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I came to your tryouts and made your team,
I got a blue jersey with bright red seams. 
I was super proud I wore it to bed
Dreams of playing travel softball danced in my head. 

The season started, we practiced a lot
You taught me things I had never been taught. 
My skills got much better, I could throw, field and hit 
I made new friends, they feel like family I admit. 

Now we are playing tournaments and games all the time
My weekends are full, softball is always on my mind. 
The twelve of us girls are having so much fun
And to our surprise last weekend we won. 

Every Saturday I show up, more than ready to play
But I'm still the last one to get off the bench and you say
"Keep working hard, you are almost there," 
So I listen and work harder, but it still seems unfair. 

My parents say be patient, ask the coach what you need to do
He only says work harder than I already do. 
I show up early, go to lessons, and stay late
I am doing everthing it I can to be valuable and great. 

As two months have passed, I still rarely get to play
But I cheer from the bench, and work harder every day. 
You gave me a jersey, I thought you beleived in me enough
To see my potential, and skill, to see that I am tough. 

I remember feeling so proud the day that I made your team
But now it feels like I am not good enough, and I no longer beam
I still work hard, I do everything I am told
But being the last to get picked to play, sure does get old. 

I wonder somedays why you put me on your team
If you never believed in me at all, or so thats how it seems. 
I am 12 years old, and all I want to do is play this game 
To prove to you I am able, and so justice to the team name. 

I don't mind sitting out, I dont mind working hard
I don't mind hitting buckets of balls in the backyard
But I do want a chance, even though I may not be the best
You CHOSE me for your team, so be brave, and put my skills to the test. 

How can I learn if I do not play, 
Why did you give me a jersey just to sit me out on game day?
You are the coach, and it's your job to treat the team as a whole
to realize that beneath every jersey lies a child with a soul. 

So, please - take a chance on me and put me into the game
I promise,  I will not make you ashamed.
Let me show you how hard I have been working to play
Don't destroy the love I have for this game along your way. 

Remember, you CHOSE ME, and I trusted you to believe
That I could play this game and be part of YOUR team! 



We LOVE the “Feeling CUTE” phase – so for a limited time get this super cute shirt for you, or your entire team (Tank or TEE) for just $7.50

The post Put Me In Coach | A Letter to My Coach appeared first on Softball is for Girls.

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Obviously, we talk a lot about hitting stances, and proper mechanics and recruiting and winning and losing and all the fun and games and stress and excitement that comes along with playing fastpitch softball.

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We don’t care, have never cared what level of ball you play. That is not our journey. We have the same respect for the girls playing Rec, as the ones we see making the Top 10 list at Extra Inning Softball weekly polls. In our eyes, they are all following the same dreams, experiencing the same feelings, and loving the same things. Which makes us much more alike than different.

What we don’t talk about enough, is what happens outside the foul lines. So many of the lessons you are learning between the foul lines, are the building blocks that create confident, strong, smart, amazing and successful young women once the foul lines have been erased and your time is done crossing them.

For instance, each time you build a team mate up, pat them on the back after an error, or find the empathy to realize that they aren’t having their best days – you have begun the road of lifting other women up, rather than tearing them down. Of the sisterhood.

Each time you ‘fail’ at the plate, and realize that you will strike out, or not get on base more times than you will hit a home run or land a double – you realize that life is really about balancing our successes and failures, and not letting our failures define us, or cage us in. Softball, especially hitting – teaches us that we don’t have to be perfect to be great.

Softball shows you that your attitude MATTERS. It matters to the people that love you, it matters to your team, it matters to your performance, it matters in the way others perceive you. And the VERY BEST part is that as you get older, you realize that you do in fact have all the control over YOUR attitude. You have a choice, to roll your eyes, or slam you bat on the ground, or cuss as you walk back to the dugout – or to learn from it, walk away unscathed knowing you will and can do better next time. Either way, your attitude about it MATTERS, and it can be the difference between success and failure, and it affects everyone around you. So just as you don’t want to let your teammates down by being a Debbie Downer, you don’t want your attitude to let yourself down in all your future endeavors.

Everything worth having takes work. Skip practice, stop going to lessons, get tired of taking ground balls at practice – and it will show on the field. The same is true with everything else in your life. It takes hard work, and commitment, and practice and focus to accomplish your goals. It doesn’t matter if you are sick to death of hitting off a tee, or studying biology, or doing the dishes – work hard at every task given and your work ethic in life will take you far.

You are never too good to shag balls and put them back in the bucket. Ever. We don’t care if you are the star pitcher, the senior on the team, the coaches kid, the best hitter, or the team captain. You are never too good to pick up the balls and help put them back in the bucket. Life will hand you moments where you can either decide you are ‘too good for this’ or whether you decide that everyone around you is your equal and responsible for pulling their weight no matter what their title. The best bosses still make the office coffee in the mornings.

Inside the foul lines your role may change. As you grow up, and move forward in your life your role will also change. You will become many things, different things to many people in many places. So flexibility is your friend. If you snuff your nose up because you are asked to play outfield and stand there with your glove on your hip, feeling entitled. then life outside the foul lines will be difficult. All new things are opportunities.

You won’t like all your teammates. They won’t all be your best friends. And you know what, that’s ok! But they are your teammates, and respect for others is essential unless you want to be one of the problems your team faces during games inside the foul lines. And outside the foul lines, the same holds true. You dont have to like everyone. You dont have to agree with everyone, or rub shoulders with everyone. AND WE PROMISE YOU, NOT EVERYONE WILL LIKE YOU, AND THAT IS OK! But you do owe others respect.

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Speaking of people. We ask each girl to take a look around them on game day. Look at all the people who are there supporting you. Realize how hard people are working to make sure you can play. Thank your parents, be kind to the umpires, respect your coaches, treat the concession stand workers nicely, clean up after yourself. All these people, no matter what color jersey they are wearing, or what happens during the game are on your side. These people – they MATTER. And it matters that you show gratitude for them, and notice them. These are the people in your village, the people cheering you on, the people who want the best for you. How YOU treat these people says quite a lot about your character. And long after you step outside the dugout for the last time, these are the people who will still be there cheering you on….treat them accordingly.

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The post Outside the Foul Lines appeared first on Softball is for Girls.

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Oh, we know who you are. You are the moms and dads who feel superior because your 10-year-old is playing on some fancy schmancy organization team where you are shelling out big bucks to make sure she is up against the best competition for her age group. There’s lots of money, and lots of travel and lots of pressure being put on her – being replaced is usually in the back of her mind because many of these organizations are always looking for the next best thing. And you snub, or thumb your nose at the rest of us, the masses playing local lower level tournaments that won’t equate to making Nationals across the country.

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We even hear you. Sometimes, when you are slumming at one of our tournaments, maybe you came just for practice, or maybe your coach was trophy hunting, and you see our girls play and shake your heads in disgust because they aren’t the very best players on the team. They may miss routine plays, your pitcher may strike them out in droves adding a perfect game to her resume, and you always hope that come bracket play – you get to play us because it’s pretty much an automatic win to move you forward toward the ‘ship.’

Your comments don’t go unnoticed. Your sense of pride and strut from having kids that are so much better than our kids doesn’t go unnoticed. We hear the “oh this is just a rec ball team,” or “why do they even bother coming out here,” and hear the snickers when your coaches pull their players off the base on purpose to help us get an out, or put in the kids to play who are normally pulling splinters out of their butt because you know…we suck….

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We aren’t newbies. We have had kids play at every level of this sport. We have seen it all. And we have always started out with a “Rec Ball Team” because local organizations do a really shitty job at keeping things competitive and supporting girls softball past a certain age. And the girls LOVE the game. They LOVE the game as much as your kid does. They might not be as good as your kid. They might not go to private lessons. But they are 12, and they are learning, and they find the same joys spending a Saturday at the ballpark with their friends playing this game as your child does.

Us parents, love watching the play just as much as you love watching your kid play. We pack the coolers and the tents and the snacks. Sure, we may celebrate some of the littler things, like our first win or two, or the second baseman who is finally ‘gettting it’ or the long ball that one of our outfielders actually caught instead of having to chase it to the fence while your players gets an in the park homerun. We may cheer a little too loud when they make the routine plays that we have been working on. We may not hold tryouts, we may not cut everyone, we may believe in equal playing time for all the girls, and we may NEVER be a TEAM that your superstar would ever EVER consider picking up on.

And we see you. We hear you. We see your smirky sarcastic faces. We see your big peacock tail in all it’s glory when the game is over, feeling sorry for us and beaming with pride because your daughter’s jersey has a really special name on the front. And we also see your daughters mimicking this behavior….

But here’s the thing. You don’t have the right to say that lesser players are watering down softball. Go play at a higher level tournament. You don’t have the right to say an 11 or 12 or even 14-year-old child shouldn’t be playing ball because they aren’t planning to go D1, or even planning to try out for a school ball team. You don’t have the right to decide who should, or can play and who shouldn’t. Because in case you have forgotten, these are kids, and childhood is about trying as many new things as possible, and learning new things, and playing games. (And yes softball is a game).

So your kid is better than mine. So what? So she works harder at it. What gives you or anyone else the right to just decide that kids don’t deserve to be out there? How do you know that one day the tables may turn and your child may quit from being burned out and my child will still be playing? How do we know what our kids are capable of unless we let them try?

Watering down softball? HA! There are plenty of tournaments to choose from. Maybe you should talk to your coach about trophy hunting and going out and playing with the bigger teams that are even bigger and better than you. Maybe then your peacock tail wouldn’t be so colorful at the end of the game. THE BEST THING WE CAN DO FOR ANY OF OUR SOFTBALL PLAYERS is MAKE THIS SPORT as BIG AS POSSIBLE!

The point is that Rec leagues are letting our girls down. Its tough to find Rec leagues that offer good learning opportunities past 8 or 10U anymore. That doesn’t mean our kids should quit, does it? There used to be a time where kids didn’t know what their ‘game’ was or their ‘skill’ was until they were much older. Suddenly today, it’s okay to classify a 10-year-old as something. And having been around this sport for well over a decade, I can tell you this – most of the superstar 10-year-olds you are spending thousands of dollars on to play a game they love will quit before they graduate high school. So chill out just a little.

And don’t feel sorry for us sucky teams. We are learning. We are having fun. So much fun. So So SO MUCH FUN!

Every once in a while you may hear the archaic ping of a Walmart metal bat hitting the ball from one of our teammates, but that doesn’t give anyone the right to shake their head in pity. Our girls have every right to be on that field, playing their game to the best of their ability without being held accountable to the softball snobbery of other parents who are gaining some sort of ego boost by strutting around their ‘better’ kid.

We are all here to GROW the game. And the love of the game cannot be measured by the name on the front of the jersey of the skill level of the player. The dreams these kids dream are all the same, and the pride they feel from playing this game is the same too.

The post An Open Letter to the Softball Snobs | Softball Is For Girls appeared first on Softball is for Girls.

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If the rain ever stops, we will be in the midst of a new softball season. We know that teams everywhere have already been preparing and practicing and getting ready for the new spring season for a couple months now, because as you know there isn’t much of an off season for softball.

Today, we’d like to give you a few tips for making sure you are prepared for the upcoming softball season!
For all the dads who threw with her first! (We have one for moms, too!)
  • Firstly, make sure that you have ALL of your paperwork in order. Birth certificates, insurance (which expires at the first of the year no matter when you initially purchased it), contact information, parent/player contracts (that go over expectations of both parents and players) and finances should already be researched and available for parents to review. Player commitment letters are also a good thing to have on hand.
  • Get your schedule together. Most tournament organizations already have their schedules out so you should be able to provide a tentative schedule to parents. If you are attending a World Series, give parents dates (and make sure you know exactly what you need to do to qualify and play in it) so that travel arrangements can be made early.
  • Collect commitment fees ASAP. The sad reality is that tons of players and parents like to play Team Bingo, and will hold off on committing until the last minute and then desert you if they get a better offer. It’s irritating and rude. If someone hymns and haws about paying a commitment fee, then they likely aren’t planning on sticking around and this is the easiest way to know where your players stand…. (This fee goes toward TEAM and player necessities such as uniforms, balls, etc.)
  • Be prepared to have transparency when it comes to team finances. Make sure that there is a http://scorestix.com/scorestix-products/check and balance system in order, so you are never accused of stealing
  • Secure practice facilities and do it fast! Fields are like precious coveted gold once the weather turns warm, and you’ll be competing with every softball and baseball team in your area, so you need to contact whomever, wherever you plan/hope to practice and secure your field times with down payments or whatever is necessary to do so.
  • Uniforms! Don’t wait until the last minute to get uniforms together. (And don’t ask everyone on the team for their opinion because we assure you that it will just cause drama) We will always recommend Two-Five Apparel, because we love their truly custom products and use them personally, and have had nothing but the very best experiences. Side NOTE – Make sure to order at least bare minimum of 4-5 sets of extra jerseys for roster changes, or pick up players.
  • Take a moment, and sit your team down (players only) and clearly explain your expectations of them. No matter what age they are, be HONEST, and up front about how playing time will work and what you are looking for in the team dynamic. Go over the RULES, what behavior WILL and WON’t be tolerated. THEN….meet with each player individually and help them come up with goals that will equate to their individual meaning of success. Let them each know what how YOU see what their roll on the team will be. We suggest writing these things down. Each player is at a different level and has specific things to work on. Where one kid may need help being more consistent in the field, another may need to work on attitude, while yet another may need to work on plate confidence.
  • Work on team bonding! Schedule all inclusive get togethers with the entire team now so the kids get to know one another better early on. Team dynamic is HUGE in this sport. Go bowling. Go to a movie. Have a sleepover.
  • Get your super cute, super amazing scoreboard from ScoreStix! Your score keeper will thank you, and they are AMAZING.
  • Be Prepared with Your New BRICK DUST DIARY so you can keep track of all the amazing things that happen this season with your daughter. It’s an amazing way to create seasonal keepsakes!

The post Tips for Preparing for the New Softball Season! appeared first on Softball is for Girls.

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The “Bench”

The “Bench”.  Most players fear being put on the bench only because someone told them that it is not a good place to be.  Why is it perceived as not a good place to be?  I’ve said it for years, you can’t manipulate playing time so if 7 players never touch the ball and only the pitcher and catcher can be guaranteed playing time, why is it so bad to be on the bench?  Here’s a new perspective that every softball parent needs to share with their players.  If there are 12 players on a team minimum, then if the 3 on the bench come in to play they have to sub for 3 other players, that means only 6 players aren’t on the bench.   Half the team are “sub’s”.  Any many more should rotate unless the rules in championship play prohibit the rotations. 

You’re right, I grew up in the land of softball and raised my kids around the game where it was an honor to be on the bench for a team like the Orange County Bastbusters.  You knew you made it… you would get recruited because coaches knew you were good enough to play on that team and to be on the bench on that team.  Why you ask?  Because you get trained by Coaches that know how to prepare you for the competition that you will face in college.  If you’re not playing with or against your peers that you will play with or face in college then it makes it a lot harder to be ready to face that level of play. 

Practice and training is where you get the tips and the repetition to be effective.  The techniques and the experience can be created and repeated.  You can’t get that experience in a game.  I hear sooooo much crying from parents about playing time and I’ll share the magic secret, if you spend the time you spend crying and whining about playing time on preparing, teaching and training you’ll never have to worry.  The hard work and effort will always pay off even if you just get one inning or one at bat.  You can only play so long on natural talent as we have seen over the years the kid with talent and hard work will always outlast the kid with natural talent that doesn’t do the work.  If you do everything YOU can to prepare your kid for the opportunities they’ll be more valuable and less likely to sit on the bench!  Get it??

On the other hand, I’ve never understood why a Coach would put a kid on the roster if they can never find a place to put the kid in the game.  Parents, put your kids on teams that they “can” play on.   Take off your rosy glasses and put them on a team that they get the right training, coaching and can be put in the game without hurting the outcome of the game.  Parents, get them to private or group hitting, fielding, technique training as a Coach will never have the time to individually train these kids as they have minimum coaching time to teach them to play as a team.  

It’s a privilege to be on a team where each kid is good enough to be on the field and on the bench. 

I started playing this game in 1970 and it has changed significantly.  However, one thing remains, the rules of the game that we all love puts 9 players on the field but you need depth on the bench to compete and to actually play the game.  You need pinch runners that have speed and can slide.  You need extra pitchers and catchers because of the amount of pressure and physical requirements.  You need kids that can play another position at any time to cover injuries, sickness or absence.  It made me crazy when we moved to Texas in 2007 and each team only wanted 10 on the roster.  Then a kid gets sick or has another event or sport to play then it was left to the coach to find a “pick up player”.  What the heck is that?  Now you have another kid to train, teach and incorporate into the team chemistry all because someone else felt the team was a lessor priority.  They all want their kids to stand there for the innings and act like that is valuable playing time.  But they’re the least committed to the issues of the team and the Coach. 

Let them all bat, what’s the big deal?  Give them as many at bats as you can.  What ever happened to playing 7 innings so the kids can get as many at bats as possible.  Oh yah, the tournaments directors want as many teams as possible to make more money but it surely doesn’t create more playing time for the kids.  You’re not preparing your kids to play the real game.  Pitchers especially need to be able to get through an entire game to understand all the issues and challenges that lay ahead of them in college. 

Play 7 innings!  Host more “Friendly” games where you can play all 7 innings, teach and train and create opportunities for all kids on the field.  The crying about being on the bench gets less when you can have the time to get them all in the game.  Scrimmage your own team.  I think it is ideal to have 16 to 18 on a seriously competitive roster, one that is trying to win National Championships.  Never less than 12 or it becomes the Coaches issue because these are the classic teams where the parents complain the most and are the least dedicated because Susie has cheer, or volleyball or something else that is perceived as “balance” for them but not good for the team or the Coach.  These are usually the families that have never coached because they don’t understand the responsibility of the Coach.  Oh, I’ll have another blog about the Coach, don’t worry! 

Here’s what the bench player should be doing.  Cheering for their team.  Keeping a score book so they understand the game.  Charting pitches so they learn strategy.  These tips can be modified by their level.  I taught 10U players to keep the scorebook and they loved it.  Have a coach talking to them explaining the game.  Teaching the game to them while they wait their turn.  Have them help the catcher get their gear on.  Warm up a pitcher or two.  There are so many things they can be doing.  It is not punishment to be on the bench.  Give them all a chance to be on the bench.  Coaches… don’t make it so lopsided.  This way they all get some opportunities and it will be obvious to the parents when you have to play only 9 by the rules. 

It is a very rare moment for any player to NEVER sit the bench.  And, those that haven’t, miss out on other aspects of the game. 

I promise you they have less struggles in High School and College if they learn all aspects of the game including THE BENCH!  This is a big reason why so many freshmen are leaving their college rosters, it is the first time the experience THE TEAM! 

And FINALLY, no employer will ask how many innings you played, what division or anything other than a deep appreciate for a all the hard work, sweat, tears, teamwork and accomplishments they’ve made! 

Teach the players the value of the Bench.  Enjoy the journey, have fun along the way. 

Cheri Naudin

President, Collegiate Sports Advocate www.CollegiateSportsAdvocate.com

The post What Players Should be Doing on “The Bench” | Softball is for Girls appeared first on Softball is for Girls.

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For the last 16 years, my daddy has been my coach. Some call it daddy ball, which I think is a stupid phrase considering if it weren’t for moms and dads willing to coach – there would be a lot fewer softball teams. 

Today, I just want to set the record straight about what it really means when a dad is a coach, at least from the daughters perspective. 

I am a pitcher. Cliche, I know. But my dad did not start a team just so that I could pitch and get mound time. In fact, my dad expects more of me than any other pitcher on his team. And when we are home, and I am just relaxing, he is always the one knocking on my bedroom door asking me if I want to go outside and throw a bunch. “Your curve wasn’t working so well last Saturday, don’t ya think we should try and fix it,” he would say. 

So I do. He on a bucket, and me on our makeshift pitching rubber in the yard working on my curve. If any of my pitcher friends were pitching he would be encouraging, and positive. But since it’s me, and since he expects so much from me, his helpfulness feels like criticism. Some of our sessions end up with me leaving and running to my room with tears in my eyes, and then he and my mom argue that perhaps he is being too hard on me. 

On game days, I am always the first one there. On practice days, I am the last one to leave. While other kids can sneak out early without cleaning up the cages, or lugging buckets to the truck – I am left as my dads right-hand gal. Sometimes, a lot of the times, the other girls on my team get to take more batting practice than I do while I am stuck shagging balls. And they get to miss tournaments or practices because of dances or parties or previous engagements. But it’s not that easy for me. I can’t just skip out because I am tired, or because I want to hang out with friends. I can’t just call in at the last minute and say I cannot play. I don’t miss practice because my dad knows that would look bad on him. 

Daddy ball also often means that I don’t get as much playing time as some of my friends. My dad is hyper-focused on me and my performance and while other girls may make multiple errors in the field, it only takes me to make 1-2 and I am pulled. Same with pitching. I think that my dad has heard so many underhanded comments about daddy ball, that he does everything in his power to make sure that he is not showing me any favoritism on the field. I don’t know how many times I have heard “HEATHER WHAT WAS THAT,” while I was playing, in a tone dads save only for their daughters that he would never use toward one of my teammates. 

And sometimes, it sucks when the coach is hard on your teammates, who happen to be your friends, and they get mad and take it out on you. Or, when they are whispering about my dad and don’t want me to hear so they hide in corners and exclude me. And yes, I hear the things that other parents say about my dad too. Loud and clear. I hear the criticism, and I have heard parents call him a dumbass, and I have seen the sour faces on parents after we lose and they want someone to blame so they, of course, blame him. And that is painful, because I love my dad. 

For all the dads who threw with her first!

What they don’t see if the countless hours he spends making line-ups. The countless hours he spends scheduling tournaments and trying to work around schedules, and the countless hours he spends at the field with the team practicing. What they don’t see if the private lessons he gives to my teammates who are struggling and need help. And still they whisper with discontent. They call him names when they don’t like the line-up. Sometimes as we are walking to our car, they stop him and confront him right in front of me. Sometimes I lose friends over this, simply because my daddy is my coach, and my friends quit and never talk to me again, even though this has nothing to do with me. 

I have seen my dad pay for my teammates to play, buy uniforms or cleats for some of my friends because their parents couldn’t afford it. We are not rich, but yet he shows up with a cooler full of snacks and drinks every tournament because he knows that some girls will have nothing. He insists I let my teammates use my new bat. And anytime someone needs a ride, he is usually the first one and sometimes the only one to offer, so I give up my bed the night before tournaments so that one of my teammates may play. 

It is not easy being the coaches kid. There are some days that I wish my dad wasn’t my coach. But the truth is that him and I get to spend a lot of time together that otherwise we wouldn’t. And even more important is that fact that my dad loves his team, his players, and no matter how tired he is, not matter how many things need to be done, there is no place he would rather be on the weekends than on the field with our team. 

My daddy is my coach. And from where I sit, he is a darn good coach. He may not be perfect. He is definitely harder on me than he is on any other person on my team. But I am grateful. Because when my team of 9 and 10-year-old girls moved up from Rec Ball and wanted to play travel, no one else volunteered to coach us up. No one thought we were good enough. No one else stepped up to the plate. No one else offered to help. But he did. And when he did, he jumped in with both feet, and showed me what commitment looks like. He showed me what compassion looked like. He showed me what it meant to be a coach, and to care about children and how important it is to try and make each of them a better person, on or off the field. 

So I play daddy ball. And judge as you may, I would not trade it for the world! I think instead of bashing ‘daddy ball’ and using it as some sort of dirty word that undermines softball, we should be thanking all the parents – who have plenty of other things to do, but who CHOOSE to step up to the plate and be a coach. 

So say what you will….but I play Daddy Ball, and I love it, and I am proud of my dad for being one of those dads who isn’t afraid to step up! 

The post My Daddy Is My Coach | Softball Is For Girls appeared first on Softball is for Girls.

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Cheers to 2019! There is nothing quite as exciting as a New Year to get us all motivated to do more of what we love, and improve ourselves tenfold. 

Here at Softball is For Girls, we believe the keys to happiness lie somewhere between the foul lines. So we have made a fairly simple, sharable and fun list to make sure YOU get the most out of 2019, by encouraging you to do more of the things you love. 

  1. First and foremost, play SOFTBALL more!  Yes, more! Even if you are at a family reunion and someone brings a plastic bat and whiffle ball, be sure to play ‘softball’ more! 
  2. Go to softball games more often. If you can squeeze them in, go to the fields more often and then revert to number 1. 
  3. Play softball ALL of the time. Even in your house, or at your dinner table, or in the car while you are riding to Grammas house. You’d be surprised how well a rolled up sock can act as a substitute for a softball without doing any damage. There is no reason NOT to play softball ALL the time! 
  4. NEVER stop playing softball. All this aging out business is for the birds. If you are well enough to walk and hold a softball bat, then we encourage you to never stop playing softball. For all those parents who think they are too fat, or who say they can’t play because they are wearing flip-flops – we say THAT’S JUST AN EXCUSE! And kids, this means that you may have to let your mom and dad show you how it’s done because we believe that you are never too old (or too young) to play softball! 
  5. Today we share what we think are the Best Softball Uniforms for 2019! We LOVE Two FIve Apparel and are pretty sure that you will as well. . Because practicing is fun. And practicing with family and friends is really fun. And because practice makes perfect. And because the more you practice the more you get to play, which is the entire point of this blog post. 
  6. Buy more Softball Shirts from Softball is For Girls! Because they are super cute! And because it means you will always have something to wear while making your life better in 2019! 
Bottom line. Softball makes you happy. So do more of it in 2019….

The post 5 Things to Do More of in 2019 appeared first on Softball is for Girls.

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It has always been said that girls need to feel good to play good, while boys need to play good to feel good.  And we think the best softball uniforms available today are from Two Five Apparel! 

And when it comes to feeling good, softball uniforms definitely play a part. Girls love to wear their team colors with class and love showing up to play ball looking better than any other team at the park. 

We have been coaching and playing fastpitch for over a decade, and nearly each and every time we see a uniform get-up that we love, it has one thing in common. It is made by Two-Five- Apparel. Sure, the other guys are okay, and your local uniform company may be able to provide you with a decent enough looking uniform. 

Our first uniforms made by Two-Five turned out to be head turners and each and every tournament we had people stop us to ask where we got the uniforms made. 

However for uniforms that really stand out, WITHOUT breaking the bank, either sublimated or stitched, there truly is no better than company than Two-Five Apparel. And NOW is the time to start thinking about your uniforms for the upcoming season. 

In our experience with Two-Five, they have always been able to produce exactly what we wanted in terms of colors and style. They offer a tremendous amount of choices that are the perfect fit for girls of nearly any age. And if you have a color pallet in mind, they have experts that can create something truly unique and stunning that your players are certain to love. 

Two Five Apparel uniforms are not your cookie cutter uniforms. The experts truly listen to what you have in mind, and will give you several different options to choose from. If you want a see an amazing sampling of just some of the designs that they have done for teams, check out the Two Five Instagram Feed by clicking here! 

Two Five also offers custom sublimated or stitched uniforms, and their turnaround time is excellent. Although we do suggest that you get your orders in early so you can get your uniforms back in time for the onset of the season. They will also send you sizing packages because as we all know, it’s nearly impossible to fit every girl in the same pair of pants. (That being said, we did not have one issue fitting our 14U with stock pants and they lasted more than 2 seasons) 

Of course one of the biggest aspects for a team looking into uniforms is cost. We all know that uniforms can literally bust a softball budget in two, but Two-Five has remained not just fair in their pricing, not just competitive – but extremely affordable. They offer two different options, for either $69 or $89 per player, which in today’s market is exceptionally priced especially when you consider the fact that you are getting something 100% personalized and original, as well as great quality. 

There is definitely a reason teams have been turning to Two Five Apparel year after year for their uniform needs. 

So here is what you will get. When you request a quote from Two Five, you will get a personalized consultant to help you with your needs. They will give you several design ideas using the colors that you are interested in (no matter how different) and an art team will draft up some samples for you to check out. 

Once you have decided on a design and color scheme (which is truly the hardest part) you will get a fit kit so that you can make sure your uniforms fit your players well. Then, of course, you will be able to choose from a plethora of fan ware items such as hoodies and t-shirts and things that players and fans alike will love to wear.

Once complete, your uniforms are made to order and shipped to your door!  We cannot speak for Two Five as far as turnaround time at this point is, but we received our uniforms within two weeks. 

We do suggest that you act quickly and don’t wait until the last moment to see what Two Five Apparel can do for you. As you know, the season is about to start – and many teams will be scrambling at the last moment to find great game day duds. Additionally, we suggest that you order a few extra jerseys and pants, not just for pick up players, but because roster changes are certainly common during a season. 

So how do you start?

CLICK HERE TO START YOUR QUOTE! 

The post Check out the Best Softball Uniforms for 2019 | Softball is For Girls appeared first on Softball is for Girls.

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We call them the Bat Wars. Every year the big bat companies come out with a new and improved, hot out of the wrapper, bat guaranteed to make the girls hit better BAT, that will only set you back a few hundred bucks. And yet our most popular fan question of 2018 (and nearly every other year) is what is the best softball bat for my daughter to use? 

So today,  we get down to the nitty gritty of the bat wars. And while our methods aren’t exactly scientific, we utilized the power of an amazing fan base of 188K fastpitch softball families to come up with the answer.

As usual, the front-runners are Demarini, Lousiville Slugger and Easton. Easton made a big come back with the Ghost and they have been very popular this year around the ballparks on tournament day. As for their staying power, 2019 will surely tell, as we know the illegality of their bat for specific organizations was definitely a Debbie downer for many bat buyers.

A few weeks ago, we asked folks to choose in a Facebook poll between DeMarini and Louisville Slugger, and to comment if they were a fan of the Easton or something else. And the RESULTS are in! 

The split between the DeMarini and the LS bats was pretty close. With 689 people voting, there were 323 for Louisville Slugger bats and 366 for DeMarini. The real news is that either way, Wilson wins, because they own both companies. There weren’t many people willing to stop scrolling long enough to leave a comment for Easton, and it seems that people either really love them, or they don’t.

Other bats mentioned were the Anderson bats, (Rocket Tech) and we know firsthand that they are good bats to keep around, especially because they aren’t limited by weather and temperatures like the expensive composites are. They kind of remind us of All Terrain Vehicle (think Hummers) that you can take anywhere and do just about anything with. Definitely, a lot of dingers have been hit with Rocket Techs, long before the composite bats became so popular.

The truth is that with any of these bats, you will not go wrong. (Not very helpful, huh?) You won’t fix a crappy swing and lack of practice, but your daughter will have a good bat to put her talents to the test. 

The best way to find the best bat for your daughter is to take her somewhere where she can actually get her hands on the bat and let her pick for herself. While it is easy to re-grip bats nowadays, the handles on all of these bats are different and are often a deal breaker for girls who are used to a certain feel from their bat. Endloaded, or balanced? The best way to decide is to let your daughter swing it, and record her exit speed.

We also recommend NOT getting a bat too big, hoping she can use it longer. The average life of these bats is only about a year anyway, so it’s not like a winter coat that you need to fit her for a couple of years. Getting a bat too long, and too heavy for your daughter’s age and size is a detriment to her hitting and can be a confidence squasher.

If you aren’t sure of the size you need or should get – here is a link for a generalized bat sizing chart that will help you decide. But again, it will come down to her strength and the way she handles a bat. CLICK HERE Softball Bat Sizing Chart

And there you have it! Now that 2018 is OVER, you will start seeing some insanely good deals on the 2018 models (brand new) as the bat wars continue on trying to convince us that buying a 2019 model will improve our daughters batting average. Stay tuned on social media, as we will share these deals as we find them.

The post Best Softball Bat of 2018 | Softball is For Girls appeared first on Softball is for Girls.

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She Threw with me First! 

(Written & Copyrighted By Stef Daniel & Softball is For Girls,  dedicated to my husband who has lovingly been the first one to throw with all of this daughters) Please SHARE, but Please Give Credit! 

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A baby pink blanket and a onesie with flowers, a girl was born you beamed for hours. 

Then it hit you one day that you didn’t know much, about barbies and makeup and dresses and such. 

The years flew by the love grew strong, she painted your nails, you played with dolls all day long. 

But now she was growing up, you wondered what you would do, to keep the bound strong all the years through. 

Then one day when she was five, you tossed her a pink ball – it fell right out of her glove, her hands were so small.

The next day she said, “Daddy can we go throw,” and you jumped off the couch more than ready to go. 

The days and the weeks turned to months of playing with the ball, “Daddy I wanna play catch,” she would call! 

Soon she could catch the ball right in her glove, and softball became a game between you two full of love.

You spent hours teaching her how to throw and to hit, how to catch and to chew up seeds and spit. 

She’d wait by the window for you to come home from work, you’d see the glove on her hand and give her a smirk.

Next was the jersey, you coached her first team, she wore your old number – suddenly softball was her dream! 

When she wanted to be a pitcher, you spent hours in the yard – teaching her how – no matter how hard. 

“Hey dad,” she would say as soon as you’d sit down – “Wanna go outside and hit me some balls on the ground?”

“Hey dad,” she would ask you multiple times a day, “wanna go up to the field with the softballs and play?” 

“Hey dad,” she would she say, “Are you bored like me, do you wanna go out and hit off the tee?” 

“Hey dad,” she would shout with her glove on her hand, “Do you wanna see how good I’ve got at my backhand?”

Soon, our weekends became full of ball games and friends, you had created something together you hoped would never end. 

You’d drive her to practice, picking up friends along the way, chatting and laughing grabbing snacks before you play. 

Then travel ball began to take over our lives, and you and her bounded on those long early morning drives. 

You were there on the good days, and there on the bad, win or lose you cheered her on, that’s the love of a dad. 

Then suddenly she was grown still playing the game that she loved, and you were still always ready with your glove. 

She beamed with her teammates, rolled her eyes at you, and now you’d sit back and just watch while she threw. 

She became one hell of a ballplayer, she was fierce on the field, your pride and admiration you could not shield.

Your favorite past time became watching her play, you and her at the ballfield together was your best kinda day. 

And now she is out there all grown up and doing her thing, and to your memories of all those years playing catch, you cling. 

That 5-year-old girl that you taught how to throw, has become a young woman who makes your heart glow. 

She may have new people to play catch with now, BUT, it will always be YOU who showed her HOW. 

For the rest of your life it’ll make your heart BURST to know you were the one she threw with FIRST! 

 

(Written & Copyrighted By Stef Daniel & Softball is For Girls,  dedicated to my husband who has lovingly been the first one to throw with all of this daughters) Please SHARE, but Please Give Credit! 

The post She Threw with Me First | Softball is For Girls appeared first on Softball is for Girls.

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