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The next book by New York Times bestselling author Spencer Quinn

The Bark is thrilled to do an exclusive cover reveal of New York Times bestselling author Spencer Quinn’s latest Chet and Bernie mystery—HEART OF BARKNESS (A Forge Books Hardcover; on-sale July 2, 2019), a delightful whodunit told from the point of Chet the dog that is sure to get tails wagging! Chet and Bernie have countless devoted fans who are clamoring for the return of this beloved duo, and HEART OF BARKNESS does not disappoint! The book cover (shown above center) features a photograph by Shaina Fishman.

In this perfect entry point to the bestselling series Chet and his human companion P.I. Bernie Little encounter heartache and much worse in the world of country music. They’re both music lovers, so when Lotty Pilgrim, a country singer from long ago, turns up at a local bar, they drive out to catch her act. 

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Dog's name and age: Tweeter, 13 years

Story behind the name:
Tweeter was given this name by the adoption center where I adopted her when she was six years old. After I adopted her, I learned where the name came from because when she gets excited she tweets like a bird!

Adoption story:
I have had Rhodesian Ridgebacks for over 20 years, so when my last one passed, I thought I should rescue a different breed. As I was walking through the shelter I came upon Tweet, a Ridgeback mix! She was huddled in the corner shaking—she looked directly at me with her large brown eyes and I knew I needed to look no further.

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Canine Christmas sweaters

Whether you love or hate Christmas sweaters, you are bound to see a lot of them this season on people and dogs alike. There are ugly ones and attractive ones, and some that can lead to awkward moments when you’re unsure which category they are in. Adding to the confusion is that even Christmas sweaters that are clearly ugly can look adorable on a dog.

There is great controversy about whether dressing dogs up in festive clothing is sweet, unkind, stupid or all in good fun. My opinion is that many dogs don’t like to be dressed up and there is often no reason to do so. If a dog objects to it in any way, whether the objection takes the form of aggression, avoidance, fearfulness or stress, we should pay attention to the dog’s feelings. If a dog doesn’t like it, a good choice is to cease and desist immediately.

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This beautifully handcrafted dog bowl set is made from the artisans over at MudLOVE. Each bowl is hand thrown in Indiana and made from 100% non-hazardous, lead-free, and non-toxic materials. This set will add a stylish flare and a bit of humor to any home. Plus each purchase will support a wonderful cause by providing a week of clean water for a family in the Central African Republic through the brands official charity partner, Water For Good.

Comes in two sizes.

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Will a canine movie theater be a hit?

K9 Cinemas just opened in Plano, Texas so that people can take their best friend with them to the movies. Owner Erik Lankford wanted a place where people could enjoy a movie and be with their dogs. As someone who wants to spend time with his dog, Lankford felt that such an opportunity was lacking in his community.

There are guidelines designed to keep the theater safe and fun for humans and canines alike. Three rules are non-negotiable: 1) Clean up after your dog. 2) Bring proof that your dog’s vaccinations are current. 3) No more than two dogs per humans are allowed.

As dog lovers, it’s natural to applaud the opportunity to spend more time with them, and it’s easy to ask “What could possibly go wrong?” in a movie theater that welcomes dogs. Unfortunately, and at the risk of sounding like a grump, it’s also easy to answer that question.

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Dave Barry Tells All in His New Book, Lessons From Lucy

Over the past 40 years, humorist and Pulitzer Prize– winning Miami Herald columnist Dave Barry has poked fun at his generation. He has joked about its delusions, its self-improvement campaigns, its indulgences, its emotional limitations and its do-gooder impulses. He’s written about everything from kitchen appliances to RV camping at Walmart. Until now, however, he has never tackled one of life’s most important relationships: the one between people and their dogs.

Practically every dog owner will admit that they learn a lot from their dog. In Barry’s case, as he faced the obstacles and challenges of getting older, he found himself turning to his dog, Lucy, to learn how to live his best life. The result of these experiences will appear in a book, Lessons From Lucy (due out in 2019).

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This whole dog thing started because of a story Verna used to tell over and over again. It was a very sad story and I can’t bear to repeat it, but it had to do with leaving behind her much-loved dog when she moved to Cleveland from Pennsylvania decades earlier.

I used to drive Verna to church, and whenever she saw someone walking a dog, she would repeat that story, much to my dismay, and end by saying she loved dogs and wished she could have a dog in her Shaker Heights apartment. Even when she became unsteady on her feet, Verna would insist she’d like to have a black Lab, her favorite breed. A Lab could have knocked Verna over just by breathing on her, but that was the kind of dog she hankered for.

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What should we call them anyway?

A couple of generations ago, a dog who was not purebred would likely be described as a cur or a mongrel—terms that have a strong derogatory connotation. The word “mutt” means essentially the same thing, but has gone from being a bit negative to becoming simply descriptive or even affectionate. The neutral term “mixed breed” has become the most common one for dogs with no known purebred ancestors.

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