Loading...

Follow Texas Green Plumbing | Dallas Plumbing Company .. on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

How to Unjam a Garbage Disposal

Learning how to unjam your own garbage disposal will save you money and hopefully keep you from having to call a plumber. Plumbing repairs for a garbage disposal can cost over $100. It’s also something that isn’t very hard to do.

One call we hate getting is when people say, “My garbage disposal is jammed.” There are things you can do to determine if you need a new garbage disposal or not.

This blog explains a few things you can do yourself if there’s a problem with your garbage disposal. You can also learn more by watching this video:

How To Unclog Your Garbage Disposal and SAVE MONEY - YouTube

The first thing you can do is turn on the power. When you have the power on, check to see if you can hear it humming.

If you hear humming while the power is on, there’s nothing wrong with it. There’s something jammed on the inside.

There’s a tool you can use that’ll save you money by not having to call a plumber out to your house. Watch how to use the tool in this video:

If you look on the bottom of the garbage disposal, there’s a small hole for the self service wrench tool. All you have to do is plug it in and turn it back and fourth.

At first you might think the wrench isn’t going to move. All you have to do is keep pushing it and eventually it will move.

Once you get the tool to move, it spins the bottom of the inside around where you can see the gears and cogs which slide out. There are no sharp blades.

That’s the false thing about a garbage disposal, everyone thinks there’s sharp blades in there. It spins around and forces the food to the outside where it grinds up whatever is in there. Then it makes it rinse out down the drain.

This little tool can save you a lot of money. Another thing we tell people is there is a red reset button on the bottom.

If the garbage disposal is clogged up and you keep running it trying to get it to stop, eventually the reset button will stop working. So, if your garbage disposal is humming and making noise or making no noise at all you may be able to take care of it by doing one of those two things.

For any questions, please call us at 972-442-4101 or message us on Facebook. To read more of our blogs, click here.

The post How To Unjam A Garbage Disposal appeared first on Texas Green Plumbing.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

What Is a Plumbing Vent?

Plumbing vents can go completely unnoticed by homeowners. They’re behind walls and rarely have issues.

Do you know how important plumbing vents are to your house? Or what could happen if your plumbing vent gets clogged?

This blog explains everything you need to know about your plumbing vent. You can also learn more by watching this video:

What is a Plumbing Vent? (and Why Do You NEED it?) - YouTube

The attic is where most vent pipes go out. The vent pipe is tied to your sewer system down below.

What your plumbing vent does is help sewer gas go out through the roof. It also lets the atmospheric pressure in your plumbing system remain the same so your p traps don’t go dry. As long as you have water in your p traps, it keeps you from getting the sewer gas smell inside your sink or through your toilet.

Have you ever had problems with a sewer smell in your house? It may be because your plumbing vent is clogged up. We’ve even seen houses where a plumbing vent never got installed.

With the plumbing vent open at the top and a p trap full of water, the pressure is the same on both sides. This keeps the p trap from sucking itself dry, keeping the sewer smell going out the roof and the water going to your drain pipe.

The vent is actually tied to the drain. This helps make sure your drain pipe drains properly and does not create an s trap. An s trap will make the p trap dry, keeping the sewer smell inside the house.

One thing to remember is, if you have a sewer smell in your house, you may want to check out your vent system. You may also want to do a smoke test in your house to make sure there’s not a leak in your sewer vent system.

If you have a plumbing leak inside your wall, you will get that sewer gas smell inside your house. That’s not a smell you want.

For any questions, please call us at 972-442-4101 or message us on Facebook. To read more of our blogs, click here.

The post What is a Plumbing Vent? appeared first on Texas Green Plumbing.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

How to Flush a Tankless Water Heater

Tankless water heaters have many benefits, making your life easier. Because of this, tankless water heaters are rapidly increasing in popularity.

To maximize the benefits of a tankless water heater, it needs to be flushed once a year. This blog teaches a quick and easy way to flush a tankless water heater. You also watch our video on how to do it here:

How To Flush A Tankless Water Heater The Easy Way - YouTube

Anyone with the right tools can flush a tankless water heater. The tools you’ll need include a pair of pliers and a circulation pump. The pump will circulate the fluid through the inlet and outlet while the water is off.

The first thing you need to do is make sure there are valves for flushing. You have an inlet and an outlet because you want to go in the same direction as the water.

Next, you’ll need to turn off the isolation valves. Turning the valves completely isolates the tankless water heater from the house.

After you’ve isolated the water heater, you’re going to hook up the hoses. Washing machine hoses work great. Make sure the hoses are on tight so it doesn’t leak.

Next, take the other end of the cold water inlet hose and attach it to the discharge side of the circulation pump. You can tell the discharge side from the inlet side because the inlet side has a filter. Once it’s attached and snug, drop it into the bucket.

For the hot water side, all you have to do is drop it in the bucket to create a closed-loop system. The chemical in the water will pump through the system and go up through the heat exchanger. This cleans the calcium and magnesium build up inside the heat exchanger.

In your bucket of water, add the chemical cleansing agent. Now, open the inlet and outlet valve to open the flow path. All you have to do now is plug it in and let it circulate for 30 minutes.

One thing to do before deciding to flush your tankless water heater is to make sure it has flush valves. It’s important to shut off the water to the rest of the house so the chemical doesn’t go through the entire system.

Now that you’re done circulating, unplug the pump so there’s no more chemical going through it. You’ll want to close the valve on the cold side that lets the chemical in and loosen the hose so it drains back down into the bucket.

Next, pour out the bucket so you can flush the system. Open up the cold inlet valve to the water heater so you can flush it out with fresh water. Do this three or four times, then run a pH test on the water to make sure everything is good.

Now that everything is flushed, close the control valve and turn the water back on to the house. Now everything is set and good. That’s all there is to it.

An important thing to remember is to be careful. Tankless water heaters heat water very rapidly. The water coming out will get hot, so be careful when filling the bucket. You also need to protect yourself to make sure you don’t get any chemical from the water on you.

If you want to save money, the trick is to use vinegar instead of the chemical. However, if using vinegar, let it circle for about an hour and a half to two hours.

As you can see, flushing a tankless water heater isn’t hard to do. Learn to do this, and you’ll be the go-to in your neighborhood.

For any questions, please call us at 972-442-4101 or message us onFacebook. To read more of our blogs, click here.

The post How to Flush a Tankless Water Heater appeared first on Texas Green Plumbing.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
How to Flush a Tankless Water Heater

Tankless water heaters have many benefits, making your life easier. Because of this, tankless water heaters are rapidly increasing in popularity.

To maximize the benefits of a tankless water heater, it needs to be flushed once a year. This blog teaches a quick and easy way to flush a tankless water heater. You also watch our video on how to do it here:

How To Flush A Tankless Water Heater The Easy Way - YouTube

Anyone with the right tools can flush a tankless water heater. The tools you’ll need include a pair of pliers and a circulation pump. The pump will circulate the fluid through the inlet and outlet while the water is off.

The first thing you need to do is make sure there are valves for flushing. You have an inlet and an outlet because you want to go in the same direction as the water.

Next, you’ll need to turn off the isolation valves. Turning the valves completely isolates the tankless water heater from the house.

After you’ve isolated the water heater, you’re going to hook up the hoses. Washing machine hoses work great. Make sure the hoses are on tight so it doesn’t leak.

Next, take the other end of the cold water inlet hose and attach it to the discharge side of the circulation pump. You can tell the discharge side from the inlet side because the inlet side has a filter. Once it’s attached and snug, drop it into the bucket.

For the hot water side, all you have to do is drop it in the bucket to create a closed-loop system. The chemical in the water will pump through the system and go up through the heat exchanger. This cleans the calcium and magnesium build up inside the heat exchanger.

In your bucket of water, add the chemical cleansing agent. Now, open the inlet and outlet valve to open the flow path. All you have to do now is plug it in and let it circulate for 30 minutes.

One thing to do before deciding to flush your tankless water heater is to make sure it has flush valves. It’s important to shut off the water to the rest of the house so the chemical doesn’t go through the entire system.

Now that you’re done circulating, unplug the pump so there’s no more chemical going through it. You’ll want to close the valve on the cold side that lets the chemical in and loosen the hose so it drains back down into the bucket.

Next, pour out the bucket so you can flush the system. Open up the cold inlet valve to the water heater so you can flush it out with fresh water. Do this three or four times, then run a pH test on the water to make sure everything is good.

Now that everything is flushed, close the control valve and turn the water back on to the house. Now everything is set and good. That’s all there is to it.

An important thing to remember is to be careful. Tankless water heaters heat water very rapidly. The water coming out will get hot, so be careful when filling the bucket. You also need to protect yourself to make sure you don’t get any chemical from the water on you.

If you want to save money, the trick is to use vinegar instead of the chemical. However, if using vinegar, let it circle for about an hour and a half to two hours.

As you can see, flushing a tankless water heater isn’t hard to do. Learn to do this, and you’ll be the go-to in your neighborhood.

For any questions, please call us at 972-442-4101 or message us onFacebook. To read more of our blogs, click here.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Sewer Inspection Can Save You Thousands

Every real estate transaction has an inspection, but do you hire a plumber to do sewer inspection? Fixing sewer lines is a common job. Too often we hear the customer just bought the house with messed up sewer lines.

We recommend every real estate agent protect their clients by doing a sewer inspection to inspect lines for damage. A sewer inspection can save you thousands of dollars in sewer repairs.

Continue reading or watch this video to learn more:

How A Sewer Inspection Can Save You THOUSANDS | Plumbing Basics | The Expert Plumber - YouTube

If you’re a homeowner, sewer leaks can lead to foundation problems which can be expensive. When we’re talking about sewer leaks, consider how old your house is. If your house was built before the ’80s, the cast-iron under your house will start rusting.

After time, the coating on the cast-iron pipe starts to deteriorate, causing the pipe to rust. Pressure from the house can also cause the pipes to split right along the top.

If you inspect it before you have a problem, it can possibly save your house from a lot of damage. When people realize they have sewer leaks, they either have water backing up in the house or a buyer wants to do a sewer inspection.

We recommend every realtor tell their buyers to do sewer inspection on any house they’re buying. The last thing you want to do is to buy a house, just to have to spend more money fixing the sewer or water lines.

The two reasons people usually get sewer inspection are:

  1. Preventative maintenance: make sure there are no costly repairs later
  2. Buying a house

Costly repairs are the biggest problem when it comes to taking care of your plumbing system. Homeowners should invest money in sewer inspection because its less expensive than an under slab leak repair.

Age and time can lead to deterioration of the pipes. Another problem is the roots. Roots also lead to foundation problems.

Sewer repairs and water repairs under a slab are all expensive. Testing a sewer to find out what’s wrong with it is a good idea.

To test it, put in a test ball and fill up the system to see if it holds water. Next, you’ll want to run a camera. Running a camera helps to see as many lines as possible.

Although having sewer inspection is something you probably don’t want to do, its still a good idea. If you think you may have foundation problems, contact your plumbing company to take care of it before it gets too bad.

For any questions, please call us at 972-442-4101 or message us onFacebook. To read more of our blogs, click here.

The post Sewer Inspection Can Save You Thousands appeared first on Texas Green Plumbing.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

If you have a humming garbage disposal, that means it’s still getting electricity. Although it has electricity, there is something causing a jam, keeping it from turning.

This blog teaches you a quick and easy way to unjam a humming garbage disposal. This DIY plumbing repair is cheap, fast, and easy. Learn how to fix a humming garbage disposal in this blog or by watching this video:

How To Fix A Humming Garbage Disposal | DIY Plumbing | The Expert Plumber - YouTube

One thing you should have around your house is a plunger. Your plunger is going to help fix your humming garbage disposal.

What you want to do is stick the wooden end of your plunger into the garbage disposal. Once the plunger is inside the garbage disposal, stir it like a witches brew. Turn it different ways until you feel things start to move around.

This is a simple trick that anyone can do at home. As long as the disposal is still humming, it’s telling you something’s jammed. If it’s not humming, it may need to be reset.

When you put the plunger in the humming garbage disposal, you’ll feel it moving around. When it’s jammed, you’ll keep feeling it lock up and hit something.

All it takes to get something undone is to use the plunger to make it turn all the way in the bottom. Once you think it’s unjammed, shine a light in the disposal to see if there is anything you can pull out.

There are many things that can get stuck and cause you to have a humming garbage disposal. You’d be surprised the things you can find getting stuck in a garbage disposal.

There are some things you don’t want to stick in your disposal. A few of these things are egg shells, pasta, rice, cabbage, and lettuce. Anything like that should go in the trash and not the disposal.

As you can see, this is an easy DIY project. This is something you can do and there’s not much to it. If it doesn’t unjam, it is what it is.

When it’s jammed, there is something stuck in there keeping the gears from turning. If this doesn’t work, try it a few more times.

For any questions, please call us at 972-442-4101 or message us onFacebook. To read more of our blogs, click here.

The post How To Fix A Humming Garbage Disposal appeared first on Texas Green Plumbing.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

5 Common Slab Leak Causes

There are a few common slab leak causes. Slab leaks are usually caused by the same thing and are expensive to repair. It’s important to know how to prevent a slab leak because prevention is cheaper than repairs.

Following the information in this blog will help prevent expensive repairs. More information is available in our video, watch here:

5 Most Common Slab Leak Causes (And How To Prevent Them) - YouTube

For some of these common slab leak causes, there are things you can do to help avoid them. Some causes can’t be prevented. Those problems are probably caused because of the plumber.

The first common slab leak causes are old construction. Old construction uses copper pipes, which wear out over time. Once the pipes are worn out is when you have a slab leak.

Another big cause of slab leaks is water quality. Chlorine in water is good because it keeps impurities out of the water. The problem is, those impurities are also in the copper pipes.

Chlorine eating away at impurities in copper pipes creates pinholes causing slab leaks. Pinholes are the most common slab leak causes that we find.

Another thing we run into is hard water. Hard water isn’t necessarily bad, but it’s acidic. The acidic water can actually eat the inside of the copper pipes.

There are water softeners and anti scalers. These can also lead to slab leak problems.

Concrete and pebble are other slab leak causes. Concrete is an issue because concrete actually eats the copper.

Copper that is laid out on a pebble in the concrete, can cause a slab leak later on. The best thing to do is put down a bed of sand to lay the copper out on. Concrete can also put holes in the copper by hot water causing expanding and contracting.

Another problem is how old the house is. Older pipes start to rust the day they are installed. This will cause you to run into problems.

Your foundation is another cause of slab leaks. The foundation shifting is one way a problem can start.

The foundation can shift on its own or the plumbing or water line can leak, causing shifting. No matter which caused the other, it’s not a good problem to have.

For any questions, please call us at 972-442-4101 or message us on Facebook. To read more of our blogs, click here.

The post Common Slab Leak Causes appeared first on Texas Green Plumbing.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

How To Do Water Leak Detection

Water Leak Detection is always a pushback when trying to sell a house. The reason is, misinformation is spread about how water leak detection is performed. This causes people to not have proper tests and homebuyers having plumbing issues.

This blog teaches you how to properly do leak detection and how it can save homebuyers money. Makes sure to watch our video on leak detection here:

How To Do Water Leak Detection Like A Plumbing Pro - YouTube
Step One: Put the Gauge on the Hose Bib

To see what city water pressure is, put the gauge on before turning the water off at the meter.

Step Two: Determine City Water Pressure in PSI

Unlike a hydrostatic test, we aren’t trying to see if the pressure can get higher. All we want to know is if there’s a water leak in the water system.

Step Three: Go to Water Meter

At this point, go to the water meter and turn it off. Take a picture of the water pressure to know exactly where it is, at what time. Now, wait fifteen minutes to see if the water pressure drops or not.

For residential leak detection, if you think you have a slab leak, this is the very first thing to do. You want to know if the sewer leaks and if the water leaks.

When it comes to leak detection, if you think you have a leak under the slab, this is where to start. You want to know, is there actually a leak or not.

Step Four: Open the Meter

So, what we’ve done is put the gauge on at the house. Now, it’s time to get into the meter to shut the water off.

Step Five: Shut the Water Off

Now that the water is off, go take the picture, and let it sit for fifteen minutes. Click here to read our blog or watch our video on how to turn off the water.

Step Six: Take the Picture and Wait Fifteen Minutes.

After fifteen minutes, you’ll be able to see if any pressure was lost. If pressure was lost, that means there is a leak somewhere between the meter and the house.

Now that we’ve tested everything and know there’s a leak, we need to put everything back together. Make sure you turn the water back on before you leave.

For any questions, please call us at 972-442-4101 or message us on Facebook. To read more of our blogs, click here.

The post How To Do Water Leak Detection appeared first on Texas Green Plumbing.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Water Meter 101 for Homeowners

A water meter is one of the biggest tools in helping manage water effectively. Water meters can also deliver bad news if your house has a leak.

Homeowners should know enough about water meters to be responsible. This blog will tell you everything you need to know about your water meter. You can also watch our video on water meters here:

Water Meter 101 For Homeowners | Plumbing Basics |The Expert Plumber - YouTube

So, what does a water meter do? A water meter measures water. It does this by having water come in the bottom half of the water meter. When the water comes in it moves parts inside that turn the dial.

You need to get to your water meter to see it. Sometime you can fit a wrench in the slot to open it, but we recommend just using a meter wrench and meter key instead. It’s much easier.

A water meter is as simple as it sounds. It’s important to know your water meter to know when your house has a leak. You should also know how to check your water meter properly.

When you watch the dial on your water meter turn, there’s a little dial that is a low flow indicator. This is what tells you if you’re losing water and if you might have a leak in your house.

If your water meter is turning and you aren’t using anything inside the house, that’s the meter’s way of telling you that there’s a leak. Your water meter has a shut-off valve on one end, a threaded connection, the meter body, and a threaded connection headed towards the house.

Any leak after the meter is all yours. It is your responsibility if the leak is anywhere leading up to the house.

If it leaks from the body of the meter, the threads from the inlet side of the meter, or at or before the valve, that is the cities responsibility. As a homeowner, you need to look at and understand how the meter works. Watch the dial turn and watch the big arrow indicator that slowly spins around.

A good thing to do is get a five-gallon bucket, hook it up, turn on the water, watch how many times the little indicator spins, and how far the big one moves. The big one may not move very far. This depends on if you have one zero or two zeros and if your meter is reading gallons or cubic feet.

If you think you have a problem with your meter, always do a five-gallon bucket test first. If you can prove to yourself that your water meter is broken, it’ll be easier to prove to the city you live in.

If you run your water meter, it reads a crazy number, and you only ran five gallons through it, you know there’s a problem. Now, you can talk to the city about it.

For any questions, please call us at 972-442-4101 or message us on Facebook. To read more of our blogs, click here.

The post Water Meter 101 for Homeowners appeared first on Texas Green Plumbing.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Cheap and Easy Ways to Prevent Frozen Pipes

Winter weather can damage the plumbing in your house. You need to know why pipes freeze, how you can prevent frozen pipes, how to thaw out frozen plumbing, and what to do if frozen pipes lead to a broken water line.

This blog tells you everything you need to know to take care of your plumbing when the temperatures get low. Watch the video to learn about frozen pipes here:

Cheap and Easy Ways To Prevent Frozen Pipes! - YouTube

So, why do pipes burst? Water expands and freezes, and winter weather is what makes that happen.

When temperatures get down below freezing and stay there, the water line inside the pipe isn’t moving. If it stays below freezing for a certain amount of time, the pipe will freeze.

Frozen pipes are bad, but thawing of frozen pipes is what creates a plumbing issue. When water freezes it expands, creating pressure on copper pipes. This causes the pipe to split or burst. If no one is there to stop the pipe from bursting, the water will go everywhere.

First, you have to identify the frozen pipe to thaw it out. If water isn’t coming to a certain fixture, you know that’s where it’s frozen.

Normally when a line freezes, it’s on the exterior wall of a house. In Texas, usually on the North side, the side that gets colder. Identifying which line it is will help determine if you can thaw it out or not.

When you figure out which pipe is frozen, you’ll know if it’s something you can fix yourself or if you’ll have to call a plumber.

Insulation is great and recommended for all of your pipes. However, it doesn’t always work. Especially in very cold weather. Just because your pipes are insulated, doesn’t mean they won’t freeze.

There are certain things you can do to help keep them from freezing. The thing to remember is, prevention for pipe freezing is the best investment for your plumbing system.

If you have plumbing on an exterior wall, think about what you can do. The first thing you can do is open cabinets hiding the plumbing. Doing this makes it easier for warm air from the house to reach pipes on exterior walls.

If you need to thaw frozen pipes, this is what you need to do:

Thawing Step #1

First, turn off the water to your house. If you can’t turn off the water to the individual line, you’ll need to turn it off for the entire house. If you need to learn to turn off the water to your house, click here.

Thawing Step #2

The next thing to do is open any faucets. Turning on the faucet will give the pressure somewhere to go once the pipe thaws.

Thawing Step #3

Open cabinets to get warmth on the pipe. The warmer you can get the area, the better. You can use things like a space heater, heat lamp, and even a blow dryer. However, make sure not to use an open flame.

If you have a pipe busted, it’s best to call a plumber. Hopefully, you’ve thought about this before and followed the preventative steps.

If the temperature is really cold turn on the faucet and let it drip prior to freezing temperatures. For water conservation purposes, put a bucket underneath to catch the water. Don’t forget to shut the faucet off as soon as the temperatures start to rise.

You may waste some water and it may cost a little more money, but at least you won’t have frozen pipes. The problem with frozen pipes falling and busting is now you have other repairs that have to be made.

Make sure to disconnect the hoses from exterior faucets. The frost proof can split and freeze on the inside.

When it comes to frozen pipes, you can normally avoid problems. This is why you should plan for it in advance. Behind the refrigerator, if your freezer has an ice maker, there’s a valve. Normally if there’s a problem, you’ll want to call a plumber to get into the wall.

For any questions, please call us at 972-442-4101 or message us on Facebook. To read more of our blogs, click here.

The post Cheap and Easy Ways to Prevent Frozen Pipes appeared first on Texas Green Plumbing.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview