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Accalia wears stylist’s own hat | Boehm Intimates ‘Devotion Bralette’ | Boehm Intimates g-string

Accalia wears Boehm Intimates ‘Poison Love Bralette’ | Boehm Intimates g-string | Stylist’s own boots

Accalia wears Boehm Intimates ‘Roses Are… Bralette’ | Stylist’s own skirt

Model: Acclia Oliver – Pride Models
Hair and Makeup: Georgia Edgar – M&Co Style Bar
Styling: Susannah Ioannou
Photos: Nik Dukic

Location: Ayers House

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Australia’s foremost kings of progressive, extreme heavy music, Ne Obliviscaris, kick off their epic Australian tour in just over two weeks’ time. Since the release of the band’s critically acclaimed album Urn in October 2017,
Ne Obliviscaris have been touring the world relentlessly, playing to tens of thousands of people. These upcoming Australian shows will be the band’s first on home soil in over a year. ‘The Painted Progression’ tour starts on 9th May and features a larger-than-life lineup of Aussie and international metal acts.

In anticipation of the tour, Ne Obliviscaris have released a 17-minute live video professionally shot in Montreal, Canada by Dr. Light Productions, as a teaser of what fans can expect of the upcoming Aussie shows.

You can watch the live video of ‘Libera’ (Part I)/’Urn’ (Part II) below.

Ne Obliviscaris - Libera (Part I)/Urn (Part II) [Live in Montreal] - YouTube

Tim Charles comments on the video:

“Our live show, to us, is such a vital part of what we do. That chance to really feel the connection between you and the audience through the music is something so special. It’s what we live for. When performing in Montreal, last October, we had the chance to film the show and are pleased to release this live video of two songs: ‘Libera’ Part 1/‘Urn’ Part 2. We are excited to get back on the road, playing here in Australia in a couple weeks’ time, alongside some amazing bands—for what is going to be our biggest ever headline shows anywhere in the world—before heading back to Europe for a festival tour in June as well. We hope you enjoy the video and that we see you at a live show sometime soon!”

‘The Painted Progression’ tour is more than a homecoming for NeO. It’s a massive five-band prog-music extravaganza featuring the nation’s other progressive shining light, Caligula’s Horse and three international acts: Beyond CreationAllegaeon and Rivers Of Nihil.

TOUR DATES
Thursday, 9 May 2019 – ADELAIDE, Lion Arts Factory Lic/AA

Friday, 10 May 2019 – MELBOURNE, 170 Russell

Saturday, 11 May 2019 – SYDNEY, Manning Bar

Sunday, 12 May 2019 – BRISBANE, The Triffid

TICKETS
Available here.

Find more information about ‘The Painted Progression’ tour here.

Follow Ne Obliviscaris

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Follow Caligula’s Horse

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Follow Beyond Creation

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Follow Allegaeon

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Follow Rivers of Nihil

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Photo: supplied

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Fresh from the recording studio and with a slew of successful shows, Sydney classic rockers Rose Tattoo joined punk veterans the Hard-Ons in their national tour, ‘Still Never Too Loud.’ Uniting to provide Adelaide with some ass-kicking tunes, these rock legends are a true testament to Australia’s great contribution to international rock.

An eclectic group of long-time fans and rockers of the new generation filled the back venue of The Gov. Microphones, guitars and a drumkit sat against a red backdrop, waiting to be thrashed by legendary Aussie rockers. To warm up the night, Adelaide-based band The Meatbeaters began their set with a swig of beer and plenty of attitude. Though they took a while to get into the rhythm, the crowd broke out in raised fists and head-banging as lead vocalist Stan’s seamless guitar riffs and raspy, charming voice filled the venue. Strumming seemed effortless for the rhythm guitarist’s fast, shredding fingers.

The Hard-Ons were up next, keeping the energy of the crowd going with their relentless punk-rocking. Some technical difficulties had frontman Keish De Silva struggling to be heard, but the band persevered with bassist Ray Ahn and guitarist Peter Blackie working hard to please the crowd. By the third song, Keish and his bandmates fired things up enough to lose their shirts as fans lost themselves in the music. Keish added to the fast-paced vibe of the guitar solos with his magnetic dance moves. By the time their set came to a close, a small mosh had formed and everyone was chanting along, primed for the next act.

When Rose Tattoo took to the stage, donned in black vests and artfully grungy tank tops, they were welcomed with impassioned cheers from the audience, which seemed to double in size. Mark Evans greeted the audience with his integral psychoacoustic bass riffs, while guitarists Bob Spencer and Dai Pritchard began the show with their famous guttural sounds. Angry Anderson’s commanding voice had everyone singing along from the very first line of their opening song, ‘One of the Boys.’

Rose Tattoo’s experience was on full display with their live performance replicating the quality of their studio recordings, showcasing an era of music that relied on pure instrumental talent and raw, real vocals. Anderson may have been a few drinks for the worse, but it didn’t stop him from interacting with his fans. After a near-tumble and a tangled microphone, a particularly gutsy fan took her opportunity to climb to the stage and plant a kiss on the frontman, who played it off with gentle assertiveness. Angry’s seasoned voice did not disappoint as beer glasses and Jack Daniels cans were raised high, along with fists and a chorus of fans screaming the lyrics back to him.

Rose Tattoo and The Hard-Ons will continue rocking punters at Perth’s Rock Rover tonight, along with cities around Australia throughout April and early May.

Find more photos here.

TOUR DATES
Saturday, 13 April 2019 – PERTH, Rock Rover
Tickets

Friday, 26 April 2019 – BRISBANE, The Triffid
Tickets

Saturday, 27 April 2019 – GOLD COAST, Coolangatta Hotel
Tickets

Friday, 3 May 2019 – CENTRAL COAST NSW, Ettalong Diggers
Tickets

Saturday, 4 May 2019 – NEWCASTLE, Cambridge Hotel
Tickets

Follow Rose Tattoo

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Photos: Matt Pfeil

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Australian rock ‘n’ roll outlaws Rose Tattoo are back on the road from March through to April. Bringing their brand of heavy blues-driven rock to the Aussie punters, with Australian punk rock band Hard-Ons for their ‘Still Never Too Loud’ 2019 tour. Rose Tattoo, or as frontman Angry Anderson calls them “the Tatts,” are part of a family of classic Australian rock bands from Albert Productions that started it all. From the Easybeats to The Angels, Choirboys, and the ever popular AC/DC, Alberts saw the potential in heavy rock ‘n’ roll and gave it a chance. 40 years later, we catch up with Mr. Anderson to talk about the upcoming tour with Hard-Ons, and a little bit about rock ‘n’ roll history.

TEO: Are you looking forward to the show?
Angry: At my age, I look forward to every show! But seriously, Adelaide produced the Twilights and one of Bon’s early bands (Fraternity)—Adelaide is a city that ‘gets it’ with rock ‘n’ roll. In early days, Adelaide was one of the first cities to give the Tatts high places in the charts. There were a lot of radio stations that wouldn’t even play our stuff—I call it the ‘Derryn Hinch Wowzer Syndrome.’ You know, like ‘oh, we’re not encouraging that kind of behaviour’ and ‘these guys are thugs, blah blah blah.’ But Adelaide always embraced the Tatts. They sort of adopted us.

It’ll be an interesting blend of the rock/metal vibe of the Tatts and the punk energy of the Hard-Ons accompanying you. How did this matchup come about?
Scotty Crawford, our manager (who resurrected the Tatts), has a company managing some of the better rock acts from past days because he believes so much in that era. He and I were talking about magical matchings and I said, ‘I get marketing-wise why you partner us with other rock acts, but what I’d like to do with the Tatts—because it’s probably the last few years we’ll be playing—are some things that we’ve not done before, and I’d like to go out with some acts where it’s a great pairing but people don’t actually see it.’ What you’re getting with the Hard-Ons and the Tatts are two powerhouse bands that have mainly established themselves outside of the country because of how hardcore they are. Both bands have a huge international following. I’ve said this for years—some of the greatest rock ‘n’ roll talent in the world is homegrown. I remember someone asking me years ago to go see the Hard-Ons. I said, ‘who wouldn’t want to go see a band that’s called the Hard-Ons? This is cool! I hope they live up to the name.’ They did!

Have you got anything special planned for your eagerly awaiting Adelaide fans?
Apart from the special occasion—you probably won’t see this again unless there’s public demand to do another run with the Hard-Ons, which of course we’d be happy to do—we’ve just rerecorded the original first Rose Tattoo album with this lineup and it’s come up gangbusters! They’re the same songs but it’s a different sounding album, and it’s got three bonus tracks that were demoed for the original album but never made the cut—they’ve come up a treat. So, we’re going to be playing the original album in its entirety plus the three bonus tracks which are ‘Snow Queen,’ ‘Sweet Love,’ a beautiful love song called ‘Rosetta,’ and of course the single, rerecorded some years later, called ‘Never Too Loud,’ which turned into a crowd favourite.

A common denominator for a lot of the great successful and influential Aussie rock bands of the ’70s and ’80s was the label, Albert Productions. What was it like working with Alberts?
I went in the other day, rerecording the first album at Harry Vander’s studio, and I ran into Harry’s wife that morning and she said he’s good, because you know, he’s sort of battling. Anyway, I’d just finished a vocal pass in the studio and came out and there’s Harry sitting on the couch. Tears sprung to my eyes. He knew that we were rerecording the album that put us on the map. Being part of the Alberts family, as it was known then and today—it’s family. When you were part of Alberts you were part of Alberts, so it meant the world to see Harry the other day. I felt the loss of brothers George and Malcolm [Young] as keenly, as they were distant members of my own family. If it hadn’t been for Alberts, you wouldn’t have the Tatts and we wouldn’t be having this conversation, because no other record company wanted to touch us with a pole. It was only at the insistence of Malcolm and Bon [Scott] and Phil [Rudd]—because Phil used to play with Geordie [Leach] and myself in Buster Brown, and he was playing drums in AC/DC by then—that they came along to see us play. The rest, as they say, is history!

If the fans are going to pay that much money to see a night of rock ‘n’ roll, then this is value for money! The only way you’re going to see proof is if you’re there—all I can say is don’t miss the experience!

TOUR DATES
Friday, 5 April 2019 – MELBOURNE, Doncaster Shoppingtown Hotel
Tickets

Saturday, 6 April 2019 – MELBOURNE, Chelsea Heights Hotel
Tickets

Friday, 12 April 2019 – ADELAIDE, The Gov Hindmarsh
Tickets

Saturday, 13 April 2019 – PERTH, Rock Rover
Tickets

Friday, 26 April 2019 – BRISBANE, The Triffid
Tickets

Saturday, 27 April 2019 – GOLD COAST, Coolangatta Hotel
Tickets

Friday, 3 May 2019 – CENTRAL COAST NSW, Ettalong Diggers
Tickets

Saturday, 4 May 2019 – NEWCASTLE, Cambridge Hotel
Tickets

Follow Rose Tattoo

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Follow Hard-Ons

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Photo: Kim Carns

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If you were not already aware of the excesses of Mötley Crüe, then the oversaturated promotion of their movie The Dirt is a taste of what the band has always been about. Hidden away in two ‘blink and you’ll miss it’ scenes, is the portrayal of the Mötley Crüe singer of their 1994 self-titled album—or as it’s been renamed Mötley ’94—John Corabi.

While John is an exceptional lyricist, singer and musician in his own right, there is always that curiosity about what happened in the couple of years that he was fronting the excess-hungry Crüe. Last night’s show in Adelaide was a chance to hear the songs of that era, and an opportunity to hear the stories from the man himself—an experience made extra special with the announcement of Adelaide’s show as the last we’ll be seeing of Mötley ’94.

Opening the proceedings was Melbourne’s Ablaze—a classic rock band with blues-shredding solos and anthems for choruses. Singer Danny Slaviero treated the cramped stage like he was at Wembley Stadium, covering every inch to connect with the audience.

Also from Melbourne, Sisters Doll is larger than life; it’s as if they guys have been plucked straight from the Sunset Strip itself. Their image is classic Marc Bolan, Slade and Crüe, and musically their hearts lie not much further away. Old school Bon Jovi-styled songs like ‘Black Mirror’ had the crowd singing back. Keep an eye out for the daggers being set alight next time they’re in town.

The Mötley Crüe album was actually a great record coming at a time when grunge ruled the world, however, in the world of Mötley Crüe, it disappeared. Last night, we experienced just how good it is, starting with ‘Power To The Music’—its sheer heaviness sounding gargantuan in the tiny club.

‘Uncle Jack’ followed suit, and the crowd’s singing was electric during ‘Hooligan’s Holiday’ before John Corabi took a moment to regale us with some stories, including one about Kate Beckinsale and lyric-rearranging with “pizza reaction” replacing “piece of the action.” The night was full of inspiring storytelling of that time, not just through the music but also through John’s humorous anecdotes. He interacted with the crowd and had them listening intently.

Whether or not it’s The Beatles-influenced ‘Misunderstood’ or the gloriously heavy ‘Smoke The Sky,’ the packed venue soaked it all in with a set-list that went well past midnight, including Mötley ’94 played in its entirety. The songs are great songs, with John’s blues-soul voice soothing to the psyche, and the band were tight, as displayed by the frantic jam at the end of ‘Droppin’ Like Flies.’ An encore which featured John’s own ‘10, 000 Miles Away’ concluded the evening, albeit early in the morning.

As a singer and a comedian, at times, John treated us to an outstanding and engaging show. It may not be Mötley Crüe, but it is Mötley ’94. May there be more ‘Power To The Music.’

Find more photos of John Corabi here.

Find more photos of Sisters Doll and Ablaze here.

Follow John Corabi

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Photos: Peter Pap

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John Corabi is a frontman and guitarist with a vast resume. The rock ‘n’ roll world has held on tightly to this guy—an artist well known for his collaborations that deliver time and time again, and it’s no wonder when you hear what he’s capable of.

25 years ago, Mötley Crüe released their self-titled album, Motley ’94 during the period when John Corabi was the band’s lead vocalist, and he’s heading our way to celebrate the anniversary, with his first ever solo tour later this month. And whilst we’re journeying back into the past with him and his current band The Dead Daisies, we thought we’d revisit five interesting things about John Corabi that you may not know.

1.
For more than four decades John Corabi has been in the heart and centre of all things rock ‘n’ roll. A hard rock singer and guitarist with a ragged edge, he’s also no stranger to the pop-metal scene, having worked with bands such as Angora, The Scream, Mötley Crüe, Union, ESP (Eric Singer Project)—and that’s only naming a few!

2.
Have you ever heard the vicious rumour that rock ‘n’ roll is dead? John Corabi puts that entire argument to rest when you reflect upon his recent work with current American/Australian hard rock band, The Dead Daisies. These guys have hit the stage… well, rocking! Since their 2013 conception in Sydney, Australia, they’ve released four studio albums plus one live recording, a solid effort over such a short span.

3.
If time is money, John Corabi is more generous than most. He’s all about fan-pleasing and felt inspired to launch what the band call DaisyLand: an initiative that encourages their followers to get involved, whether it be through frequent signing opportunities, meetandgreets or competitions that reward their most loyal fans. For example, DaisyLand Acoustic Sessions is an opportunity for the first 50 in line at select shows to attend an exclusive acoustic set before doors open for everyone.

4.
In February 2015, still early in the band’s professional career, The Dead Daisies made history when they were the first rock band to play in Cuba when heavy restrictions around US-Cuba trade ties were starting to ease. The guys spent a week in Cuba, famous for its musically rich culture, while media press kept a watchful eye. Performing at a sold-out show at Havana’s Maxim Rock Club and wrapping up their stay with an unforgettable performance at the Concert for Peace (Roc Por La Paz). Significant attention, worldwide respect and praise followed.

5.
It’s not commonplace for artists these days to create an authentic rapport with their fan-base. John Corabi’s presence via social media is a refreshing change from the same ol’, same ol’ we’re so used to seeing on Facebook and Instagram. John Corabi is a guy who shares because he cares to do so—posting about what’s happening in his world with personality, humour, lots of beautifully scenic photos and all in a style that makes you feel included and appreciated for following him and the awesome music journey he’s been on.

Don’t miss out—tickets are selling fast!

TOUR DATES
Thursday, 28 March 2019 – SYDNEY, Crowbar

Friday, 29 March 2019 – MELBOURNE, The Prince Bandroom

Saturday, 30 March 2019 – BRISBANE, Crowbar Black

Sunday, 31 March 2019 – ADELAIDE, Enigma Bar

TICKETS
Available here.

Follow John Corabi

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After taking the metal scene by storm last year with their record Tū and playing huge international festival dates, New Zealand groove metallers Alien Weaponry have returned to Australian shores with no shortage of hype behind them.

Eager metalheads, donned in the usual assortment of black band shirts and patched denim jackets, rallied into the Enigma Bar to catch the support acts Hidden Intent and COPIA. Adelaide’s own Hidden Intent kicked off proceedings with a gutsy surge of thrash intensity, made all the more adrenaline-pumping by guitarist Phil Bennett’s slick guitar lines and confident stage presence. Brisbane’s COPIA didn’t fare quite as well, with some of the cleaner vocal parts failing to project into the crowd, though their insane djenty breakdowns still incited plenty of movement.

Alien Weaponry took to the stage to the sounds of traditional Maori chanting and the elated cheers of the mosh-ready crowd. Launching straight into the down-tuned frenzy of ‘PC Bro,’ the band’s aggression and tightness was immediately apparent and somewhat astonishing considering they’re all under 20.

As to be expected from such a young band, Alien Weaponry’s song subjects are coloured significantly by teenage angst, with guitarist/vocalist Lewis De Jong dedicating the crushingly groovy ‘Hypocrite’ to “a certain special teacher.” Unlike many bands who implement similar themes of angst, the emotional release here feels genuine and earned, especially when the band turns their attention to politics.

Opting to sing in their native language of Te Reo Māori, Alien Weaponry don’t shy away from tackling the bloodshed and mistreatment their people have faced at the hands of colonialism. This adds a certain poignancy to their onslaught of heavy riffs and enraged shouts that makes them even more fun to mosh to. And mosh we did, with the band inciting multiple circle pits and even a wall of death which—within the cramped confines of the Enigma band room—is truly impressive.

Alien Weaponry play a winning formula of ‘all meat and no veg’ groove metal that had the floor shaking with every thud of the bass drum, and hair spinning with each new riff. Unafraid to find a tight groove and stick to it, the band’s sound pulls from groups like Lamb of God and Gojira, whilst also having a spark of youth that’s entirely their own.

Leaving a crowd of satisfied and sore-necked punters in their wake, Alien Weaponry gave Adelaide the kind of show that will see them surpassing their influences in the future.

You can catch Alien Weaponry live in Australia on Saturday 16th March at Perth’s Badlands Bar.

Tickets available here.

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Photo: Piotr Kwasnik

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Slayer, one of the founding ‘Big Four’ bands of thrash metal are saying goodbye. With a career spanning almost 40 years, and 12 studio albums under their belts, this much-loved band will be sorely missed. Supported by special guests Behemoth and Anthrax on their farewell tour last night, they were part of a rare combination we’ll never witness again.

Hooded and masked for their opening track ‘Wolves ov Siberia,’ Behemoth wasted no time and dove right into their set, removing their masks to reveal the classic Behemoth corpse makeup. The scale of production along with the stage set-up, curtain backdrop, hoods, and their stage personas made you realise that this wasn’t just a gig—this was a ceremony. Just before they broke into ‘Ora Prob Nobis Lucifer,’ vocalist/guitarist Nergel lit incense, wafted it around the drumkit and placed it there to burn for the rest of the performance. Incense isn’t usually something you’d associate with a metal gig, but it added to the religious experience that is Behemoth. They were captivating; unleashing rumbling, growling vocals alongside heavy, groove-laden and intricate drumming. These musicians are true artists.

It’s worth mentioning that this was an all-ages show (props to Slayer for encouraging inclusivity). It was great to see a little girl wearing her battle vest while on crutches, and a father and son singing lyrics to each other—this was a family event, which just happened to take place to a heavy metal soundtrack.

Anthrax picked up the pace and brought the energy with their first song ‘Caught in a Mosh,’ and a mosh there was. Vocalist Joey Belladonna dashed around the stage and interacted with the audience, pointing in approval to fans who were singing along with horns held high. Anthrax played ‘Madhouse’ and ‘I Am the Law,’ along with a spot of light-heartedness when Scott Ian introduced ‘Evil Twin.’ Joey held his mic and stand over Ian’s like a boom as Ian screamed to the crowd, “do you like thrash metal?” The guitarists worked the stage, swapping sides and riling up the crowd, ending their set with ‘Indians.’ The band left the stage to chants from the crowd: “long live rock and roll!”

By this time, the crowd couldn’t have been more amped for Slayer. As the lights dimmed, the curtain dropped and revealed a translucent sheet with lights and logos projected onto it while ‘Delusions of Saviour’ played. The band then entered the stage with ‘Repentless,’ and so began their unforgettable final set in Australia.

There was fire, walls and bursts of it, along with lasers and smoke. Crowd-surfers and extreme moshers appeared everywhere, not just in the pit. There were horns, fists and head-bangers—the way a true metal show should be experienced.

With a discography as extensive as Slayer’s, fans had a lot to look forward to. They played songs from nearly all of their albums, each one a bigger hit with the audience than the last. ‘Mandatory Suicide’ saw an impressive fire display, ‘Payback’ had a dedicated introduction from vocalist/bassist Tom Araya about karma, and ‘Angel of Death’ was an emotional conclusion to Slayer’s four-song encore, leaving the crowd roaring.

Tom stood at the forefront of the stage after ‘Angel of Death’ ended and stared at the crowd—beginning on one side and slowly making his way across the entire stage. It was as if he was committing to memory the faces of the fans; being in the moment with thousands of people screaming for them. “Thank you. Thank you for everything. Goodbye, we’ll miss you.”

After 90 minutes and 20 songs, they left a stunned Adelaide crowd for the last time ever. These men aren’t young anymore, but they are still—and always will be—stars. Long live metal.

Find more photos of Slayer here.

Find more photos of Anthrax and Behemoth here.

Follow Slayer

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Follow Anthrax

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Photos: Matt Pfeil

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Hellfire has hit the shores of Australia for the last time as the final world tour of thrash legends Slayer begins its Australian leg. Slayer is a band that needs no introduction. For metalheads everywhere, they represent the most extreme of the extreme—an embracement of the darkness metal had only ever hinted at before them. For the uninitiated, their name conjures grotesque images of satanic worship and bloody violence.

While the other bands in thrash metal’s “Big Four” like Metallica and Anthrax enjoyed a certain amount of mainstream success, Slayer has always stuck to the unmarketable primal tenets of extreme metal, appealing to the outsiders of the metal scene in need of something more aggressive.

Forming in 1981 in Huntington Park, California with Kerry King at only 17-years-old, Jeff Hanneman (17), Dave Lombardo (16) and Tom Araya (20), Slayer would put out their first record Show No Mercy two years later. Their sound was unlike anything the world had heard before—a merging of metal and punk that dared to be heavier and more gruesome than their contemporaries.

In 1986, Slayer released Reign In Blood and changed the complexion of metal forever with blisteringly heavy performances on all fronts, and lyrical themes awash with satanic and Nazi imagery—it’s a bold record and the massive risks would inspire legions of bands to come. The opening riff of the classic single ‘Raining Blood’ would still send chills down the spine of any metal fan to this day.

After a 37 year-long career marked by many accolades, including two Grammy wins and five nominations, the band’s own Smithsonian exhibit and constant reverence from the music media—as well as the unfortunate passing of their original guitarist Jeff Hanneman in 2013—Slayer has finally decided to put the demon to rest.

Set to headline Australia’s Download Festival in Sydney and Melbourne—as well as sideshows in Brisbane and Adelaide alongside their Big Four brothers Anthrax and the equally menacing Behemoth—this is a sendoff you’d be a fool to miss.

Watch the two videos below for a look back on Slayer over the years.

SLAYER - Early Days: Episode 1 - YouTube

SLAYER - Early Days: Episode 2 - YouTube

TOUR DATES
Thursday, 7 March – BRISBANE, The Riverstage

Saturday, 20 March – SYDNEY, Download Festival

Monday, 11 March – MELBOURNE, Download Festival

Wednesday, 13 March – ADELAIDE, AEC Arena

TICKETS
Available here.

Follow Slayer

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Photo: supplied

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Detroit’s break-out heavy stars I Prevail are back with a new album announcement and two new singles. Initially gaining traction off a Taylor Swift cover that took the world by storm, the band has rapidly grown to be a frontrunner in the post-hardcore scene, raking in insane streaming numbers and selling out the entirety of their Australian tour in 2017.

The two appetisers we’ve got from the album—‘Bow Down’ and ‘Breaking Down’—show whole new dimensions to the band’s sound as well as a huge step up in production value. ‘Bow Down’ leans on I Prevail’s metalcore influences with rapid-fire chugging guitars and harsh screams, building into a massive hook where clean vocalist Brian Burkheiser soars. ‘Breaking Down’ is something else entirely, with a hip-hop inspired electronic drum beat and pitch-shifted vocal fragments rounding out an earnest anthem about mental health awareness.

Both singles will be appearing on I Prevail’s new album Trauma which is set to drop on 29th March 2019.

You can pre-order Trauma here.

You can catch the band live at Download Festival on 9th March in Sydney, and 11th March in Melbourne.

Follow I Prevail

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Photo: supplied

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