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Slow American English by Karren Doll Tolliver - 1w ago

Welcome to Slow American English, the podcast for learners of American English. I’m your host, Karren Tolliver.

This is episode number 55: The Liberty Bell

Before we begin, I have some announcements:

  1. I hope you acted on the previous podcast, which describes how to become a patron of the podcast. Please visit the podcast website and click on the top menu bar where it says “Patron Level Details”. The link is www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net/PatronLevels. Your contributions will help me continue to bring this important podcast to the world.

  1. The next live discussion for Level 1 patrons and above will be on Thursday, 18 July, at 10:00am US Mountain Time. You must email me at info@slowamericanenglish.net to let me know you will attend. I realize that, if you are in certain time zones, it might prevent you from participating. If so, please email me and let me know. I will schedule a different time for groups in other time zones.

  1. Don’t forget to buy the fourth Slow American English workbook. It’s available on Amazon, along with the first three workbooks. You can use the workbooks either with the podcast or without it. They are full of ready-made lessons for teachers and students.

  1. Become a website subscriber at www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. There are free transcripts PLUS links to become a patron and to buy workbooks.

Now for the podcast:

Transcript:

It’s hard to think of a more famous symbol of the United States than the Liberty Bell. In addition to the bald eagle, Statue of Liberty, American flag and Uncle Sam, the Liberty Bell stands for freedom – it’s even in the name!

It stands now in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which used to be the capital city of the USA before Washington, DC. You can visit it at Liberty Bell Center near Independence Hall, where the Founding Fathers signed the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

The Liberty Bell has a large crack. Legend says that ringing the bell on the day the Declaration of Independence was signed caused it to crack. Unfortunately that is not true. A magazine writer invented this story.

The bell was made by Philly (short for Philadelphia) metalworkers John Pass and John Stow. They melted down a defective bell to make this one in the early 1750s. It was installed in the State House (capitol) in Philadelphia. It was rung to call legislators and citizens to meetings.

An inscription is written on the bell, which says, “Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all inhabitants thereof.” A second inscription says, “By order of the Assembly of the Province of Pensylvania for the State House in Philada.” (‘Philada’ was a short form of ‘Philadelphia’.) A third inscription reads, “Pass and Stow/MDCCLIII.” The last part is the year 1753 in Roman numerals.

Although specific details are unknown, the bell developed a small crack probably around the 1840s. To repair it, a larger crack was created, but the repair failed. A second crack also appeared shortly after that, ruining the bell forever. It could never be rung again.

The bell was called the State House Bell until the mid-1800s. But even before it was called the Liberty Bell, abolitionists, women’s suffragists and Civil Rights leaders were inspired by the first inscription on the bell. In fact, it is said that people fighting for the end of slavery came up with the name ‘Liberty Bell’.

More Liberty Bell facts:

  • It weighs about 2,080 pounds.

  • It is made of bronze.

  • The original musical note of the bell was E-flat.

  • The bell rang to mark the signing of the Constitution.

  • During the Revolutionary War, the bell was taken from Philadelphia and hidden in a church in Allentown, PA. It was moved to prevent the British from finding it and melting it down for weapons.

  • It was rung to mark the deaths of George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other Founding Fathers.

  • It was last rung on Washington’s birthday in 1846.

  • Every Fourth of July, descendants of the signers of the Declaration of Independence gently tap the Liberty Bell 13 times in honor of the patriots from the original 13 states.

  • Every Martin Luther King Day, the bell is gently tapped in honor of this great Civil Rights leader.

  • Every state capitol received a copy of the Liberty Bell in 1950 as part of a fundraiser by the US Treasury Department. These copies don’t have cracks.

  • Normandy, France, also has a copy of the bell. It was created in 2004 for the 60th anniversary of D-Day in WWII, which was in 1944. It was the day Allied forces landed in Normandy to eventually end the war.

### End of Transcript ###

That’s the podcast for this time. Slow American English is written and produced by Karren Tolliver. Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

For a free transcript and to subscribe to the podcast, visit www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. You can also subscribe via any podcast feed reader.

Theme music for this podcast is written and performed by SW Campbell and used by permission. Find more music by this artist at www.Soundclick.com/swcampbell.

This has been Slow American English. I’m Karren Tolliver. Thank you for listening.

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Welcome to Slow American English, the podcast for learners of American English. I’m your host, Karren Tolliver.

This is a special podcast to ask you for help.

Are you learning as much as you can from each Slow American English podcast episode?

You could be learning more faster as a patron of the podcast!

All patron contributions help me continue to bring this podcast to you.

To become a patron, visit www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish.

There you can choose from four levels of patrons, each with valuable monthly rewards.

Patreon Patron Level 2 is really the BEST level, with the most rewards for your money!

Here are the details for Patron Level 2: Instructors and Serious Self-Study Students.

I consider Level 2 to be the best level for the money. The cost is $10.00 USD per month, which is only about 34 cents per day.

This level is for teachers of ESL (English as a Second Language) and serious students who want to work on their own to improve their English skills.

Here are the rewards you get for Level 2 every month:

Reward 1. All Level 1 rewards, which include

  • a downloadable pdf file with exercises
  • a monthly, live discussion of the podcast topic with me and other patrons
  • a free Slow American English workbook, digital or print version
  • and a chance to win private English lessons with me

Reward 2. A FULL Exercise Worksheet (downloadable pdf file)

  • Vocabulary and Multiple-Choice exercises help you improve your listening comprehension.
  • A Discussion exercise provides ideas to practice speaking English, or you can use the same questions to improve your writing.
  • Each worksheet has gaps for answers.
  • Answer keys appear at the end.
  • The Transcript is included and has line numbers so you can easily refer to the text. Using this included transcript, you can use the exercises to test your reading comprehension also.
  • Any Bonus Material for the episode is also included.
  • Teachers: Each Exercise Worksheet is a ready-made lesson! You can photocopy it up to 30 times per term/semester. Your students will appreciate the extra reinforcement, and you’ll appreciate the time savings!

Reward 3. An mp3 file of the Natural-Speed Recording of that month’s podcast episode

  • Serious self-study students, use this recording to practice listening to faster, natural-speed speech.
  • Teachers, use this recording in your classroom to help your advanced students improve their listening skills. Employing a combination of the podcast episode or Natural-Speed Recording, plus the FULL Exercise Worksheet, allows teachers and serious self-study students to take full advantage of the podcast.

Reward 4. An exclusive, patron-only Slow American English Patreon RSS Feed

  • Just like you listen to the regular, monthly podcast, this RSS feed brings you the Natural-Speed Recordings automatically. However, only Level 2 patrons and above can access this feed to stream or download the recordings.

In my opinion, Patreon Patron Level 2 is really the BEST level, with the most rewards for your money!

So please visit Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish

and become a patron today.

Teachers, use these valuable rewards to help your students!

Students, use your rewards to quickly improve your English!

This has been Slow American English. I’m Karren Tolliver. Thank you for listening!

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Slow American English by Karren Doll Tolliver - 1M ago

Welcome to Slow American English, the podcast for learners of American English. I’m your host, Karren Tolliver.

This is episode number 54: Math Words

Before we begin, I have an important announcement:

As of June 1st, there are four new reward levels on my Patreon site. Please consider becoming a patron for the podcast. In return for your monthly contribution, you get valuable rewards, depending on the level you choose.

For example, if you sign up for the English-Learners level, for only $5.00 per month you get exercises to go with the podcast, a free workbook, a live discussion about the podcast each month, and more! So visit www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish and become a patron today. I can’t produce this podcast without you!

Note: This month’s live discussion is on 20 June at 10:00am Mountain Time, which is UTC-6.

A note to my existing patrons: please visit the Patreon site for an important message about changing your level. If you don’t change it, you won’t get any rewards in the future. And I really want you to get rewards for your generous support! Go to Patreon.com/slowamericanenglish for all the details.

Visit the podcast website at www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. Find links there to subscribe to the website and to follow me on social media. Slow American English workbooks are available on Amazon(***link). Find that link on the website, too.

Note: Visit www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish for FREE bonus material that goes with this episode. Download a pdf file containing information about cardinal and ordinal numbers in American English.

Now for the podcast:

Transcript:

In this episode I present some American English math words. I recommend visiting SlowAmericanEnglish.net and reading the transcript for this episode to see the signs and symbols used in math as I speak the words.

Math‘ is short for ‘mathematics‘; both of these words are singular. There are several types of math, such as algebra and geometry. In this podcast, I will present vocabulary for the branch of math called arithmetic. Arithmetic includes basic number operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Numbers in arithmetic use the decimal system, which is based on ten.

Arithmetic operations all use the equals sign (=) just before the answer. It is pronounced ‘equals’ or ‘is’. Because the operation ‘equals’ the answer, the written operation is called an ‘equation’.

Addition is the process of adding, or combining numbers. For example, if you want to combine ten and five, the equation would be ‘ten plus five equals fifteen’ or ‘ten and five is fifteen’. It is written 10+5=15. The small cross between ten and five is the ‘plus sign’. The answer of an addition equation is called the ‘sum’.

Subtraction is the act of subtracting, or taking away numbers. For example, if you want to take five away from ten, the equation would be ‘ten minus five equals five’. It is written 10-5=5. The small line between ten and five is the ‘minus sign’. The answer of a subtraction equation is called the ‘difference’.

Multiplication is the operation of multiplying, or increasing numbers. For example, if you want to multiply ten and five, the equation would be ‘ten times five equals fifty’ or ‘ten multiplied by five is fifty’. It is written 10×5=50 or 10*5=50. The answer of a multiplication equation is called the ‘product’. School children learn their multiplication tables, or ‘times tables’ in second grade.

Division is the process of dividing, or separating numbers into groups. For example, if you want to separate ten into groups of five, the equation is ‘ten divided by five equals two’ or ‘five goes into ten two times’. It is written 10÷5=2 or 10/5=2. Notice the symbols between ten and five used for division. The answer of a division equation is called the ‘quotient’.

More Vocabulary

‘Numerals’ or ‘digits’ are the symbols we write for numbers. For example, the numeral, or digit, for ‘five’ is ‘5’. We use Arabic numerals in American English.

Numbers higher than zero are positive. Numbers less than zero are negative. Negative numbers are written with a minus sign before them, which is pronounced: -22 is pronounced ‘minus twenty-two’ or ‘negative twenty-two’.

You might see the word ‘maths’, spelled with an ‘s’ at the end. This is the British English form of ‘math’.

For numbers vocabulary about measurements, see Slow American English Episode 51: The US Measurement System.

Numbers in Writing

For numbers more than 999, use a comma to separate every three digits: 1,000 for one thousand or 2,000,000 for two million.

Use a dot, or period, to show parts of a number, such as tenths, hundredths and thousandths. (This is different than the European way, so be careful when dealing with international numbers.) These are decimal numbers. The dot is called a ‘decimal point’ and it is pronounced ‘point’ as well. For example: 4.356 is ‘four point three five six’.

In formal writing, if a number begins a sentence, you must write out the words. Also write out the words for a number less than ten. For all other numbers, use digits.

### End of Transcript ###

That’s the podcast for this time. Slow American English is written and produced by Karren Tolliver. Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

For a free transcript and to subscribe to the podcast, visit www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. You can also subscribe via Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, TuneIn and any other podcast feed reader.

Theme music for this podcast is written and performed by SW Campbell and used by permission. Find more music by this artist at www.Soundclick.com/swcampbell.

This has been Slow American English. I’m Karren Tolliver. Thank you for listening.

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Welcome to Slow American English, the podcast for learners of American English. I’m your host, Karren Tolliver.

This is PLUS Episode 2: Interview with ESL Instructor Gwen Campbell

This is the second PLUS Episode. Today I interview Gwen Campbell. She lives in Florida and teaches ESL there.

Note: There is no transcript for the interview, and it is in natural-speed English. However, it is still a good listening exercise, and you can learn some study and teaching tips from Gwen.

Here is something we didn’t discuss in our interview: Gwen has a business making and selling soap! Check out her website at www.HarmonySoapery.com.

Now for the interview:

###Begin###

INTERVIEW

### End ###

That’s the podcast for this time. I hope you enjoyed this PLUS Episode. Slow American English is written and produced by Karren Tolliver. Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

For free transcripts and to subscribe to the podcast, visit www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. You can also download the podcast with any RSS feed reader such as Apple Podcasts or Google Play.

Buy Slow American English workbooks on Amazon.com in print and Kindle formats.

To support the podcast and become a patron visit www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish.

Contact me directly via email at info@slowamericanenglish.net.

Theme music for this podcast is written and performed by SW Campbell and used by permission. That is Gwen’s husband! Find more music by this artist at www.Soundclick.com/swcampbell.

This has been Slow American English. I’m Karren Tolliver. Thank you for listening.

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Slow American English by Karren Doll Tolliver - 2M ago

Welcome to Slow American English, the podcast for learners of American English. I’m your host, Karren Tolliver.

This is episode number 53: The Great Lakes

Hello Slow American English listeners! Before we begin, here’s some important info:

This week I sent out a question form to the website subscribers. I hope you all answer the survey because the information and opinions you give will help make this podcast better. Check your inboxes! AND, there will be a second question form for listeners who aren’t subscribers soon. Keep listening to this podcast for details.

Follow me on social media! Click the icons for Instagram, Twitter and Facebook on the podcast website at www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net.

Buy all four Slow American English workbooks on Amazon now! You can use the workbooks either with the podcast or without it. Students AND teachers, you can use them for listening, reading, speaking and writing practice.

A million thanks to my Patreon patrons for pledging a small amount every month to keep the podcast going. This month I changed the Patreon benefit levels, so take a look at the changes and rewards at www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish.

Become a website subscriber at SlowAmericanEnglish.net. There are free transcripts PLUS links to become a patron and to buy workbooks.

Note: You can visit Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish for FREE bonus material related to this podcast episode. You can download a pdf file containing maps of the Great Lakes. It really helps you understand the Great Lakes when you are listening to the recording.

Now for the podcast:

Transcript:

The Great Lakes are five very large bodies of water in the upper Midwest area of the USA, north of the Mississippi River basin. We think of them as inland seas and call them the nation’s fourth seacoast. They lie on the border with Canada and measure more than 750 miles from east to west. They touch eight states: Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. The Great Lakes, along with their connecting rivers, form the largest fresh surface water system on earth.

The Great Lakes were formed by glaciers thousands of years ago, and they are very deep. They hold about 20% of the world’s fresh surface water supply and 90% of the USA’s. The Great Lakes provide drinking water for about 48 million people. In addition, the lakes are used for transportation, recreation, electricity, fishing and many other economic and ecological functions.

Weather can be very dangerous for ships on the Great Lakes, and there are dangerous reefs, too. Many terrible shipwrecks have happened there. One of the most famous was the wreck of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald in 1975. You may have heard the famous song about it by Gordon Lightfoot.

Because of pollution and other problems, the Great Lakes have been damaged. Now, there are lots of federal programs to help clean and restore them. Canada, 40 Native North American tribes and eight US states take part in the programs.

The lakes’ names are Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie and Superior. You can remember the names of the Great Lakes by thinking of the word HOMES. Here is a little information about each one. They are listed in order from west to east:

Lake Superior

Lake Superior is the largest in surface area and water volume. The name comes from the French phrase for “upper lake”, lac supérieur, because it is north of Lake Huron.

Lake Michigan

The name of Lake Michigan comes from the Ojibwa Native American tribe’s word mishigami, meaning “large lake”. Lake Michigan is the third largest Great Lake in surface area. It’s the only one that is located entirely within the US. It is connected to Lake Huron by the Straits of Mackinac. Some people consider Lake Michigan and Lake Huron to be two halves of one larger body of water.

Lake Huron

The name comes from the Huron, or Wyandot, Native Americans, who lived there. It’s the second largest Great Lake with the longest shoreline. Manitoulin Island is located in Lake Huron; it’s the largest island in any inland body of water on Earth.

Lake Erie

The name of Lake Erie was taken from the Iroquoi Native Americans’ word for “long tail” (erielhonan), which describes Lake Erie’s shape. It is the fourth largest Great Lake in surface area, but smallest by water volume.

Lake Ontario

The Native American Huron word for “lake of shining water” is ontario. This is the smallest of the Great Lakes by surface area. Water from Lake Erie flows into Lake Ontario by the Niagara River. Lake Ontario is at the base of the famous Niagara Falls. Water flows out of Lake Ontario by the St. Lawrence River, which leads to the Gulf of St. Lawrence and then into the Atlantic Ocean.

### End of Transcript ###

That’s the podcast for this time. Slow American English is written and produced by Karren Tolliver. Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

For a free transcript and to subscribe to the podcast, visit www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. You can also subscribe via Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, TuneIn and any other podcast feed reader.

Theme music for this podcast is written and performed by SW Campbell and used by permission. Find more music by this artist at www.Soundclick.com/swcampbell.

This has been Slow American English. I’m Karren Tolliver. Thank you for listening.

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Welcome to Slow American English, the podcast for learners of American English. I’m your host, Karren Tolliver.

This is episode number 52: San Francisco, California

Hello Slow American English listeners! Before we begin, here’s some important info:

Now you can follow me on social media. Click the icons for Instagram, Twitter and Facebook on the podcast website at www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. I send information about American English idioms on Mondays and podcast episode information every Friday. Plus there are additional posts with more information.

Don’t forget to buy the fourth Slow American English workbook. It’s available on Amazon, just like the first three workbooks. You can use the workbooks either with the podcast or without it. Teachers can use it for listening, reading, speaking and writing. Students can use it for self-study. For links to buy all my workbooks, visit the podcast website.

A million thanks to my Patreon patrons for pledging a small amount every month to keep the podcast going. Your contributions help pay for web hosting and other expenses. Without you, I could not produce this podcast every month. Thank you! To become a patron, visit www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish.

Become a website subscriber at www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. There are free transcripts PLUS links to become a patron and to buy workbooks.

Now for the podcast:

San Francisco, CA, is one of the most important ports in the USA. It is on the West Coast, on the Pacific Ocean, and has a large, safe bay and harbor for ships. The city and bay are famous for the quickly changing weather, especially fog and rain. In fact, the fog hid the harbor from European explorers for over 300 years. Before that, the Yaluma people lived there.

Beginning with the European settlers, San Francisco was a Spanish mission, and later a Mexican mission. Then, in 1848, gold was discovered in the nearby mountains. Many people poured into the area in 1849 hoping to get rich. This movement of people was called the Gold Rush, and the people were called the 49ers. This nickname is so popular that San Francisco’s football team‘s name is the 49ers.

San Francisco sits on very steep hills, and part of it is on filled-in marshland. The city lies on the San Andreas Fault, which means there is a high danger of earthquakes. In fact, the great earthquake of 1906 destroyed much of the city. Fires burned for three days afterward, destroying even more. More recently a large earthquake occurred in 1989. Highways, buildings and bridges fell, and many people died.

However, San Franciscans rebuilt each time, and it continued to grow. It is a very rich, crowded city, with many high-tech companies and a progressive culture. Writers and poets came to the city, including the beat poets of the 1950s. In the 1960s, the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood was famous as a center for the hippie counterculture. San Francisco has always been a place where many activists, including those for environmental, labor and feminist issues, live and work. In the 1980s, the Castro District area was a center for gay rights and a movement to help homeless people and those with AIDS.

Other interesting facts about San Francisco:

Thousands of Chinese immigrants came to San Francisco to work because of the discovery of gold and silver, and also because of the railroad. As a result, the Chinatown area of San Francisco became the largest Chinese settlement outside of Asia.

Visitors to San Francisco should ride the famous cable cars. They were installed in the late 1800s and helped the city grow on the steep hills.

Another popular sight is Fisherman’s Wharf, a historical part of the waterfront. While there, tourists like to see the hundreds of sea lions that visit Pier 39 every year. From this area you can take a boat tour and visit the famous ex-prison, Alcatraz, which is located on an island in San Francisco Bay.

But I have saved the most famous sight of San Francisco for last: the Golden Gate Bridge. That, and the Bay Bridge, were both built in the 1930s. They connect the city to nearby communities like Oakland and Marin County.

### End of Transcript ###

That’s the podcast for this time. Slow American English is written and produced by Karren Tolliver. Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

For a free transcript and to subscribe to the podcast, visit www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. You can get the podcast episodes via Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher, Spotify and any other RSS feed reader.

Theme music is written and performed by SW Campbell and used by permission. Find more music by this artist at www.Soundclick.com/swcampbell.

As always, you can contact me directly via email at info@slowamericanenglish.net.

This has been Slow American English. I’m Karren Tolliver. Thank you for listening.

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Slow American English by Karren Doll Tolliver - 4M ago

Welcome to Slow American English, the podcast for learners of American English. I’m your host, Karren Tolliver.

This is episode number 51: US Measurement System

Subscribe to this podcast feed anywhere you get your podcasts. Become a website subscriber for free at www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. Find free transcripts there PLUS links to become a patron and to buy workbooks.

I hope you enjoyed my first Plus Episode that posted March 1st. Look for more Plus Episodes in the future.

And, remember that the fourth Slow American English workbook is now available on Amazon!

Like the first three, this workbook has all the transcripts, bonus material, exercises and answer keys for all the podcast episodes for an entire year. This Volume 4 contains all episodes from 2018, and it’s available in print and Kindle formats.

You can use the workbooks either with the podcast or without it. Teachers can use it for listening and reading comprehension and discussion. Students can use it for self-study. For links to buy all my workbooks, visit www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net.

This episode has FREE BONUS MATERIAL. Visit www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish to download a free pdf file with lists of the US measurement units and equivalents. While you are visiting Patreon, please become a patron. It’s very inexpensive and helps everyone around the world who listens to this podcast. If you are already a patron, thank you!

Contact me directly via email at info@slowamericanenglish.net. Now for the podcast:

Transcript:

Globally there are three main measuring systems: metric, British Imperial and US Standard or Customary. Today, most countries officially use the metric system. In fact, even Britain officially converted to the metric system in 1965.

The US system comes from the old British Imperial system. Much of the vocabulary is the same, but some of the measurements are different.

In 1975, Congress passed the Metric Conversion Act, making the metric system the preferred system. However, it was voluntary. Therefore, some things in the US converted to the metric system and others did not. Today, anything related to science, the military and some industries is measured in metric.

However, most everyday measurements still use the US system. For example, we buy gasoline by the gallon, measure flour by the pound and drive in miles per hour (mph). On packaging, especially food, weights are given in US units, but most packages also list the metric equivalent just after the US measurement.

There are a few exceptions, such as

  • Larger soft drink bottles are liters

  • Medicine is in milligrams

  • Some car parts are in millimeters

But:

  • Distance is in miles, yards and inches

  • Dry weight is in pounds and ounces

  • Liquid volume is in gallons, quarts, cups and ounces

Note that some measuring words, such as ounce, are used for both dry and liquid, especially for cooking recipes. To find accurate conversions, use an app or a website that has a converter.

For a list of tables with the US measurement units and equivalents, visit my Patreon page at www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish. There you can download a FREE pdf file containing these tables and some metric conversion tables, too.

Here are some general tips:

  • A quart is a little larger than a liter. There are 32 ounces in a quart. Four quarts equal a gallon.

  • An inch is about the size of the end of your thumb; there are 12 inches in a foot.

  • A foot is based on the size of a man’s foot. There are three feet in a yard. A yard is a little longer than a meter.

  • Two-thirds of a mile is about one kilometer.

  • Thirty-two degrees Fahrenheit is 0 degrees Celsius (32=0). Sixty-one degrees Fahrenheit is about 16 degrees Celsius (just reverse the numbers, 61=16). Eighty-two degrees Fahrenheit equals 28 degrees Celsius (82=28).

  • One pound is about half a kilogram.

Language notes:

  • A dozen is 12; a baker’s dozen is 13.

  • An American football field (100 yards by 160 feet) is often used for comparisons. For instance, “The base of the Eiffel Tower is the size of two football fields.”

  • To inch means to move a small bit at a time. “The dog inched closer to the woman’s food.”

  • A miss is as good as a mile means a narrow failure or escape has the same result as a wide failure or miss. Terry: “I almost won the race!” Pat: “But you still didn’t win. A miss is as good as a mile.”

  • An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure means it’s better to prevent something than to have to solve a problem later.

### End of Transcript ###

That’s the podcast for this time. Slow American English is written and produced by Karren Tolliver. © Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

For a free transcript and to subscribe to the podcast, visit www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. You can also subscribe via Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, TuneIn and any other podcast feed reader.

Don’t forget to download your FREE BONUS MATERIAL for this episode. Visit www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish to download your free pdf with tables of the US measurement units and equivalents.

Theme music for this podcast is written and performed by SW Campbell and used by permission. Find more music by this artist at www.Soundclick.com/swcampbell.

This has been Slow American English. I’m Karren Tolliver. Thank you for listening.

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Welcome to Slow American English, the podcast for learners of American English. I’m your host, Karren Tolliver.

This is PLUS Episode 1: IELTSPodcast Interview with Ben Worthington

This is a special episode and not typical. Today I interview Ben Worthington who has an ESL podcast called the IELTSPodcast. He helps students pass the IELTS exam.

There are two unusual things about this episode. There is no transcript for the interview, and it is in natural-speed English. However, it is still a good listening exercise, and you can learn about a good way to study for the IELTS exam.

Find links to Ben’s website, including the IELTS Essay Correction Service and the IELTS Vocabulary and Lexical Resource on my website at www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net.

Now for the interview:

###Begin###

INTERVIEW (no transcript)

### End ###

That’s the podcast for this time. I hope you enjoyed this very special episode. Slow American English is written and produced by Karren Tolliver. Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

For free transcripts and to subscribe to the podcast, visit www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. You can also subscribe via Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher and any other RSS feed reader.

Buy workbooks on Amazon.com in print and Kindle formats.

To support the podcast and become a patron visit www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish.

Contact me directly via email at info@slowamericanenglish.net.

Theme music for this podcast is written and performed by SW Campbell and used by permission. Find more music by this artist at www.Soundclick.com/swcampbell.

This has been Slow American English. I’m Karren Tolliver. Thank you for listening.

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Welcome to Slow American English, the podcast for learners of American English. I’m your host, Karren Tolliver.

This is episode number 50: Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Before we begin, I have some good news! The fourth Slow American English workbook is now available on Amazon!

Like the first three workbooks, this workbook has all the transcripts, bonus material, exercises and answer keys for all the podcast episodes for an entire year. This Volume 4 contains all episodes from 2018, and it’s available in print and Kindle formats.

You can use each workbook either with the podcast or without it. Teachers can use it for listening and reading comprehension and discussion. Students can use it for self-study. For links to buy all my workbooks, visit www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net.

Also, many thanks to my Patreon patrons for pledging a small amount every month to keep the podcast going. Your contributions help pay for web hosting and other expenses. Without you, I could not produce this podcast every month. Thank you!

To become a patron, visit www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish. It’s very inexpensive and helps everyone around the world who listens to this podcast.

Become a website subscriber for free at www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. Find free transcripts there PLUS links to become a patron and to buy workbooks.

Subscribe to the podcast feed via Apple Podcasts, Android, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn and any other RSS feed reader.

Contact me directly via email at info@slowamericanenglish.net. Now for the podcast:

Transcript:

Martin Luther King, Jr., was one of America’s greatest leaders. He was an African-American, born in Atlanta, GA, in 1929. He was smart and well educated, entering college at age 15 and earning a doctorate from Boston University. He was also a pastor at a church in Alabama. I mentioned him in podcast Episode 2: Black History Month.

When King was born, racism, segregation and discrimination were legal. This means that black people and other minorities could not enjoy the same quality of life as whites. Things like hotels, hospitals, restaurants and schools were segregated, or separate, and the places for blacks were usually in very bad condition. Blacks could not buy houses in certain areas, they were often prevented from voting, and they could not get good jobs. King himself attended segregated schools.

In the 1950s and 60’s Dr. King and others led a non-violent movement against segregation and legal discrimination. It was called the Civil Rights Movement. There were many protests and demonstrations, especially in the South.

Dr. King was part of or led many important civil rights protests and demonstrations.

  • During the Montgomery, AL, bus boycott of 1955-56, Dr. King’s house was bombed, and he and 89 others were arrested.

  • In 1957 he helped form the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), whose goal was to achieve full equality for African-Americans through non-violent protests.

  • About 250,000 blacks and other civil rights workers gathered in Washington, DC, in 1963. They held a protest against discrimination and segregation called the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. On the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, Dr. King gave his famous “I have a dream” speech. In it, he called for an end to racism using emotional and poetic language. Repeating the phrase “I have a dream”, he stated his hope for equality and peace.

  • In 1963, he was arrested during a protest in Birmingham, AL. There, he wrote his civil rights manifesto, “Letter from the Birmingham Jail”. The letter tells exactly why he and his group were doing what they were doing.

  • In 1965 during the first of three marches from Selma, AL, to Montgomery, King helped lead a group of about 600 civil rights protesters. Police attacked the marchers and beat and hurt many of them badly. The protesters had to go to court to win the right to march again, which they did a short time later.

The Civil Rights Movement was successful in some important ways. Because of the courage of the people in it, laws were passed that made discrimination and segregation illegal. Much of the success is due to Dr. King’s leadership.

In 1968, Dr. King was assassinated in Memphis, TN. He was only 39 years old. However, King’s legacy of working for equal rights for everyone continues today, and he is recognized as a world leader. Now, there is an official federal holiday on the third Monday of January honoring him and his contributions to Americans.

End of Transcript ###

That’s the podcast for this time. Slow American English is written and produced by Karren Tolliver. Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

For a free transcript and to subscribe to the podcast, visit www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. You can also subscribe via Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, TuneIn and any other podcast feed reader.

Theme music for this podcast is written and performed by SW Campbell and used by permission. Find more music by this artist at www.Soundclick.com/swcampbell.

This has been Slow American English. I’m Karren Tolliver. Thank you for listening.

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Welcome to Slow American English, the podcast for learners of American English. I’m your host, Karren Tolliver.

This is episode number 49: President George Washington

Before we begin, did you know that you can buy Slow American English workbooks? Each workbook contains the Exercise Worksheets, answer keys, Bonus Material and transcripts from each podcast episode. There are three workbooks so far. Each contains a year’s worth of podcast episodes. Volume 1 has episodes 1 – 12, Volume 2, episodes 13 – 24, and Volume 3, episodes 25 – 36. You can buy all the workbooks on Amazon. The link is on the podcast website at www.slowamericanenglish.net.

And very soon there will be a new workbook, Volume 4, with episodes 37 – 48. I will announce it when it is published.

Also, I want to thank my Patreon patrons for pledging a small amount every month to keep the podcast going. Your contributions help pay for web hosting and other expenses. Without you, I could not produce this podcast every month. Thank you! If YOU think this podcast is helpful, please visit www.Patreon.com/SlowAmericanEnglish and become a patron. It’s very inexpensive and helps everyone around the world who listens to this podcast.

In addition, you can become a website subscriber for free at www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. Find free transcripts there PLUS links to become a patron and to buy the workbooks.

Subscribe to the podcast feed via Apple Podcasts, Android, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn and any other RSS feed reader.

Contact me directly via email at info@slowamericanenglish.net. Now for the podcast:

Transcript:

George Washington was born in Virginia in 1732. His family had a successful plantation, which he later owned. During the Revolutionary War for independence against Great Britain, Washington was commander of the American army. He became a national hero because of this. He was one of America’s Founding Fathers. They wrote the Constitution of the United States. He was the first to sign it, too.

The electoral college elected George Washington as the first president in 1789 and again in 1792. He is the only president to be elected unanimously. For this and many other reasons, Washington is called the Father of Our Country.

He decided not to be president for a third term, although everyone wanted him to. This tradition was followed by all other presidents for 150 years. In 1947, this two-term limit was made into law.

Washington knew that everyone was watching everything he did as the first US president. He knew his actions would be examples for all other presidents to follow. Therefore, he was very careful to be a very strong leader. For example, he organized the president’s Cabinet well. He also allowed the other branches of government to balance the power of the president.

Of course, you can look up all this history if are interested. However, I want to tell you some of the things about George Washington that Americans learn as children:

  • There is a story about George Washington which is probably not true. It says that, when he was a child, George Washington chopped down his father’s cherry tree. It was a terrible thing to do. When his father asked who did it, George replied, “I cannot tell a lie. I chopped down the cherry tree.” This legend shows how honest he was.

  • Another story says that, as a boy, George Washington threw a silver dollar across the Potomac River in Maryland. This can’t be true. There were no silver dollars then and the river was too wide.

  • A true fact about George Washington: He had false teeth made of wood!

  • George Washington’s wife’s name was Martha.

  • Washington’s plantation and home was Mount Vernon, VA. You can visit it today.

  • When he led the army during the Revolution, Washington and his soldiers crossed the Delaware River on Christmas night, 1776. They went into New Jersey for a surprise attack on the enemy. There is a famous painting by George Cableb Bingham called Washington Crossing the Delaware.

  • Also during the Revolutionary War, Washington and his soldiers camped in Valley Forge, PA. It was the hard winter of 1777-78. They survived and trained there to become a strong army. They were able to defeat the British soldiers in the spring.

Today, George Washington’s face is on the US dollar bill and the quarter coin. In addition, many parks, streets, schools and even people have been named after him. The state of Washington and Washington, DC, are also named after him. In addition, the very tall Washington Monument stands in front of the nation’s capitol building in Washington, DC.

### End of Transcript ###

That’s the podcast for this time. Slow American English is written and produced by Karren Tolliver. Copyright 2019. All rights reserved.

For free transcripts and to subscribe to the podcast, visit www.SlowAmericanEnglish.net. You can also subscribe via Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, TuneIn, Stitcher and any other podcast feed reader.

Theme music for this podcast is written and performed by SW Campbell and used by permission. Find more music by this artist at www.Soundclick.com/swcampbell.

This has been Slow American English. I’m Karren Tolliver. Thank you for listening.

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