Loading...

Follow The Travel Intern on Feedspot


Valid
or
Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Password:

The post Protected: Harry Potter London Itinerary: The Quintessential Guide To 4 Days in London for All Potterheads appeared first on The Travel Intern.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Password:

The post Protected: The Ultimate Narita Travel Guide — Best Things To Do In The Chiba Region During Your Tokyo Layover appeared first on The Travel Intern.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Password:

The post Protected: Budget Hokkaido Itinerary: 8D Road Trip Under S$1k incld. Accommodation appeared first on The Travel Intern.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Password:

The post Protected: The Ultimate Sapporo City Guide: Top Things To Do In The Gateway To Hokkaido appeared first on The Travel Intern.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Roughly 40 minutes away from central Berlin, Potsdam is a quiet and beautiful town that’s one of Berlin’s most popular day trip spots.

When Berlin’s former mayor Klaus Wowereit described Berlin as “poor but sexy”, Potsdam authorities described their town “rich and beautiful”. True to form, Potsdam is home to quaint, Baroque buildings, scenic landscapes and 17 majestic palaces. We’d say stepping into Potsdam felt almost fairytale-like.

Orangery Palace. Credit: Mydeutschlandblog.wordpress.com

Potsdam is a favourite summer getaway with its spacious parks and clear lakes that make it perfect for cycling and picnics.

If you’re looking to escape from the bustle of Berlin city, this day trip to Potsdam is for you.

Read Also: 5-Day Budget Berlin Travel Guide

Potsdam Essentials 1) Berlin WelcomeCard

If you’re already travelling around Berlin with the Berlin WelcomeCard, getting to and around Potsdam is free as long as you purchase the Berlin + Potsdam ABC zones.

In addition, you’ll be eligible for discounts up to 25% selected tours, museums and bicycle rentals.

2) Sanssouci+ Ticket (optional)

This Sanssouci one day pass (€19) grants you entry to most palaces and gardens in the Sanssouci area. You can purchase it online, or at the tourist information counter once you arrive at Potsdam Hauptbahnhof Station.

Most of the places do no need advanced bookings except for the Sanssouci Palace and New Palace.

*Pro-tip: Enjoy discounted rates for the Sanssouci pass (€15.20) by presenting your Berlin WelcomeCard when making your purchase.

Getting from Berlin to Potsdam

From Berlin Central Station (Berlin Hauptbahnhof), take the S-Bahn S7 train to Potsdam Hauptbahnhof, the terminal station. The journey takes 40 minutes, and arrives in 10 to 30-minute intervals.

Alternatively, you may also take the Regionalexpress RE1 train towards Brendenburg / Magdeburg, which takes slightly less time at about 25 minutes, but only arrives every 30 minutes.

Potsdam Day Trip Itinerary New Palace in Sanssouci

Getting Around: As the attractions are quite scattered, renting a bicycle for this is one of the best ways to get around with this itinerary. Bicycles can be rented straight from Potsdam Hauptbahnhof Station (Taxi Stand) from €1 per hour to €5 for the whole day (prior registration required), with 20 other designated drop-off points you can return them to.

Bicycle parking is free as long as you park them at designated racks around.

1) Filmmuseum Potsdam Credit: n-tv.de

Only a short distance from the train station, enter Germany’s oldest film museum showcasing 100 years of film in Babelsberg in a permanent exhibition. They also house a special, seasonal exhibition along with a cinema that screens films at selected times (at additional cost).

Entrance Fees: €8 (~S$12.90) or €6 with the Berlin WelcomeCard (~S$9.65)
Opening Hours: 10AM – 6PM, closed Mondays (Box office closes 5:30PM)
How to get there: Cycle 850m from Potsdam Hauptbahnhof Station

2) Brandenburg Gate Potsdam Credit: Inspirock.com

Don’t mistake this for a mini replica of the other Brandenburg Gate in Berlin — this is the OG gate that was first built; 20 years before its famous cousin.

How to get there: 1.1km cycle from Filmmuseum Potsdam

3) Sanssouci Sanssouci Palace

A garden spanning 300 hectares (roughly the size of 400 football fields), Sanssouci Park is where you can find the famed, rococo-style Sanssouci Palace that resembles a yellow wedding cake. The palace was the former King of Prussia’s favourite summer residence then, reportedly having spent 40 of his summers there during his lifetime.

An interesting feature here is, as you reach each base of the staircase, the palace disappears from your view, and gradually reappears as you reach the top of each flight.

Other places worth checking out are the Chinese House, Chinese House (requires reservation for guided tour to enter), Orangery Palace and Charlottenhof Palace.

Inside the Prussian baroque-style New Palace

Cost: Free with sanssouci+ ticket
Opening Hours:
Varies
Address (Sanssouci Palace): Maulbeerallee, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
How to get there: 1km cycle from Brandenburg Gate

4) Dutch Quarter Dutch Quarter, Potsdam

Experience Holland vibes with 134 brick houses built in the 18th century for Dutch immigrants. To date, this is the largest Dutch-only neighbourhood outside of the Netherlands! There are many antique and craft boutique shops, as well as restaurants, cafes and pubs to take a break at.

Address: Holländisches Viertel, Benkertstrasse, 14467 Potsdam, Germany
How to get there: 1.8km from Sanssouci Palace — if you’re not walking or cycling, you can take Bus 695 from Sanssouci Palace (Potsdam, Schloss Sanssouci Station) to Potsdam, Jägertor/Justizzentrum Station, and walk/cycle the remaining 700m.

5) Babelsberg Park Credit: Potsdam.de

Several architects and landscape artists have left their mark on this 124-hectare park over a decade, resulting in a beautifully organised chaos upon completion. Here, it houses the neo Gothic-styled Babelsberg Palace and the Steam Engine Building that resembles a mosque, but was actually where the most powerful steam engine of the early 1840s sat.

A scenic, calming garden-park to relax and immerse in greenery, Babelsberg Park is a good vantage point to catch the sunset, and look at the famous Glienicke Bridge.

Opening Hours: 6AM – 7PM
Address:
 Park Babelsberg 11, 14482 Potsdam
How to get there: Cycle 4km from Dutch Quarter. For public transport: cycle 550m to Potsdam, Platz der Einheit/Nord Tram Station, take Tram 94/99 to Potsdam, Plantagenstrasse Station, then take Bus 616 to Potsdam, Sternwarte Station. You will arrive at Babelsberg Park after cycling another 550m.

6) Glienicke Bridge Credit: Entertainmentcentralpittsburg.com

A bridge connecting Berlin’s Wannsee with Potsdam, it was once used to exchange captured spies between the Americans and Soviets during the Cold War. You might also recognise this bridge as it was featured in the 2015 film, Bridge of Spies.

Address: Glienicker Brücke, Königstraße, 14467 Berlin, Germany
How to get there: Walk / Cycle 2.9km from Babelsberg Park

We hope you found this Potsdam Travel Guide useful! As an idyllic country retreat, we definitely think a day trip there from Berlin is worth it. If you’re up for someplace with even more nature, check out our Day Trip Guide to Spreewald!

Did we miss out on anything? Let us know in the comments!

For more travel inspiration, follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“You’re going to take so many insta-worthy pictures! Gurl, you’d better post all of them!” My friends exclaim when I say Berlin is my next destination. They’re right. A city that’s rich in history, endless street art and cheap good beer at every corner? Berlin is indeed an ideal place to show off on Instagram.

The problem with a city like this is that everyone wants a shot of the same place. Good luck trying to nailing that perfect shot — sans other tourists getting into your frame; and your nerves. Here’s nine Instagram worthy places in Berlin, along with tips to snapping that perfect shot.

1) Brandenburg Gate

There are many things to know about the Brandenburg Gate other than the fact that it is just a “mere military monument”. Before the reunification of both East and West of Germany, it was erected in 1791 as a symbol of peace.

Taking photos from the middle is difficult to do when you’ve got other tourists vying for that same shot. Avoid crowds by taking it from the back — while you don’t get the front of the statue, you’d still get the grandiose of the gate. Alternatively, you could take it from the side as well!

The best time to visit would be in the morning, just as the sun is rising. Not many people would be around as it might be too early for them. You’d also be able to capture the gate with the perfect morning rays!

One thing I’d suggest to take precaution of, are the people who will be asking you for donations. They can be quite demanding! Another thing to note would be pick-pocketers, especially during summer. Pick-pocketers tend to target areas with crowds, especially during peak tourist periods.

Location: Pariser Platz, 10117 Berlin, Germany

2) Checkpoint Charlie Photo credit: @paulasaman.ma via Instagram

Another tourists’ favourite, the replica of Checkpoint Charlie now stands in the same original spot with actors dressed as soldiers. A sum of €3 would satisfy them for a couple of pictures. If you try to sneak one past them, the actors tend to get upset, utter explicits or hide their faces!

Location: Friedrichstraße 43-45, 10117 Berlin, Germany

3) Reichstag Dome

The Reichstag Dome is the perfect spot for those who are interested in architecture. Explore the structure and decide which part of the venue is best for taking symmetrical shots!

This is also one of the best places in the city to catch the sunset! Alternatively, arrive later and watch the stars under the glass ceiling. The entire dome has windows that give you the most perfect views of Berlin.

Photo credit: @juanignacioarq via Instagram

If you’re lucky, you might even get to see the German Parliament in action! The dome allows you to look down into chamber. This actually represents that the people are now above the government.

Admission is free. However, do bring along your passport to make advanced reservations needed to enter.

Location: Platz der Republik 1, 11011 Berlin, Germany
Timings: 8AM-12AM Daily.

*Pro-Tip: If you do not manage to book in advance, visit the Reichstag Building at 8AM to check for available spots. Most of the time, you’d get openings since you’re early!

5) Berlin Cathedral

The Berlin Cathedral is the largest church in the city and hard to miss. Located in the middle of Museum Island, the entire area is filled with beautiful architecture and fountains for you to get that perfect IG shot!

It took about an hour just to explore the area outside. It’d be best to allocate more time if you’re looking to visit all four museums and the Cathedral!

Since the whole venue is so huge, taking photos aren’t an issue. If you can, visit the Cathedral during different times of the day. You’d notice that the sky reflecting off the building provides a different colour scheme.

Location: Am Lustgarten, 10178 Berlin, Germany
Timings: 10AM-6PM Tuesday to Sunday, 10AM-8PM on Thursdays. Closed on Mondays.

6) East Side Gallery Photo credit: @christianacollings via Instagram

Visiting the East Side Gallery is a definite-must if you’re in Berlin. Head down to the world’s largest open air gallery to update your Instagram feed with iconic murals such as, “My God, Help Me Survive This Deadly Love” by Dmitri Vrubel.

The East Side Gallery is not just a place with brilliant graffiti but filled with many untold stories.

Since this is such an representative of the East Side Gallery, you can expect many visitors waiting for their turn with this mural. Sometimes, there might even be groups of people in the area, attending an art tour.

It’d be good to plan how you’d like your picture to be while queuing. While many are polite and will wait for you to be done with your picture, you’d probably have a good 30 seconds to snap your pic. You know, before you become that tourist that hogged the photo spot for like, ever? *deep sighs*

Address: Mühlenstraße 3-100, 10243 Berlin, Germany

Also read: Berlin’s Illegal Street Art: 10 Iconic Spots With Fleeting Art Pieces to find out the stories behind them.

7) S-Bhf Friedrichstarbe

A train station used for Instagram purposes? Oh yes, head down to the Friedrichstabe Station to get your perfect shot. With the sun rays glimmering through the windows, how is this not the perfect photo opportunity?

The train comes almost every 4 minutes so use the intervals in-between well! Everyone clears from the tunnel away rather quickly but the trains arrive just as efficiently too. It’s best to avoid this area during peak hours (7-8AM). Any time past the golden hour (6pm) isn’t ideal as well. Trains are more constant as people are headed back home and sunlight is setting.

Location: The inside of Friedrichstrabe Station
Timings: 4.30AM-1.30AM on Weekdays, 24 hours on Weekends.

7) Markthalle Neun Photo credit: @markthalleneun via Instagram

Food, food, food! Tasty and beautifully plated food are worth every Euro here at Markthalle Neun. Get your tastebuds acquainted with not just German food but fusion cuisines like Kimchi Burgers or even local SEA cuisine like Gado-gado!

Photo credit: @sherrified via Instagram

Here’s one that left us fantasising about it back home. Tata’s Muffles aren’t just aesthetically pleasing, this sweet treat tastes amazing too! The dessert comes a choice of different whip creams — regular, caramel or baileys, and a huge array of toppings for free! In summer, they replace the whip cream with ice-cream. Dessert sure is the sweetest way to reward yourself, especially after a long day of exploring!

Location: Eisenbahnstraße 42/43, 10997 Berlin, Germany
Timings: 8AM-6PM Monday to Sunday, 8am-10pm on Thursdays. Closed on Sundays.

8) Berlinische Galerie

The iconic yellow tiles outside the Berlinische Galerie is one that you might recognise on Instagram. Taking pictures outside the museum is free and open 24/7, score! Also, since most of its visitors are interested in what’s inside this museum of modern art than the outside, you won’t have to clamour with others for a photo. Double score!

Stepping in is worth a visit if you are into contemporary art too. I personally enjoyed the various array of art in the museum which was not limited to visual art but films as well.

Entrance Fee: €8, €5 with Berlin Welcome Card
Timings: 10AM-6PM, Wednesday to Monday
Location: Alte Jakobstraße 124-128, 10969 Berlin, Germany

*Pro-Tip: Entrance on every first Monday of the month is only €4.

Also read: Budget Berlin Travel Guide to learn other discounts the Berlin Welcome Card can get you!

9) Spittlemarkt

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

At 28, Nurul Humairah (also known as Mairah) has gone on 7 solo trips. That might not sound like a huge feat, until you hear that she’s in fact, deaf since birth.

While some of us might think twice before embarking on a solo trip, Mairah just won’t allow her deafness to get in the way of her dreams to visit as many countries as possible. From climbing Mt. Rinjani to exploring India solo, this is one Singaporean packed with a good dose of courage and adventure.

Photo credit: @mai.rawr 

We had so many questions we eagerly wanted to ask Mairah. How does she travel alone if she can’t hear of dangers? Has she ever felt lost or lonely? Will there be a difference between city escapés or nature retreats if she can’t hear the overwhelming noise of a city? We knew we had to meet up with Mairah and learn more about her solo travel adventures thereafter.

When we finally got to meet, we were all infected by her positive, upbeat, and jovial personality. Her energy filled the room. Her signs and gestures spoke loudly to us, painting lively pictures of her adventures overseas. If “a picture paints a thousand words”, it’s a thousand more for Mairah. Have we mentioned that she’s also a freelance photographer? Double dope! And below is our interview with Mairah (with the help of an interpreter, Zhi Xiong).

1) Hi Mairah! Do tell us more about how you started travelling solo. Mairah during her Youth Camp in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2015. Credit: @mai.rawr

My first solo trip was in 2015, exploring the streets of Bangkok on my own after a youth camp. After that trip, I stumbled upon a website by a young deaf American — Seek the World by Calvin Young.

It was he who inspired me to travel even more.

He spreads deaf awareness through his social media sites, and I thought I could do the same and create more awareness within Asia.

We may be deaf but we can walk, and we can do everything else. We just can’t hear.

2) What are the challenges you faced travelling alone? Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India, 2017. Credit: @mai.rawr

Mis-communication do happen sometimes due to cultural nuances.

In India, I was having a conversation with an Indian local using Google Translate, but his gestures were confusing — was it a “Yes” or a “No”? *laughs*

Other than that, communication is fine as I communicate with others through writing, gesturing, and using Google Translate on my phone with locals who don’t understand English.

Jaipur, India. Credit: @mai.rawr

I did have a weird encounter once. I was in Jaipur, India when a friendly local Indian volunteered to show me around the Pink City, after knowing I’m deaf. He then brought me to his “shop”, a small storeroom, and told me about the seven chakras. While he might not have any ill intentions, I felt uncomfortable as I was alone with him in a small room. Thankfully I managed to change the subject and left.

I still think about this incident and wondered if I had thought too much then, but it’s always better to be safe than sorry, especially when you’re travelling solo.

3) Your Instagram (@mai.rawr) is pretty dope. How did you pick up photography? Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India, 2017. Credit: @mai.rawr

My interest in photography started when a friend introduced a camera to me after my O’Levels. I was just curious and playing around with it, bringing it to events and just snapping away. With those experiences, I became even more interested in photography — especially in street photography — and that’s how it went on from there.

4) Where do you intend to go with your interest in photography? Guide up Rinjani. Credit: @mai.rawr

My dream is to be a full-time travel photographer or photojournalist. I hope through it, I can inspire more Deaf people to travel, and at the same time spread awareness to the hearing community through my travels.

5) Which has been your favourite country so far and why? Mairah at Taj Mahal, Agra, India. Credit: @mai.rawr

I’ve been to Thailand, Malaysia, India, Vietnam, and Indonesia. I think the best experience was my trip to India. Before I went on the trip, many people told me negative things about India, but I still decided to go ahead and see for myself.

The ‘Tuk Tuk’ of India. Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India, 2017. Credit: @mai.rawr

When I got to India, I was mind-blown — I had a culture shock, not in a bad way though. Also, I endured a 17-hour long train ride, squeezing with the locals. That was definitely the most memorable experience on my solo trips so far.

The 17-hour train ride in India. Credit: @mai.rawr

My advice for anyone who wants to visit India is, you’ll get the same culture shock, but that’s very likely what you’ve anticipated anyway, so don’t bother about the negative things that people are saying. Just go for it.

6) When you travel overseas, how do people usually react when they realise you cannot hear? Jaipur, India, 2017. Credit: @mai.rawr

I’ve met different people while travelling, but people are generally nice. Some may look shocked, and there are others who simply ignore me when I approach them with a paper. But I’ve also met very kind people who were really patient and willing to communicate with me. Some were even impressed to see that a Deaf person can travel on her own!

That’s when I felt that even as Deaf people, we can also be an inspiration to others, by stepping out of our comfort zone and pursuing what we like.

7) As a Deaf traveller, what’s one misconception you’d like to clear?
Rishikesh, India, 2017. Credit: @mai.rawr
Sometimes, people frown on me traveling solo because of my deafness, but in fact, Deaf people like me have no issues travelling alone. My deafness has never disabled me from chasing my dream. With what I have shared, I hope to prove that Deaf people are just as capable of travelling independently.
8) Do you prefer travelling to cities or go on nature retreats? Street photography, 2014. Credit: @mai.rawr

I do street photography when I visit cities, observing the busy crowd and cityscapes. However, I see myself as an introvert, and the city life drains me mentally at times.

Mt. Rinjani, Indonesia. Credit: @mai.rawr

Elements of nature are simple and peaceful, and I’m able to find truth and joy in nature, and also improve my mental health. So between the two, I would choose nature.

9) What are your future travelling plans? Any dream destinations? Credit: @mai.rawr

So far I’ve only travelled within Southeast Asia, and I hope to go further this year. Perhaps to the Middle East, Africa, Mongolia, or China. There’s really no one specific country that I really want to go to. You can say that my dream is to travel to as many countries as I can.

10) Is there anything you’d like to tell other Deaf individuals, or even, the hearing community?
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In a city brimming with so much art, it may come as a big surprise that street art in Berlin is actually illegal.

In fact, artists can face up to three years in jail if caught in the act! So, unless the artists have been commissioned by the government or granted permission from the building, most art in Berlin can be said to be illegal.

Since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, the city serves as ground zero for street art artist to spark their career in graffiti art. If you’d like to find out more about the history of street art, check out this article on Berlin Street Art.

Embarking on a trip to Berlin? Here’s a list of 9 street art spots to look out for the next time you’re in town!

Read Also: 5 Day Berlin Budget Guide — S$1,500 incl. flights and accommodation

*Pro-Tip: Save money by purchasing a Berlin Welcome Card. Other than discounts on entrance fees to museums and attractions, it acts as a transport pass for unlimited travel between these places below.

Famous Illegal Street Art Pieces

The culture behind Berlin’s street art is intense and rich with history, yet the artwork never stays for long. People paint over one another or establishments colour their walls back in a bid to keep their buildings clean.

While fleeting, some artists have made their iconic art pieces known at first glance, without even putting their name to it. Here’s some you’ll spot across the city but the following places are where we first found them!

1) Kripo Image Credit: Street Art Berlin

Trivia: Kripo’s nickname amongst street art fans is Berlin’s Spiderman.

Once you’ve seen one of Kripo’s Yellow Fists, you won’t be able to stop spotting it around the city. A symbol of rebellion and defiance, these signs are in positions you’d think is impossible to reach.

Location: Berlin Friedrichstr. Station

2) Blu

Trivia: Blu’s iconic murals in Berlin were erased and many were upset by it. Interestingly enough, it was reportedly Blu himself that erased the artworks.

Not only is Blu‘s “The Pink Man” a reference to Germany’s past, it is also relevant to current society’s need to conform. The big pink monster, which comprises of many scared individuals squirming not to stand out, is about to swallow the individual painted white.

Location: You can find his mural at the west side of Oberbaum Bridge.
How To Get There: Take the train to Berlin Warschauer Straße Station.

3) Banksy Image Credit: Graffitiartpedia

What is Berlin without street art? What is street art without Banksy? It’s mind-blogging that Banksy has not done more street art in Berlin since his visit in 2003.

There are tours by VisitBerlin that you can explore art works allegedly done by Banksy.

If you’d like to explore on your own, you can reference this google map to see all 34 pieces that are believed to be Banksy’s.

This iconic Flower Chucker can be found in the courtyard of The Kunsthaus Tacheles (Art House Tacheles) — an old department store that was once taken over by street art artists. It is closed now but you’d still be able to spot the art done by the artists previously.

Location: Kunsthaus Tacheles, Oranienburger Str. 54-56a, 10117 Berlin, Germany
How To Get There: Take the train to Berlin Oranienburger Straße station.

4) “Little Lucy” by El Bocho

Trivia: Stencils or stickers are used by certain artists so they can reduce the risk of getting caught by minimising the time required to stay and spray paint.

On the side of non-commissioned street art of the Haus Schwarzenberg Street Art Alley, you can see one of El Bocho‘s stencil of the Czechoslovakian 70’s cartoon, Little Lucy.

You’d be able to find this sweet little girl everywhere in Berlin. You’d also notice that El Bocho’s work comes with a twist! She is always depicted killing her cat — be it using the cat as a swing, it being microwaved or being ripped into two.

El Bocho’s artworks are so famous that he had to change the base of his stencils for Little Lucy to avoid people ripping it off the streets to keep.

Try looking for this little lady with her cat around town!

Location: Rosenthaler Straße/Rosenthaler Str. 39, 10178 Berlin, Germany
How To Get There: Take the train to S Hackescher Markt station.

5) “IT’S TIME TO DANCE” by Sobr

The dancing girls have made their mark from Paris to Berlin. Made to resemble a barricade tape, you can spot the distinctive title, “IT’S TIME TO DANCE”, printed in black on a yellow tape, surrounding the art. The women are usually stencilled in black and white with confetti scattered all over.

Image Credit: Paris Street Art

Sobr enjoys partying and uses ladies who are dancing slightly further out from the crowd in festivals or parties as his inspiration.

Similar to El Bocho, Sobr’s works are all over Berlin. You can also find the two dancing girls at Haus Schwarzenberg Street Art Alley, beside El Bocho’s Little Lucy.

Location: Rosenthaler Straße/Rosenthaler Str. 39, 10178 Berlin, Germany
How To Get There: Take the train to S Hackescher Markt station.

6) “Anne Frank” by Jimmy C.

Trivia: Out of all the commissioned works that comes and goes on this specific wall, Jimmy C’s art work of Anne Frank remains.

Right opposite the past two projects, Jimmy C‘s art work of Anne Frank lies right outside the Anne Frank Zentrum (€5 for entry). The exhibition tells of Anne Frank’s life, past and how it affects the present. If you are unable to visit Amsterdam and visit Anne Frank’s house, this would be great if you’d like to know more about her.

Location: Rosenthaler Straße/Rosenthaler Str. 39, 10178 Berlin, Germany
How To Get There: Take the train to S Hackescher Markt station.

Street Art Joints in Berlin

While most street art in Berlin is illegal, there are designated establishments known amongst the street artists to be a somewhat safe haven to express their artworks.

7) Haus Schwarzenberg Street Art Alley

Trivia: Hidden in this alley is a workshop owned by Otto Weidt — a blind brush maker, known for hiding and creating fake IDs for handicapped Jews during World War Two. The workshop has now been converted into a museum which you can enter for free.

You can find the Haus Schwarzenberg Street Art Alley hidden behind Cafe Cinema — (one of the oldest cafes to have survived the gentrification in the area). The hidden alleyway is a street haven for street artists.

Location: Rosenthaler Straße/Rosenthaler Str. 39, 10178 Berlin, Germany
How To Get There: Take the train to S Hackescher Markt station.

One side is reserved solely for commissioned artists. The walls are painted over at least four times a year. The other, though considered illegal, is scattered with street art, stickers and stencils. As mentioned earlier, you can find El Bocho’s Little Lucy and Sobr’s Dancing Girls this side of the wall.

Along with many more residents, this alley houses an artist group called The Dead Chickens. They take pride in using big metal structures and mechanical tools in their art and paint around their area.

8) Mauerpark
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Password:

The post Protected: 7D Hong Kong Outdoor Itinerary — Exploring A Different Side of The Concrete Jungle appeared first on The Travel Intern.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Password:

The post Protected: 9 Lesser-Known Sights in Hong Kong Better Than From Victoria Peak appeared first on The Travel Intern.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview