on your strengths. And as a listener of this podcast, you can get up to $10,000 off your start-up fees and costs waived by visiting inktel.com/tim.

This episode also is brought to you by LinkedIn and its job recruitment platform, which offers a smarter system for the hiring process. If you’ve ever hired anyone (or attempted to), you know finding the right people can be difficult. If you don’t have a direct referral from someone you trust, you’re left to use job boards that don’t offer any real-world networking approach.

LinkedIn, as the world’s largest professional network, which is used by more than 70 percent of the US workforce, has a built-in ecosystem that allows you to not only search for employees, but also interact with them, their connections, and their former employers and colleagues in a way that closely mimics real-life communication. Visit LinkedIn.com/Tim and receive a $50 credit toward your first job post!

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What was your favorite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

SELECTED LINKS FROM THE EPISODE
  • Connect with Eric Schmidt:

Website | Twitter | LinkedIn | Facebook

SHOW NOTES
  • Why did Eric begin his undergrad in architecture and shift to electrical engineering? [08:17]
  • Eric talks about working at Sun Microsystems in 1983 and contrasts the world of electronics then with today. [10:06]
  • How did Eric wind up at Sun and who does he consider his mentors from those days? [12:22]
  • Has Eric always been known as a clear communicator, or is it something he developed over time? [14:28]
  • What did Eric learn about the executive arts at this point in his career, and how did they differ from the way things are done today? [15:23]
  • When you’re teaching, learning, and doing business in uncharted territory, sometimes you’ve got to write the reference material. [18:19]
  • On the seemingly everywhere venture capitalist John Doerr and how small Silicon Valley is — and was, especially in its early days — despite how vast it might appear to outsiders. [20:26]
  • Eric’s 30-second history of Silicon Valley. [24:07]
  • Does Eric believe Silicon Valley is a unique, non-recurring phenomenon? What would it take to replicate its positive characteristics for entrepreneurship elsewhere? [26:35]
  • John Doerr’s role in introducing Eric to Google. [28:36]
  • Eric sets the scene of his interview with Larry Page and Sergey Brin. [29:57]
  • How time proved all sides right in an argument between Eric, Larry, and Sergey about proxy caches. [31:07]
  • During his Google interview/argument, what clued Eric in to the fact that he was dealing with atypical founders? [32:36]
  • How did Larry and Sergey assess Eric as a potential leader, and what qualities in Eric did John Doerr see as a complement to those of the Google founders? [33:23]
  • In what ways did Eric lend his “adult supervision” to manage the brilliant chaos of early Google and spur its growth? [35:13]
  • Eric explains Sergey’s 70-20-10 model and how it’s been applied at Google. [37:24]
  • What Eric believes a company should focus on to keep growing pains from becoming an equally scalable distraction. [39:29]
  • What Eric considers his most important job as a CEO. [41:08]
  • What did Google’s weekly meeting schedule look like initially, and how has it adapted over time? Is it what Eric would consider ideal? [42:37]
  • Who was Bill Campbell, and why did Eric, together with Jonathan Rosenberg and Alan Eagle, write Trillion Dollar Coach about him? [46:13]
  • Why does coaching matter in the business world, and what made Bill such an exceptionally gifted coach? [47:34]
  • What were Bill’s opinions about starting and running meetings? [49:27]
  • The key difference between a coach and a manager. [50:44]
  • The importance of regularly articulating motivating principles over falling back on feelgood cliches. [52:00]
  • How would Bill facilitate solutions when decision makers didn’t see eye-to-eye? [53:37]
  • When Google went public in 2004, Bill recommended that Eric step aside as chairman, but made sure he would be reinstated as chairman later. What was his thinking behind this, and how did he pitch it to Eric? [54:57]
  • Though..
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“The biggest problem we run into is going, ‘This is who I am, this is what I’m like, this is how I function’ while failing to notice that you don’t do that anymore.”
— Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman (@neilhimself) is the bestselling author and creator of books, graphic novels, short stories, film and television for all ages, including Neverwhere, Coraline, The Graveyard Book, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, The View from the Cheap Seats and the Sandman series of graphic novels. His fiction has received Newbery and Carnegie Medals, and Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, Bram Stoker, and Will Eisner Awards, among many other awards and honours.

His novelistic retelling of Norse myths, Norse Mythology, has been a phenomenon, and an international bestseller, and won Gaiman his ninth Audie Award (for Best Narration by the Author).

Recently Gaiman wrote all six episodes of, and has been the full-time showrunner, for the forthcoming BBC/Amazon Prime mini-series adaptation of Good Omens, based on the beloved 1990 book he co-wrote with Terry Pratchett.

Many of Gaiman’s books and comics have been adapted for film and television including Stardust (starring Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer), Coraline (an Academy Award nominee and the BAFTA winner for Best Animated Film), and How to Talk to Girls at Parties, a movie based on Gaiman’s short story. The television series Lucifer is based on characters created by Gaiman in Sandman. His 2001 novel, American Gods, is a critically acclaimed, Emmy-nominated TV series, now entering its second season.

In 2017, Neil Gaiman became a Goodwill Ambassador for UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency. Originally from England, he lives in the United States, where he is Professor in the Arts at Bard College.

Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Overcast, Castbox, or on your favorite podcast platform.

#366: Neil Gaiman — The Interview I've Waited 20 Years To Do
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/c23f9079-1e14-4b4c-93cc-5dbe8684d06f.mp3Download

The Tim Ferriss Show | Neil Gaiman — The Interview I've Waited 20 Years To Do - YouTube

Want to hear an episode with another world-building dreamer? — Listen to my conversation with filmmaker Darren Aronofsky in which we discuss nomadic writing, how to navigate tough conversations over creativity and control, dealing with critics, and much more. Stream below or right-click here to download.

#263: Filmmaker Darren Aronofsky — Exploring Creativity, Ignoring Critics, and Making Art
https://rss.art19.com/episodes/d1969bd1-650c-448e-b4a2-273e3d81619b.mp3Download

This podcast is brought to you by Peloton, which has become a staple of my daily routine. I picked up this bike after seeing the success of my friend Kevin Rose, and I’ve been enjoying it more than I ever imagined. Peloton is an indoor cycling bike that brings live studio classes right to your home. No worrying about fitting classes into your busy schedule or making it to a studio with a crazy commute.

New classes are added every day, and this includes options led by elite NYC instructors in your own living room. You can even live stream studio classes taught by the world’s best instructors, or find your favorite class on demand.

Peloton is offering listeners to this show a special offer. Visit onepeloton.com and enter the code TIM at checkout to receive $100 off accessories with your Peloton bike purchase. This is a great way to get in your workouts, or an incredible gift. Again, that’s onepeloton.com and enter the code TIM.

This episode of the Tim Ferriss Show is also brought to you by Hello Monday, a new podcast from LinkedIn’s Editorial Team filled with the kind of advice that stays with you — the kind you can actually use.

Each week, host Jessi Hempel sits down with featured guests, such as Seth Meyers, host of Late Night with Seth Meyers, and Elizabeth Gilbert, bestselling author of Eat, Pray, Love, to uncover lessons you can apply to your career.

For example, Elizabeth Gilbert talks about relieving creative pressure to get more done: As Liz was approaching her follow-up to Eat, Pray, Love, she tried to write for six million people and felt overwhelmed. Instead, she focused on writing for her 10 closest friends. She didn’t know how to please millions of strangers, but did know how to reach those 10 friends.

Find Elizabeth Gilbert’s episode and other episodes from Hello Monday on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What was your favorite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

SELECTED LINKS FROM THE EPISODE
  • Connect with Neil Gaiman:

Website | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook

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