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(please note: iTunes takes a little longer to update, so if you can’t see our episode there, please use Spotify or the embedded player above.)

The post Key Voices #17 – An interview with Jon Glenn, Director of Learn to Swim and Workforce at Swim England appeared first on The Key.

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New ‘quality of education’ judgement

This judgement will have the curriculum at its heart. It replaces the ‘quality of teaching, learning and assessment’ and ‘outcomes’ judgements from the current framework.

What will inspectors look at?

  • The extent to which your curriculum sets out the knowledge and skills pupils will gain at each stage (intent)
  • The way you teach and assess your selected curriculum, to support pupils to build their knowledge and to apply that knowledge as skills (implementation)
  • The outcomes pupils achieve as a result of the education they’ve received (impact)

Ofsted says this judgement will place more focus on the “substance of education” and less on performance data.

Separate judgements for ‘personal development’ and ‘behaviour and attitudes’

Behaviour and attitudes

Ofsted’s created a separate behaviour judgement to give parents reassurance about how well behaviour is managed in your school.

It’ll assess:

  • Whether you’re creating a safe, calm, orderly and positive environment free from bullying
  • The impact this has on the behaviour and attitudes of your pupils

Personal development

The ‘personal development’ judgement will recognise the work you do to build pupils’ resilience and confidence in later life. It’ll evaluate:

  • Your school’s intent to provide for the personal development of pupils
  • The quality with which you implement this work

Ofsted says separating these judgements will help enhance the inspection focus on each area and enable clearer reporting on both areas.

Section 8 inspections of ‘good’ schools to happen over 2 days

Section 8 inspections for ‘good’ schools (formerly ‘short’ inspections) will be extended to 2 days (except for the smallest schools – 150 or fewer pupils on roll). Ofsted says this is so:

  • Inspectors have enough time to gather sufficient evidence
  • Schools have the opportunity to provide evidence they believe is relevant

A section 8 inspection of a ‘good’ school will focus on particular aspects of the school’s provision (principally quality of education and safeguarding).

Longer initial phone calls with the lead inspector

Ofsted inspectors will “considerably” increase the amount of time they spend speaking to school leaders during the normal pre-inspection phone call.

These phone calls will include:

  • A reflective conversation focused on the school’s progress since the last inspection
  • A shorter, inspection-planning conversation that focuses on practical and logistical issues

These conversations will likely last 90 minutes.

Internal performance data no longer used as inspection evidence

Inspectors won’t look at non-statutory internal progress and attainment data. This is to help make sure inspection doesn’t create unnecessary work for any school staff.

Inspectors will:

  • Gather direct evidence of quality of education in your school
  • Have meaningful discussions with you about how you know the curriculum is having an impact
  • Ask you to explain:
    • Why you’ve decided to collect the assessment information you collect
    • What you’re drawing from this information
    • How that informs your curriculum and teaching

Members of The Key for School Leaders have access the a wealth of resources on preparing for inspection and all other areas of school leadership and management at www.thekeysupport.com/SL

The post What’s changing under the new Ofsted framework appeared first on The Key.

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(please note: iTunes takes a little longer to update, so if you can’t see our episode there, please use Spotify or the embedded player above.)

The post Key Voices #16 – An interview with Julia Clements, Children’s Psychologist from Place2Be appeared first on The Key.

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Have a policy that parents have signed

Make sure that your procedure is set out clearly in the home-school agreement and that fines or after school club charges are transparent. You may wish to have clauses relating to calling or make arrangements prior to the end of school resulting in the charges being forfeit.

Having something that the parents have read and signed gives you the documentation to back up any challenging conversation about timely collection of pupils.

Dig a little deeper

Sometimes there are genuine reasons as to why a child can’t be collected on time – they may have siblings at different schools or a parent with a demanding job which often overruns. In such situations, having a meeting and coming up with a solution with the parent is always the best way to solidify a relationship and ease a child’s concerns. If these issues are long-term and the school is unable to support, then enlist the guidance of other children’s charities or families services.

Can we charge/fine for late collection?

We asked an education welfare officer at Haringey Council who explained:

That schools are not able to issue fixed penalty notices for late collection in the same way that they can fine parents for unauthorised absences.

He said that, if a child is repeatedly collected late, schools may wish to levy a charge to cover the costs of staffing or a place in an after-school club. However, he stressed that there is no guarantee that the parents will pay it.

What do you think? What do you do if children aren’t collected on time? Leave a comment on our groups.

Popular topics this week (Thanks to our group members!)

As ever, please leave any thoughts in the comments below and have a great week.

Join the conversation on our Facebook groups using the links below:

The post Managing the late collection of pupils appeared first on The Key.

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Focus on the achievement, not the individual

You should praise the achievement or piece of work, rather than praising the pupil as an individual. By praising the pupil as an individual, they may doubt themselves when they are not experiencing success. For example, by telling a pupil they are clever after succeeding at a task, they may assume they are not clever when they are not experiencing success. This affects their confidence and resilience.

By praising the piece of work, you enable the pupil to reflect on what went well objectively. Focus your praise on how the pupil achieved success, so they can replicate the approach in future.

Acknowledge effort

You should refer to the fact the pupil has tried hard and/or consistently over time. This shows the pupil that by putting in effort in future, they can achieve success again.

Be specific

Make sure your praise is specific about what exactly the pupil did well. You could link praise to targets relating to learning, or to school values for good behaviour, to make the praise specific. You can then support pupils to understand what targets to aim for next.

You should link the praise to your rewards system as set out in your behaviour policy, so that pupils get recognition for their achievements.

Demonstrate the behaviour you’d like to see

Staff around school should demonstrate the behaviour they’d like to see from pupils. For example, if staff hold doors open for pupils carrying heavy books, then pupils can emulate this behaviour.

The headteacher could also model this level of courtesy towards pupils, so that pupils can see your position in school doesn’t affect how you behave towards others.

When you praise pupils for adopting this behaviour, you reinforce pupils learning by copying an example of good behaviour, rather than having to be explicitly told.

Members of The Key for School Leaders have full access to a range of resources on managing pupil behaviour, as well as a wealth of other subjects on www.thekeysupport.com/SL

The post Putting praise to good use appeared first on The Key.

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(please note: iTunes takes a little longer to update, so if you can’t see our episode there, please use Spotify or the embedded player above.)

The post Key Voices #15 – An interview with Sidonie Bertrand-Shelton, Head of Education Programmes at Stonewall appeared first on The Key.

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Provide appropriate and regularly updated staff training

Knowing what to look for is vital to early identification of peer-on-peer abuse and preventing it from escalating. Provide staff with regularly updated and appropriate safeguarding training that enables them to understand:

  • How to identify the indicators of abuse
  • What to do if they have a concern about a child
  • How to respond to a report of abuse
  • How to offer support to children
  • Where to go if they need support

Challenge inappropriate behaviours

You’re required to have a behaviour policy and measures in place to prevent all forms of bullying, and your child protection policy should also include the procedures you have in place to minimise the risk of peer-on-peer abuse.

As part of enforcing these policies and measures, ensure staff challenge inappropriate behaviours by, for example:

  • Making clear that sexual violence and sexual harassment is not accepted, will never be tolerated and is not an inevitable part of growing up
  • Not tolerating or dismissing sexual violence or sexual harassment as ‘banter’, ‘part of growing up’, ‘just having a laugh’ or ‘boys being boys’

Dismissing inappropriate behaviours risks normalising them. You should have clear sanctions in place to respond effectively to incidents.

Provide a preventative curriculum programme

Your curriculum should ensure that children are taught about safeguarding, including how to stay safe online. However, make sure your curriculum also tackles issues such as:

  • Healthy and respectful relationships
  • What respectful behaviour looks like
  • Consent
  • Gender roles, stereotyping and equality
  • Body confidence and self-esteem
  • Prejudiced behaviour
  • Sexual violence and sexual harassment

These issues should be addressed in an age-appropriate and inclusive way, and could be explored through your computing, relationships and sex education (RSE), and personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) provision.

Resources

Child Exploitation and Online Protection (CEOP) Command has developed resources to help you support young people with developing confident, healthy approaches to relationships and the internet. These include videos, toolkits and activities that can be used in lessons, assemblies, or shared with parents.

Childnet International has an online safety PSHE toolkit with films and lesson plans exploring issues such as:

  • Cyber-bullying
  • Sexting
  • Peer pressure
  • Self-esteem

You can also find assembly ideas on the theme of bullying on assemblies.org.uk.

Members of The Key can download a useful staff fact sheet on peer-on-peer abuse available as part of our Safeguarding Training Centre. They can also access and adapt our model behaviour and child protection policies on The Key for School Leaders

The post Reducing the risk of peer-on-peer abuse appeared first on The Key.

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Permanent exclusions only as a last resort

The report stresses the important that permanent exclusions (PE) are only used as a last resort and there are many things that schools should exhaust before a permanent exclusion is even on the table.

It states:

85% of all mainstream schools not expelling a single child in 2016/17 but 0.2% of schools having expelled more than 10 pupils in the same year.

DfE report

As you would have expected vulnerable groups are most likely to get excluded. 78% of all PE being administered to those who have SEN or classified as pupil premium children.

Rewarding schools which are doing well and holding to account those which aren’t

The report states:

We expect school leaders to make sure all children are getting a good education, but we must equip them with the skills and capacity to do so. We need to reward schools which are doing this well and hold to account those who are not. Most importantly there must be safeguards in place for when things go wrong so that we can keep children on the path towards the successful future they all deserve.

DfE report

Ensuring school accountability for exclusions

The consultation said that one of its goals is to ensure that schools are accountable for the exclusions that they make. This will include having funding available for alternative provision. It also made some very promising statements:

Teachers do not take the decision to exclude lightly. Neither the review or the Government propose limiting the number of exclusions, with intervention aimed at supporting schools to use them effectively, while encouraging early intervention in support. The Government has confirmed that it will re-write guidance on managing behaviour and the circumstances when exclusions should be used. This will extend to the use of isolation units and support for those with SEND, to make sure they are used constructively, as outlined in Edward Timpson’s recommendations.

DfE report

What do you think? What do you do to prevent exclusions? Leave a comment on our groups.

Popular topics this week (Thanks to our group members!)

As ever, please leave any thoughts in the comments below and have a great week.

Join the conversation on our Facebook groups using the links below:

The post An update on the Exclusions Review appeared first on The Key.

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Day-to-day management

Who should manage it? 

Limit the number of staff who have access to the page. The person responsible for the page should probably be the headteacher, a member of the senior leadership team, or the school business manager.

How often should we post?

Start small, and increase if you have the time and resource. Create a posting schedule to start with (for instance, one post every Tuesday and Thursday) to build consistency. You can re-evaluate the schedule after a month or so.

Settings that will make your life easier

Use the following settings to help manage your page:

  • In the ‘visitor posts’ section: disable posts by other people (anyone who doesn’t help you manage the page), or review posts before they’re published
  • In the ‘messages’ section: don’t allow people to message you privately. Stick to your official communication channels
  • In the ‘tagging ability’ section: turn off this function. You don’t want other people to be able to tag your posts or photos with other people’s names or profiles
  • Turn on the ‘profanity filter’ to strong. This blocks words and phrases commonly reported as inappropriate

You can set these in the ‘general’ section of the settings tab.

Adjust the notifications you receive so it doesn’t get overwhelming. Do this in the ‘notifications’ section of the settings tab.

You can either:

  • Limit notification to 1 every 12-24 hours (that notification will summarise all of the activity on your page during that time)
  • Turn off notifications for specific types of activity (for instance, when someone ‘likes’ or shares one of your posts)

It may be a good idea to get notifications when someone comments on your posts, but you don’t necessarily need an alert each time someone ‘likes’ something.

Use ‘insights’ to help improve your page and posts

The ‘insights’ tab helps you keep track of things like:

  • How many people ‘like’ your page
  • How many people saw a post
  • How many times people recommended your page to others
  • What people click on on your page

You can use this information to help you decide (for example):

  • What to post (certain types of posts may get more ‘likes’ or views)
  • When to post (comparing how many people saw something you posted at 8:00am vs 4:30pm may help you decide when its best to post to reach the most parents
Keep your log-in details secure

Don’t let your internet browser keep you logged in, or store login details.

Log out after every use.

How to build an audience
  • Encourage people to ‘like’ your page. This means your posts will show up in their newsfeeds, and they’ll get notifications on their mobiles and tablets when you’ve posted something new
  • Link to your page on your school website
  • Ask your audience to share certain posts to reach a wider audience – particularly posts about fundraising or events you’re running
  • Like posts from other local businesses, community groups, and schools. Facebook recommends pages to its users based on things like location, category, and what other users have liked, so connecting with other organisations could lead to more people becoming aware of your page

Members of The Key for School Leaders can access further resources on making their school social media presence a success, including some valuable dos and don’ts of what to post on your Facebook page and how to handle negative comments. 

The post Facebook for schools appeared first on The Key.

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(please note: iTunes takes a little longer to update, so if you can’t see our episode there, please use Spotify or the embedded player above.)

The post Key Voices #14 – An interview with Laura Tomkinson and Joy Corner, Team Managers for Data Protection at the ICO appeared first on The Key.

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