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Deadline: 
July 14, 2019
Job Type: 
Academic
Organization: 
Kentucky Geological Survey, University of Kentucky
Location: 
Lexington, KY

The Kentucky Geological Survey seeks applications for a position emphasizing geoscience communication, outreach, policy support, and economics within the context of our state mandated mission and our internal vision to be the primary source of geoscience information for and about Kentucky. We are looking for someone who will, in addition to excelling at day-to-day communications and outreach responsibilities at the survey, develop an active and collaborative research program on geoscience communication; the use of geoscience information for policy, planning, or engineering decision support and risk minimization; and/or the economic value of publicly available geoscience information.

The position requires:

A PhD in a relevant field and at least three years of professional experience.

Demonstrated ability to (1) perform publishable research leading to papers in peer-reviewed journals and presentations at major scientific conferences, (2) collaborate towards common goals as part of a diverse high performance team, (3) prepare complex proposals and budgets for scientific or engineering projects, and (4) perform general office work in support of KGS research and outreach objectives (this may include occasional lifting of 50 lb or more and occasional overnight travel).

Demonstrated potential to (1) conceive and acquire outside funding for research projects relevant to Kentucky and the KGS mission, (2) develop and foster mutually beneficial collaborations within the University of Kentucky and the broader scientific community, (3) engage KGS stakeholders in conversations about the value of publicly available scientific information and their information needs (including social media), and (4) embark on a program of continuous professional development leading to national or international stature in the candidate's field of specialization.

Preferred qualifications are (1) professional experience in marketing and/or public/government/client relations within a scientific or technical organization and/or (2) one or more degrees in some aspect of geoscience or significant professional experience working in a geoscience organization.

About KGS

The Kentucky Geological Survey is a research center within the University of Kentucky, with an organizational history stretching back to the first publicly funded geological reconnaissance of Kentucky in 1838. With main offices on the UK campus in the heart of Kentucky's Bluegrass region, KGS comprises 50+ FTE scientists and support staff engaged in a wide range of geological research and service activities beneficial to the Commonwealth of Kentucky. This includes active collaborations with colleagues in the UK Departments of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Civil Engineering, Mining Engineering, Plant and Soil Sciences, Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, as well as the UK College of Nursing and other research centers such as the Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute and the UK Center for Applied Energy Research. Most KGS doctoral-level scientists have adjunct faculty appointments that offer optional opportunities for teaching and advising. UK, an R1 research university with 16 degree-granting colleges and more than 200 academic programs, is one of only eight institutions in the country with liberal arts, engineering, professional, agricultural, and medical colleges and disciplines on one contiguous campus. Lexington is a midsize city of about 300,000+ people that offers a wide range of cultural, social, educational, and recreational amenities in addition to easy commuting and an affordable cost of living. Please visit kgs.uky.edu for additional information about KGS.

To be considered for this position, individuals must submit a UK Jobs application through the following quicklink: http://ukjobs.uky.edu/postings/232702

The deadline to apply is Sunday, July 14th, 2019.

For questions, contact University of Kentucky HR/Employment, phone (859) 257-9555 press 2.

The University of Kentucky is an Equal Opportunity University that values diversity and inclusion. Individuals with disabilities, minorities, veterans, women, and members of other underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

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Hello colleagues,

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IECA colleagues: I am sad to report that will not be able to attend COCE 2019 in Vancouver next week due to a family emergency at home. Congratulations in advance to the IECA board, conference committee chair Geo Takach, and Executive Director Mark Meisner for hosting what looks to be a marvelous conference. I will be participating remotely in my Wednesday session, chaired by Jill Hopke, on teaching innovation.

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Type of Call: 
Call for contributions
Deadline: 
July 31, 2019

MeCCSA 2020, University of Brighton

Conference Theme – Media Interactions and Environments

We invite you to submit abstracts, panel proposals and practice-based contributions for the next Annual MeCCSA (Media, Communication and Cultural Studies Association) Conference, to be held from 8-10 January 2020 at the University of Brighton, UK. The theme of the MeCCSA 2020 conference is Media Interactions and Environments.

Interactions with media are increasingly pervasive, woven into the textures and cultural politics of everyday lives. And when the spaces of our homes, shops, schools, offices and cities are so intensively mediatised, media becomes our environment, brought to life through our mundane, personal, professional, creative, commercial and ideological interactions. But what are the social, political and material implications of these media and cultural experiences and encounters? Whose voices and perspectives are included or excluded, and how is power and agency reconfigured, realigned or reproduced in this complex media landscape? The theme Media Interactions and Environments is designed to address this critical moment in contemporary media culture, and appeal to a broad range of media, communication and cultural studies interests and approaches.

This conference approaches the theme of media interactions and environments in an expansive sense, to include, amongst others, media texts, technologies, practices, audiences, institutions and experiences. Media interactions might be digital, cultural, political, emotional and imaginative. Environments could be spatial, political, representational, urban, local, physical, virtual and ecological. This conference theme will also enable the MeCCSA community to question how we should live responsibly and ethically in a politically and ecologically changing world, through an exploration of the central role of media cultures and creative practices in addressing social, political and climate-based challenges. 

We invite proposals for scholarly papers, themed panels, posters, film screenings and other practice-based contributions. Proposals might engage with the various social, political, economic, artistic, individual, collective, institutional, representational and technological dimensions of media interactions and environments. Potential topics could include, but are not limited to:

Media, communication and inequality: exploring race, gender, sexuality, class and (dis)ability

Datafication, agency and power

Ecologies of media industries 

Social movements, activism and civic engagement

Transformative learning environments and pedagogy

Participatory media and collective engagement

Popular culture, media and representations of the environment


Media archaeology, sustainability and archives

Digital cultures and immersive technologies, practices, audiences and experiences 


Communicating and envisioning futures

Critical and creative responses to the anthropocene

Visual cultures, representations and experiences

We welcome contributions across the full range of interests represented by MeCCSA and its networks, including, but not limited to:

Race, ethnicity and postcolonial studies

Representation, identity, ideology

Film and television studies and practice

Radio studies and practice

Cultural and media policy

Social movements and activism

Climate change, sustainability and environment

Digital culture and games studies

Gender and sexuality studies

Disability studies within media studies

Media pedagogy

BAME experiences of media and culture industries

Children, young people and media

Diasporic and ethnic minority media

Political communication

Methodological approaches

Media practice research and teaching

Community media

Submitting a proposal

Individual abstracts should be up to 250 words, and include a 200 word biog. Panel proposals should include a short description and rationale (200 words) together with abstracts for each of the 3-4 papers, and the name and contact details of the panel proposer. The panel proposer should coordinate the submissions for that panel as a single proposal.

Practice-based work

We actively support the presentation of practice-as-research and have a flexible approach to practice papers and presentations. This may include opportunities to present papers and screenings in the same sessions or as part of a separate screening strand. We also welcome shorter papers in association with short screenings. We also have dedicated presentation spaces to display practice artefacts including screenings, posters and computer-based work. For displaying practice work, please include specific technical data (e.g. duration, format) and a URL pointing to any support material when submitting your abstract. We expect delegates who are showing screenings to be present at the conference.

Please note that all proposals (abstracts and practice-based work) will be peer reviewed. PGRs are welcome to submit.

 

Submission deadline:31 July 2019

Submit proposals to: meccsa2020@brighton.ac.uk

Website: http://www.meccsabrighton2020.co.uk

Twitter: @MeCCSA2020

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The IECA by Pieter Maeseele - 3w ago
Type of Call: 
Call for abstracts
Deadline: 
May 31, 2019

Call for papers for the 12th OURMedia Conference

Brussels, 27-30 November 2019

The Université libre de Bruxelles invites submissions for abstracts for papers and panels for the 12th OURMedia Conference to be held 27-30 November in Brussels, Belgium. The deadline for submissions is midnight GMT on 31 May 2019.

The conference will be held under the general theme ‘Mediactivism – Scholactivism’. We encourage the submission of papers that focus on the (real or imagined) gap between academia and society, exploring how academic scholarship could be useful for (alternative) media (activists) and the myriad ways in which media scholars can be committed to equality, social and climate justice and progressive social change. The general theme ‘Mediactivism – Scholactivism’ refers to how both media practitioners and media scholars, rather than being impartial or partisan, can be ‘committed’ by actively and openly campaigning for particular ideals. As the conference will coincide with the 20th anniversary of Indymedia, we encourage the submission of papers specifically focusing on analysing its legacy, achievements, shortcomings and influence on contemporary (online) media activism.

The confirmed keynote speakers are Dorothy Kidd (University of San Francisco), Des Freedman (Goldsmiths, University of London), Keltoum Belorf (DeWereldMorgen.be) and Vincent Verzat (Partager C'est Sympa).

The conference program committee consists of Amaranta Cornejo Hernandez (Centro de Estudios Superiores de México y Centroamérica), David Domingo (Université libre de Bruxelles), Pieter Maeseele (Universiteit Antwerpen), Dimitra Milioni (Cyprus University), Ana Lucia Nunes de Sousa (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro), Robin Van Leeckwyck (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Pantelis Vatikiotis (Kadir Has University).

The local organizing committee consists of Roel Coesemans (Vrije Universiteit Brussel), David Domingo (Université libre de Bruxelles), Stijn Joye (Universiteit Gent), Florence Le Cam (Université libre de Bruxelles), Pieter Maeseele (Universiteit Antwerpen), Steve Paulussen (Universiteit Antwerpen), Ike Picone (Vrije Universiteit Brussel), Robin Van Leeckwyck (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Victor Wiard (Université libre de Bruxelles; Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles).

Guidelines

We welcome both individual abstracts and panel presentations in English, Spanish, French or Dutch. All proposals must be submitted to ourmedia12@riseup.net. Abstracts should be between 300 and 500 words. Panel proposals consist of a panel description (title + framing text) and the individual abstract of each panel member contribution.

We particularly encourage the participation of activists, both scholactivist and mediactivist. A limited number of travel grants is available.

Finally, we strongly encourage travelling by train instead of plane. Moreover, a videoconferencing system will be available to those who are unable to physically attend the conference.

 

Key themes

In particular, the conference will focus on four topics:

  1. Legacy of Indymedia
  2. Mediactivism
  3. Scholactivism
  4. Digital and offline media activism

A special series of sessions will be dedicated to the celebration of the 20th anniversary of Indymedia, by critically approaching its legacy: the Indymedia network was set up in 1999 in London and Seattle (with the WTO protests). Using new technologies of information and communication, activists created online content in parallel to what was broadcasted and reported by traditional media. But what is left of the Indymedia network after its 20th  anniversary, and how has it helped in shaping the evolution of (alternative) media? We propose to tackle this theme by asking three questions: (1) How can we explain the decline of Indymedia’s local and regional centers? (2) How has the role of Indymedia evolved over time in the social movements landscape of the regions/countries it is or was present in ? And (3) which influence has the "Indymedia experiment" had on new alternative media initiatives?  

Indymedia is a form of Mediactivism, which constitutes the second theme of the conference. We encourage presentations that focus on examples of mediactivism, using online and/or offline tools. Activists’ experiences may foster scholarly discussions that take us beyond the classical division between expressivist (ie citizens’ participation) and counter-hegemonic (ie discourses and form opposed to the mainstream) media. We warmly welcome activists’ testimonies and presentations of current and future projects.

As a specific form of activism, we also put forward the question regarding scholactivism, which is the third theme of the conference. As scholars, how can we be involved in activism? To which extent can we collaborate with traditional or alternative media? How can we express our solidarity with progressive social movements, and more importantly, take inspiration from them and embed our work in their campaigns? Can we be part of the “counter-power”? We ask specific experiences that foster innovative research approaches and question established methodological practices. The goal of the conference is to make a link between mediactivism and scholactivism. How can we foster cooperation between scholars, activists and media-practitioners? How can we justify the social engagement of academia and deactivate the assumption that researchers (and professional journalists) are supposed to have a “neutral point of view”?  

Looking at the Arab Spring, the Occupy Wall Street Movement or the Indignados, the anti-TTIP movements or the more recent climate marches, and the influence of Facebook and Twitter on those movements, it may seem that social media are at the core of contemporary counter-hegemonic communication strategies, in the realm of digital activism. This is the fourth theme of the conference. In this regard, social media are not always used by the same kinds of activists. Extremist right-wing political trolls seem to have found online the perfect space to bully professional politics and shape the agenda towards intolerance and hate. Are social media really helping us to structure social movements and effectively changing political power imbalances? Is the political economy of social media being critically discussed and assessed when used? For this crucial discussion, both media practitioners and scholars can exchange experiences and knowledge regarding the effects of social media platforms, their interfaces and algorithmic mechanisms in the hope to gain knowledge on how to use or distance oneself from these online services. Finally, research and debate among scholars today are generally focused on online communication. Is there still a place for offline activism and offline media? How can one develop alternative media without social media, the internet or digital technologies? Are face-to-face discussions and the quite old-fashioned leaflets still useful? We welcome contributions on the offline side of mediactivism.

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As climate change advocates, we are often told to be more like our political opponents: more ruthless, more cunning, more aggressive, more willing to bend facts to our side, and more committed to the most audacious and ambitious policies, regardless of their flaws.

We are all too quick to rally around the banner of those voices that emphasize “us versus them,” “good versus bad,” and “winning versus losing.” We view those opposed to action on climate change as extreme but seldom apply the same label to those on our side.

Yet the more we become angry and the more we catastrophize about the future, the less likely we are to find common ground or even be able to treat our political opponents as human beings, I argued in a May 1 address to the American Climate Leadership Summit held in Washington, D.C.

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On Tuesday the Columbia Journalism Review and The Nation jointly announced a new project, “Covering Climate Change: A New Playbook for a 1.5-Degree World,” with the goal of improving climate change reporting among U.S. media with a one-day town hall in New York City at the Columbia Journalism School.

In the interest of not contributing carbon-emissions by traveling from Chicago to New York, I followed along via the event’s live-stream, an archive of which is available on YouTube. In an important element of user-generated content, London-based freelance environmental journalist Juan Mayorga provided Spanish translation via Twitter.

One theme of the day was that climate change is the context for all sorts of stories, not just ones about climate science. “Climate is not a story,” said panelist and author Naomi Klein. “It is the backdrop for all of our other stories. It is life.”

The #CoveringClimateNow project is well-timed and needed. It’s long overdue, for that matter. The IPCC’s special report on 1.5 °C warming in the fall, along with the U.S. Fourth National Climate Assessment, again sounded the alarm on climate change. Media coverage of climate change in relation to extreme weather events in 2018, from heat waves to wildfires, or the lack thereof, elicited public discussion, especially commentary that media outlets weren’t doing enough to draw connections to climate change. NPR Public Editor Elizabeth Jensen opined on factors that continue to make climate change a challenge for journalists to cover, particularly for non-climate beat reporters covering breaking news. My research on the extent to which media coverage of extreme weather events discusses climate issues shows that for both heat waves and wildfires, climate change issue attention increased significantly from summer 2013 to 2018.

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Type of Call: 
Call for chapter proposals
Deadline: 
May 1, 2019

Dear colleagues,

Final call for submission of chapter proposals for the ICA Handbook of International Trends in Environmental Communication. Abstracts are due tomorrow to btakahas@msu.edu.

 

 

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Event Dates: 
May 26, 2019
Location: 
Washington D.C., ICA conference
Event website: 

Anyone in D.C. in May :-)? Then join the IECA-roundtable panel at this years ICA-conference! The panel, organized by Franzisca Weder, Silje Kristiansen and Birte Fähnrich, and complemented by Bruno Takahashi and Ilya Kiriya, is dedicated to responsible environmental communication and ethical issues challenging the discipline. Provocative statements coming from different cultural perspectives offer a starting point to stimulate reflection and discussion about environmental communication as a critical discipline!

When: Sunday, May 26th, 2-3:15 PM,

Where: Columbia 6 (Washington Hilton/Terrace Level)

Those of you who are not registered for ICA yet or if you're not a member of ICA, don't worry: you can register for the ICA conference at the ICA member rate without having to be an ICA member (because IECA is an Association member of ICA). Looking forward to seeing you there!

 

 

 

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Deadline: 
April 15, 2019
Job Type: 
Academic
Organization: 
University of Rhode Island
Location: 
University of Rhode Island, Kingston RI, USA

 

The Harrington School of Communication and Media and the College of Environment and Life Sciences at the University of Rhode Island invites applicants for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of assistant professor communication and public relations to begin fall 2019.

The successful applicant will establish a competitively funded research program relevant to Media and Environment; Science, Environment, or Climate Communication; Sustainable Development; Environmental Advocacy; Environmental Crisis Communication; Environmental Health; Environmental Justice; Resilience; Corporate Sustainability and Communication; Inclusive Science Communication; and/or Risk Communications and Environmental Dispute Resolution. 

The successful applicant will: teach undergraduate and graduate level courses, including Communication for Marine Affairs (MAF 310) and courses in public relations and/or strategic communication, and engage in the general education program; publish original research, provide advising and research mentorship to undergraduate and graduate students;  and provide service to the department, University and the profession, as well as leadership to URI-wide initiatives to expand science and environmental communication via courses, experiential education, and/or professional development.

The candidate will be working in both the Harrington School and the College of the Environment and Life Sciences. The Harrington School is one of the nation’s leading schools of communication and media. Administratively housed within the College of Arts and Sciences, the largest college in the University of Rhode Island, the Harrington School is home to programs in communication studies, digital media, film/media, multimedia journalism, library and information studies, public relations, sports media and communication, and writing and rhetoric.

The ideal candidate for this position will be joining a dynamic community of 65 full-time faculty, 100 professional instructors, and 1350 undergraduate and graduate students, and will teach and work with students in our new $6.8 million communication and media hub and newly renovated broadcast center.

The College of the Environment and Life Sciences (CELS) is a community of approximately 100 faculty members and 2,200 total students. CELS fosters cross-disciplinary relationships that enrich student educational experiences and create impactful solutions for today’s global challenges. CELS houses ten academic departments, leading in the areas of environmental and life sciences, environmental economics and management, policy, and design. Driven by a responsibility to provide access to higher education for our students and the public, we uphold our Land Grant and Sea Grant heritage while growing and innovating for the 21st century.

The University of Rhode Island is conveniently located near the state’s famous beaches, one mile from an Amtrak station connecting to Boston and New York City, 20 miles from T.F. Green International Airport, and 30 miles from Providence, Rhode Island.

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