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We were introduced to the fascinating work of Gabriel Barcia-Colombo when we stumbled across his TedTalk “Capturing memories in video art” in which Gabe discussed his memorialization of friends via virtual and cellular means. His piece, Animalia Chordata, reads like a cabinet of curiosity displaying people trapped in glass jars, individuals who seemingly respond to one’s presence; others are a little less humorous and a tad unsettling, like his DNA Vending machine which grants patrons the opportunity to purchase actual DNA samples. In all of his projects, Gabe explores and plays with capturing memories, the role of technology in society, the virtual and physical identities we create across platforms, and so much more.

In this episode, we speak with Gabe about his mixed-media, interactive work, his personal trajectory from cinema to digital art, his projects with Soethby’, the reception and role of tech art in the art world, and the future of art and ownership.

-About Gabriel Barcia-Colombo-

Gabriel Barcia-Colombo is a mixed media artist whose work focuses on collections, memorialization and the act of leaving one’s digital imprint for the next generation. His work takes the form of video sculptures, immersive performances, large-scale projections and vending machines that sell human DNA. His work plays upon this modern exigency in our culture to chronicle, preserve and wax nostalgic, an idea which Barcia-Colombo renders visually by “collecting” human portraits on video.

Gabriel was commissioned to be the first digital artist to show work at the New Fulton Terminal Stop with the MTA Arts & Design program in New York City. His work has been featured in the Volta, Scope, and Art Mrkt art fairs, Victoria & Albert Museum as well as Grand Central Terminal and the New York Public Library. He recently received an Art and Technology grant from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art where he created “The Hereafter Institute,” a company that questions the future of death rituals and memorials and their relationship to technology. His work is part of the permanent collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Gabriel served as a member of the artist advisory board at the New York Foundation for the Arts, as well as the education committee member at the Museum of Art and Design. In 2012 Gabriel gave a TED talk entitled “Capturing Memories in Video Art,” and in 2014 he gave another entitled “My DNA Vending Machine” and was awarded a Senior TED fellowship.

In 2016 Gabe founded Bunker.nyc a pop-up gallery showcasing emerging art made with technology. Bunker became the first pop up digital art gallery to open in the Sotheby’s Auction House in New York Summer 2017. Gabe is a New York Foundation for the Arts grant awardee and faculty member at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.

You can learn more about Gabriel Barcia-Colombo here

Follow Gabe @gabebc

Tweet him @gabebc

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From 1967 to 1971, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) ran a revolutionary program which facilitated the partnering of emerging artists with tech and science companies of the time. Among the roster of artists who participated in the first iteration of LACMA’s Art + Tech program are Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, and James Turrell. Today, LACMA’s Art + Tech Lab (est. in 2013) continues this spirit of cross-disciplinary collaboration, funding artist-led projects that wouldn’t be achievable without the financial and advisory support offered through the Lab. In this episode, we speak with Joel Ferree, Art + Technology Lab Program Director, about the history of the Lab, the various projects and partnerships that are offered, and LACMA’s commitment to providing the time, space and resources to make possible these creative projects.

-About LACMA’s Art + Tech Lab-

Inspired by the spirit of LACMA’s original Art and Technology program (1967-1971), which paired artists with technology companies in Southern California, the Art + Technology Lab at LACMA supports artist experiments with emerging technology. Through our sponsors, the Lab provides grants, in-kind support, and facilities at the museum to develop new artist projects. To date, 20 artists from around the world, including Ghana, Ireland, Korea, Mexico, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Switzerland, have received awards through the Art + Technology Lab.

Learn more about the Art + Tech Lab here

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Often times when we think of the convergence of fashion and tech, our minds go to fashionable wears and accessories that compliment or facilitate our mobile technology; in other words, wearable tech. But the Fashion Innovation Agency (FIA) at London College of Fashion asks student designers to think beyond how tech can be fashionable, and ask how tech can revolutionize and further empower how we experience the world of fashion.

In this episode, we speak with Matthew Drinkwater, head of FIA, about the diverse projects he and his students are pursuing, from using augmented and virtual reality to offer new ways of experiencing the runway, to how tech can facilitate the consumer experience.

-About Matthew Drinkwater-

Head of Fashion Innovation Agency (FIA) at London College of Fashion (LCF)

Matthew works at the crossroads of Fashion, Retail and Tech to head up LCF’s Fashion Innovation Agency; Partnering the most exciting designer talent in London with the very latest fashion-tech to create ground-breaking brand collaborations and consultancies across the fashion, retail, lifestyle, cultural and digital industries.

Matthew delivered the world’s first digital skirt for Nokia, wireless charging clothing for Microsoft, a 3D-printed bionic arm to help celebrate the launch of Star Wars: The Force Awakens and what Forbes described as ‘the first example of truly beautiful wearable tech’ for Disney. He was named in the 100 most influential in the world of Wearable Technology, amongst the ‘Top 15 people in UK tech’ by BBC3 and as a ‘fashion-tech trailblazer changing the course of retail’ by Drapers.

Tweet him @drinkmatt

-About the Fashion Innovation Agency-

The Fashion Innovation Agency (FIA) are experts in working with emerging technologies to help designers and brands change the way they make, sell or show their collections. FIA has delivered ground-breaking and award-winning projects in wearable technology, AR/VR, and Blockchain, and is currently working on major developments in Nanotechnology, IoT, and Robotics.

Learn more here

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In this episode we speak with artist and medical professional, Dorothee Chabas, about her work as a neuroesthetician. With 25 years of medical experience under her belt, Dorothee uses neuroscience to explore and understand aesthetic experiences at the brain level. Why do certain colors attract us? What is it about art that moves us? What is going on when artists create artworks and how do viewers process them? These are the questions Dorothee’s work as a neuroesthetician aims to answer and learn more about.

-About Dorothee Chabas-

Dorothee is a French-American painter and MD PhD (neurologist) based out of San Francisco. She shares her time between painting and neuroesthetics.

Dorothee has been drawing all her life. She practiced live model painting more formally in the nineties at the Ateliers des Beaux Arts de la Mairie de Paris, France, and then at the Sharon Art Studio, San Francisco, CA. More recently, she spent three years painting and drawing full time at the San Francisco Studio School.

Dorothee has practiced Neurology for many years, first in Paris, then at the University of California, San Francisco, where she co-founded the Regional Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Center. Her research work on multiple sclerosis performed at Stanford University and UCSF has been internationally recognized.

Learn more here

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András Szántó’s consulting foundation assists with all aspects of building museums, cultural organizations, commercial brands, foundations, and educational institutions worldwide, at any point of their conception. From launching concepts from the ground up, to implementing new programming and marketing initiatives, Szántó’s expertise in the industry has enabled several projects across the world with collaborators such as The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Absolut, Art Basel, BMW, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.

In this episode, we discuss Szántó’s background in sociology which allowed him to closely study the dynamics of the art world in the 1980s, his mentorship under art critic and philosopher, Arthur Danto–who famously coined the term “art world”–and his perspective on demystifying the arts.

-About András Szántó-

András Szántó, Ph.D. is writer, researcher, and consultant in the fields of art, media, and philanthropy. He is the former director of the National Arts Journalism Program and the NEA Arts Journalism Institute at Columbia University, a regular moderator of the Art Basel Conversations series, and oversees the annual Global Museum Leaders Colloquium at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Learn more about András Szántó here

Follow him @andrasszanto

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We continue our discussion with speakers from CODAME’s Art + Tech Festival, ARTOBOTS, held at The Midway in June. Part 2 features one-on-one, on-site conversations with robotics professor Amy LaViers, technologist and performer, Catie Cuan, and NPR correspondent, Laura Sydell.

In this episode, collaborators Amy LaViers and Catie Cuan from the Robotics, Automation, Dance (RAD) Lab at the University of Illinois discuss their research on incorporating natural movement into robots, how dance plays a role in this study, and their performance piece, Time to Compile. We conclude the episode with an amazing conversation with NPR Digital Culture correspondent, Laura Sydell, who shares insight on how and why artists and criminals will shape the future of technology.

Thank you CODAME for inviting us to cover this awesome event, and a special shoutout to Vanessa Chang, CODAME curator, for personally extending the invitation to us. You can listen to our interview with Vanessa Chang here.

-About Amy LaViers-

Assistant Professor, Mechanical Science and Engineering — University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Amy develops high-level abstractions for expressive robotic systems and study human-machine interaction. She lead two interdisciplinary teams toward this end: her research group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Robotics, Automation, and Dance (RAD) Lab, and her start up, AE Machines. Amy is also passionate about teaching engineers to write and roboticists to dance and about bringing artists into the design of technology. This work applies to manufacturing, national defense, personal robots, entertainment, engineering education, somatic practices, and art — to name a few!

Tweet her @alaviers

Learn more about Amy here

-About Catie Cuan-

Catie Cuan is an artist and technologist based out of Brooklyn. As a performer she has worked with the Metropolitan Opera, the Lyric Opera of Chicago, Lisa Bielawa/KCET, Katherine Helen Fisher, Clare Cook, NY Fashion Week, and CATAPULT Entertainment, as well as Broadway choreographer Peggy Hickey. Her own choreography has been presented at venues and festivals such as the Actors Fund Arts Center, DanceNOW Raw, the Brooklyn Dance Festival, Zellerbach (Berkeley), NY Theater Barn, New York Musical Festival, and The Tank, where she won the inaugural XYZNYC Choreography Competition. Her passion for technology is evidenced by her previous work experience at Google/YouTube and Bain & Company before joining Color + Information, a digital creative agency, as Vice President. She is currently a digital consultant and avid VR researcher. She graduated with High Honors from UC Berkeley with a dual degree in Business Administration and Dance and was a visiting student at the University of Oxford, New College.

Catie Cuan is also a 2018 TED Resident and ThoughtWorks Arts Resident.

Learn more about Catie here

Follow Catie @itscatie

-About Laura Sydell-

Laura Sydell fell in love with the intimate storytelling qualities of radio, which combined her passion for theatre and writing with her addiction to news. Over her career she has covered politics, arts, media, religion, and entrepreneurship. Currently Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for NPR’s All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and NPR.org.

Sydell’s work focuses on the ways in which technology is transforming our culture and how we live. For example, she reported on robotic orchestras and independent musicians who find the Internet is a better friend than a record label as well as ways technology is changing human relationships.

Tweet her @Sydell

Learn more about her interest in artists & criminals here

-About CODAME-

Sparked by the network of creative coders, designers, and artists that Bruno Fonzi and Jordan Gray knew from around the world, CODAME was founded to celebrate their passion for art and technology. The CODAME brand of immersive, engaging, and out of the ordinary experiences was coined at the inaugural CODAME ART+TECH Festival in 2010 on a foggy rooftop in downtown San Francisco. CODAME builds ART+TECH projects and nonprofit events to inspire through experience.

Follow them @codame

Tweet them @codame

Learn more here

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State of the Art Podcast was invited to attend and speak with participants in CODAME’s Art + Tech Festival, ARTOBOTS at The Midway earlier this month. Part 1 features one-on-one on-site conversations with artists Alexander Reben and Meredith Trombleon art and AI. We conclude the episode with a fascinating conversation with UC Berkeley artist and professor, Ken Goldberg, on the “uncanny valley.”

Thank you CODAME for inviting us to cover this awesome event, and a special shoutout to Vanessa Chang, CODAME curator, for personally extending the invitation to us. You can listen to our interview with Vanessa Chang here.

-About Alexander Reben-

Alexander Reben is an artist and roboticist who explores humanity through the lens of art and technology. His work probes the inherently human nature of the artificial. Using tools such as artificial philosophy, synthetic psychology, perceptual manipulation and technological magic, he brings to light our inseparable evolutionary entanglement to invention which has unarguably shaped our way of being. This is done to not only help understand who we are but to consider who we will become in our continued codevelopment with our artificial creations.

Projects referred to in this episode: BoxieHeadgasmatron, and Pulse Machine

Learn more at http://areben.com/

-About Meredith Tromble-

Meredith Tromble is a multimedia artist, writer, performer, and teacher at the San Francisco Art Institute.

Learn more about Meredith at http://meredithtromble.net/

-About Ken Goldberg-

Ken Goldberg is an artist, inventor, and UC Berkeley Professor focusing on robotics. He was appointed the William S. Floyd Jr Distinguished Chair in Engineering and serves as Chair of the Industrial Engineering and Operations Research Department. He has secondary appointments in EECS, Art Practice, the School of Information, and Radiation Oncology at the UCSF Medical School. Ken is Director of the CITRIS “People and Robots” Initiative and the UC Berkeley AUTOLAB where he and his students pursue research in machine learning for robotics and automation in warehouses, homes, and operating rooms. Ken developed the first provably complete algorithms for part feeding and part fixturing and the first robot on the Internet. Despite agonizingly slow progress, he persists in trying to make robots less clumsy. He has over 250 peer-reviewed publications and 8 U.S. Patents. He co-founded and served as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering. Ken’s artwork has appeared in 70 exhibits including the Whitney Biennial and films he has co-written have been selected for Sundance and nominated for an Emmy Award. Ken was awarded the NSF PECASE (Presidential Faculty Fellowship) from President Bill Clinton in 1995, elected IEEE Fellow in 2005 and selected by the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society for the George Saridis Leadership Award in 2016. He lives in the Bay Area and is madly in love with his wife, filmmaker and Webby Awards founder Tiffany Shlain, and their two daughters.

Tweet him @Ken_Goldberg

-About CODAME-

Sparked by the network of creative coders, designers, and artists that Bruno Fonzi and Jordan Gray knew from around the world, CODAME was founded to celebrate their passion for art and technology. The CODAME brand of immersive, engaging, and out of the ordinary experiences was coined at the inaugural CODAME ART+TECH Festival in 2010 on a foggy rooftop in downtown San Francisco. CODAME builds ART+TECH projects and nonprofit events to inspire through experience.

Follow them @codame

Tweet them @codame

Learn more here

-About ARTOBOTS-

June 4-7, 2018 @ The Midway, San Francisco

The annual CODAME ART+TECH Festival is a four-day conference with workshops, talks and nightlife events with immersive, engaging, out of the ordinary experiences. The festival features gallery installations, screenings, and performances.

This year’s ART+TECH Festival, codenamed #ARTOBOTS, examines the sphere of robotics, automation, and artificial intelligence. Through art, discussion, play and performance, CODAME probes these potentials.

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Vince Kadlubek pioneered the creative force that is Meow Wolf, a Santa Fe artist collective dedicated to building interactive and immersive experiences to transport visitors of all ages into fantastic realms ripe for exploration. In this episode we speak with Vince about how Meow Wolf achieve its impressive level of success, what Meow Wolf’s ethos is, and where/how he sees tech is enabling the arts.

-About Vince Kadlubek-

Vince Kadlubek is the Co-founder and CEO of Meow Wolf, an arts collective that has transformed into a remarkable, award winning arts production company. After leading Meow Wolf to win the inaugural startup competition from Creative Startups Vince created the business plan for Meow Wolf’s House of Eternal Return. In the last year he has started 3 new thriving businesses. He is the chair of the Santa Fe, New Mexico planning commission. Vince is a native of Santa Fe and is deeply committed to supporting local growth as well as bringing unique, indescribable, immersive art experiences to the world. His unorthodox approach to business has helped pave the way to Meow Wolf’s unprecedented success.

Follow Vince @VinceKadlubek

Tweet him @VinceKadlubek

-About Meow Wolf-

Meow Wolf creates immersive, interactive experiences to transport audiences of all ages into fantastic realms of story and exploration. The group’s first permanent installation, launched in March 2016 with support from Game Of Thrones creator George R.R. Martin, showcases the THEA Award-winning House of Eternal Return, where guests discover a multidimensional mystery house with secret passages, portals to magical worlds, climbing apparatus, and surreal, maximalist & mesmerizing art exhibits along with a children’s learning center, top ten in the U.S. music venue and cafe area.

The company is composed of nearly 200 artists across all disciplines including architecture, sculpture, painting, photography and video production, virtual and augmented reality, music and audio engineering, narrative writing, costuming and performance, and more. Basically everything.

Follow Meow Wolf @meow_wolf

Tweet them @MeowWolf

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Everyone is familiar with MIT and the university’s reputation as a serious force in the world of science, tech, and research, but how many are aware of MIT’s legacy in the arts? Did you know that MIT’s founder had envisioned incorporating the arts from the very beginning?

In this episode we speak with Leila Kinney and Evan Ziporyn of MIT’s Center for Art, Science, and Technology (CAST) about MIT’s culture of creativity and exploration, the institution’s mission to humanize science and tech, and the exciting projects that have emerged from CAST, like Tomás Saraceno’s Arachnid Orchestra.

-About Leila Kinney-

Leila W. Kinney is the Executive Director of Arts Initiatives and of the MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST), working with Associate Provost Philip S. Khoury, the School of Architecture and Planning (SA+P), the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (SHASS), the Creative Arts Council, the Council for the Arts at MIT, the MIT List Visual Arts Center, and the MIT Museum, to advance the arts at MIT in the areas of strategic planning, cross-school collaborations, communications and resource development.

Kinney is an art historian with experience in both SA+P, where she was on the faculty in the History, Theory and Criticism section of the Department of Architecture (HTC) and SHASS, where she taught in the Program in Women’s Studies and in Comparative Media Studies. She specializes in modern art, with an emphasis on media in transition, arts institutions and artists’ engagement with mass culture. She is a member of the Executive Committee of a2ru (Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities) and of the Advisory Committees of the Catalyst Collaborative at MIT, the MIT List Visual Arts Center and the MIT Museum.

-About Evan Ziporyn-

Evan Ziporyn makes music at the crossroads between genres and cultures, and between East and West. He studied at the Eastman School of Music, Yale University, and UC Berkeley with Joseph Schwantner, Martin Bresnick, and Gerard Grisey. He first traveled to Bali in 1981, studying with Madé Lebah, Colin McPhee’s 1930s musical informant. He returned on a Fulbright in 1987.

Earlier that year, he performed a clarinet solo at the First Bang on a Can Marathon in New York. His involvement with Bang on a Can continued for twenty five years. In 1992, he co-founded the Bang on a Can All-stars (Musical America’s 2005 Ensemble of the Year), with whom he toured the globe and premiered over one hundred commissioned works, collaborating with Nik Bartsch, Iva Bittova, Don Byron, Ornette Coleman, Brian Eno, Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Thurston Moore, Terry Riley, and Tan Dun. He co-produced their seminal 1996 recording of Brian Eno’s “Music for Airports,” as well as their most recent CD, “Big Beautiful Dark & Scary” (2012).

Ziporyn joined the MIT faculty in 1990, founding Gamelan Galak Tika in 1993, and beginning a series of groundbreaking compositions for gamelan & Western instruments. These include three evening-length works, 2001’s “ShadowBang,” 2004’s “Oedipus Rex” (Robert Woodruff, director), and 2009’s “A House in Bali,” an opera which joins Western singers with Balinese traditional performers, and the Bang on a Can All-stars with a full gamelan. It received its world premiere in Bali that summer and its New York premiere at BAM Next Wave in October 2010.

As a clarinetist, Ziporyn recorded the definitive version of Steve Reich’s multi-clarinet “New York Counterpoint” in 1996, sharing in that ensemble’s Grammy in 1998. In 2001, his solo clarinet CD, “This is Not A Clarinet,” made Top Ten lists across the country. His compositions have been commissioned by Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road, Kronos Quartet, American Composers Orchestra, Maya Beiser, So Percussion, Wu Man, and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project, with whom he recorded his most recent CD, “Big Grenadilla/Mumbai” (2012). His honors include awards from the Massachusetts Cultural Council (2011); The Herb Alpert Foundation (2011); USA Artists Walker Fellowship (2007); MIT’s Gyorgy Kepes Prize (2006); the American Academy of Arts and Letters Goddard Lieberson Fellowship (2004); as well as commissions from Meet the Composer/Commissioning Music USA and the Rockefeller MAP Fund. Recordings of his works have been been released on Cantaloupe, Sony Classical, New Albion, New World, Koch, Naxos, Innova, and CRI.

He is Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Music at MIT. He also serves as Head of Music and Theater Arts, and in 2012 was appointed inaugural Director of MIT’s Center for Art Science & Technology. He lives in Lexington, Massachusetts, with Christine Southworth, and has two children, Leonardo (19) and Ava (12).

-About MIT CAST-

The MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST) creates new opportunities for art, science and technology to thrive as interrelated, mutually informing modes of exploration, knowledge and discovery. CAST’s multidisciplinary platform presents performing and visual arts programs, supports research projects for artists working with science and engineering labs, and sponsors symposia, classes, workshops, design studios, lectures and publications. The Center is funded in part by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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