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The Street Photographer's Guide by Jamesfitzpatrickphotography - 1d ago

NEWS!

Recently we decided to push forward with the YouTube Channel and move on to Vloggs. Before we do so however we wanted to post some videotography of the photos we took with the Panasonic the Nikon and different lenses

Please let us know what you think or if it is something you want done with your own photos.

Enjoy!

Ireland 2 Beautiful Photos of Ireland - YouTube
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No. 8 Northern Ireland 1970’s

The body of Jack Duddy is being carried away after being shot on Bloody Sunday

The 1960’s and 1970’s brought with them great changes in modern life, and none more so in Catholic Nationalist areas of Northern Ireland. One such incident still lives with us today and will forever be a reminder of the bad times the Provence lived through. This day became known as Bloody Sunday. The incident, live ammunition fire on Protestors.

As protestors ran from an army line, shots rang out, hitting a Mr. Jack Ruddy, who was the first casualty of the day. The man standing beside Mr. Ruddy, Father Daly gave him his last rites.

The then Priest in the picture, Father Edward Daly, became a symbol of determination in the face of adversity due to a series of photographs taken by photojournalist Fulvio Grimaldi, as he tried to get Mr. Ruddy to a safe place.

Speaking to the BBC on hearing of the death of now Bishop Edward Daly, Fulvio said

“I want to take this opportunity to appreciate his (Edward Daly’s) courage, his bravery in doing his duty and beyond his duty,”

“I was very proud and happy to see that this picture then ended up as an iconic symbol of the suffering of the Derry people and of the Northern Irish people at large.”

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No. 9    The Sudanese Famine

A young starving boy crawls to a feeding centre as a vulture looks on

This was a Pulitzer Prize winning photograph, March 1993, published by the New York Times, but one which came with the ultimate price tag. It won the Feature Photography Pulitzer in 1994.

In 1993, Kevin Carter and his friend Joao Silva went to cover the Sudanese war and ultimately the famine which derived from it. They were both young, Carter was in his early 30’s and ambitious, eager to push forward in their careers.

One day Carter noticed what he believed to be a little Girl crawling toward a UN Food Depot and decided to take a photo. As he got down to take another he noticed the Vulture. On returning to Silva he told him he had chased the Vulture away, but was affected by the incident. There is no proof either man carried the girl to safety.

About four months after the photo was published, Carter, who had a daughter of his own, took his own life. He would never learn the faith of the Girl in Sudan.

In 2011 however, the child’s father revealed the child was actully a boy, by the name of Kong Nyong, and he had been taken care of by the UN food station. Nyong had died four years prior, around 2007, of what the family classified as “fevers”.

To this day people wrongly refer to the person in the photo as a girl, maybe it pulls on more heart strings, but this only goes to show an increasing level of ignorance amongst news organisations, and their lack of due diligence.

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No. 10    Anti Vietnam Protests Washington DC

Washington DC. 1967. Jan Rose KASMIR, confronts the American National Guard outside the Pentagon during the 1967 anti-Vietnam march. This march helped to turn public opinion against the US war in Vietnam. Photo Marc Riboud

17-year-old Jan Rose Kasmir raises a chrysanthemum to the tip of a soldier’s bayonet during a march on the Pentagon protesting the Vietnam War. Photographer Marc Riboud took the picture on what was to become an historic day.

50 years later the same lady was at it again, marching against the election of President Trump, telling people how outraged she was at electing someone who disrespects the post.

However the first time round she didn’t even know her photo existed for 20 years. Her father found the photograph in a Magnum photo book and pointed it out to her. She immediately rang the Photographer and things went on from there.

She is now an author and inspirational speaker. Amazing what one simple act of kindness can do amid all the horror. A lesson to us all….

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No. 10    Taxi Driver (The fare’s home)

De Niro looks back at Scorsese in the film Taxi Driver

You will notice composition and expression are the main themes of these photos, and in Taxi Driver you get both. Directed by Scorsese, who also makes a cameo in this scene, the film has now taken noir cult status, focussing on the loneliness of the life of a Taxi Driver. In this scene Scorsese asks the driver to bring him to his home so he can spy on his wife. There is resignation and anger etched across his face, two feelings the driver can associate with. There is great dept of field too with a little bokeh, think 35 or 50mm lens wise closing the aperture down.

No. 9    Apocalypse Now (The Hotel Room)

Martin Sheen very drunk and equally upset in difficult scene

What is so special about this scene I hear you ask? Well, believe it or not, it’s because it’s actually real. While making the film Apocalypse Now, Martin Sheen developed a great need for alcohol, and effectively became an alcoholic. In the scene where he punches the mirror he is very drunk, but Coppola suggests they continue to roll, which they do. Unfortunately only days later Martin had a massive heart attack, which he survived returning to set six weeks later very sober. Although Sheen was not the original dream castee for the role in a film depicting the futility of war, it is certain he made the character his own, and turned in an epic if not sobering performance.

No. 8    Modern Times (The Machine)

Charlie Chaplin lies on the machine in Modern Times

Modern Times was to be his first talkie, but Chaplin scrapped the script and made the film a silent masterpiece. And we’re not complaining. After travelling around Europe, and experiencing the Great Depression, Chaplin came across Gandhi, who was firmly against Modernisation. Although not totally against it, Chaplin agreed it had cost jobs and felt therefore it created poverty, so he set about creating the film. What is incredible is how clear stills like the one above are, how little Bokeh there is, and how well composed the shot is. Might give you an idea on how to use your studio space, which you can always rent.

No. 7    Cleopatra (When they fall in Love)

Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor fall in love in Cleopatra

The soft colouring, the bokeh, the sharpness and the composition, what more could you possibly demand from your subjects? Emotion. And this photo gave it in spades. Burton and Taylor, both of whom were in loving relationships, met for the first time on the set of Cleopatra. It was to create fireworks, and not just between  the couple but also in the global media. There is no doubt looking back it is easy to see how in love they were, but at the time it would be interesting to know how many knew.

No. 6    Pulp Fiction (Sex sells)

Uma Thurman in her promotional garb

Ok so it is not a still from the film, it is however a promotional still, but who cares. It’s a redefining moment in Hollywood, where the rule book was thrown out, but the old structuring of beginning middle and end, were kept. (Joseph Campbell, A Hero with a thousand faces). And why not. What is great about the still is what it portrays. Uma Thurman, a shy young 23 year old, is exploring herself through film, in a role she wasn’t sure of, but was glad she took. She is a virgin of big Cinema, on a bed made for a queen, chugging a fag while gripping a gun. No doubt loaded. What’s more iconic than this?

No. 5    Dr Zhivago (Moment of realisation)

Julie Christie sits with a determined stare

Dr Zhivago was the book which should never have been, which made the film which nearly never was. Made mainly in Spain, as Russia was out of bounds, David Lean brought together a Stella cast of people who in the end, under different conditions, might not have had any part in the film. The likes of Caine, Brando and Peter O’Toole shunned the chance to take part, Caine even getting to the part of going through the Dailys with Lean and Proposing Sharif. But it was the female performances which make the film. Julie Christie was exceptional and her ability to play the young puritan in distress is second only to her performance as the weather beaten older version. The photography is Lean at his best.

No.4    The Graduate (Seduction)

“Mrs Robinson, you are trying to seduce me, aren’t you?”

Not even Dustin Hoffman thought he would get the role of the seduced College boy, but he did. Robert Redford and others were further up the list but he was chosen in the end, because he was actually out of place. Either way it worked perfectly. Anne Bancroft, the seducer, was 35, and even though he was just 6 years younger he played it wonderfully. The scene above is now very famous, but it was risqué for it’s time. Again great dept of Field, with a wide angel shot getting everything including the lines and angles created off the leg.

No. 3    Bicycle Thieves (Window Gazing)

Father and son gaze at a Bicycle in a window in the classic Bicycle Thieves

For some this simple film is the greatest ever made, for others it is one of them, either way it is hard to fault. Great film photography is about capturing only what you need to, and keeping it as realistic as possible. This film does this maybe better than any other. The cast is completely comprised of untrained actors and people found on the street. The film is shot on the street, nothing is done in the studio. The storyline is basic and revolves around the poverty of post war Italy, and although it may be classed as Neo Realism, in truth it is a very simple gem, similar to the film Once made in Ireland, painted in the mind of a master, Vittorio de Sica.

No. 2    Citizen Kane (On top of the World)

Orson Wells stands on Newspapers on the set of Citizen Kane

Orson Wells understood the power of the press and the people behind it, and this is why Citizen Kane is so iconic, and why this photograph says everything about what a media mogal really stands for. Kane and Wells were making a statement, yes the script came from Mank, but only half of it, the acting the direction and the selling of the project came from Wells. Mank disliked Hearst because he made the writer feel like he didn’t fit in, but it was Wells who was really bitter. He had found it hard to break in to RKO after they plucked him from obscurity after War of the World’s, and so this became his opportunity to show everyone what he could do. He would go on to later live in the attic of Robert De Niro’s Mother’s studio, old and battered by war after war, but it was here where he stood the tallest, few men braver ever graced the industry.

No. 1    The Great Dictator (The world in his hands)

Chaplin with the world at his feet

Chaplin understood the system similar to Wells, except he was wise enough to choose a foe thousands of miles away, less likely to hurt his career. Citizen Kane and The Great Dictator had big boots to fill, as Gone with the Wind, the big studio’s first Colour Picture, had just been released the year before, in 1939. And fill them they did. To the brim. Chaplin was always left of Centre politically, something which would later hurt him in a right leaning America, but he also despised Hitler. The film boasts the greatest ever speech written or given in motion picture, and it was delivered at a time when it was greatly needed. This photo above should be an inspiration to those thinking along the same lines in today’s society. History always repeats itself, so they say….

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No. 10    2001 A Space Odyssey

Director Stanley Kubrick gives advice on set

This particular film is more for the minimalist in you. Yes it’s a long film, well over 3 hours, and the story line is not very complex, but the cinematography is spectacular as is the acting. An Arthur C Clark short story is famously brought to life by Director Stanley Kubrick, and a computer called Hal. An object, a dark hovering rectangle, gives people the opportunity to explore the past and the future with horrific consequences. Sci Fi.

No. 9    The Field

The Field was shot in Ireland with Richard Harris

A John B Keane masterpiece is brought beautifully together by two of Ireland’s own, Director Jim Sheridan and actor Richard Harris. Set within the stoney grey fields and cobbled walls, with the beautiful backdrop of Ireland, it should an inspiration to both cinematographers and movie buffs. The storyline revolves around the selling and purchase of a field which was always deemed to be bequeath. Stellar performances from Tom Berenger, John Hurt and Sean Bean help magnify the genius of story telling. A must for the Ansel Adams in you and those who love Ireland (See also The Quiet Man).

No. 8    Casablanca

Bogart and Bergman stand on set in Casablanca

“Sam, play it again”, (wrongly quoted as “Play it again Sam”) and “Here’s looking at you kid”, were the staple diet of many a young film maker for many a year, but this film offers so much more to the photographer which is never really covered. Brassai was one of the first street photographers to use mist and fog to create atmosphere. In Casablanca atmosphere is everything, and having a world war as a back drop must have helped, but the shady characters and the use of dim light or low light to extenuate this is very important. If you want to understand character building with a camera here is your Mecca.

No. 7 Cidade de Deus (City of God)

Brazilian Film Cidade de Deus did very well internationally

A Brazilian biographical modern great, about a boy growing up in the slums of Rio, is shot with the elegance and striking colour depicting the highs and lows of a would be Photographer. The richness of story line and the historical elements add to this cacophony of tone and light heartedness, ultimately leading us to a show down in both reality and fantasy. This is a fast paced thriller based on the ideology of educationally impoverished youth versus a corrupt state. Does anyone ever wins these wars, outside arms dealers?

No. 6    Seven Samurai

Hollywood copied the film through The Magnificent Seven

One of the greatest fight scenes in cinematic history, a process involving opening scenes not relevant to storylines, a Hollywood copy (The Magnificent Seven) and a much vaulted storyline, gives this Japanese masterpiece a place in our top ten. The storyline has many hidden gems (Traditional v modern Japan) but is basic in it’s main plot. It involves a town about to be over run asking a poor Samurai for help. He hires six others and they set about teaching the people how to defend themselves against the forty strong foe on their way to destroy them.

No. 5    Apocalypse Now

The Vietnam based anti war movie was made with borrowed helicopters

The Vietnam War, like all wars, was a massive human tragedy, which needed an equally big film to tell at least one small part of the story. In Apocalypse Now you get this, and more. The colours, the noise, the music, the characters all gel together within a salubrious Musical opera to tell the story of one man’s military contract to hunt down and destroy another. There was never going to be an easy ending. The photography is stunning, and the backdrop of Asia and countries bordering Vietnam in the late seventies gives it it’s auntenticity. Couple this with Martin Sheen’s heart attack, Brando holding out for his $1m, the ten years it took to make from script to cinema and the Helicopters being returned on a wild wet Tuesday morning because a Dictator needed them and you have something of character which is rarely if ever equalled. The director’s cut, although longer, is much better however, and explains the French angle and where the dancing girls ended up. Orange sky lovers will love this.

No. 4    Blow Up

The film launched the careers of David Hemings and Vanessa Redgrave

The film may focus on an inability to communicate and people’s irreverence to each other during a psychedelic period, but it’s the studio scenes which will interest Photography lovers. Sadly the lead character is short and snappy with the models, but it is part of his inherent boredom with what he is doing which pushes his past the point of patience. You know this through the under cover Photography he is doing and the street stuff. Also with the book he is trying to get printed. Rumours abound Connery was to be the lead actor, but Hemings throws in a master class, so not all was lost. Fashion photographers might enjoy this and street photographers. Either way it’s a photographer’s film.

No. 3    Persona

The film explores female emotion and compassion

Rarely if ever is female sexuality ever discussed let alone filmed in main stream Cinema, but Bergman was no ordinary Director, and Persona was no ordinary film. Having said this like all his films there is a bit of him in it. Maybe a lot of his childhood. He grew up in a very religious house hold. He was punished by being put in a closet away from the family when he forgot something he was to remember. In a way Persona is about the same person not two people, the same person with, like all of us, two characters inside one body. Through two women it explores this. For photographers it is the expressions the close ups the shadows the light which will inspire you.

No. 2    8 1/2

Director Fellini and cast stare up at a camera above bed

Italian Director Fellini is the master of the Art House Film, and in 8 1/2 he creates the perfect blend of Art imitating art way before Woody Allen and others took it by storm in the 70’s and 80’s. The film is an Autobiography. He had made 7 1/2 films up to this point thus the whimsical title, however don’t let the name fool you. The point Fellini is making is he has come to a cross roads in his film making. He is now a modern film maker not just an arty one from Southern Europe. He is a global name and as good as any in his field. And through this direction we get the inspiration of great acting cinematography and editing. If you take one thing from this film, it’s to make your art your way.

No. 1    The Third Man

Orson Wells at his creative best in this post war based thriller

Black and white photography is something of a golden lamb when it comes to street photography, and some fashion work, so if there is a film which will inspire you through it’s cinematography it is this. The underground chase scenes are simply amazing as is the use of light. The shadows on the walls, the shadow work in the streets were brilliant as was the direction and acting. Krasker deserves a lot of credit too, as does Wells, but it was Cotton’s beleaguered character which draws you in. He travels to Europe only to find out his old friend who had promised him a job has been hit by a car and passed away. After visiting the funeral he sets out to find out what happened before he returns to America. What follows is the stuff of post war legend….

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The Street Photographer's Guide by Jamesfitzpatrickphotography - 4M ago

The Citizen's Poetry

A Full Life of Narrow StreetsTitanic Poetry Book

Beneath the broad columns of Herculean Pillar,

Weeps the springtime feather dance

Of freezing frothing blanket.

He lies on Irving’s rocks across the Henry,

Painting words of Freedom’s March across a furrowed brow,

Till tiredness creeps it’s feet on lonely eyes,

Counting mountains

As they frown down from above.

On the first crack of the distant Bell

A teary head raises from a bloody pillow,

And sings out the count, to defiant beats.

Flakes drift softly round a faraway moon,

As drizzle melts the lines of morning strollers,

With the hoofs their companions, embossed upon the heather.

His eyes close as he settles to dreams of futures possible,

Picturing rows of steaming turrets, sharpened blades

And crumbling fear, as they draw known faces on fancy paper.

He hears whispered talk of sagging brows and lobbing smiles,

Scribbling and Scripting our morning…

View original post 591 more words

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Every year People come from all around the world to listen to musicians strut their stuff in Irish Venues all around the country, but what they probably do not know is many of them made their name busking on Grafton Street and all the other cobbled dark streets of Ireland.

Irish Times photo showing Bono and others busking at Christmas

Even now every Christmas these same people take to the streets without police or security and play for charity. As it’s not a country which has taken to the selfie or celebrity it seems to suite them fine. My own father used to move U2 on near Merchant’s Arch when they were finished a set, they were very good.

But rock music plays second fiddle to folk for a lot of people and Gospel Singing has also become very popular with the locals. You can always tell if people like a sound by the amount of people around them.

Irish Band at the top of Grafton Street

Most bands who play in the cities do so to promote their music. Getting a following will allow them to get paid by a bar or other band for backing them. They sell music as well.

Brazilian Music on Grafton Street

We have a big Brazilian population in Ireland now and it is interesting how their music is making it’s way on to the streets and getting a following.

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What is the best photograph size for a present?

Recently my Mother wanted me to give some photographs as a present, minus the inlay and frames, as people might want to get their own. I agreed, but as it wasn’t something I was selling, I had no clue as to the size someone would want for their home. I was lost.

Then I came up with a plan. I went to my account on Fine Art America and clicked on one of my images. I then chose a frame. Now I was able to view a template of what something would look like on a wall in a home. Bingo. In the end I chose something which was very close to A1. A1 is 59.4CM x 84.1CM fineartamerica.com

Photo was just over 5.6 Megabites A1 size

File Sizes

Yes it is big, but once you don’t have a low resolution photo, you should be fine. The list below should help size wise, PPI is Pixels per inch so you can see how you may lose definition if you print this size with a low resolution. Even so, You can tell from my photos they still turned out fine with even low MB.

A1 – 72 PPI 1684 Pixels 2384 Pixels 4.01MP
A1 – 200 PPI 4678 Pixels 6622 Pixels 31MP
A1 – 300 PPI 7017 Pixels 9933 Pixels
A1 – 400 PPI 9356 Pixels 13244 Pixels

Here’s are some free tools to help you calculate megapixel, sign your name on photos and resize photos

MP Calculator

https://toolstud.io/photo/megapixel.php

App to sign Photos

A+ Signature

Resize Photos

http://www.picresize.com

Keep the board cover to protect print

Printing

To print I went to a Fuji Film in a local chemist, rather than a bespoke printer which you might want to use for selling. The A1 cost me €21 per print. About $25. Not bad.

Unfortunately it was not aligned properly and I had to cut around the border. This meant there was no room left to sign it. So when getting prints make sure they know what they are doing and if you want to sign something make sure you have space. Some people say a Silver pen is great for signing. Also make sure you state whether you want it rolled or not, some people don’t but for this size it’s better to carry unless you have bought your backing board.

Use the backing board to help cut your boarder

To Remove Border

As the photos were not aligned properly I removed the borders altogether using a Stanley knife and a backing board. Place the board along the edges of the photo and use it as a ruler. It does not have to be perfect as you will lose a few mms with inlay or if just using board you won’t notice. We may do a video on this later if people want one.

Backing board

A backing board can be bought in an Arts and Crafts shop. They have different sizes so if you want to print different sizes these people will help you out. Allign the photo on top of the board and cut around. Make sure you measure the distances from the side of the photo to the board’s edge.

You should use some wood beneath the board as you will be cutting through. Use bluetac to stick photo to board if the board is not going to be used as a mount. You can always use an A1 as a poster without the board don’t forget as it is actually poster size.

Inlay and Frame

You can get frames online on eBay.com Amazon.com and many shop related websites but my advice is to go to a specialist dealer. Ring them up and get prices before you drop in or check their websites. By going to a dealer in frames you can get the right frame for the photo and the right inlay. Antique frames can be bought from an Antique dealer.

If you like the Samples used and want to purchase please send us an email though the contact section with sales in the subject box.

Samples Used

The Portrait Sample

The Burren County Clare Ireland

5.6MBs

A1 Poster Size

Gloss Finish

Fuji Film Print in local Chemist (Pharmacy) €21 $25

Backing board found in art and crafts shop €2.99 $4

Nikon D3300 50mm 1.8G 24MP

The Landscape Sample

The Customs House Dublin Ireland

2.5MBs

A1 Poster Size

Gloss Finish

Fuji Film Print in local Chemist (Pharmacy) €21 $25

Backing board found in art and crafts shop €2.99 $4

Panasonic LUMIX G5 16MP 14 to 42

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A piece on thestreetphotographersguide.blog

ALTculture Magazine

By James Fitzpatrick James Fitzpatrick is a photographer based in Dublin Ireland. He comes from a Photographic family, but he treats photography more as a passion and hobby rather than employment. He does however like to take socially relevant photographs of things happening where he lives. He is a Street and fashion photographer and uses either a 35MM or 50mm prime lens. Generally he uses a Nikon 4/3 for the street or a Panasonic G5 due to the durability and size.

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