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Well another Australian federal election has wrapped up and while most of the country was left reeling at the result, I wasn’t. I wasn’t because once more I placed my faith in Google data that showed a great deal of negativity for Labor, mostly centred on taxes, superannuation and how their policies would hurt you in the hip pocket.

What I learned
  • A supposed Labor landslide was pure speculation
  • I called the result with hours to spare
  • Google Trends once again excels at predictions!
  • Voters care about their money
  • Search volume has sway
  • Google can determine user intent
Transcript

Hey, welcome back Rankers! You having a good day? I had an interesting weekend. Apparently I called the federal election early. I didn`t know I was calling early because I was just looking at the data. And apparently it was a little bit controversial, because we had a bit of our own sort of Trumpian type opposite you could say. We had someone, apparently he was meant to win and they didn`t. And the other bloke did.

The data doesn’t lie

And so I`m just going to call them red team and blue team today, because politics really makes me sick. But I find the data very interesting. And you might remember I did a show a couple of weeks ago about the federal election, how it was affecting sales.

And at the time I also tweeted out this slide which was just a screenshot from Google Trends, right? And it`s just the last seven days at that time, so from the 24th of April back seven days, showing what people were searching for in relation to the major parties and their leaders.

And I said at the time, `I wonder if the politicians are looking at this,` because one of the things that struck me with certainly the Labor search here or the blue search, I should say in this particular case. Sorry, I`m going to get the blue and red mixed up. It doesn`t matter. They`re all the same. So the blue one, which in this case happens to be Labor, when I put that search in all the related queries were around superannuation tax, superannuation policy. And then there was this one here called `inheritance tax` as well. And it was on the 24th of April. I thought, `Wow. When you compare that to the Liberal Party, there doesn`t seem to be anything there around taxes or negativity.`

You could say the leadership spill was negativity. Certainly some of those other words other people would say are quite negative. But there`s no, I guess, overriding thing like there was with the other search, which is all around finance and super and, `What`s happening to my money?`

Then on Saturday, and I didn`t intend to do this, and I just thought, `Oh, I`ll just screenshot what people are thinking about.` Because if you`ve been following this show for a while, you know that we used Google Trends back in 2016 to predict Trump, right? And then we went back, and I went back through every U.S. election since 2004 and showed the data, how Google Trends would have predicted the outcome of those elections. Okay. So this isn`t new to us. So if you`re struggling to get your head around some of this data, there`s the background to it.

But basically what it means is it`s the volume of people searching for these particular keywords. And this search was done Saturday morning. You can see that it was 11:11. I did it, and it was the last four hours of searches for Liberal and Labour. And this is pure volume of Australia the last four hours. And what you can say there is that the blue line, the blue team, is way ahead of the red team, and that gap widened during the day.

Greater searches are opinions

Now some people have said to me, and I also went through this when I first started looking at this about four or five years ago, was, `Well, hang on. Just because more people are searching for you, does that necessarily mean you`re going to win?` The answer is yes, it does. And we know this because we`ve got presidential elections going back to 2004. We`ve got the 2009 election for Australia, and I did another one since then. I think I`ve done a few of these.

But anyway, what it means is that if your party is leading on the day you`d tend to win in Australia. In America, or it`s if the presidential candidate is leading on the day, they tend to win. But when you see, and even if you don`t agree with how I interpret the data, but even if you look at that there are probably, it was like 20% more people searching for the blue team in this example rather than the red team. Okay? So that means this is election day. They`re at the polls. They`re heading to the polls. Why would you search one team more than another? Chances are that team is going to get more things written down for it at the ballot box.

So, and when I broke it up over the whole country, this was meant to be a big election on climate and things like that, right? So that`s the buzz. All I got from the meeting. I tried to avoid it, but sometimes it leaks through. And you can see there that breakdown of the greens and the blue and the red team that the red team is suffering quite a bit in that graph right there. They`re not getting penetration, and it`s like a brand, right? If your brand isn`t getting penetration …

And I rang into a call-back radio in Melbourne, ABC 774, and I spoke to John Thein who I used to see regularly when I was on ABC. And I said to them, `Why isn`t anyone looking at this?` And I had someone on at the time who was a social media person. I don`t know who they were. I`m sorry I didn`t get your name. But they basically said that, `Oh, Google Trends doesn`t show sentiment.`

Google shows user intent

It`s like; well that`s just a total fundamental misunderstanding of the data. So it`s not that Google Trends is showing the sentiment, but just think of it this way. Google`s advertising products, they were artificial intelligence products, are set up to determine intent of users` search. Okay? So Google can determine the intent of the user search based on artificial intelligence.

What we`re looking at here, we can make certain assumptions based on the nature of the search and when it was done. You can make some fairly logical jumps I would think, such as if you are not getting the most search on the day you`re probably gonna lose, because no one`s looking for you. Pretty simple. Right? The other one is this. I thought that was funny. He`s much hated by the people on the red team and some of the people in the blue team from my understanding as well.

But people were asking if he`s part of their team. No, he`s not. He`s not part of anyone`s team anymore. But this search is, once again, it`s just looking at the phrases related to the different teams. And what Google Trends will allow us to do is find what other queries people who, say, search for the red team are also gonna run a search for.

In this case they`re searching for, `Is Abbott liberal or labour?` And that graph down at the bottom is, once again, you can see that gap widening between the two teams over the course of the day. But this is the one that clinched it for me. So ten to three. At three o`clock I called it with my mate, and I just said, `Nah, it`s over. Blue team`s won.` I said, `I don`t know who was meant to win, but it`s not the red team.`

Because when I looked at this graph and it was, once again, the last four hours and it was saying, what are people more concerned about right now? And that`s what I was looking for. What are they searching for right now in Australia? It`s voting day. This is meant to be an election about the climate and those sorts of things and all sorts of things. But that was one of the major things, right?

And I looked at that and I went, `Hmm, people care way more about tax today, so that`s probably how they`re going to vote.` Right? So that was what I saw. So then I looked back over the last 30 days, and I went, `Oh, okay. People are way more concerned about their hip pocket as we`ve always heard over the years, than they are anything else.` Okay. That always is going to be barely top of mind.

So there it is. There it is in the data. But when I looked at, yeah, red team versus blue team or liberal/labour over the last 30 days, the thing that stood out, and I have not been following this election, right? So I don`t know why these other pollsters and all get it wrong. No idea because the data`s all there. Right? And you can see that anyone who looked at that over the last 30 days and saw all these related queries showing that the red team, major issue, major, major, major, was there, death tax, inheritance tax.

Now, look, I don`t even know if they had those things. They may not. They may be made up. They may be fictional. All I`m saying is what people are searching for, what Australians are searching for, when they looked for the red team was all about death tax and inheritance tax and Coles` opening hours.

Anyway, that`s it for this week`s show, and we will see you next week. Thanks very much, everyone. Bye.

The post Australian Federal Election 2019 – How it was lost appeared first on StewArt Media.

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Caught up with an old friend and industry colleague last week and the conversation turned to SEO. Yes, I know, that ranking thing. I explained how it had become a popularity contest and if you combine your strong brand with technical aspects you should dominate your category. The difference in the approaches of Google and DuckDuckGo are very different and interesting in their assumptions. I’ll be covering the technical details in greater depth at my workshop at the upcoming Retail Global event. Tickets are almost gone!

What I learned
  • SEO is a popularity contest
  • Why a strong brand can lead a category
  • The different results from Google and DuckDuckGo
  • The technical stuff that matters
  • Why changing small things can have big impacts
Transcript

Hey, welcome back rankers. How`re you going? I just wanted to show you something today about SEO as it turns out. Yes, SEO, remember that? Rankings?

SEO = Popularity

So, I was explaining this to my mate on Friday night. Hi, Yvonne. I said to her, look, SEO is basically a popularity contest now, okay. I said, you’ve got to get a lot of things right, but if you`re the number one brand in your category, you pretty much don`t have to get all the other things right that everybody else has to. Now, that category can just be a small niche, a small demographic, a small geographic region, whatever it might be. It doesn`t have to be this whole fashion category or whatever. It might be a sub, sub, sub, sub fashion category that you want to dominate, okay. So, keep that in mind when I tell you this.

Here`s the extreme example. You go to Google, and do this at home. You type in the word ‘shave’, and there`s some bit of questionable content there this morning, but if we scroll down. Whoopsie daisy. Go back here to ‘All’. If we scroll down past all the other listings, so if you`re on mobile and you`re looking around for the word ‘shave’ unless you got an ad, you`re not going to probably get that many clicks. Anyway, but you can see the number one result is Dollar Shave Club right there, right, the organic result.

Now for most people, most places in the world where I`ve done this search- I`ve done it all over the world- It`s always Dollar Shave Club. You go, hmm, interesting. Now, we go across to DuckDuckGo, and you type in the word ‘shave’. They don`t even in their knowledge box talk about the word shave. They`re talking about the act of shaving, right. You can see here, this is an ad, this one here, but the first result here is a dictionary result, and then we`ve got Wikipedia, then we`ve got The Perfect Shave, and then we`ve got Dollar Shave Club.

Now, you might say, yeah, but maybe DuckDuckGo is not as good a search engine as Google. I don`t know, but one thing I can tell you is the difference here is that Google believes that when people are typing in the word ‘shave’, what they`re actually looking for is the Dollar Shave Club, and if you go and have a look at the related queries, you can see that quite clearly Google is saying in Google Trends when people are looking for the word shave, typically they`re looking for the Dollar Shave Club.

So, Google`s made it an assumption or put an added interpretation on top of the action of doing the search. It`s not just a word; where is it? What does it mean? It`s about we`re trying to guess what it is we think you want. So, the way to do that is to be the most popular, which is if URL`s are more popular on the Internet, tend to be crawled more often to keep them fresher in our index. Google 2017. Okay, remember that one. Well, that`s it, okay.

The big workshop reveal

It could just be your personal brand, if that`s what you need to rank for. It could be making sure that your personal brand is synonymous with the things that you`re trying to rank for or that your company brand is synonymous with the things that you want to rank for in your geographic region, locally, whatever, doesn`t matter.

So, the workshop when it comes to SEO, it`s about getting all the technical stuff right. So, you guess you’ve got to get all the technical stuff right, but guess what? If you`re the biggest brand on the block, you don`t have to get all the technical stuff right. In fact, you can get a lot of the technical stuff horribly wrong and still rank number one if you are the strongest brand.

However, most of us are not the strongest brand, right, so we go look at other ways. It`s not just about getting to number one. Obviously, we can see that if you`re number one on mobile, then that particular search you are probably not going to get as much traffic as the person who`s buying the ad, right.

This workshop at the end of the month at Retail Global, which is nearly sold out now, is all about that. It`s all about how do we take what we`ve learned, and we look at whether we need more traffic, or whether we need more conversions, or whether we need more … I don`t know, content even, but most of the stuff that we do now is about changing small things. Small things that have massive impacts. As I was saying to my mate on Friday night, I said, you would be shocked and stunned and amazed about the sort of stuff that we`ve learned because Yvonne’s been around, geez, a long time, Yvonne.

But, anyway, come to the workshop. It`s selling out fast. In fact, we had- This is the workshop that other SEO`s try to sneak into, okay. No kidding. We had two sneak in last year. Unbeknownst to me as I found out recently, and they were posing as retailers, which is kind of odd. They could`ve just come to the workshop. This year, they can`t. We`re not letting SEO`s in this year, right, or agencies, any sort of marketing agency. It`s only for retailers.

If you`re a retailer and you want to take your revenue to the next level, then this is the workshop for you. Hope to see you there and we`ll see you next week. Thanks very much. Bye.

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I’ve been hearing from folks in all industries that traffic has been down across the board lately with no rational explanation for the weird fluctuations. One of the main reasons could be the announcement of the federal election. It appears traffic for brand searches and politics have been playing seesaws with one another over the past 30 days. If it happens, don’t panic, just investigate why and see if there are issues you can fix.

What I learned
  • The federal election sales myth may hold some truth
  • Why does politics affect major brands?
  • Election announced: Brand searches increase
  • If you see traffic drops try to work out why
  • Is your direct traffic seasonal?
Transcript Hey, welcome back Rankers! How you doing? Sorry there`s a bit of noise in the background. The 3D printer is printing a few brackets for a few things around the studio.
Traffic slump?

How`s your traffic at the moment? A lot of people are saying traffic`s down, down. And we`re saying it reflected in stats as well and you`re thinking, `What could be going on?` It`s across the board. Seems to be organic, seems to be well, just about everything. Impressions are down. Even when you go and have a look at your Google Search Console. And see if you`re seeing any downward trends in searches for your own brand.

So if you go into Search Console and then into the performance area and you filter by query, just your brand, and then look at it over say a period of 90 days so you can see the pattern. And see if you can see anything like this.

So what I`m looking at here is we`re looking at the last 12 months in Australia. And I`ve got the Prime Minister of Australia as the search. I`ve got the Federal Election as the search. And JB Hi-Fi which is a large retail brand in Australia, Harvey Norman same and David Jones same. David Jones is not just a mate, okay?

So, in this search, I can see okay, this is Christmas presumably. Yep, Christmas, Boxing Day Sales, all that sort of thing. Then down here we have a thing going on right now called a federal election. And if your traffic is down, then blame the politicians.

I used to think it was a bit of a myth when retailers used to say to me, and I`ve been working with retailers since the … I was a retailer. In the late 80s, right? So I`ve spoken to a lot of retailers in that time. And there was always this thing, a federal election, sales are going to be down, everything`s down. Building is down. Everything is down. And I thought, `Yeah, but I don`t know. Surely that`s a bit of a cop out. Surely we can find the traffic.` But when you go and have a look at graphs like this, and what we`re looking at specifically here, we`ll zoom in on this in a sec a little bit more, if you can see, your federal election is announced here. And then for some reason, and this is the bit that I don`t understand because I don`t follow politics at all, it kind of makes me throw up a little bit in my mouth when I think about it actually, if I`m honest.


Why is your traffic down?

But when I have a look at this and I see it`s, we`ve got the federal election call and then I`ve got this uptick in retailers and searches for their brand. So if this is happening to you, you might be noticing some odd patterns. Because then on the week of the 21st or the 27th of April, somebody else can tell me who follows politics, what happened then? I don`t know, honestly. And I haven`t investigated. We`ve seen interest in the federal election go up. This is that red line.

And we`ve seen searches for the major brands go down. So when we go and have a look at this a little bit more granularly, let`s have a look. We`ll go 90 days. Now, here`s the federal election called. Here. And you can see here we`ve got these lovely patterns of brand searches which seem fairly consistent, right? And then we`ve got a little bit of buzz about the Prime Minister maybe calling a federal election around here. And then from that period when he does that, we start to see these odd patterns.

And here`s this little uptick. Election gets announced. Searches for brands go up. And then as soon as we see the searches for the federal election go up, all of the brands start crashing. I don`t know why. It`s like something happened where everyone went, `There`s a federal election?` Because we don`t care about it as much as a lot of people might think.

But if we go and have a look at, say, even the last 30 days, it`s just really odd. See, there it is there. Searches or interest in… the loss in your retail sales is proportional to the interest in our federal election. Okay? That`s the only conclusion that I`ve got. I`ve got no idea what else happened. But I just thought that`s interesting.

But I have seen a lot of clients when you see some drops, you go and look at certain… and this is something you should go and do yourself, so try to work out, did I do something wrong with the site? Are my rankings down? What`s happening? Why am I getting less traffic from Google all of a sudden, or whatever source it might be? You might think it`s just Google. You might see sales are down.

Go and check all your paid, your direct traffic even because that`s a good indication. If your direct traffic is down seasonally, that can be something to look at as well. And they can often be indicators that people are actually just not buying at the moment. This is especially true if your brand starts to drop. I would suspect right now sales are down for those major retailers. So if you`re in the same boat, don`t start pulling your hair out because you`ll look like me. And we`ll see you next week. See you at Retail Global! Check out retailglobal.com.au. Thanks very much everyone! Bye.

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Instead of trying to source fresh traffic, have you asked yourself whether you’re utilising your existing traffic? One of the easiest ways you can ensure a smooth sales funnel for today’s customers is to become one. Have you ever purchased anything from your own store? Test it on all devices and platforms to identify problem areas and increase conversions.

What I learned
  • Make use of existing traffic by identifying problem areas
  • When you make changes, establish a sample size
  • Analyse your revenue graphs
  • Be your own mystery shopper
  • See me at Retail Global for all the insider tips
Transcript

Hi, welcome back Rankers! It`s getting cold. Winter is coming. Really.

I want to talk to you a little bit about this today. Look, it`s more about making use of your existing traffic, making sure that you`re not annoying existing people who are trying to buy from you. `Cause by and large, as I have said in the last few months, that`s a lot of what we find. And by the way, I`m wearing the Pubcon shirt today, because speaking at Pubcon again this year in Vegas, October. I`ll give you the full dates closer and the paper that I`m doing.

The right sample size

However, this is just another one. Now, this change was actually analysed by one of our digital business consultants. Nothing to do with me. He`d gone in and picked this up and said, `This has got to be killing sales,` and he was right. When we first posted this data, I only had about a week`s worth of data. I posted it on LinkedIn. I forget who it was, but they said, `Really, a week`s worth of data? You`re going to make a call on that?` And it wasn`t so much that I was making a call on that week`s worth of data, it was that we had made this change, and we`d seen immediate upticks in revenue. We didn`t know whether it was going to last or to what extent it would increase revenue, but we knew it was working. To what extent, we didn`t know how much. Well, now we know, `cause we`ve got a bigger sample size. Of course, over the course of the year, you`re going to get a better idea, right? But other things happened to the site during that time as well.

But when you`re trying to isolate a change and its effect, you`re best to just watch it like a hawk. Establish a sample size. Like for us, like this person made the comment, `Oh, a week, is that enough?` Well, it was around three and half thousand sessions. So for this site, that was enough to make a call on, it was a big enough percentage. Like it was 10% of whatever we were looking at at the time. So a fair enough sample size.

So what we`re looking at here is this client. What I`ve got up here on this graph is a users versus revenue. We made the change on the 11th of April, so I`m looking before the 11th of April up until today. I`m looking at users versus revenue, because it`s important to have a look at the revenue graphs inside Google Analytics and across your separate channels. The reason for this, is you can see that some channels might be a bit lumpy or you might find that you`re getting more sales through some channels at a certain time of the week or certain time of the day, whole range of things depending on the category you`re in and those sorts of things. So I like to actually go in and have a look and do that.

So the revenue`s up 52%. Now, the areas where it`s really interesting is the ones where we don`t have any more traffic, like email, right? Email is down 14% on traffic, and normally your email is going to convert better than your other channels, `cause it`s from people that know you. But in this case, it`s 95% up on the last email that was done. You can see there, the traffic for the email is down, but the e-commerce transaction, right, is up 111%. That could be higher, right? 0.7% for an email is terrible. There`s a lot there to do. You can see organic is up 4% in traffic but 88% in revenue. CPC up slightly, 9%, but 95% in revenue.

Be your own customer

So all of these things together, you begin to see a pattern. You go, okay, I understand. Every one of these changes that we do now, it`s basically an iterative approach. So we`ve made that one. We`ll let that one sit. It`s had a couple of weeks. Leave it another week, see what happens. Then we can go and make some assessments about where we can either get more revenue, make the next change, get more traffic. But I think right now, for this client`s … For instance, you look at that email conversion rate, and you can see just with the change at the site that we made, it has increased revenue from email by 97%. But we haven`t looked at the emails yet, right? So you`ve got less people clicking or opening their email or coming to an email, but you`ve doubled your revenue, and we haven`t actually looked at the email.

So that is our next area where we should look at, `cause that represents, I think, the biggest revenue uptick. So for instance, if we`re getting two and a half thousand or three thousand people coming to your email, and you`re only getting 0.7% … I mean, all these conversion rates are terrible, right, in the grand scheme of things. And we know why. They could all be a lot better. But 0.7, I reckon we should be able to get that up to at least 1.5. So that means we double that revenue again, right? So that would be the plan.

Now, I`m not going to tell the client I`m going to try to do that, `cause I`ve got to work out whether I can do it first, and then we`ll have that discussion with the client. And the things that can stop this happening is the client`s reluctance to make changes to their email, to the way that they email, giving you access, all those sorts of things.

So just remember, if you`re doing this in-house, or if you`re doing this for yourself, have a look at the little things. Have a look at the things that make it hard for you to buy from your own site. Get your family and friends to have a go. Basically, we`re like mystery shoppers for a digital store. So that`s what we do. You can do that on your own site as well and get a feel for things and how things are working and aren`t working. Make sure you try it on different devices. Do it on a tablet, do it on a mobile, and do it on desktop. Do it on different browsers. But have a play with your site as though you are someone who doesn`t know your site or hasn`t used it before. Quite often, a lot of business owners have not used their own site to make a purchase. You really should.

Hopefully that`s helpful. Remember, we`re teaching all of this at Retail Global at the end of May. Incidentally, the workshop`s selling out fast. Sorry, I didn`t realise. There`s not many seats left. I think there`s only a few left, so get on to retailglobal.com today if you are a retailer. No agencies, sorry. We`ll see you there. Thanks very much everyone, bye.

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It’s quite easy to while away the hours tinkering with tools that can affect channels like SEO and Google AdWords, when you could be focused on the user experience on your site and how it may be affecting conversions. You need to understand the relationship that different channels have, and how they often work in conjunction with one another.

What I learned
  • Don’t get bogged down playing with the tools
  • Put yourself in your user’s shoes
  • Google is a popularity engine – so use it!
  • Don’t be scared to buy your brand
  • What’s stopping your conversions?
Transcript

Hey, welcome back Rankers. I`ve gotta a little bit of a misshapen face this morning. True story. Last week it was out here like this. Abscess. They hurt. Now I want to talk to you so … I`m still drugged up, basically, so. Sorry if I sound incoherent. More than usual.

Are you missing the bigger picture?

I wanna talk to you a little bit today about ads, `cause I`ve been having a couple of conversations this week with clients about ads and those sorts of things. And I just want to show you some data because sometimes you can tinker around the edges and everything else with all the different tools, whether it be SEO or Google ads or social, or whatever it might be. But sometimes the biggest impact you can have on all of those channels is just by looking at what`s happening to the user on your own site. And that`s very true for retailers.

So this is a retailer site, this is a small retailer. This is a retailer that`s only spending about $1,000 a month on ads. Now their return on their ad spend still isn`t where it needs to be. The return on their ad spend is 500 percent, 600 percent, something like that.

Now it`s interesting, I was listening to the radio on the weekend unusually because, well, the football is back on. So, I listen to the radio. And the thing about radio that I love is that they advertise you should advertise on radio. And having worked in newspapers years and years and years and years ago, when you see what we call a house ad, like that, typically means they can`t fill a spot so they put one of their own ads in or they`ll put a charity ad in or a community service ad, or something like that.

Okay, so you’ve got space that you can`t fill, so you`re advertising it. But one of the things that they say on radio is that you can get 500 percent return on ad space. Now I don`t know how they measure that. I don`t know how you measure an ad on radio`s absolute effect on your retail. A little bit difficult, but I think most ad radio advertising these days could be utilised a lot better because you can use radio advertising to go number one organically. Okay.

Now a lot of people would disagree with me about that. That`s fine. But I`ve seen it happen. And I`ve got my data. So, if we accept that Google is a popularity engine, as I`ve demonstrated with data, then it makes sense that if you can increase your brand awareness on radio, in conjunction with the keywords that you`re trying to rank for, and then you will rank higher for them.

However, this one`s only getting 500 percent, should be getting a thousand percent, right. Last year, the manager last year, and this is year on year, they spent $8,000 and they made $11,000, which is rubbish, right. Now, I don`t know the … maybe the client was difficult back then, maybe they`re more difficult than what they are now. I don`t know. But I don`t think so. I think maybe they were doing it themselves. I haven`t actually asked them.

But when you focus on getting your … and for this campaign to do what it`s done, all I`ve done is removed two things that I thought was slowing down the users progress to the site. That`s it. And that affected … the spend went down, the revenue went up. But it also affected every other channel.

Like organic went through the roof. Organic month-on-month is something like 274 percent up on revenue or something. I wasn`t even working on organic. So quite often you`ll hear agencies these days say, `Yeah, we need to look after both your AdWords and your organic.` There`s a reason for that. It`s because they work in conjunction with one another.

Like if I`m increasing traffic from mobiles, one of the easiest ways to do it is through spend on mobile because most of that real estate in search is taken up by ads on a mobile phone, so you need to be there. So you`re buying your own brand, essentially. And so you`re not going to get that traffic from organic now because you`re buying it. But you`re better off buying it than not getting some of that traffic at all. Right?

What’s stopping your conversions?

So and when you do that and you fix up the things on your site. So just fixing up little things on your site can have a massive impact on both your organic traffic and revenue and Google ads traffic and revenue. Okay.

I got an email from someone this morning, a client this morning. And he said look, `I`ve just been looking into Google ads and, you know, the revenue on this one campaign is down from last year.` I said, `Yeah, I know. You haven`t implemented the site changes.`

And he`s saying, `But why don`t we go into Google ads and have a look and see if we can adjust-`

Hmm. Nah. We want more conversions, right? And to get more conversions, we need to establish why you`re not getting them on the site. Is it the wrong traffic? Well, it`s Google AI products, so hopefully not. Your structured data is all right and everything else. So that being the case, if we can fix up conversions and increase conversions by making the experience easier … simple as that … for the user, then you`ll see your Google ads improve, you`ll see your Google organic improve and you`ll see everything else improve.

And this one, for instance. This is another one. This is looking at their entire spend. Now this is interesting in that … actually, this is the same one … so this is it. So, year on year, they went up 24,000 percent on revenue. And you can see here, the traffic is not that different.

Now we didn`t do anything from organic, but organic has gone up, even though we`re buying it. When we say we`re getting a lot more traffic from ads, this traffic here has just come because those two changes made on the site. Direct traffic is right up because over the 12 months they`ve been increasing their brand awareness as well. But now it`s converting a hell of a lot better.

I mean, you look at the difference in these conversion rates, right. So even when you`re not getting many, you would expect the direct conversion rate to be a lot higher with a smaller quantity of users. Especially for direct traffic, which is already brand aware. Not the case.

But look at this. 7.7% on organic increments conversion rate. Now that`s … I`ve got maybe four clients in that range that are getting that. And that`s because of the user experience. This guy`s brand, although he`s done some work on it, it`s not a household name. It might be well known in amongst these industries and his mates, and that`s all you have to do. Right.

You have to become popular in your niche as a brand. You have to have an awesome site, technical SEO. Right. Get all of that fixed. And you need to be using some of the Google AI ad products if you`re in retail, and make sure you have great structured data, all those things, which you`ve taken care of, with your technical SEO. And then if you get those things right, kaboom! That`s the reason.

Now, I`ll been telling you what the changes were for this site at Retail Global at the end of May on the Gold Coast. Retailglobal.com, head across, .com.au sorry. Head across to that and go and have a look.

And I just want to say thank you to my awesome viewers, one of whom provided me with this unannounced. It`s a fly swatter for those of you not from Australia. Very handy in this studio. I get a lot of flies. I live in the country.

So, get your ads working, get your site functioning properly, make sure that your users can get to the thing that they need to as soon as they possibly can. Hopefully that`s helpful and we`ll see you at Retail Global. Thanks so much. Bye.

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I’ll be going into greater detail about my revenue model when I present at this year’s Retail Global event in May on the Gold Coast, but for now I’ll remind you of what you should be focusing on in your retail business and update you on the client we’ve been tracking with data. What I learned

  • Does a revenue model suit your retail business?
  • Can you adapt quickly to changes?
  • Our client made an additional $120k in March ($100k on mobile)
  • Why we buy a lot of traffic
  • When was the last time you reviewed your mobile traffic?
Transcript

Hey, welcome back Rankers. As I told you last week, at Retail Global end of May on the Gold Coast retailglobal.com.au, I’ll be showing how we do a lot of this revenue stuff and revealing the actual steps of how we’re going to meet extraordinary numbers. Excuse me while I play with my microphone. You can’t see that, but wires are all over the place.

I’m only doing it at that workshop, so there’s not going to be any open presentations where I’ll be telling people exactly how we do this, and the reason for that is that it’s too valuable. I’ve given a lot of stuff away over the last 20 years and I’m not giving this away. So if you do want to be part of that, there are definitely limited seats. I don’t know how many are left. I know we’ve sold a few and so if you want to be there, and then get across to retailglobal.com.au.


Is revenue your focal point?

But I just wanted to show you more about the sorts of things you can be doing, or the sorts of things you need to be looking at or focused on in your own retail business. As I’ve said before, this doesn’t suit every retailer, right? And the reason for that is a multitude of things but usually it’s organisational in structure, meaning that the organisation can’t cope with the change that’s required to come from within to make these things happen quickly, and to give them a focus.

Usually, there’s a lot of other competing ideals. Now you might say, “Well, surely revenue is the most important thing to most businesses.” No, you’d be surprised. It’s not. There are other things, other competing interests inside the business. So this is specifically geared for organisations that as I said last week are a bit agile, can move quickly. So really, we’re looking for another two or three clients to go onto this model for the time being. So we’re not looking for high volume, so I’m not doing the speaking gigs that get lots more clients doing this at all. Not at all. I do it ’cause I enjoy it.

So I just wanted to show you … It’s been … We’ve got a month’s worth of data now for our client that was shall we say, not small potatoes but small items, right? So he sent his first month of data. Now, this was the guy who had … was running one of the AI search products and it wasn’t quite getting … It was only getting about 300% return on his ad spend which for the size of items that he was selling, is not high enough, you know. 1 or $2 items.

But we’ve got a month’s worth of data in now, and it’s interesting that we haven’t seen necessarily uniform changes or growth across the sites that we’re doing this to. We’ve seen growth in different areas, probably depending on the nature of the products, the person who’s buying and what they’re buying.

So in this case for instance, the mobile order value has gone from $16 to $32, but the desktop, pretty much it’s on par, a bit better. 48 to $105 where the baskets are. Now, the traffic once again, desktop has smashed it. Mobile doubled. Sorry, the conversion rates have smashed it, mobile doubled.

We’ve got transactions here, yeah, but the transaction growth is very similar. We’ve got this uniform growth across this one, where you’re not likely to say, “Oh well, this one’s outperformed mobile’s app from desktop,” or whatever. That’s not happening in that one. I mean, great results obviously. The client’s very happy. But incidentally, this is only around 650% of generated spend at the moment, so it’s got a ways to go. So some improvement to be made there.

This is the other one that is a bigger ticket item and this was interesting ’cause I wanted to see where the revenue had come from, and primarily what you can see … We’re 65% up on revenue last year, which is about $150,000, something like that, and most of that’s basically come from March, that extra 120,000. And that extra 120,000, basically 100,000 of it purely on mobile.

The main source of growth has been mobile devices, not desktop at all. I mean desktop, look at this. Desktop traffic’s up 10% and the revenue’s only up 5, and here we’ve got mobile up 51% but revenue … I mean, you would expect mobile to be up. The reason it’s up that high, and you might think, “Oh, a strong base.” Well no, the reason it’s up so high is we’ve bought a lot of that traffic.


Don’t be afraid to buy traffic

They were losing a lot of that mobile traffic previously because they weren’t buying it. On mobile devices, you are going to lose it, right? You’re not going to get the amount of organic market share on a mobile device ’cause quite often, a lot of the searching, all that is on the home page for Google is actually ads and that’s the nature of it. That’s the reality. That’s what it is.

And overall, e-commerce conversion rate up is great but I mean the big winner once again is mobile, 77% conversion rate but even, like across the board, the changes that we made have greatly affected the conversion rate across all devices.

This is the difference with this one with the basket sizes and … you can see here. So the mobile basket size is up 25% to $846 but the desktop basket size has dropped to $724 year on year. So we’re now getting a much higher spend at a transactional level on the mobile device, which is not something intuitively I would have thought as I’ve said before would ever happen.

But the mobile revenue, you can see the big difference is there. It’s fairly stark. So what I would say to you from learning this information … What’s this client? This client has got what percentage of mobile traffic? Well you know. See mobile is over half now. So 53% of this client’s traffic comes from mobile.

So go and have a look at your traffic. How much of it is mobile? And when was the last time you looked at your site on a mobile device? Go have a look. Anyway, if you have any questions about the workshop in May at Retail Global, where we’re going to talk about this sort of stuff and how you do it, hit me up.

The book’s coming out, Get Stuffed Google, and of course if you like the show, please subscribe on YouTube. Thanks, bye.

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Went to Cairns last week where I presented on revenue. It was very well received and I’ll be teaching again at this year’s Retail Global on the Gold Coast. I’ll be showing off some new revenue techniques that I won’t be doing in public. This week I’m talking about a client that was getting a poor return on his ad spend. The Google AI wasn’t working well with his site. I gave him three things to fix and his ad revenue is up 48,000 percent!

What I learned
  • Get your tickets for Retail Global on the Gold Coast in May
  • Google’s AI ad products need strong site structure
  • 3 things that’ll be saving for the Retail Global workshop that increased ad revenue 48,000 percent
  • Why the revenue model doesn’t suit all retailers
  • Why we don’t bow to Google
Transcript

Hi! Welcome back Rankers. If you came out and saw me in Cairns last week thank you very much. I had an absolute ball, met a saltwater crocodile named Sugar and she was lovely and a carpet python and a whole bunch of wonderful people. I hope to be back soon. That was a lot of fun. I wanted to carry on from last week, about our revenue model. Because I developed a couple of techniques recently that I will be teaching at the Gold Coast Retail Global workshop only; I’m not going to be doing these publicly.

But what I will be telling you today, is that it isn’t anything different to what we’ve been talking about in the past. Right? So, all of these things, it’s in my videos, how I’m putting it together now is a little bit different and that’s proprietary in nature. But, essentially, you can do this at home. Now, this is what I showed you last week. I’ve just extended the date range. I’m recording this on March 30 and it is March 30. So we can see now it’s 93 percent up on the previous year. Our Google revenue is up 151 percent. Interestingly, once again, our organic traffic is still down 32 percent because we’re buying a lot of that. However, the organic traffic is down, but the revenue is up 29 percent.

That’s because of these other changes that we’ve been doing. You might say, “Well Jim, how much did you spend on ads?” Well, good question. Our return on spend, including Google Ad spend and our fee for that client, is 1600 percent this month. That’s including our fee. That’s hard to do. This is the ad spend, it is up $3100 from last March and that has produced an extra $82,000 or there about. So that’s pretty good, that’s a pretty good return.

3 magic tips
Then I went ahead and looked at another client, because this client, they only sell one to two dollar items, 50 cent items, and little things. Sometimes they only sell one and they lose money on the transaction. But, we just set a small ad campaign up for him because we set down that you should be able to do some ads. Because it’s very cost prohibitive to market this sort of stuff, right? We set that up for him, but he rang earlier in the month and said, “It’s just not working.” We had a look at the return on ad spend and it just wasn’t getting it. It was down at three or four hundred percent, which is not great for what he’s selling. Especially because we like to get up around a thousand percent.

Now the products … the ad products we were using on his site were the AI products within Google. They rely, as I’ve said in the past, a lot on the structure of your site and how well it’s structured. Do you have structured data? Are your merchant feeds all up to date? For the dynamic search ads, they don’t require a merchant feed, so where is all your content? Can we scan it? Can we get in there? All those sorts of things. And then your normal speed, everything else.

We hadn’t done any of those sorts of things to his site cause it’s essentially, they’re kind of SEO. I just said look, just go do this, this, this, and this. And I gave him three things. Those three things is what I’m going to be teaching in the workshop. And he went and did it himself. Now, he’s not a technical person, and these weren’t necessarily that technical for him to do. But the results were that his traffic this year is up 66 percent and as you can see 70 percent of his paid traffic is right up. So we’ve bought a lot of traffic for him. The result of that, the traffic he was buying last year basically didn’t give him any, well it gave him one sale for ten dollars. This year he’s had 48,000 percent increase on his revenue.

Sorry, there’s flies in the studio. This year, we’ve got a 48,000 percent increase on Google ad revenue. That’s pretty cool. Organic is more inside, you can see here. We’re only slightly up on organic. Organic’s only a little bit up, and we’re not doing any organic for him. Keep that in mind, no organic. And his sales are up 77,421 percent. And this has only happened since we made these changes on the seventh of March, right.

That’s 33,000 percent up for his direct traffic. A whole range of just ridiculously awesome numbers. Month on month it’s more than doubled. I think overall the site is up nearly 600 percent on revenue. It’s just crazy right? And these are simple things to do. If you are interested in finding out how we do this, it does not work for every retailer. Let me emphasise and stress that.

If it ain’t broke!
The reason it doesn’t work for every retailer, is that some retailers just can’t handle it. Case in point, the one I showed you last week, their revenue is now tanking because someone decided, in this organisation, which is a larger organisation, that they were going to change the Hero page that was generating all the revenue. That’s an internal decision. It’s a bit soul destroying if you’re working on it when you’re seeing these sorts of numbers. That’s why it just doesn’t work for everyone.

If you are coming to the workshop, keep that in mind. You’ve got to be a fairly agile organisation, fairly aware and focused on the lead measures and the metrics that you need to be. When I talk about lead measures, I’m talking about, you know just the things we’ve always talked about. Speed, ease of use, errors, up-time, everything, all the SEO stuff. I had a client, not a client recently, say, I can’t see any SEO in this proposal. I said everything’s SEO. Everything’s SEO because all that Google is trying to do is provide the most relevant result for the user, that’s a really great experience.

Our job is to make your website a really great experience for the user and get stuff Googled. We’ll use your ad products and if you want to send us organic traffic, cause we’re awesome, do it. Because we’re gonna make more money from it. But we’re not going to go and try to bow to the algorithm, or you know, try to trick the algorithm. Because at the end of the day we can make more money doing three simple things.

Hope to see you at the workshop. End of May 2019, tell your friends, share the video. Subscribe if you like it. Thanks very much. Bye.

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Off to Cairns today where I’ll be giving a presentation on how to boost revenue on a website. It’s been a real eye-opener since switching to a revenue focused model and I’m learning new things all the time. Drops in old metrics that used to be cause for panic, such as organic traffic, bounce rates and eCommerce conversion rates, are no longer such an issue because I’ve learnt to focus on the one true marker; revenue.

What I learned
  • The simple tactics to boost revenue
  • Why not clicking on ads is outdated thinking
  • Why organic falls can be great news for mobile
  • Why you should over-charge your brand/li>
  • Mobile display should adjust your thinking
  • Speed is more than just load times
Transcript

Hey, welcome back, Rankers. Sorry if we get a bit of noise today. There’s a lot of heavy weather about and playing havoc with the studio. I’m off to Cairns this afternoon. For those of you who don’t know where it is, it’s a long way away from where I am. It’s about 32 hours’ drive up north in the tropics. We’ll be talking about basically things that you can do on your site today to boost your revenue, right? So it’ll be a lot of fun.

But the sorts of things we’re going to be talking about, and I’ll just show you, because I’ve been doing this a long time. When you see stuff that you haven’t seen before, you go, “Oh, well, that’s very interesting. I haven’t seen that before.” That’s certainly what’s happening since we have moved to focusing on revenue for clients.

Be an ad clicker
So let me just show you the one to start with. There’s a lot of myths, I guess, about the way that we use the web. We always used to get told by clients, “Oh, I never click on the ads.” That was basically 2009 or something like that. Everyone clicks on the ads now, all right? So if you’re one of those people that don’t click on the ads, you’re a minority now, okay? Because people don’t care anymore, and here’s a case in point.

So you can see here this is organic traffic, and this is month-on-month, sorry year-on-year, so March, as up until yesterday, versus March last year. You can see there we’ve had a massive drop in organic traffic. We’ve had a 31% decrease in organic traffic and 23% decrease in mobile, I should say. So some massive drops there.

You can see the sessions are down, bounce rate’s worse, pages per session slightly better, average session duration down, e-commerce conversion rate down although mobile is up a lot, which is good. Then you have a look at transactions are down, but then you have a look at this. Revenue was up. What? Yeah, revenue was up. You can see on mobile it’s up significantly.

Now, that’s less traffic, more money, right? The reason there’s less traffic is because we’ve got a Google Ads campaign going as well, which is absolutely killing it on mobile. So let’s not forget when you do a search on mobile, most of the screen that you will see from most searches is just going to be ads, right? So this is why people say over charge your brand, right? Because you don’t know who else is going to be there. You don’t know what other terms people are going to associate with your brand, whether someone else is going to broad match on those other terms, all these other things.

Basically, obviously, you’ve got to measure, right? So you’ve got to measure you’re getting the right return. We go down now to a very granular level because I want to understand what’s happening with certain devices, with certain navigation functions or certain products. Do we find that people on mobile behave differently? Well, yeah, they do. We know that. The main thing that they want to do is they want to find things quickly.

All about speed
So when I have a look at this, this is a, let’s just say it’s a navigation feature that we’ve put in, and it’s a way just to help users find what they want. What I’m looking at here now is organic sessions, so people coming in from well, Google, from SEO work. You can see there we’ve had double the amount of mobile users use this function, which is what it was for. So if they couldn’t get to it before, they couldn’t see it before, now it’s easier for them to see. You can see there Google has actually … Well, this isn’t new traffic from Google. This is new traffic using that function, I should say.

But it’s worked, I would say, by anyone’s standard even though e-commerce conversion rate’s down overall for desktop. We’ve had a 418% increase in revenue through that channel, and that much of it, all 8600% has been mobile, who the design change was for. So tick, that one’s worked.

Now, some may say, “Well, so I’m not worried about these figures that say where our session times are down or any of those sorts of things.” Overall, the site, and this is, once again we’re looking at year-on-year for March, and this is … What’s that? That’s an extra above last year 85%. So we’re up 85% revenue for this retailer on last year.

Those changes that we’ve been doing this month have all been about helping the user solve the problem quickly. They’ve all been about essentially a speed, speed of transaction, speed of finding the product, speed of the page loading, and these are all really just performance issues.

If I could tell you one thing that you could do, even though that last one I showed you of 8600% seems extraordinary and it is, it’s basically all we’re doing is helping the user get to their purchase as quickly as they can. This is why I don’t worry about things like bounce rates or session times as you saw with that organic. Everything was down. Everything was down. If you just focus on your e-commerce conversion rate, you’re going to get yourself into trouble as well.

All of a sudden, you get a lot more new traffic, as we can just see here. As we saw before, one of them’s 48% down on the conversion rate, but then revenue is way up. So it’s important to focus on the right things, and that’s what we’re going to be doing at Cairns tomorrow and talking and showing people how we do these things. If you’d like to learn more, then please subscribe and share. We’ve got the book coming out, so if you want a copy of that, just email getstuffedgoogle@stewartmedia.biz. We’ll see you next week. Thanks very much, everyone. Bye.

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As great as Google is as a search engine, it isn’t without its flaws. One such flaw is its use of social proof and popularity to return search results. Unfortunately this is why results often miss the target leaving you scratching your head. Some people claim that the only people that are successful on Google are ex-Google engineers that can manipulate the SEO. I disagree, as accurate search results are more than just strong SEO.

What I learned
  • Google’s algorithm doesn’t always deliver accurate results
  • Why you don’t have to manipulate Google
  • Your site needs the 3 pillars of Google
  • Grow your brand for success
  • Don’t forget the SEO basics
Transcript

Hey welcome back Rankers! Do you like my phone? Kids this is a phone. It’s what we used to talk to people on. It used to cost money. You used to go down to the shop, put your money in there, turn this around, look this … this thing. So we’ve got the numbers here. Weird, huh?

SEO is not manipulation
I want to tell you a little bit about popularity and Google. There was a conversation I had last week with Stephan on Twitter along with John Mu and I just want to demonstrate something first before we got into that. This is an Australian red pay phone, 1979. I know, before a lot of you were born. I’ve had it in the shed for about 20 years and decided to clean it up on the weekend. I was looking forward to seeing if I could get some keys to unlock the thing because I want to get inside it and clean it out and see if there’s any interesting coins in the coin box. Stuff like that. Probably just be full of washers.

I started to do the search on Google and this is incognito. So this is “Australian red pay phone unlock.” So immediately Google says to me, “Jim did you mean Australian red phone unlock cause I think you’re looking for a mobile solution, is that right?” No Google. It’s not. This is all the results that I’ve got. This is all about unlocking a mobile phone and getting off a contract, IME codes, all this stuff. None of those things does this phone have any idea of, okay? It doesn’t know what you’re talking about. So then I go across to duckduckgo.com and we talked about DuckDuckGo last week and to me it’s a really good example, exact search and I haven’t restricted it to Australia either but it’s giving me Australian results, cause I’ve got “Australian red payphone unlock.”

This site here, these first two sites have been bang on what I was looking for. Bang on and that’s the difference with Google’s search engine in that it uses this concept of popularity or social proof as part of the metric in order to give a more relevant result to users. In this case, it ain’t working. So what was the conversation I had with Stephan? The reason I tell you this story is Stephan came out to John Mu on Twitter and said the only people who can do SEO or manipulate Google are the ex-Google engineers who can do SEO.

John Mu came back and said SEO’s not about manipulating Google. They can’t actually do that. All they can do is make sites better for the search engines to understand, interpret, and all those sorts of things. Give users a better experience. When I hear what’s on the end of that, a question like that, is usually because he’s had trouble getting ranked. So I just said, “Have you got a site you want me to have a look at and I’ll have a look at it?” So I went and had a look and Stephan was showing me he’s getting some great traffic there. He’s done a really good job. It’s really fast. He’s obviously a smart coder or smart bloke. He’s built a pretty functional site from what I can tell. The problem though is when we go and have a look at the site, this is the home page, and I’m not presented with any level of trust or any level of integrity of the data that I happen to be looking at.

Grow your brand
This is all calendar-based stuff. It’s date stuff. It’s holidays and all these sorts of things. I have to know that I can trust that data, but there’s nothing there to give me that. There’s nothing there to say that you are the authority or that you have the expertise to deliver these things. The three pillars of Google right? So I look at that and I go I don’t know. And what you’re looking to do, this might function really well. It might be getting good traffic, but if you want this to spread and to become popular, you’ve got to grow the brand. This site is devoid of any brand, right? The reason that you need a brand is because you need people to associate your brand with this strong content, this fast site, this reliable content. That’s what you’re looking to do.

Now one of the ways that you can do that simply is start advertising somewhere. Wherever your audience is. People go, “Oh god, I’ve got to do content marketing to build my brand.” Well content marketing can be taking out ads on YouTube or something, anything right? You’re just trying to get the message in front of your audience wherever they may be. Once you start growing that brand and getting more people associating your brand with the key search criteria that you want to rank for, so if it’s shoes then you want to be ‘Windsor Smith Shoes’ or whatever.

You want people to be typing in your brand and then the keyword. Now one of the ways that you can measure this to see how you’re going, one way or the other, is just go into Google Search Console, use Google search analytics, and what you’re looking for is a rising number of people typing and searching for your brand. Once you start to see people searching for your brand, then it’s going to be a whole lot easier for you to rank. Now in the meantime of course, you’ve got to do all the things that are technical SEO. You still have to go and make the site fast if it’s not already and Stephan is a smart bloke, he’s coded it well from what I can tell anyway. You need to go and get the Google index cleaned up. You need to go and fix all the errors inside Google Search Console. You need to make sure your mobile usability is great.

All these things have to be done. But you do those things, but you don’t worry about Google cause the reason that you’re doing those things is because you’re doing them for the user. Hopefully that’s helpful and we’ll see you next week, I’m going to make a few phone calls. Thanks so much, bye!

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In a classic case of the old guard trying to defend its long-held grip on an industry, News Corp has appealed to the government to break up Google as they have become too powerful. Pot. Kettle. Black. While the fear of being outmuscled by a business rival is understandable, it is also confusing and misguided as News Corp not only makes money from Google but maybe should learn some lessons in adaptation.

What I learned
  • News Corp is displaying hypocrisy at its finest
  • News Corp owns an agency that sells Google AdWords. What the?
  • Do Google really abuse their advertisers?
  • Are you paying too much per click?
  • Paywall modelling is restrictive
  • Maybe News Corp should alter their structure
Transcript

Hey. Welcome back Rankers. Here’s a funny story for you today. I had to go with this one. I had a bunch of other stuff to do … Sorry, I think it was Stephan Winterburg. I was going to talk to you about your site, and do a bit of a review based on some John Mueller conversations you were having. However, this is a funny story. News Corp has called on the breaking up of Google because they’re too powerful. I mean, everyone immediately goes, “That’s pot calling the kettle black,” but forget about that for the moment. Forget what a monolith Google is because it’s big. It’s a big tech giant, and let’s make no mistake. Does it have too much power? I reckon that’s a conversation worth having.

Seismic Shift
But News Corp … Obviously have been a dominant media player for many years, and the thing that gets me about this story, is the sheer stupidity of it. I don’t get it. I don’t … What are they trying to do? Because, here’s the thing. News Corp essentially has called for the breaking up of the Google publishing arm and the advertising arm. They’ve got the advertising revenue separate so third parties can get involved. Who would they be, News Corp? Here’s the thing. News Corp already sell Google ads. They have an agency, who reportedly has, I think from memory … Yes, a bat-phone to Google and Facebook. That’s a News Corporation agency, and these, the employees of that agency must be going, “What the hell?” because further into the story, they … I can’t bring you a News Limited story, a News Corp story, because they’re all behind paywalls. Right?

I’ll take this back a step. Come back to these poor employees of the agency. Their bosses have just thrown in the muck. But back in 2009, Rupert Murdoch was complaining about Google stealing his content. I did a series of stories on it back then. It’s just ridiculous because all you had to do was either use robot.txt, disallow bots done, or you could just put in noindex on the pages that you didn’t want Google to index.

Now, when you go and have a look at the index today, a lot of the News Limited properties don’t have as many pages, anywhere near as many pages as some of the other publishers because everything’s behind a paywall. Now, a lot of the submissions, Rupert Murdoch was complaining about Google stealing their content, right? Then, in one of the submissions … This is from the AFR, which is a Fairfax and not News Limited, because it can’t … Actually Fairfax, the Australian Financial Review, and the paywall only applies to people seemingly who use JavaScript, so I’ll let you work that one out. But, the ACCC’s preliminary report found that the use of snippets did not adversely affect click-through rate, but News Corp disagreed, saying, “ACCC should increase regulation, which could include requiring digital platforms to compensate publishers for the use of their content.” And it’s like, Why? What makes you think your content is worthy, News Corp? That’s what we say to everybody. That’s what we say … Talk about SEO. Why do you think you need to be ranked? Why do you think Google needs to rank you? What’s so good about you? At the moment, why would they rank you? You don’t want them to rank you because they’re stealing your content, but you want them to pay for that content, but do you want the traffic?

I mean, back to Google’s … News Corps own agency that sells Google Ads … Their employees must be going, “What the hell?” Because one of the things they’ve said in this story is, “Google enjoys overwhelming market power in both online search and ad tech services and is abusing its dominant position to the detriment of consumers, advertisers, and publishers.” Well, no. Partly, yes, they are dominant, definitely dominant … But are they abusing advertisers?

Measure Your Return on Ad Spend
I don’t know any advertisers that feel abused. Maybe a lot of them will say, “Okay, well we’re paying too much per click.” Well, that’s because you’re not measuring it properly. Okay? If you think you’re paying too much per click, then don’t do those ads. Look at your returns on your ad spend, measure that. Start to measure that. If you’re getting 1300 percent return on ad spend, try getting that out of a newspaper. That’s not going to happen. News Corp have built up a huge empire globally. Rant. And it’s based on the back of restriction of free trade because all of these publishers and broadcasters have to buy licences from the government, and that restricts the entrance into the field. You’ve got this restrictive field, where you don’t have much competition at all. You never did until we got the Internet, Rupert Murdoch, and that’s when you’ve got competition, and now, you’re not making as much money because you’re selling Google ads. Your own ads suck. Even if you’re doing display advertising on your own property, you’ve got a limited amount of people because you’re trying to keep Google out, and you’re putting everyone behind a paywall, and you’re paying to see the ads. It’s crazy. It’s old school thinking. It’s old media thinking.

Now, yes, there needs to be a conversation about the dominant power of big tech and the about of data they have. But if you’re worried about those, go and use other search engines, like duckduckgo.com. I’ll say that again. Duckduckgo.com. That’s fun to say actually. If you go and use that search engine, you will find quite often you’re getting different results. I’m at the point now, where some of the Google personalisation, where I think, I don’t know if that’s helping because I’m not discovering new things. I’m only seeing things that the algorithm thinks are suitable to me. That’s why I think it’s very healthy to go out and use other search engines. Bing, if you want to, but if you believe Google, they copied them anyway. Use other social networks, go and have a look at minds.com or some of those, the ones that are open source social networks who’re connecting on the blockchain, all these other things. If you’re concerned about your privacy, learn about it, and do something about it.

But for big media, old media, tech publishing company like News Corp to come out and say they need to break up Google because it’s affecting publishers … I used to sell newspaper advertising. Okay? I now sell digital advertising. I can tell you which works better, and it ain’t the newspaper advertising.

This is free market, right? This is what happens when you build a product … And this is the essential nature of the internet. As a better product comes along, people use it. That’s what happened with Google. Build a better product. Get more people using it. Start a movement. But to say that one old media company should be breaking, should come out and say, “Break up the old one.” I think we should break them all up and maybe while you’re at it, because they’re saying that it affects journalism because there’s not much publishing around.

Have you watched the journalists on Twitter? Most of them are just arguing with one another. Arguing left and right. It’s like “Oh. Forget it. I’m not even interested. I’m not even going to find my own news. I’m not interested in your bickering.”

This has come about because the Australian Consumer and Competition Commission has set up an inquiry about the market dominance of these big digital players, rightly so. Okay. That’s been ongoing since last year, and this is the News Corp submission, which I find hilarious. Hopefully that’s helpful, and we will see you next week. Thanks so much everyone. Bye.

The post Newscorp: Break up Google appeared first on StewArt Media.

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