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I had the absolute pleasure of interviewing Joyce Williams also known as “Grandma Williams” on her journey to becoming a first-time blogger at 80!  Joyce is a fantastic example of how older adults are disrupting the long-held (stubborn) beliefs of what it means to grow older.  With a stellar sense-of-humor and an impactful pen (keyboard), … Read more An Interview with Joyce Williams, 2018 UK Blogger Finalist for ‘Grandma Williams’
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Guest Post Author: JJ Koll | https://courtyardatmttabor.com/

When it comes to elderly care, there is one thing which calls for greater attention. Yes, you guessed it right- the meal. Whatever they eat affects their health physically and mentally, together. Hence, if you are struggling with the challenge of preparing a senior a meal, here is some help.

Do you have an elderly loved one living at home? Or do you have the responsibility to cook meals for seniors at an assisted living home?

In both the cases, there is a big challenge to deal with as whatever you make needs to be best at taste and very nutritious. And then there will be many hurdles like sudden shifts in their eating patterns.

There are chances that the physician has expressed concern regarding their weight. So, you will be required to monitor diet and eating patterns too. In short, there is a lot to consider when you prepare something for elderly loved ones. To simplify your work a little, below are some important considerations.

Check for Loss of Appetite

In most cases, it happens that older adults do not eat as much compared to their younger age. So, there are chances that they would prefer having a full meal only once a day. Or the other case would be that they eat several small meals or snacks a day. There is nothing wrong with either way. Here it is worth understanding that for a senior, food is about quality, not quantity. So, please don’t force them to eat more than necessary.

You can begin by offering them something healthy with what they love to eat, preferably in small amounts. For instance, if you want them to have healthy food like steamed broccoli, give it to them with a small portion of their favorite meat.

Be Regular and Consistent

The golden rule to keep elderly people happy with their food routine is to keep up with consistency and routine. Hence, get into a habit of offering them their meals and snacks at the same time each day. Don’t delay or make it early. While this will help them develop a habit of eating, it will also set their hunger patterns. Plus, be mindful that their habits and preferences of younger years will not go away very soon. This means if they don’t like raw carrots when they were younger, they likely won’t eat them when they are older. Never take away the food preference completely.

Keep an Eye on Mechanical Issues

Is there anything which prevents them from eating properly? There can be some external factors that affect eating like dentures and difficulty in swallowing. Many elderly would like to have a normal appetite but won’t be able to eat normally because of those issues. It is your responsibility to serve foods that are easy to chew. Ensure that vegetables are always cooked well and are as soft as possible without losing flavor. And if the conditions tend to be severe, look for a meal replacement. You can switch to shakes, soups, and supplements available to help provide adequate nutrition.

Consider Health Issues Too

Just like mechanical issues, there can be some health problems which affect how an older adult eats. For example, if a person has diabetes, he/she will require small meals frequently. But here you have to be more careful as you have to limit fruit and juice intake. The best thing you can do is plan their meals to maintain consistency.

Remember, there are several health issues, and each case is different. It is a must that you make a list of food preferences as per the health constraints and serve what is right.

Now once you have the answers to these simple questions, you can plan and prepare a proper diet for the elderly. Lastly; always be patient, plan meals of time, and try to make mealtime an enjoyable experience.

Have any experiences to share? Or have some other ideas to care for seniors? Share your views, ideas or experiences in comments below.

A friendly disclaimer: The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website is for informational purposes only. The goal of this site is to promote broad and more positive consumer understanding and knowledge of various aspects of Dementia and Alzheimer’s. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Author the Author:

JJ Koll has a broad experience of over 20 years in the senior housing industry which comprises of census growth, team building, and leadership to achieve business goals & objectives. Currently, working as a senior housing executive at Courtyard at Mt. Tabor, Portland, OR to take care of all the senior living facilities in the community. Follow Courtyard at Mt. Tabor on Facebook and YouTube.

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I’m proud to be working with CVS Pharmacy to help spread the word about #BetterHealthMadeEasy, how to #FindYourHealthy and #DiscoverCVS. All opinions expressed are my own, and all product claims or program details shared should be verified at CVS.com or with the appropriate manufacturers.

Medication Management Made Easy

As a family caregiver, you know how difficult it can be to organize and administer all your loved one’s medication.  Medication management is a critical aspect of a family caregiver’s duty and ensuring your loved one receives the proper intake of medicines at the appropriate times each day is vital to their health and safety.

The sheer number of prescription drugs your loved one takes can be overwhelming. The Health Policy Institute at George Washington University reports that the average number of prescriptions filled increases with age, from thirteen orders for those ages 50 to 64 to twenty-two prescription for those ages 80 and older.

With so many instructions to manage, it quickly becomes cumbersome, and the risk of errors significantly increases. CVS Pharmacy understands how difficult medication management can be and has created a new program that addresses these concerns for its patients. CVS Pharmacy’s new prescription management system, ScriptPath Prescription Schedule, is designed to make it easier for patients to locate and understand prescription information and dosing instructions to ensure greater efficacy and improved adherence.

 A Better Way to Understand Doctor’s Orders.

A doctor’s appointment can certainly leave you with more questions than answers.  We’ve all sat there as the doctor quickly overviews the new regiment they’ve prescribed and outlined each drug lengthy list of instructions. We nod our heads in complete understanding only to leave and pick them up at the pharmacy with no idea which is which.

ScriptPath includes the newly released Prescription Schedule, which features the patient’s prescription information and includes specifics on when and how much medicine to take, as well as clear refill instructions and personalized notes. The Prescription Scheduler automatically manages all your medication’s and organizes the prescribers’ instructions for each.  It even provides you with a schedule of the most effective times to take medications by separating it into four dosing times (morning, midday, evening and bedtime).

Not only will you be able to easily access and manage your prescriptions, but using such a sophisticated system will save you hours of your time and significantly lower the chances of a medication error!

And, Wait There’s More!

In rolling out their new ScriptPath Prescription Scheduling program, CVS Pharmacy took great strides in ensuring they understood the needs of their patient’s. Too often, the small and lengthy text makes reading prescription instructions a hassle!  CVS understands how important it is to understand and manage medication instruction is to medication adherence and has made several changes to how they share medication information with patients.

In addition to the ScriptPath rollout this year, CVS Pharmacy is introducing a new Prescription Label, which will feature more explicit directions, larger text and color-coded icons to signify different times of the day for dosing, as well as a new Prescription Overview that will include easier-to-read dosing and refill information.

No Time to Waste!  ScriptPath Prescription Schedule is Available NOW!

ScriptPath Prescription Schedule is available now upon request at all CVS Pharmacies, more than 9,700 retail pharmacy locations. Already a CVS Pharmacy member? If you are one of the more than nine million CVS Pharmacy patients who take more than five medications each day, the system will be automatically offered along with a consultation with a store pharmacist when you pick up your prescriptions.

There is an infinite number of items on your To-do list as a family caregiver.  With so much to do and to worry about it is easy to feel that you may be in this alone.  Caregiving is a tiring job, and many of the finer details of care will take up a significant portion of your day. Fortunately, with programs like ScriptPath Prescription Scheduler, effective medication management is one less thing you will have to worry about. Their easy-to-use system will keep you up-to-date and organized on a schedule that is convenient for both you and your loved one.

Want to learn more?  CVS Pharmacist are excited to offer this helpful and thoughtful service to their patients and are more than willing to answer any questions you may have.  Just stop by or call your local CVS Pharmacy to learn more about the ScriptPath program today!

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Some people have a strong affiliation either for or against the use of terms of endearment. They either love it or hate it, and the middle area of when their use is appropriate is grey. When about older adults, there is a multitude of reasons why you should not exchange an individual’s name with a term of endearment. And only one reason for why it is okay.

The only time calling an older adult “Sweetie,” “Honey,” or any other term of endearment is if you ask them directly and they say yes. Or at best in the cases, that a person is no longer able to communicate an answer close family members and friends can confirm that these names are appropriate.

So why draw such a sharp line?  It’s not like these nick-names are deliberately offensive. And on the surface, there are many reasons why people use them. Some of the most popular reasons I’ve heard over the years are:  “I call everyone, Sweetie.”,”They call me, Honey all the time.”, “I was raised to call people that,” or “I am horrible at remembering names.”

However, when used to an older adult, particularly older adults who are in the care of someone else the use of terms of endearment can raise a dignity issue.

What’s in a Name? 

Something strange happens when you receive a diagnosis. Suddenly your name becomes that diagnosis, or if you are living in a long-term care facility, your name become’s a room number and diagnosis.  Too often, I’ve been told “room 204 with dementia” can’t go to activities today because they have a doctor’s appointment.

Side note: a Resident has the Right to choose their schedule.  So if they want to go to the day’s activity instead of their doctor’s appointment, it is their right to do so.  Of course, under the advisement that a doctor’s appointment is important. 

To then replace their name with “Sweetie” or “Honey” only further distances themselves from who they are.  A diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer’s already ripped away pieces of their identity from them, as their caregiver we should try everything in our power to maintain their sense of self.  One of the best ways to do this is to call them by their preferred name.

Now, if they have spent their whole life being called “Baby” then yes, of course, that is what we should call them, but to know this requires us to ask for their preference and spend the time to learn more about them.

Right to Dignity

The Resident’s Rights don’t explicitly spell out that terms of endearment shouldn’t be used. However, a resident’s right to be treated with consideration, respect, and dignity does encompass a preference for their name.

As a society, we have learned the power of a name. Calling someone something other than their birth name or nick-name can have very serious connotations. There is no difference when discussing the dignity of an older adult. As harmless as it may seem, and no matter the reason for their use without knowing the older adults preference, calling them “sweetie” or “honey” can be offensive and even demeaning.

Have a Conversation

While this article has taken a bit of an earnest tone, there is an excellent opportunity to get to know the person in your care.  So often terms of endearment are used as a personal sign of respect. However, their use isn’t one size fits all and the quality of care really should be person-centered.

There is so much in a name and asking someone what they would prefer to be called can offer great insight into their personality and even a life story. Finding out how someone came about receiving a nick-name has brought on wild tales that I still think about today.  The older adults in our care deserve the respect of a name preference, and we should always offer that choice to them.

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Guest Post Author: Danny W. Pettry, II, M.Ed., LPC, NCC, CTRS | www.DannyPettry.com

A Review of Sandra Parker, Carol Will, and Cherly Bruke’s (1989) Activities for the Elderly

Book Title: Activities for the Elderly, Volume 1: A Guide to Quality Programming

Authors: Sandra Parker, Carol Will, and Cheryl Burke

Released: 1989

Publisher:  Idyll Arbor

ISBN: 9781882883004

Starting a recreation program for the elderly can be a challenge for a person who is just starting out. Fortunately, there are many experienced professionals and resources available.  Dr. Sandra Parker’s (1989) book, Activities for the Elderly is one of those useful resources for beginners.

How I discovered the book:

Dr. Sandra Parker was my academic advisor for my undergraduate degree in Therapeutic Recreation at Marshall University (in Huntington, West Virginia).  Dr. Parker taught a course on Leisure and Aging. Her book, Activities for the Elderly, was one of the required readings for this course.

Dr. Parker provided students (who were mostly younger people right out of high school) with opportunities to interact with seniors.  She set up a series of guest-speakers of seniors, who were active in life, including musicians, artists, and authors. Students in her course took a tour of local nursing homes and senior housing.  The majority of this class was outside of the classroom.

Practicing is the key to success

Practice facilitating and leading activities are the best way to increase competency and confidence. Dr. Parker created a “lab,” through the University that allowed students to practice facilitating activities for the elderly. Seniors who lived in local high-rise apartments (senior housing) were invited to participate in the activities program, which was on site to allow for easy accessibility.  Students in our class took turns leading group activities for this program. Students observed and assisted other students when it was their week to facilitate an activity. Students often implement activities from Dr. Parker’s book or from other related books. There was a wrap-up discussion each week to discuss the group facilitator’s strengths in leading activities as well as to identify areas of needed improvement.

Some useful information from the book:

Dr. Parker’s Activities for the Elderly is like a “recipe cookbook” with 75 activities. Each activity includes a list of resources that are needed for each activity and instructions on how to implement the activity.  There is also a summary of potential benefits for each activity (for example increased concentration or physical endurance).

Training and motivating volunteers and activity assistants is covered in the front of the book. This is a very valuable skill to have. An individual who is hired to start an activities program may be required to teach and train direct care staff or activity assistance on leading activities as well. Practice and experience build abilities.

The rest of the chapters in the book are separated into various types of activities. These include:

  • Large muscle activities;
  • Mental/ memory activities;
  • Arts and crafts;
  • Music;
  • Dance and drama;
  • Outdoor/ nature activities; and
  • Religious activities

Who else would be interested in this book:

Recreation therapists, activity directors, and other programmers who work with the elderly may enjoy this book. It could serve as a useful reference tool. People who provide services for other age groups (children, teens, or adults) can be creative and adapt many of these activities for those age groups as well.

About the Author

Danny Pettry, M.Ed., LPC, NCC, CTRS  has worked as a practitioner at a Psychiatric Residential Treatment Program for children and adolescents with various mental and behavioral health needs since 2002. Pettry has provided continuing online education for recreation therapists since 2007. Follow Danny on  Facebook or on LinkedIn.

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Guest Post Author: Chris Golen| thecommonsinlincoln.com

Discussing Quality of Life with Your Aging Parents

Living a long, happy and healthy life is something we desire, not only for ourselves but for our loved ones, as well. Indeed, as we grow older, quality of life issues become even more important. As executive director for a Boston-area senior living community, I’ve seen firsthand the importance of creating an environment for seniors where they can thrive as part of a community of neighbors, with the support they need.

What exactly is quality of life?  It’s a hard concept to describe, and answers differ from person to person. Understanding how your parents define quality of life is important to ensuring their long-term happiness and health. Maybe it is the opportunity to volunteer with a local non-profit, stay active in their church, participate in a much-beloved hobby, or spend time with family and friends on a regular basis.

Scientifically, quality of life has been defined by three key indicators: overall view of life, relationship to self, and relationship to partners or friends.

Here are some recommendations to help identify how your parent defines quality of life and areas for improvement.

Overall View of Life

Ensuring your parents maintain a positive view on life is crucial to their happiness. This extends to peace of mind in their finances and confidence they have the care they need in the event their health changes.

It’s important to note that while a senior living community can provide the support your parents’ need, these communities are not one size fits all. A Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) model allows your parents to plan for the unexpected and enjoy life. CCRCs often offer a life care plan, allowing your parents to mitigate the risk of potential rising costs of health care and protect their assets.

Relationship to Self  

Opportunities to explore interests and focus on health will allow your parents to build self-confidence and enjoy life more fully. As your parent’s age, it can become difficult for them to motivate themselves to stay active, prepare healthy meals and value their physical health. Identifying a community of support may be the right environment. Senior living communities provide daily support, easy to follow fitness routines and delicious, healthy meals.

Health in mind, body, and spirit is the best way to ensure the greatest relationship to self. If your parent feels healthy and strong, they are better able to reach out to the ones they love, build new relationships, and continue to participate in life.

Relationship to Others

Interpersonal relationships will allow your parents to feel supported and part of a community. As we age, building new friendships can be difficult unless there are scheduled activities in place to create opportunities for social engagement.

Residents at senior living communities can become involved socially as they select from daily activities calendars to continue to enjoy the hobbies and experiences they love. Residents enjoy trips to local attractions, on-campus musical performances, opportunities to join or create a club for their hobbies, and lifelong learning with guest lectures.

Where Should You Begin?

It all starts with a conversation. Ask a series of questions to understand what aspects of your parent’s life they find most enjoyable. Questions could include:

  • What activities have you been participating in recently?
  • Are you able to participate in the activities purposeful to you?
  • What are the upsides and downsides of living alone?
  • Are you having any problems maintaining the house?

These questions will not only convey your interest in hearing about their lives, but it will allow you to pick up on major clues that their quality of life could improve with some changes.

If your parents seem lonely, removed, or have difficulty engaging in activities that give them purpose, transitioning to a new living situation, like a senior living community may be the right solution. With support from staff and daily opportunities to interact with others and participate in beloved activities, your parents may experience improvements in their overall view of life.

About the Author

Chris Golen, campus executive director at The Commons in Lincoln in Lincoln, Mass., has dedicated his career to improving the lives of seniors. Golen has made quality of life the top priority at The Commons by identifying a staff dedicated to making life more enjoyable for each resident. As a Continuing Care Retirement Community with a Five-Star Medicare rating in skilled nursing, The Commons offers the highest level of care available. Follow The Commons in Lincoln on Facebook or Twitter.

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Guest Post Author: Angela Stringfellow | Caregiver Homes

There’s tons of advice offering relaxation strategies to help caregivers cope with stress, but what about those moments when you feel like everything is going to fall apart — the moments when you feel like screaming? No one needs to tell you that self-care is important, but finding the time to focus on your own needs seems an impossible feat, let alone finding the money to pay for luxuries like a day at the spa or a massage.

As a caregiver, you need stress-beating self-care strategies that you can use, in the moment, without taking valuable time out of your caregiving duties or money that you simply don’t have to spare. Here are a few such coping strategies that are both cost-effective and easy to use – strategies that you can implement in minutes, with immediate results.

Visualization and Guided Imagery

This stress-busting tactic is free to use, and for some, it’s an effective coping technique when you desperately need an escape. MentalHelp.net describes the technique as a “systematic practice of creating a detailed mental image of an attractive and peaceful setting or environment.” It’s really as simple as that:

  • Find a calm, quiet space.
  • Take a few deep breaths to calm your mind and body.
  • Close your eyes.
  • Devote all your attention to imagining your ideal escape – a beach, the woods, a boat on the middle of a glistening lake, or whatever setting makes you feel calm and relaxed.
  • Spend time focusing on your senses and imagining the sensations you’d experience in your visual escape. For instance, you might imagine the feeling of warmth on your skin from the sun or the smell of the ocean.
  • Imagine yourself feeling calm and relaxed, happy and smiling.
  • Once you feel relaxed, you can end the visualization, open your eyes, and rejoin the real world.

Progressive Muscle Relaxation

Progressive muscle relaxation is a technique often used in conjunction with guided imagery, but it works as a stand-alone stress-busting tactic as well. This stress-busting strategy is also sometimes called “tense and release,” as it involves systematically tensing up muscle groups, from your head to your toes, and then relaxing while focusing on the way your muscles relax as the tension flows from your body.

Because it requires your full attention, progressive muscle relaxation can take your mind off of those in-the-moment stressors for a few quick minutes, and once you’ve worked through each muscle group, you might just be surprised by how much calmer and more relaxed you feel.

Aromatherapy

Essential oils can be useful for a variety of circumstances, but there are several essential oils that are particularly beneficial for stress relief, such as lavender, bergamot, chamomile, fennel, and Ylang Ylang, among others.

There are a few ways you can use aromatherapy to combat stress. The simplest way is to open a bottle of stress-relieving oil and gently breathe in the aroma. If you have the time for a quick shower, you can drop a few drops of essential oil into the shower for a whole-body aromatherapy experience, complete with the relaxing sensation of hot water and steam.

5-Minute Cardio Break

Exercise releases endorphins – those feel-good chemicals in the brain that make us feel happy and content. That’s why a quick, 5-minute cardio break can be such an effective stress-beating strategy for caregivers. Put some basic exercise equipment to use if you have it available, or you can do something as simple as a set of jumping jacks to reap the benefits of physical activity for combating stress. According to Harvard Medical School professor John Ratey, MD, just two minutes of exercise is enough to boost your mood – as long as the activity increases your heart rate.

10-Minute Yoga/Stretching Break

While it won’t raise your heart rate like cardiovascular activity, taking a 10-minute stretching or yoga break can also do wonders for beating acute stress and anxiety. Whether you simply take a few minutes to yourself to stretch your aching shoulders, arms, and legs or want to follow a formal, instructor-led yoga series, this is an activity you can do for free in just a few minutes for some immediate relief.

There are many yoga tutorials and guided stretching videos available online, free of charge. You can even choose videos that demonstrate the best stretches to target certain muscle groups, such as your upper body, or those that can help to alleviate a stiff neck or lower back pain.

Taking time out for self-care as a caregiver may seem like a mountain you just can’t climb. Thanks to these creative, cost-effective, stress-beating tactics, you can finally combat stress and find a welcoming escape to get through those moments when you feel like you’ve met your breaking point – all without breaking the budget or spending hours of time away from your loved one.

About author:

Angela Stringfellow is a freelance writer based in central PA. She writes about aging, senior living, and issues facing older adults and senior caregivers for Caregiver Homes and a variety of caregiver-focused publications.


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A well-known and yet hurtful reality of dementia or Alzheimer’s is the forgetfulness and memory loss that can occur.  Memory loss is particularly difficult for family members to cope with when their parent or loved one forgets who they are.

Forgetting the names of their children, forgetting that they have children, or mistaking their child for another person or family member is not uncommon for individuals living with dementia or Alzheimer’s.  And while this new reality may be shocking, to remind them that they’ve forgotten such an intimate detail about their life can be quite upsetting to them.

When I worked in the nursing home, my training prepared for these types of interactions.  I would say hi to some residents who I’d been working with for years and knew that while I may look familiar to them, they sometimes had no idea who I was. Although not being recognized did have an emotional impact on me this is nothing when compared to caregivers who are also daughters, sons, husbands, and wives. This is sometimes the most difficult for family members, and I want to offer tips on how to work through and cope with this specific aspect of dementia care.

Let them be who they are, no questions asked.

Correcting and quizzing are two common responses to loss of recognition that I’ve witnessed both professional and family caregivers use over the years. At times these types of approaches do work, however, in my experience the intent of asking the question is to offer the caregiver reassurance or validation rather than the person living with dementia or Alzheimer’s.

The most common orientation questions are, “Mom, who am I?”, “Who is this?”, “Do you know where you are?”, “Do you know where you live?”.  The directness of the question can be confusing for someone living with dementia. Their memory recall is not as fast as ours, so undoubtedly when faced with these types of questions the easiest answer is a sheepish laugh followed by an “I don’t know.”

These types of questions also force the person to suddenly take back control of their situation and surroundings, which can be quite alarming. They’ve had to entrust that the caregiver will provide for them and it’s our job to maintain that sense of safety at all times.

Watch the video below from the Alzheimer’s Society of Ireland as they work through questioning and frustrations that can occur for someone living with Alzheimer’s.

Sharing memories Enhancing lives - YouTube

Staying in the moment  

Our relationships are built on years of memories, and when someone forgets who you are to them, it can be hurtful and confusing. Spending quality time together will help them feel more secure. Try holding their hand and listening to their favorite song.  Spending time on things they enjoy doing or that you shared together in the past is a beautiful experience for both of you.  Not only do you get a piece of your relationship back you also provide them with a sense of self.

Unsure of where to start?  Check out 4 meaningful ways to spend time with a loved one living with dementia.

Reminisce

Reminiscing is a good tool for stirring up memories for your loved one. Asking broader questions can be a great way to start the reminiscing process. Through conversation and dialog, you may find that your loved one begins to remember so much more.

Many people living with dementia-related to Alzheimer’s remember their childhood through their young adult lives quite vividly. Looking at old photos or discussing old family recipes or family vacations will prompt and orient their memory.

We Remember Their Love When They Can No Longer Remember

Comprehending a life without memories is difficult. Memories mean so much to us. They provide us with a sense of self and stand as a reminder of the journey we have taken in this life. And the memories we share with the people closest to us become an intricate piece of our identity. Alzheimer’s may take these memories away from us, but the inability to remember does not mean that it has to redefine who we are nor does it diminish the importance of the many moments that we have collected over the years.


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Guest Post Author: Kristen Heller

As we grow older, we realize that our parents need our attention now more than ever before. Forget about your teenage years when everything they did seemed to annoy you, and you couldn’t wait to finish high school and move out on your own. As it turns out, you also got to grow up and with it came some wisdom. You realize just how important it is to have a relationship with your parents.

What our aging parents need most from us is our time. It does not matter how many expensive gifts you have delivered to your parent’s doorstep or how many cards you send to their mailbox; what they need most is your presence. Sending a card on a birthday or mother`s day is great, but it would lighten up their hearts more if you were there to celebrate with them.

Not all family members have maintained a relationship throughout life. The idea of starting a relationship with your parents now that they are in need of care may feel overwhelming and maybe even impossible. But, it is never too late to begin forming a bond. Here are a few reasons why spending quality time with your folks is an incredible experience and fun ideas to get you started.

Make up for Lost Time

If either of your parents weren’t around much when you were growing up, there’s no better way to make up for lost time than being there for them as they get older.

Spending time together now allows you to get to know each other more, and you start seeing them in a different light. There is still a lot that you can learn from your parents even once you are an adult, vital life skills that only a parent can share with their child.

By now they also know that there is no better time to pass on some of the things they have learned while growing up; some wisdom gained from their parents and others from experience. They went through tough times, and the wisdom they will share with you is to ensure you don’t have to go through it.

Mend Broken Relationships

Maybe you missed out on a lot of the parent-child relationship because you were hard-headed during your teens, and because you were always causing trouble your parents showed you some tough love. In return, you moved out from home early and what followed were years of little communication with your folks. Of course, there are times they would try to reach out, but your pride would often get the best of you. At times you would be overcome with guilt and wish things were much easier with your parents, but you didn’t even know where to start. In truth, there’s no better time to mend your relationship than now.

Reach out to them; don’t miss out on spending the last few years with your folks because of pride. Past mistakes cannot be undone, but you can patch things up. The time you spend with them will always be priceless, and your folks will get to spend their time knowing their child was there for them when they needed you most.

How to spend quality time with your aging parents

The first step is learning how to create time to spend with them, no matter how busy your schedule is. You do not have to turn up every day, but make an effort to see them every so often. If your parents have medical challenges, becoming their caregiver can ensure they are comfortable.

Below are a few fun things you can do while spending time with your aging parents:

– Start digging for long lost oldies that your parents loved listening to when you were young. It may take a lot of digging, but it will be worth it. Music speaks to the soul and helps us to reminisce certain periods of our life and what we were going through at that time, bringing feelings of nostalgia.

– Cooking- Show up at their place with ingredients and a recipe, ready to prepare them their favorite meal. Ask your mum or dad to join you in the kitchen and bond as you cook together.

– Hunting- If your dad has a thing for hunting, plan a weekend getaway out in the woods. Hunting is a great way to spend some quality time together.

– Fishing- do your folks love fishing? Hire a boat and go out fishing on the lake.

– Try outdoor trips, especially to places that your parents have always wanted to visit.

– Reading your favorite books, especially to parents with dementia-related ailments.

– Going through old photo albums with your parents, as you listen to the stories and memories behind each photo.

– Showing them new technology- your parents will always be awed by how far technology has come. Every time you introduce them to some innovation in technology, you will get to hear stories of how great things were back in the good old days.

– Keep active- for instance, a game of hoops, tennis or table tennis with your dad, or yoga with your mom. Exercising together can be a great way for both of you to keep in shape.

It’s Never Too Late

Spending time with family that you don’t have a good relationship with is hard, but that doesn’t mean its impossible.  Many adult children will find themselves thrust back into their parents lives as they begin to require extra care.  While overwhelming, there are plenty of good reasons why you should attempt to form a relationship with them.  Using any of the fun activities above can be a great icebreaker for your developing relationships!

About the Author

Kristen Heller is a passionate writer, teacher, and mother to a wonderful son. When free time presents itself, you can find her tackling her lifelong goal of learning the piano.


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Guest Post Author: John Stuart | angelcarers.com

If your loved one requires round-the-clock care, but they’re reluctant to leave their lifelong home, then hiring a live-in carer could be the perfect alternative. Live-in carers provide specialist care to your loved one in the comfort of their own home, bringing with them a wealth of knowledge and experience to provide full-time support. If you’re considering hiring care for an elderly friend or relative, you might be wondering what the benefits are when compared to residential nursing homes.

Avoids upheaval

Hiring a live-in carer allows your loved one to stay in safe and familiar surroundings. Even when they require care, many individuals prefer to stay in their own homes for as long as possible, with their personal belongings, memories, and pets.

Moving an elderly relative can cause major distress and can be a truly difficult time in their life. With the help of a live-in carer, you can rest assured that your loved one will be put through as little disruption as possible, allowing them to stay at home with their home comforts while receiving all of the care they require.

Better quality of life

At a time where your relative may feel like they’re losing their independence, remaining in their own home can make all of the difference in their quality of life.

By employing a live-in carer, you can ensure a better quality of life for your relative than if they were to move to a residential care home. By staying in their own home, your elderly relative is able to keep their pets and belongings, which hold a lot of memories and sentimental value. It also allows them to continue with their social activities by remaining in their local area, meaning that they’re able to stay in contact with neighbors, friends and continue to participate in their favorite hobbies.

Dedicated care

Live at home carers can provide bespoke round-the-clock, dedicated care to your elderly relative.  Not only will this give you peace of mind that your relative will care for 24 hours a day, but it also provides consistency. Having a small team of one to two carers means that your relative can build a relationship with their carer as well as ensuring they’re receiving the best possible care and can establish a solid routine.

Companionship

According to research by the Campaign To End Loneliness, over half of all people aged 75 and over live alone, so a live-in carer can provide the perfect companionship to improve their quality of life. Elderly people will often build close bonds with their live-in carers, helping to avoid feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Statistically, many elderly people can go days without any social activity. A live-in carer can open up new opportunities to your elderly relative, helping them to engage in activities which may have become difficult, such as getting out to the shops or social clubs. Companionship is one of the most overlooked, but most important, benefits of a live-in carer for your elderly relative.

https://www.campaigntoendloneliness.org/loneliness-research/

Continuity

A small team of live-in carers provides continuity for your elderly relative and allows them to maintain their regular routine. This is especially important for dementia sufferers who can struggle to get used to having a multitude of carers and new surroundings in a residential home. By living at home, your loved one is able to sustain their schedule, meaning that they can dictate their meal times, social and leisure activities which would be difficult in a residential home.

Peace of mind for family members

Live-in carers don’t just benefit those receiving the care – they can also provide peace of mind for family members who can rest assured that their relative is receiving the best, dedicated care possible. Live in carers also alleviate the pressure on busy family members and can lessen the guilt they feel if they are unable to frequently visit their elderly relatives.  Unlike residential homes, family members are able to visit their elderly relative whenever is convenient for them, without having to worry about adhering to visiting hours.

Live-in carers provide many valuable benefits and are definitely an option worth considering if your elderly relative requires round-the-clock care. By employing a live-in carer for your relative, you’ll ensure that your loved one is receiving a dedicated care plan to help them to remain healthy, happy and positive throughout their senior years.

About the author: Angel Carers provide a bespoke domiciliary care service as well as live-in care throughout the South of England. They suit all of their services to each of their clients, offering a truly bespoke care service. Discover more on their website – http://www.angelcarers.com/


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