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In January 2019, our marketing department set an ambitious goal: to write, publish and market a physical book by Q2, 2019.

But not just any book: the best e-commerce marketing book for online retailers. (#NoPressure.)

By March, we had a professionally-copy edited manuscript, a beautifully-designed front cover, and a proof copy from the printer.

Having never published a book before, we sought after what experts recommended. But after Googling “how to launch a book,” we found that many of the strategies were, at best, general (“email your subscribers”) and at worse, obvious (“share on social media”).

So, we looked at what others were doing and devised a robust strategy that could turn the book into a bestseller.

In April, we began taking preorders. And to our surprise, we made €7,410.80 ($8,268.54) in pre-orders in the first 7-days, alone.

The best part was, due to “residual” promotion, we continued taking orders after our pre-launch campaign (PLC) ended.

Today, to celebrate the launch of our book, Built to Scale, I’ll share our three biggest revenue multipliers. Plus, I, with inputs from Rikke and Seray, will share our biggest learnings and what we would do differently if we were to do it again.

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Should You Even Write a Book?

Before getting into our book launch strategies, it’s worth mentioning briefly why we wrote a book, to begin with, as our goal informed our entire launch strategy.

Despite the earnings I mentioned in the introduction, our goal with Built to Scale was NOT to earn a lot of money. Nor was it to publish an Amazon bestseller (although, it would have been nice). Both are fair goals, of course, but we wanted to set our sights even higher.

Our 50,00-foot goal, to borrow David Allen’s analogy, was to write a book that would be the go-to marketing resource for e-commerce marketers; something they would refer to again and again for years to come.

Our 30,000-foot goal, though, was to write a book that would:

  • Minimize customer churn;
  • Win back churned customers;
  • Position Sleeknote as an authority in our field;
  • Reward customer and partner loyalty;
  • Upsell new and existing customers to an annual subscription;
  • Warm marketing and sales qualified leads for Managed Solution, our done-for-you service; and
  • Warm marketing and sales qualified leads for our software.

So, now that you know our Why, our reason behind writing the book, let’s discuss the three strategies we used to pre-sell it.

Strategy #1: Create World-Class Pre-Launch Bonuses

Launching a book used to be a publisher’s responsibility. Today, though, it’s down to the author(s) to get the word out about their work and create as much buzz as possible (especially if they’re self-publishing).

One way to create anticipation before and during a launch is to offer pre-launch bonuses.

Here’s how the strategy works.

To incentivize orders before the book goes live, you offer several time-sensitive bonuses that go away by a predetermined deadline (this is often the end of the PLC).

If a customer buys the book directly from the seller, you redirect them to a dedicated landing page where they can access their bonuses.

Here’s an example from Brian Kurtz’s launch for his book, Overdeliver:

Alternatively, if the book is available from an online book retailer like Amazon, the customer forwards their receipt to the seller to claim the bonuses.

When Michael Hyatt launched his book, Living Forward, he offered $360 worth of bonuses if buyers forwarded their receipt.

Although our goal wasn’t to launch a bestseller for reasons mentioned above, we settled on the latter approach due to it giving us greater control over our launch.

How to Create World-Class Book Pre-Launch Bonuses

During the brainstorming process, we considered several ideas, but not all of them were viable.

For instance, one idea we had was to record an audio version of the book with all three authors reading their respective chapters. But after factoring in recording and editing time, not to mention the book’s length (500+ pages), we decided to shelve it and returned to the drawing board.

It’s important to mention here that we wanted to create bonuses that were as good as the book. We didn’t want to cobble something together last-minute; we wanted to create bonuses that complemented the book and, much like our content upgrades, invited readers to refer to them again and again.

Finally, after much back and forth, we settled on five pre-launch bonuses we felt proud of:

  • A 30-day free Sleeknote trial (including all our products and features);
  • An eBook with plug-and-play copy formulas for popup campaigns;
  • A swipe file of e-commerce email templates;
  • An activation guide to help readers take action on the key insights and takeaways from the book; and
  • A bonus chapter.

But that’s not all.

We didn’t want to direct customers to Google Docs bonuses after purchase, so we sent them to Design to ensure that they matched the book’s design.

One of our beautifully-designed pre-launch bonuses courtesy of our Brand Designer, Damien.

Again, we didn’t want to give the impression that we threw something together last-minute. “We go the extra mile” is one of our company values, and it’s something we take seriously. Our goal was to convey that with the book as well as the bonuses.

Should You Add a Value to Your Bonuses?

One practice we followed for our bonuses was adding a monetary value to each resource. For example, instead of writing a bonus as “Built to Scale: The Activation Guide,” you would write it as “Built to Scale: The Activation Guide (Value: $49)”

We added monetary values to our bonuses two reasons:

  • To increase the bonuses’ perceived value. It’s easy to overlook the value of something when you’re getting for free. In one study, Dan Ariely found that when candies were offered for 1 cent, students, on average, took 3.5 candies. But when candies were free, they took 1.1 candies. To increase the perceived value of each resource, we added monetary values to remind potential buyers how much they would pay if they were to buy the bonuses individually.
  • To create a price anchor for the book. We knew that we would retail the book at an above-average price of €97. But we also knew that many potential buyers would feel €97 would be too much for a book. To offset that cost, we anchored the book against the bonuses’ combined value of €314. Moreover, we positioned that book in such a way that even implementing one of the book’s strategies would deliver a return on the reader’s investment manyfold.

If you’re going to add bonuses to a launch, consider creating new bonuses rather than repurposing content (i.e. eBooks, etc.) and adding an arbitrary price tag. It’s far too common online. Not only does it devalue the resources because you KNOW they’re normally free—it creates mistrust between you and your customers.

The Essential Elements of a Book Launch Landing Page

Much like with the rest of our launch strategy, we based our landing page’s design on best practices for other book launches, including sections promoting the bonuses…

Details on how to claim them…

And information about me, Rikke and Seray.

Because the landing page was built using Elegant Theme’s Divi Builder WordPress plugin, we were able to remove any modules relating to the bonuses at the end of our pre-launch week.

Sam’s Key Learning

As mentioned above, we created an “activation guide” to help readers take action on the key insights and takeaways from the book. The problem, though, was because we weren’t shipping the book for another month, we risked spoiling the book’s content.

To solve that problem, we added a personalized handwritten note to each book with a link to the bonus. Not only did it show we were willing to go the extra mile; it created another memorable and meaningful moment in the buying experience.

Strategy #2: Market Where You Audience Are

Given we were self-publishing the book, we needed to gauge interest quickly as doing so would inform the number of books we needed to order.

One way we gauged that interest was announcing the book’s upcoming launch on LinkedIn. While LinkedIn isn’t a normal marketing channel for us, it did give us greater reach due to the potential virality of publishing posts. (If you publish a post and it’s visible for public, not only do your network see it, but their network, and so on.)

We experimented with two approaches to promoting the book on LinkedIn:

  1. Hosting a competition; and
  2. Promoting our pre-launch bonuses.

Let’s look at each.

1. Hosting a Competition

To celebrate the launch of Built to Scale, we offered five readers a chance to win a free copy of the book.

Here’s an excerpt from Rikke’s LinkedIn post:

We also added a video to show the book in physical form.

Following from Rikke, Emil, our CMO, offered 10 readers a chance to win a copy of the book. But he added a twist: in addition to giving away 10 free copies, he offered to give commenters a 30% early bird discount.

And the results were astounding…

Total: 1,267 comments (and counting).

Granted, Emil has a big network in Denmark and beyond, so the above results aren’t common. But if you’re rubbing shoulders with the who’s who in your industry, it’s a great way to gauge initial interest in a product or service.

2. Promoting the Prelaunch Bonuses

Given my LinkedIn network isn’t as extensive of my colleagues’, I tried another LinkedIn promotion strategy: promoting our bonuses.

Here’s how it worked.

First, I explained how to claim the bonuses.

Then, when readers replied, I contacted them privately and gave them the discount.

Here’s the template I used:

Hi, Leo.

Thank you so much for your interest in Built to Scale. We really appreciate it 🙂

Here’s what to do now:

First, order the book by clicking the link below:

https://sleeknote.com/built-to-scale

Then, click, “Pre-Order Built to Scale Now” Next, enter the coupon code [COUPON] at checkout. (You’ll get 30% off your purchase.)

Finally, check your inbox. We’ll send you a link to your free bonuses in the confirmation email.

Enjoy!

Sam

Finally, to drive as many people to the post as possible, I sent two emails:

  1. To people on my personal email list; and
  2. Anyone that clicked through to the post but didn’t reply.

The Results

To track the results of each approach, we created a coupon for each team member in Selz, our e-commerce software. And, as you can see, hosting a giveaway outperformed promoting the pre-launch bonuses.

The above isn’t conclusive, of course. (Emil, for instance, has a bigger LinkedIn network than Rikke, Seray or I). But if you’re hedging your bets, go with a giveaway.

Seray’s Key Learnings

One mistake we made with our LinkedIn promotion strategy was that we failed to realize the amount of time it would take to contact each commenter.

Due to setting our post to “public,” people from outside our networks were able to see and comment on our posts. That’s great, of course; the more people that saw it, the greater our reach.

But it also meant we needed to connect with each commenter before we could send contact them. If we were to do it again, we could ask commenters to connect with us to avoid having to connect and wait for dozens of connections to go through.

Strategy #3: Write a Pre-Launch Email Sequence

You know email marketing is effective, so I’m not going to bore you with third-party statistics or banal, empty platitudes, here.

I’d rather show you what thoughts went into our email campaign. So, let’s dive in.

If you’ve ever launched a new product, you’ve likely asked yourself:

  • How many emails do I send?
  • When do I send them?
  • What do I write?

We asked ourselves that, too.

After a brainstorm, we outlined five emails; one for each day of the working week and with a specific goal.

Here’s a brief overview of how it looked:

  1. Email #1: Introduce the Offer
  2. Email #2: Incentivize Orders
  3. Email #3: Overcome Objections
  4. Email #4: Use Social Proof
  5. Email #5: Help Prospects Make a Decision

Let’s look at each in more detail.

Email #1. Introduce the Offer

One week before our PLC, we teased the announcement of the book in the P.S. of our weekly newsletter.

Then, on day one of our PLC, we mailed our list to:

  • Introduce the book;
  • Set expectations for the coming week (“We’re going to email you every day this week”); and
  • Tease the bonuses (more on that in a moment).

We got a lot of positive feedback and many readers replied to say that they were looking forward to getting the book.

Email #2. Incentivize Orders

Here, we incentivized orders by introducing the bonuses I wrote about above.

We also reminded readers that access to the bonuses was limited and that we would remove them at the end of the week.

While it’s hard to say for certain, introducing bonuses had a big impact on our number of orders, given that our “Incentivize Orders” was our best performing email in terms of converting into orders.

Email #3: Overcome Objections

You’re always going to get questions during a product launch. That’s a given. So you can’t always write an objection handling email in advance.

But what you can do, is address the biggest barriers to making a purchase by offering a satisfaction guarantee, clarifying whether you ship internationally, and more.

And in email #3, that’s exactly what we did.

Email #4: Use Social Proof

Given that the book wasn’t available on Amazon during our PLC, we didn’t have the luxury of showing the number of reviews our book had.

But what we did have, was testimonials from Danish e-commerce influencers that had read parts of the book. So, we included them in this email to assure readers it was worth the investment.

An example of one of the testimonials we included in this email.

Email #5: Help Prospects Make a Decision

We all have a tendency to procrastinate. It’s why promotions have deadlines, and why influencers like Jeff Walker says mailing at least twice on the last day of a launch.

We didn’t go that far, (that seemed excessive for a book) but we did remind readers that it was their last chance to get the bonuses before they went away forever.

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You’re probably already familiar with local marketing. For years, brands have been zeroing in on their geographical area, particularly with search, in hopes of reaching local consumers within their region or city.

Even though digital marketing allows brands to advertise to consumers all around the world, sometimes it’s simply more effective to reach consumers nearby.

But a technique that takes local marketing to a whole new level and zeroes in on an even narrower segment of the population is hyperlocal marketing.

This is where you target a specific city or even neighborhoods within a city.

Hyperlocal marketing is laser-focused and designed to reach prospects while they’re right near your business.

In this post, I’ll explain the basics of hyperlocal marketing and why it’s effective. I’ll also discuss some specific techniques you can use to dominate sales in your area using hyperlocal marketing.

Here we go.

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A Brief Overview of Hyperlocal Marketing

Simply put, hyperlocal marketing is the practice of targeting customers who are based in your immediate area.

Unlike traditional local marketing that goes after a fairly broad region or city, hyperlocal marketing aims at reaching prospects in a highly specific, extremely narrow geographical area.

Here’s a quick example.

Say you own a luxury fashion boutique in Portland, Oregon. With traditional local marketing, you would likely be trying to reach prospects in the entire Portland area and potentially neighboring cities like Beaverton to the west and Gresham to the east.

But with hyperlocal marketing, you would be targeting prospects in a far more geographically restricted area—say the area between the Pearl District to the north and downtown Portland to the South.

As you can see, it’s a much smaller radius.

The Correlation Between Hyperlocal Marketing and Mobile

So what’s the big deal about hyperlocal marketing?

Why would you want to focus on such a small area and potentially miss out on nearby prospects that aren’t within your immediate area?

It boils down to one main thing—mobile.

The majority of people now access the Internet on mobile devices. Statista places it at 63.4 percent penetration as of 2019, and that number will likely continue to grow in the future.

With nearly two out of every three people performing searches on a mobile device, it only makes sense that a huge amount of those searches are hyperlocal.

This is evident by the fact that 82 percent of smartphone shoppers performed “near me” searches in 2018, with the most commonly searched categories being:

  • Food (84 percent)
  • Entertainment (56 percent)
  • Banking (50 percent)
  • Apparel (41 percent)
  • Personal care (38 percent)

As for retail-specific lookups, they were as follows:

  • Product research (63 percent)
  • Price comparisons (62 percent)
  • Search for coupons/deals (56 percent)
  • Store hours (54 percent)
  • Store locations (52 percent)

People performing “near me” searches are looking for businesses right in their immediate area—often within walking distance.

What’s perhaps even more interesting is Think With Google explains, in 2017, “Search volume for local places without the qualifier ‘near me’ has actually outgrown comparable searches that do include ‘near me.’”

This suggests that many users now expect Google to identify their current location and take it into account when displaying search results.

The bottom line is that a growing number of shoppers want and expect search results from businesses that are within an extremely close proximity.

Hyperlocal marketing is a strategy that’s designed to reach those consumers and make them aware of relevant brands they may be interested in that are located close by.

Now that we have a basic understanding of what hyperlocal marketing is and why it’s beneficial, here are some of the top strategies for using it to generate qualified leads.

Optimize Your Google My Business Listing

The first place I recommend starting is with your Google My Business listing.

With Google having 92.42 percent of the worldwide search engine market share as of April 2019, it’s the number one place shoppers will turn to when looking for businesses in their area.

Creating a comprehensive listing that’s fully optimized gives you a considerable advantage over other local competitors who have skimped in this department.

It’s also key for getting your business featured in Google’s Local Pack, putting you front and center.

Check out, for instance, some of the top luxury fashion stores in Portland that pop up in the Local Pack when I search for “luxury fashion portland oregon.”

Click on any one of these stores, and you’ll see that they’ve spent time thoroughly filling out their listing and including critical information like:

  • Shop information
  • Address
  • Hours
  • Phone number
  • High-quality images
  • Links to social media profiles

Here’s some of the information that’s listed by designer apparel company Mario’s.

You’ll also want to add relevant keywords (e.g. “Portland” and “Downtown Portland”) wherever possible.

Scroll down just a bit more, and you’ll notice their review summary, which brings me to my next point.

Get Customer Reviews (And Plenty of Them)

Online reviews are huge these days.

“Research shows that 91 percent of people regularly or occasionally read online reviews, and 84 percent trust online reviews as much as a personal recommendation.”

One of the first things many people look at when deciding whether or not they want to check out a local business is customer reviews.

I know I do.

I can’t count how many times I’ve selected one business over another simply based on the strength of their reviews.

So getting a good quantity of positive reviews from satisfied customers is massively helpful for increasing both leads and conversions.

Just check out some of the great reviews Mario’s has.

But it goes deeper than that.

Review signals like review quantity, review velocity, review diversity, etc. account for 15.44 percent of how Google decides to display results in its Local Packs, according to Moz.

If you’ve got a bunch of great reviews like Mario’s does, you should be well positioned to flourish with hyperlocal marketing.

Now getting Google reviews is a topic in and of itself that I don’t have time to fully discuss here.

But let me 15.44 percent I think is helpful from the digital marketing company, Blue Corona.

It lists 10 effective ways to get more reviews and is jam-packed with solid information.

Optimize Your Site for Hyperlocal Customers

In addition to improving your Google My Business profile, there are a couple of things you’ll want to do with your website to reel in more local shoppers.

One is to include some robust contact information, which is something Mario’s also does well.

They have multiple shops throughout Oregon and Washington state but feature detailed contact information about their Portland location on their site.

They include their address, phone number, email, hours, as well as provide a link to get directions and view events in the Portland area.

Also, they wisely include “Portland” three times in the contact area, which no doubt helps search engines understand where Mario’s is located.

Besides that, they feature the addresses of their three stores in the footer section of their site as well.

Another technique is to carefully incorporate location-based keywords into your website’s copy.

Here’s how Mario’s does that on their “About Us” page.

And besides just using the city name, you can include anything else that relates to your city.

For instance, a business in Portland might mention Voodoo Doughnut, the Portland Trail Blazers, the city of roses, etc.

So get creative with your website copy and include any keywords that will help search engines figure out your precise geographical location.

Editor’s Note

One way to optimize your website for local customers is to create a popup campaign that targets visitors from a specific geo-location. Here’s an example of how a Sleeknote campaign I made:

 

Create High-End Local Content

Content marketing is still red hot in 2019 and isn’t likely to go out of style any time soon. And this is largely due to its awesome ROI.

In fact, “Content marketing generates over three times as many leads as outbound marketing and costs 62 percent less.”

A great way to round off your organic hyperlocal marketing initiatives is by devoting time and energy toward creating high-end local content.

Sometimes known as geo-marketing, this involves developing quality content that’s specifically tailored for your local audience.

This kills two birds with one stone because it gives you the opportunity to provide local customers with valuable information they’re interested in, while at the same time naturally incorporating hyperlocal keywords into your content to appease search engines.

For example, Mario’s might create a blog post featuring a list of the top upcoming fashion events coming to Portland over the next few months.

Or they could make a video on how to look great in rainy weather—something that would be useful considering Portland receives over 36 inches of rainfall each year.

It’s all about being creative and coming up with interesting ways to create content around a hyperlocal audience.

Use a Tight Radius for Paid Ads

Up to this point, I’ve strictly covered the organic search side of hyperlocal marketing.

But what about paid advertising on Google, Facebook, Instagram, and so on?

You’ll want to run your campaigns so that ads are only shown to people in a very small radius.

So if you were using Google Ads, you would want to enter your business’s address and use a target radius of one mile, which is the lowest.

Any ads you create would only be shown to shoppers in and around the downtown Portland area like this.

That would be far more preferable than using a larger radius—say 10 miles—which would look like this and extend into neighboring cities.

By using just a one-mile radius, you would be well positioned to have your ads seen by potential customers who are right in your area within just a few minutes of your store.

Target Hyperlocal Keywords

It should go without saying, but you’ll definitely want to use hyperlocal keywords in your paid campaigns as well.

Focusing on geographical keywords in your immediate area will help get your ads seen by a select local audience located right near your store.

Going after specific neighborhoods is an effective way to do this.

For instance, Mario’s might use “Pearl District,” “Nob Hill,” “Goose Hollow” and “Downtown Portland”—all neighborhoods that are close by.

Include Negative Keywords

Equally as important as selecting the right geographical keywords, is knowing which ones to avoid.

These would be classified as negative keywords, which you can use to avoid having your ads seen by prospects outside of the specific area you’re targeting.

Let’s use an example to show you how this works.

Say that Mario’s was only looking to reach shoppers within a one-mile radius of their store like I showed you earlier.

Anything outside of that blue circle they don’t want to target because it would no longer be hyperlocal marketing. It would simply be local marketing.

So they may use negative geographic neighborhood keywords like “Northwest District,” “Irvington,” “Sullivan’s Gulch,” “Kerns,” “South Portland,” and so on.

They may also want to include nearby cities like Hillsboro, Beaverton, Milwaukie, and Gresham as well.

They would just plug those keywords into the “Negative Keywords” list on Google Ads or whatever platform they happen to be using like this.

That way they would have much more control over the visibility of their ads and avoid wasting money on non-hyperlocal leads.

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Conclusion

A huge part of effective marketing is simply connecting with the right demographic. You need to get in front of the targeted leads who are most interested in your products or services and likely to buy.

And in many cases, that’s the prospects that are located right in your immediate area.

Hyperlocal marketing takes similar concepts as traditional local marketing and amplifies them so you don’t just reach shoppers within your region or city, but in nearby neighborhoods or even people right down the block.

The end result is an influx of ultra qualified leads for increased conversions and revenue.

Do you expect search engines to take your location into account when you’re searching for something? Leave a comment below.

The post How to Dominate Sales in Your Area with Hyperlocal Marketing appeared first on Sleeknote.

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There’s a common misconception among marketers today. And it’s one that’s misleading the industry:

Popups are only for capturing email addresses.

Yes, popups are great when it comes to growing your email list. But after analyzing 1+ billion campaign sessions, we know that’s not all they’re good for.

In reality, popups are a great way of increasing on-site e-commerce conversions … but only if you’re willing to get creative with them.

So, with that in mind, I want to share nine of my favorite popup use cases that do NOT involve asking for an email address.

Let’s take a look.

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1. Build Social Proof with Product-Specific Testimonials

I probably don’t need to tell you the importance of using customer testimonials in your marketing.

Inviting buyers to vouch for your products is one of the best ways to convince on-the-fence buyers that your product is worth buying.

But how you use customer testimonials on your website impacts their effectiveness.

For example, featuring general testimonials on product pages isn’t nearly as effective as showcasing product-specific testimonials.

Further, where you place testimonials is also important. If you place them at the bottom of the page—as most online stores do—they’re easy for potential buyers to overlook.

Here’s an example from Sephora:

One way to draw attention to testimonials, without putting them front and center, is triggering a popup to slide in at the bottom of the page after visitors have had time to view a product.

Here’s an example of what it could look like:

My recommendation is to review a product page’s average session duration in Google Analytics and then trigger a popup to show just before visitors bounce. So, if a page’s average session duration is seven seconds, you could show a popup after five seconds.

Takeaway

Create slide-in popups with product-specific testimonials and trigger them on popular product pages. Remember to include people’s names and headshots (provided you have their permission, of course).

2. Use Popup-Based Size Guides to Reduce Friction in the Buyer’s Journey

We all know how hard it is to find the right size when shopping online.

Often times, without the option to try things on, we end up guessing and choosing the wrong size, and inevitably, returning the product when it doesn’t fit. Other times, we don’t buy at all because we don’t want to risk getting our size wrong.

To overcome problems like the above, many e-tailers offer size guides. But there’s a problem. Because they’re often on another page, visitors have to leave the product page they’re on to view it.

Well, not always.

With a well-designed popup, you can trigger a size guide when visitors click a link on a product page.

The best part is you can have different size guides trigger on different product categories.

Here’s an example of a popup for a product page selling t-shirts:

It’s simple, easy to close, and it doesn’t redirect visitors from your product page.

My recommendation is to review a product page’s average session duration in Google Analytics and then trigger a popup to show just before visitors bounce. So, if a page’s average session duration is seven seconds, you could show a popup after five seconds.

Takeaway

Avoid redirecting visitors from your product pages to view size guides. Instead, trigger size guides on the individual product page to shorten the journey from visitor to customer.

3. Drive More Traffic to Your Newest Products and Increase Sales

When you launch a new product line, you want everyone to buy it, right?

The thing is visitors who enter your site for the first time might not be ready to buy yet.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t tell them about your new products.

One of my favorite best practices for promoting new products is guiding ONLY new visitors to a new product page using a slide-in popup.

Don’t ask people to buy yet. Instead, use phrasing like “Discover our new…” or “Learn about our…” and more.

Here’s an example:

It might seem like semantics, but asking people to view a product rather than buy it requires less commitment—and that means more click-throughs to your product pages.

Takeaway

Drive traffic to new products using a popup with a low-commitment call-to-action. Remember to include an attention-grabbing headline and image of the new product(s).

4. Tease Upcoming Sales to Boost Awareness

Having a big sale on your site isn’t worth much if people don’t know about it.

Yes, you can email your list and let them know you have an upcoming sales.

But what about the people who aren’t on your list?

One way to create buzz for an upcoming sale in advance is by using a promotion bar on your website. That way, you’ll drive more traffic to a product page when the sale begins.

Here’s an example of how you can promote your upcoming sale with a promotion bar:

By adding a countdown timer to the bar, you can build anticipation for the sale and make your message more memorable.

Takeaway

Drive traffic to new products using a popup with a low-commitment call-to-action. Remember to include an attention-grabbing headline and image of the new product(s).

5. Collect Feedback for Product Development

Asking for feedback is not often a strategy you would use to increase sales.

But if asked correctly, it can be highly effective, especially if you’re looking to collect feedback to validate a future product line.

Let me give you an example.

When Bang & Olufsen launched the Beoplay A2 Portable Speaker, they wanted to know which colors their audience preferred.

To get feedback, they created a popup for visitors to give their opinion:

With a popup like the above, B&O was able to collect valuable feedback for future product development.

If you offer products in different colors and ran a similar campaign on your website, you could base stock orders on the colors most voted for by visitors.

Takeaway

Use popups to gather valuable feedback from your visitors. Make it easy for visitors to provide their feedback (e.g. with radio buttons). Base future product development on this information and implement the findings in your sales strategies.

6. Suggest Additional Products to Increase Average Order Value

We all know that offering customers tailored product recommendations works.

In fact, product recommendations found that 45 percent of consumers are more likely to shop on a site that offers personalized recommendations. Moreover, 56 percent of online shoppers are more likely to return to a site that offers product recommendations.

One of my favorite ways to personalize product recommendations is to create a popup that shows based on the number of items a visitor has in their basket.

Let me take you through an example.

Imagine a visitor adds a pair of jeans to their cart. You want to increase their order value, so you show them t-shirts that go well with the jeans they added.

One way you might do that is show a slide-in campaign, like the one below:

With this strategy, you can personalize your product recommendations to the product category and ONLY show it to visitors once they’ve added a product to their cart.

Takeaway

Create different slide-ins that trigger on your most popular product category pages. Show products that go well with the items in the cart and make sure to include images of the recommended products along with an “add to cart” button.

7. Keep Visitors Engaged with Transparent Support Messages

Imagine your checkout crashes and you’re unsure when it will go live again. You need to inform your visitors and give them a temporary solution so they don’t abandon your site.

A great way to do that is to create a popup informing visitors about the problem and encourage them to stay on your site while you fix the issue. Here’s what that could look like if you sell makeup:

This type of popup should appear after a few seconds on your site so everyone sees it. And it should be easy to close. (For example, by using two buttons like in the example).

When you tell people that you’re having issues and you’re working to solve it, they’ll have more patience.

And if you give visitors something to do (like asking them to watch a video), you’ll increase the chances of them keeping them on your site until the issue is resolved.

Takeaway

Don’t be afraid to let your visitors know of any problems you’re experiencing. Be honest and your visitors will have more patience. Add a call-to-action in your popup and encourage visitors to stay on your site while you fix the issue.

8. Help Prospects Find Right Products With Interactive Guides

I think we’ve all tried entering an online store only to feel overwhelmed with choice, right?

Many online stores have multiple products on their product category pages making it can be hard for visitors to figure out what product is right for them.

They can’t ask a shop assistant for help like in a physical store, but that doesn’t mean you can’t give them the same personal experience.

One way to do that is to offer product guides.

For example, you can create a slide-in that offers a guide for products that need further explanation.

Here’s an example:

When visitors click through, you can ask them a series of questions to narrow down product options.

You can even create a fun quiz to help visitors find what they’re looking for.

Quizzes work well because they’re fun to do, they engage visitors, and they don’t require the same level of commitment as a “Buy Now” or “Shop Now” button.

Takeaway

Show visitors a slide-in offering a guide to help them find the right product for them. Keep your guides short and fun, and make sure to include product recommendations at the end.

9. Recommend Products Featured in Your Video Content

Do you have videos on your site?

If so, this strategy is for you.

This strategy involves showing a popup when a visitor has watched a certain percentage of one of your videos.

Pretty clever, right?

Let’s imagine, for example, that you sell golf equipment and have an on-site video tutorial on how to improve your putting stroke.

When a visitor has seen 75% of the video, you could trigger a popup like this:

Why? Because if a visitor has watched 75% of a video showing them how to improve their putting stroke, you can assume they’re looking to improve their putting skills. (They might also be interested in equipment that can help them do so).

Showing them products used in the video makes the decision to buy easier for prospects because they don’t have to sort through hundreds of products. They’ve seen how the products work in the video, so they’re more likely to add one of the products from the video to their cart.

Takeaway

Use your visitors’ behavior on your site to determine what message to show and when. A visitor who’s watched 75% of a tutorial video featuring your products is more likely to buy one of those products than a visitor entering your site for the first time. Set up different popups for the different videos you have to make your message more personal.

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Conclusion

Popups can be used for so much more than just for lead generation.

Consider your popups as a shop assistant whose job is to create a personal shopping experience for your visitors.

They can do wonders for your bottom line if, that is, you trigger the right message at the right time to the right person.

Are you using popups for more than lead generation? Or are you considering trying one of the above popup use cases? Leave a comment below.

The post Popup Use Cases: How to Use On-Site Message for More Than Collecting Emails Copy appeared first on Sleeknote.

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There’s a common misconception among marketers today. And it’s one that’s misleading the industry:

Popups are only for capturing email addresses.

Yes, popups are great when it comes to growing your email list. But after analyzing 1+ billion campaign sessions, we know that’s not all they’re good for.

In reality, popups are a great way of increasing on-site e-commerce conversions … but only if you’re willing to get creative with them.

So, with that in mind, I want to share nine of my favorite popup use cases that do NOT involve asking for an email address.

Let’s take a look.

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1. Build Social Proof with Product-Specific Testimonials

I probably don’t need to tell you the importance of using customer testimonials in your marketing.

Inviting buyers to vouch for your products is one of the best ways to convince on-the-fence buyers that your product is worth buying.

But how you use customer testimonials on your website impacts their effectiveness.

For example, featuring general testimonials on product pages isn’t nearly as effective as showcasing product-specific testimonials.

Further, where you place testimonials is also important. If you place them at the bottom of the page—as most online stores do—they’re easy for potential buyers to overlook.

Here’s an example from Sephora:

One way to draw attention to testimonials, without putting them front and center, is triggering a popup to slide in at the bottom of the page after visitors have had time to view a product.

Here’s an example of what it could look like:

My recommendation is to review a product page’s average session duration in Google Analytics and then trigger a popup to show just before visitors bounce. So, if a page’s average session duration is seven seconds, you could show a popup after five seconds.

Takeaway

Create slide-in popups with product-specific testimonials and trigger them on popular product pages. Remember to include people’s names and headshots (provided you have their permission, of course).

2. Use Popup-Based Size Guides to Reduce Friction in the Buyer’s Journey

We all know how hard it is to find the right size when shopping online.

Often times, without the option to try things on, we end up guessing and choosing the wrong size, and inevitably, returning the product when it doesn’t fit. Other times, we don’t buy at all because we don’t want to risk getting our size wrong.

To overcome problems like the above, many e-tailers offer size guides. But there’s a problem. Because they’re often on another page, visitors have to leave the product page they’re on to view it.

Well, not always.

With a well-designed popup, you can trigger a size guide when visitors click a link on a product page.

The best part is you can have different size guides trigger on different product categories.

Here’s an example of a popup for a product page selling t-shirts:

It’s simple, easy to close, and it doesn’t redirect visitors from your product page.

My recommendation is to review a product page’s average session duration in Google Analytics and then trigger a popup to show just before visitors bounce. So, if a page’s average session duration is seven seconds, you could show a popup after five seconds.

Takeaway

Avoid redirecting visitors from your product pages to view size guides. Instead, trigger size guides on the individual product page to shorten the journey from visitor to customer.

3. Drive More Traffic to Your Newest Products and Increase Sales

When you launch a new product line, you want everyone to buy it, right?

The thing is visitors who enter your site for the first time might not be ready to buy yet.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t tell them about your new products.

One of my favorite best practices for promoting new products is guiding ONLY new visitors to a new product page using a slide-in popup.

Don’t ask people to buy yet. Instead, use phrasing like “Discover our new…” or “Learn about our…” and more.

Here’s an example:

It might seem like semantics, but asking people to view a product rather than buy it requires less commitment—and that means more click-throughs to your product pages.

Takeaway

Drive traffic to new products using a popup with a low-commitment call-to-action. Remember to include an attention-grabbing headline and image of the new product(s).

4. Tease Upcoming Sales to Boost Awareness

Having a big sale on your site isn’t worth much if people don’t know about it.

Yes, you can email your list and let them know you have an upcoming sales.

But what about the people who aren’t on your list?

One way to create buzz for an upcoming sale in advance is by using a promotion bar on your website. That way, you’ll drive more traffic to a product page when the sale begins.

Here’s an example of how you can promote your upcoming sale with a promotion bar:

By adding a countdown timer to the bar, you can build anticipation for the sale and make your message more memorable.

Takeaway

Drive traffic to new products using a popup with a low-commitment call-to-action. Remember to include an attention-grabbing headline and image of the new product(s).

5. Collect Feedback for Product Development

Asking for feedback is not often a strategy you would use to increase sales.

But if asked correctly, it can be highly effective, especially if you’re looking to collect feedback to validate a future product line.

Let me give you an example.

When Bang & Olufsen launched the Beoplay A2 Portable Speaker, they wanted to know which colors their audience preferred.

To get feedback, they created a popup for visitors to give their opinion:

With a popup like the above, B&O was able to collect valuable feedback for future product development.

If you offer products in different colors and ran a similar campaign on your website, you could base stock orders on the colors most voted for by visitors.

Takeaway

Use popups to gather valuable feedback from your visitors. Make it easy for visitors to provide their feedback (e.g. with radio buttons). Base future product development on this information and implement the findings in your sales strategies.

6. Suggest Additional Products to Increase Average Order Value

We all know that offering customers tailored product recommendations works.

In fact, product recommendations found that 45 percent of consumers are more likely to shop on a site that offers personalized recommendations. Moreover, 56 percent of online shoppers are more likely to return to a site that offers product recommendations.

One of my favorite ways to personalize product recommendations is to create a popup that shows based on the number of items a visitor has in their basket.

Let me take you through an example.

Imagine a visitor adds a pair of jeans to their cart. You want to increase their order value, so you show them t-shirts that go well with the jeans they added.

One way you might do that is show a slide-in campaign, like the one below:

With this strategy, you can personalize your product recommendations to the product category and ONLY show it to visitors once they’ve added a product to their cart.

Takeaway

Create different slide-ins that trigger on your most popular product category pages. Show products that go well with the items in the cart and make sure to include images of the recommended products along with an “add to cart” button.

7. Keep Visitors Engaged with Transparent Support Messages

Imagine your checkout crashes and you’re unsure when it will go live again. You need to inform your visitors and give them a temporary solution so they don’t abandon your site.

A great way to do that is to create a popup informing visitors about the problem and encourage them to stay on your site while you fix the issue. Here’s what that could look like if you sell makeup:

This type of popup should appear after a few seconds on your site so everyone sees it. And it should be easy to close. (For example, by using two buttons like in the example).

When you tell people that you’re having issues and you’re working to solve it, they’ll have more patience.

And if you give visitors something to do (like asking them to watch a video), you’ll increase the chances of them keeping them on your site until the issue is resolved.

Takeaway

Don’t be afraid to let your visitors know of any problems you’re experiencing. Be honest and your visitors will have more patience. Add a call-to-action in your popup and encourage visitors to stay on your site while you fix the issue.

8. Help Prospects Find Right Products With Interactive Guides

I think we’ve all tried entering an online store only to feel overwhelmed with choice, right?

Many online stores have multiple products on their product category pages making it can be hard for visitors to figure out what product is right for them.

They can’t ask a shop assistant for help like in a physical store, but that doesn’t mean you can’t give them the same personal experience.

One way to do that is to offer product guides.

For example, you can create a slide-in that offers a guide for products that need further explanation.

Here’s an example:

When visitors click through, you can ask them a series of questions to narrow down product options.

You can even create a fun quiz to help visitors find what they’re looking for.

Quizzes work well because they’re fun to do, they engage visitors, and they don’t require the same level of commitment as a “Buy Now” or “Shop Now” button.

Takeaway

Show visitors a slide-in offering a guide to help them find the right product for them. Keep your guides short and fun, and make sure to include product recommendations at the end.

9. Recommend Products Featured in Your Video Content

Do you have videos on your site?

If so, this strategy is for you.

This strategy involves showing a popup when a visitor has watched a certain percentage of one of your videos.

Pretty clever, right?

Let’s imagine, for example, that you sell golf equipment and have an on-site video tutorial on how to improve your putting stroke.

When a visitor has seen 75% of the video, you could trigger a popup like this:

Why? Because if a visitor has watched 75% of a video showing them how to improve their putting stroke, you can assume they’re looking to improve their putting skills. (They might also be interested in equipment that can help them do so).

Showing them products used in the video makes the decision to buy easier for prospects because they don’t have to sort through hundreds of products. They’ve seen how the products work in the video, so they’re more likely to add one of the products from the video to their cart.

Takeaway

Use your visitors’ behavior on your site to determine what message to show and when. A visitor who’s watched 75% of a tutorial video featuring your products is more likely to buy one of those products than a visitor entering your site for the first time. Set up different popups for the different videos you have to make your message more personal.

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Conclusion

Popups can be used for so much more than just for lead generation.

Consider your popups as a shop assistant whose job is to create a personal shopping experience for your visitors.

They can do wonders for your bottom line if, that is, you trigger the right message at the right time to the right person.

Are you using popups for more than lead generation? Or are you considering trying one of the above popup use cases? Leave a comment below.

The post Popup Use Cases: How to Use On-Site Message for More Than Collecting Emails appeared first on Sleeknote.

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There are 1.92 billion digital buyers in 2019. That means about a quarter of the world’s population now shops online.

And according to Statista, that number will rise steadily in upcoming years. They predict there will be 2.14 billion digital buyers by 2021.

This means there’s plenty of opportunity for e-commerce brands to thrive and prosper.

It’s just a matter of:

  • Offering products and services people love;
  • Running a successful marketing campaign; and
  • Creating an amazing on-site experience.

And it’s the last part that I want to focus on here—improving the on-site experience.

Of course, there are your givens like making your e-commerce site lightning fast, catering to mobile users, following navigation best practices, and so on.

But for this post, I want to focus on actionable strategies—strategies that are specific and that cover all aspects of the e-commerce experience.

So let’s get right down to it.

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1. Provide Free or Discounted Shipping

Now I want to discuss the final phase of the digital shopping process—the checkout.

There are a few common reasons why people abandon their shopping carts.

But hands down, the biggest is shipping costs.

In fact, that’s the primary reason why 63 percent of digital shoppers abandoned their carts in 2018.

Offering free or discounted shipping is a simple yet effective way to boost your conversions and increase e-commerce sales.

And if you use the right promotion—like offering free shipping once customers reach a certain threshold—you can really crank up your sales.

For instance, apparel and shoe company, 6 pm offers free shipping on orders of $50 or more.

They also let shoppers know about it by placing the offer above the fold.

And to ensure there are no misunderstandings, you should create a page where shoppers can find instant answers to shipping-related questions.

Like this.

That way they’ll feel more comfortable completing their purchase, and you should end up with fewer customer complaints.

Editor’s Note

One of my favorite (albeit little-known) cart recovery strategies is offering free shipping on orders above a certain value.

Here’s an example of an exit-intent campaign I made using our SiteData condition.

2. Add a Search Bar

The first thing I feel I should touch on is navigation.

If a shopper can’t find what they’re looking for, they can’t buy it. It’s really that simple.

So you need to do everything possible to streamline the product search process so shoppers can find what they want in a snap.

One of the best ways to do that is to incorporate a search bar where visitors can type in exactly what they’re looking for.

That’s something Australians women’s online fashion boutique Amaroso does.

It’s positioned in an easy to find location which no doubt saves their shoppers a lot of time.

Simply enter your search criteria, and you instantly get relevant results.

And here’s the amazing thing about site search.

It can lead to crazy high conversions.

Research actually found that search users are 7-10 times more likely to convert than regular visitors.

That’s because this segment knows what they want and is often heavily motivated to make a purchase.

By making their search ultra simple, you should see a noticeable spike in conversions.

3. Showcase New or Relevant Items on Your Homepage

Shoppers will always be drawn to what’s fresh.

There’s something infinitely appealing about products that are brand new or in season.

And you can use this tendency to your advantage by highlighting new arrivals or relevant, seasonal items.

Menswear company, Bonobos does a great job of this on their website where the first thing visitors see when landing on it is a CTA to check out their new arrivals.

It’s early summer as I’m writing this, so clicking on the link takes me to their newest products that are perfect for warmer temperatures and really capture the summer vibe.

British fashion retailer, ALLSAINTS, does something similar by making summer clothing a focal point on their homepage.

Click through, and you see their collection of men’s shorts, which are perfect for this time of year.

This is a great way to pique the interest of shoppers and gives you the chance to bring attention to any certain products.

Perhaps the ones with high-profit margins or the ones you’re looking to move in a hurry.

4. Create an Explainer Video

Let me preface this by saying an explainer video isn’t always necessary and doesn’t make sense for all brands.

For instance, a clothing company probably doesn’t need a video to explain their products.

But for many other brands, it can be a huge help for educating consumers, which is an excellent way to increase e-commerce sales.

One study even found, “73 percent of all consumers are more likely to purchase after watching videos explaining a product or service, and 96 percent of all consumers find videos helpful when making purchase decisions online.”

If you sell items that need a bit of explanation as to how they work, their features, benefits, etc., this is an effective way to go about it.

A good example is wearable “fitness coach,” Moov.

At first glance, it’s not necessarily obvious exactly what the product does.

But they’re quick to educate shoppers with a fantastic explainer video.

This is actually the first thing you see once landing on their homepage—a CTA to watch a video on how Moov works.

After clicking on it, viewers know the ins and outs in less than two minutes.

While not necessary for all e-commerce stores, it’s definitely a content medium to consider if any of your products require clarification.

5. Use Social Proof

Social proof is a term that was created by Stanford marketing, business and psychology professor, Robert Cialdini back in 1984.

“Social proof is based on the idea of normative social influence, which states that people will conform in order to be liked by, similar to or accepted by the influencer (or society),” ConversionXL explains.

It’s something that can be applied to numerous areas of business and marketing, and e-commerce is no exception.

Incorporating content where others validate your brand is an excellent way to warm leads up and get them over the buying hump.

A good example is Beatific, a company that sells “blissfully happy” planners and journals.

Upon arriving on their site, you see that real people have recently made purchases and that Beatific is loved by more than 101,000 people.

Scroll down a bit further, and you see that it’s also loved by some notable brands including The New Yorker and Vanity Fair. 

This nod of approval from customers and big name brands lets shoppers know the company is legit and people love the product. So many of the reservations they may have had will go out the window.

6. Offer Reviews

Modern shoppers love reviews, and reviews have a significant impact on their purchasing decisions.

In one study, “90 percent of respondents who recalled reading online reviews claimed that positive online reviews influenced buying decisions, while 86 percent said buying decisions were influenced by negative online reviews.”

In other words, customer testimonials matter—a lot.

So why not incorporate them directly into your e-commerce store? That’s what organic tea company, FitTea does. Shoppers can quickly find a link to their “reviews” page.

After clicking on it, they can check out over 2,400 reviews to get input from actual customers to get a feel for how well FitTea’s products work.

That way they can get an objective perspective and form their own opinion of FitTea.

And assuming the bulk of the reviews are positive, it should motivate many shoppers to go ahead and complete their purchase.

But there is one caveat.

To really make this strategy work, you need to have a sizable number of reviews.

As of 2019, prospects wanted to see an average of 40 reviews before they believed a rating, which is up from 34 in 2017.

So be sure you’ve got at least 40 reviews before incorporating this feature into your e-commerce store.

7. Offer Irresistible Discounts

Who doesn’t love a good bargain?

It’s a huge motivating factor for shoppers and can serve as a powerful incentive to buy from you.

Business psychologist, Dr. Dimitri Tsivrikos has spent time examining the brain scans of consumers excited by a bargain and explains that it creates dopamine rushes when they feel an increased level of control over a transaction.

So offering discounts on your e-commerce store is an excellent way to entice shoppers, especially new ones, to take the plunge.

It’s just a matter of offering discounts that people will respond to and placing them in a conspicuous location.

Take for instance the website of clothing and accessory company MSGM.

They put their discount front and center so visitors immediately see it once arriving on their site.

Or you could use functional sportswear brand, 42|54’s strategy of offering a discount for signing up for a newsletter.

They just use a simple popup to alert shoppers of the discount.

Regardless of the approach you take, this is a simple way to increase e-commerce sales and keep your customers happy.

8. Include Security Badges

Another massive roadblock to the checkout process is security concerns.

And it’s easy to see why.

More than 6.2 million data records are lost or stolen every single day.

That’s 73 records each second.

This has created a collective unease about forking over highly sensitive payment information to e-commerce brands, especially if those companies aren’t well-known powerhouses like Amazon.

So it’s absolutely critical that you quell those concerns.

One of the best ways to do that is to include security badges to let shoppers know their data is in good hands.

Luxury accessory brand, Mulberry does a great job at this on their checkout page.

First, they have two areas that let shoppers know their personal details are secured when entering their email address.

Second, they have a section that clearly states they have a secure checkout.

It explains that their customers’ security is very important to them, and they include a security badge from one of the most trusted names, Norton.

And if shoppers want to know more about Mulberry’s security precautions, they can click on “Privacy Policy” for more details.

In a day and age where cybercrime is the norm, addressing security concerns like this is vital.

To learn more about the impact of security badges on conversions and sales, as well as which ones people trust the most, check out a previous post we wrote on this subject.

9. Offer PayPal as a Payment Option

One final way to reduce cart abandonment and increase e-commerce conversions is by simply offering PayPal as a payment option.

This payment platform has experienced significant growth over the past decade, and as of the first quarter of 2019, there were 277 million active PayPal users.

So it only makes sense that you’ll want to offer PayPal as a payment option.

And here’s the thing. It has a far higher checkout conversion rate than other platforms.

Research has even found, “PayPal transactions have a 70 percent higher checkout conversion than non-PayPal transactions.”

The main reason is because people feel more comfortable using it because it doesn’t require them to give out their credit card information.

It basically acts as a data barrier, which is something many security wary shoppers prefer.

So it’s smart to offer it to your customers.

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If you’re in e-commerce, you’re probably trying different strategies to reduce cart abandonment.

Maybe you haven’t reached the results you’re aiming for or you want to achieve even lower cart abandonment rates.

You know the importance of well-written abandoned cart emails and how they can boost your conversion rates.

But are you making the most of your on-site messages to stop abandoning visitors?

With timely cart abandonment popups, you can convince more visitors to stay on your site, collect warm leads, gather valuable insights, and increase your sales.

The best part is, you don’t have to discount your products or offer free shipping to every visitor in order to achieve these goals.

In this article, you’ll read seven little-known strategies to convert abandoning visitors into customers. Plus, I’ll show you my favorite cart abandonment popup examples from top e-commerce brands.

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1. Nudge (Some) Visitors with Free Shipping

Visitors might leave your site without completing their order for several reasons:

But the number one reason for cart abandonment, according to Baymard, is unexpected extra costs, such as shipping.

Offering free shipping on your site doesn’t only increase conversions, but it also urges visitors to spend more.

In fact, 93% of consumers tend to buy more products if the online store offers free shipping.

If you already offer free shipping, you might be thinking that it’s enough to write it down on your product pages.

But free shipping is only an incentive if you nudge visitors with it when they’re about to leave their cart.

So if you’re offering free shipping, make sure you always remind your visitors about it with a timely popup.

Here’s the popup Kate Spade displays when you’re about to leave your basket:

With the title “Congratulations!,” the company gets your attention and informs you that you qualify for both free shipping and free returns.

Even though they include in the checkout details that you don’t have to pay for shipping, Kate Spade makes sure that you are aware of it before you leave your items behind.

Given that not all e-commerce brands are as big as Kate Spade, you might consider offering free shipping only for expensive purchases.

If you’re a Sleeknote user and add the SiteData condition to your campaigns, you can detect a customer’s basket value and trigger a free shipping popup for visitors with over a certain amount of basket value.

Here’s how such a campaign might look like:

Change your campaign’s condition to exit-intent and you can convert abandoners with a tempting offer before they leave.

2. Host a Giveaway

Most of the purchases on your site will take more than one session to complete. That’s a given.

After all, first-time visitors aren’t always ready to buy.

Instead of asking them to buy on their first visit, you can ask them to take another action, such as leaving their email address in exchange for something valuable.

Hosting a giveaway is one effective way of getting more visitors to sign up to your email list—without spending a fortune on gifts or lowering the perceived value of your products.

You might be thinking that on-site giveaways are only useful for collecting email addresses.

And you would be right in thinking so. But giveaways are especially effective when promoted to visitors abandoning their cart.

Wallstickerland illustrates this well:

Translation: “Wait … Don’t miss out on our competition to win a gift card worth 1,000 DKK for Wallstickerland!”

 

If you choose to leave your cart items behind, the company gently recommends you “not to miss out” on their giveaway.

This way, they trigger your fear-of-missing-out (FOMO) and give you a strong reason to leave your email address.

Plus, they get warm leads that they can follow up on with both abandoned cart emails and promotional emails when their giveaway ends.

Another approach you can take is nudging your visitors to complete their purchase within a time limit in order to participate in your giveaway.

Here’s an example of how that might look:

For these type of cart abandonment popups, a countdown timer is a must-have to drive a sense of urgency and scarcity.

3. Promote Special Offers

Even though abandoning visitors are not ready to buy from you, they are already in the decision stage of your sales funnel. Why? Because they took an important step in becoming a customer by adding an item to their cart.

Maybe the timing or the price wasn’t right for them.

This means that even if they didn’t buy the product at this moment, they might be interested in the item in the future (especially if/when it goes on sale).

So why don’t you let them know when your next big sale is approaching?

That’s exactly what Chubbies does when you’re about to abandon your cart:

The company lets you know when the sale will take place and what you should expect from it, even if you’re not ready to buy at this point.

But here’s the twist: They add a second layer of discounting to it if you place an order today.

If they had only announced the next big sale in their cart abandonment popup, it would delay your purchase rather than incentivize you to buy now. Why? Because if you know there’s a big sale approaching, why should you buy anything now?

That’s why if you complete your order today, they offer you an extra 15% on top of a big sale.

(And it sounds too good to miss.)

With this popup, Chubbies not only aims to reduce cart abandonment but also turn buyers into repeat customers.

If you want to use this strategy, you can improve this popup by;

  1. Focusing more on the benefit of completing the purchase now, instead of giving too many details about the upcoming sale;
  2. Including a countdown timer to drive urgency;
  3. Adding a benefit-driven call-to-action (CTA) button, such as “Claim Extra 15% Off.”
4. Personalize Your On-Site Messages

Personalization is no longer a luxury for e-commerce sites. It’s a must.

Online consumers expect and desire a more personalized shopping experience and they’re willing to share their data in exchange for it.

Many e-commerce sites welcome their return visitors with personalized copy or make relevant product recommendations. But few marketers go above and beyond to personalize their on-site messages.

We know from customer data, and our own experiences, that online stores that provide personalized offers achieve higher conversion rates.

By personalizing your cart abandonment popups, you can remind abandoning visitors what they are about to miss out on.

Here’s a brilliant cart abandonment popup example from Pandora:

When you add a product to your cart and go to leave their site before buying it, Pandora displays a popup with the picture of your cart item.

They also trigger your FOMO with the headline “Don’t miss out on this great style!”

Showing the number of people viewing that item, they both point to the product’s scarcity of availability and add social proof to it.

Plus, they add a link button that reads “Find Your Local Store,” in case you want to visit a physical store and complete your purchase there.

Using the SiteData condition, you can personalize your cart abandonment popups based on the visitor’s basket items and convert them with a highly-relevant offer.

5. Offer an Alternative

Although clicking the “Add to Cart” button carries greater purchase intention, it doesn’t mean that the visitor is 100% sure about buying the product.

You might assume that your site visitors leave their carts due to reasons unrelated to your products:

  • They don’t want to pay for shipping;
  • They’re not comfortable with giving you their credit card details;
  • They’re distracted by something else;
  • And so on.

But what if the problem is directly related to your products?

Maybe the visitor couldn’t find what they were looking for and didn’t feel comfortable completing the purchase at this point.

Even if you provide your visitors a seamless site navigation, you should still consider that they may not always find the right product for them. So try offering them an alternative solution, instead.

Here’s how Højmark, a Danish travel agency, does that:

Højmark knows that different visitors have different needs. Instead of letting go of the visitors who can’t find their ideal vacation, the company offers them a custom quote.

Setting this campaign to work on exit-intent, Højmark converts visitors who can’t find a vacation that fits their needs by suggesting them an alternative.

If you want to personalize your custom offers based on the users’ visiting behavior, you can use the SiteData condition.

If a visitor adds items to their cart from a certain category before leaving your site, you can customize the contact form to fit their needs.

For example, if a visitor has cart items in the hiking category, you can frame the campaign copy as “Let our team of hiking experts offer you a custom quote…”

This type of cart abandonment campaign especially works well if you’re selling expensive products, offering wholesale, or handling custom orders.

6. Convert Abandoning Visitors Into Warm Leads

You might think that the only purpose of cart abandonment popups is to convince your visitors to stay on your site and to complete their purchase as soon as possible.

And you’re not wrong in thinking that.

In an ideal world, you would capture and convince all of your abandoning visitors to buy from you. But in reality, it takes more than that.

If you convince abandoning visitors to leave their email addresses, you can target them later with highly specific email campaigns. But in order to do this, you need to give them a valid reason to opt in.

Frame your campaign copy around the benefit you provide your visitors in exchange and they’ll be more likely to opt in.

Many e-commerce marketers use discount codes as an incentive and it surely is a great offer. But how can you stand out if everybody else is doing it?

Maybe you want to try something else or maybe you can’t afford to discount your products.

Luckily, there’s another value you can offer to abandoning visitors: saving their cart.

Here’s how your campaign might look like:

There are multiple reasons why online shoppers abandon their carts and lack of time is among the most common reasons.

Offering your abandoning visitors to save their cart will help you build an email list with warm leads that you can target with personalized email campaigns.

Make sure you hide this campaign from your existing subscribers so that they don’t see an invite to join a list that they’re already in.

7. Ask for Feedback

You’re likely working hard to collect valuable feedback from your customers and trying new methods to get positive testimonials.

But oftentimes, the critical feedback you need to grow your business will come from unsatisfied prospects.

If a visitor is leaving your site after adding an item to their basket, that’s a problem you need to work on.

And if you never ask, you’ll never know.

Asking short and simple questions to abandoning visitors can help you collect valuable insights on why your visitors leave their carts on checkout pages.

If you’re suffering from high cart abandonment rates or if you want to improve your conversions, try running a campaign where you ask your visitors why they’re leaving.

This way, you can find out the biggest barriers to purchase on your online store and use those insights in your cart abandonment popups.

Take this example by Novasol:

When Novasol ran this campaign on their site, they gathered more than 18,000 responses.

Why?

  • The form is easy-to-fill with a limited number of input fields and radio buttons.
  • The company doesn’t ask for any personal information, such as name or email address, and makes it clear that all answers are anonymous. This way, visitors feel more comfortable about giving their honest opinion without being targeted with email campaigns later.

Add a URL condition to make sure your campaign is only visible on relevant pages, such as your checkout page, and show it only to abandoning visitors by using the exit-intent condition.

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Conclusion

There’s a common misconception that a good cart abandonment popup must promise visitors a discount code.

As you’ve seen in the examples above, you don’t necessarily have to discount your products in order to convert more abandoning visitors into customers.

Try these seven strategies to grow your email list, collect feedback, and increase your sales—without sacrificing the perceived value of your products.

Which of these popup examples is your favorite? Will you try them on your site? Share with us below.

The post 7 of the Most Inventive Cart Abandonment Popup Examples We’ve Seen appeared first on Sleeknote.

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Though simple in its approach, continues to get major results.

This is mainly due to the sheer volume of people who use email every day and their receptiveness to communicating with brands through this medium.

Recent HubSpot data found, “Active email accounts are expected to hit 5.6 billion by 2019, and 99 percent of consumers check their email every day.”

Furthermore, “59 percent of respondents say marketing emails influence their purchase decisions.”

It’s an amazing opportunity to connect with prospects, nurture leads, build trust and inevitably convert subscribers into customers.

But to get the most out of it and avoid needless mistakes, it’s crucial that you pay attention to certain email marketing metrics.

And that’s what I’m going to cover in this post. Here I’ll discuss at length the most vital email marketing metrics to analyze to increase engagement and conversions.

So let’s get right down to it.

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1. Deliverability Rate

Before you look at anything else, I suggest examining your , which is the number of emails that make it to your recipients’ inboxes.

The higher your deliverability rate, the larger the percentage of emails are actually making it to subscribers. So you want that number to be as high as possible.

So what specific factors contribute to your deliverability rate?

According to Benchmark, these include:

  • Your IP address reputation
  • Sender reputation
  • Your email service provider
  • Email list quality

In some cases, subscribers may send your emails to spam.

2017 research from Return Path actually found, 13.5 percent of emails across all industries wound up in the spam folder.

Here’s a closer look at the spam placement rate by industry from this study.

Or delivery may fail altogether, and you may see a message like this.

Either way, it’s no good.

If you’re finding that your deliverability rate is lower than it should be— average inbox placement was 77 percent in 2017—you’ll need to identify the problem and correct it.

Some of the most common issues that hurt deliverability are:

Fixing these problems should help you get things back on track and ensure more of the emails you send actually make it to your subscribers’ inboxes.

2. Open Rate

This is simply the percentage of subscribers who open your emails.

Obviously, the higher the open rate, the better because it means more subscribers are taking the time to check out your content and see your offerings.

There are a ton of variables that determine your open rate with some being:

For instance, this graph from HubSpot shows how the number of monthly campaigns impacts the open rate, with 16-30 being the sweet spot.

And this other graph clearly shows that B2C companies enjoy a higher open rate than B2Bs.

While there are a myriad of variables that affect email open rates, the average across the board is 32 percent.

If your open rate is lower than average, it can greatly reduce the impact of your campaign and ultimately means only a small percentage of subscribers are reading your content.

In this case, you’ll need to do some sleuthing to figure out precisely what’s going on.

Some of the more common issues include:

  • Poorly written subject lines
  • Using spammy words (consult the list mentioned in the prior section)
  • Using aggressive spelling (e.g. too many capital letters and exclamation points)
  • Sending emails too frequently
  • Not properly segmenting email lists
  • Attaching files

Here are some examples of emails that would probably never be open due to these types of issues.

With a little tweaking, you should be able to resolve this problem and raise your open rate to a more acceptable number.

3. Click-Through Rate

An even more critical metric than the open rate is your click-through rate.

While open rate tells you how many subscribers clicked on your email and checked it out, click-through rate tells you how many actually performed an action and interacted with your email.

For example, the main CTA in this email from Ray-Ban sunglasses is to click on “Shop the Deals” where I can find sunglasses up to 50 percent off.

The click-through rate indicates what percentage of subscribers are clicking on the links within your email (usually to your website) and learning more about your products.

So as you might imagine, it’s one of the most critical email marketing metrics of all, as it helps you identify how much engagement your emails are receiving and affects your overall conversions and revenue.

Here’s the formula for calculating click-through rate:

(Total clicks OR unique clicks ÷ Number of delivered emails) * 100

In terms of an average, the 2016 Email Marketing Benchmark Study by IBM found it was 3.3 percent across all industries in the US.

If your click-through rate is greater or equal to that, it shows you that your content is likely engaging, people are responding to your offerings and you have an effective CTA.

Otherwise, if it’s considerably lower than that, you’ll need to work on improving these areas.

4. Conversion Rate

There’s a three-step process involved in making a sale through email marketing.

First, subscribers must open your email, which is measured by the open rate.

Second, they must interact with your email by clicking-through on a particular link.

These are the two points I just discussed.

And third, they must actually convert by purchasing whatever you’re offering on your site.

Here’s a simple example of how that sequence would go down.

First, I open an email in my inbox. In this case, it’s from Airbnb featuring “a perfect day in Virginia Beach.”

Next, I see an experience I’m potentially interested in—a “Heart of Norfolk Art Immersion.”

I then click on that to check out the full details on Airbnb’s website and ultimately check out the dates and make a purchase.

The final step would be the conversion—something you should keep careful tabs on because it provides insight as to what your ROI is.

In turn, you can decide whether or not the number of subscribers who are converting and the revenue they generate justifies the time and money you’re spending on email marketing or if you need to make some changes.

5. Unsubscribe Rate

This metric is simply the percentage of people who opt out from your email list, which lets you know how many people are ditching their subscriptions.

Here’s the formula for calculating your unsubscribe rate:

(Unsubscribed numbers / Email delivered) * 100

A certain amount of churn is normal and is to be expected with email marketing. In fact, recent benchmarks put the average unsubscribe rate at 0.02 percent across all industries.

However, most experts agree that anything below 0.05 percent is usually acceptable. But if you find that your unsubscribe rate is any higher than 0.05 percent, it’s cause for concern.

In that case, you’ll need to figure out what’s going on and if there’s anything, in particular, that’s causing subscribers to opt-out in such a high volume.

For instance, if you notice a sharp spike in opt-outs shortly after sending a specific email, there’s likely an issue that sparked the mass exodus.

Maybe it contained irrelevant content. Maybe it was overly salesy. Or maybe you overdid it by sending too many emails in a short period of time.

Whatever the reason, you’ll want to adjust your campaign to prevent making the same mistake in the future.

6. Complaint Rate

“The complaint rate is calculated as the number of ‘report spam/junk’ complaints out of emails sent,” explains Glock Apps. “For example, the 0.1 percent complaint rate is considered acceptable and often seen among good senders, but the 0.5 percent rate is already too high.”

There are several reasons why subscribers may give spam complaints.

They may have unknowingly subscribed to your email list, not recognized your email or thought a particular email was a phishing attempt. Or maybe they received a ton of emails and accidentally flagged your email as spam by mistake.

The scenarios are endless.

Regardless of the reason, your complaint rate is something you should be cognizant of.

And if it starts approaching the 0.05 percent mark, it’s something you’ll want to urgently address because it can negatively affect your deliverability.

“The complaint rate used to be underestimated, but the recent research shows that 20 percent of deliverability issues were caused by a lot of spam complaints,” Glock Apps adds. So it’s not something to take lightly.

Some of the best fixes include:

  • Using a double opt-in rather than a single opt-in
  • Using an easily identifiable sender name (e.g. your company name, your personal name or a combination of the two)
  • Not bombarding subscribers with too many emails
  • Making your unsubscribe link easily visible (some users will simply report a message as spam when they can’t easily unsubscribe)
7. Email Forwarding

Another great metric for determining engagement is looking at the number of times subscribers forward your emails to others.

If a particular email is forwarded numerous times, subscribers likely found it interesting or entertaining and felt there was enough value to warrant sending it to someone they know.

In this case, you would want to figure out what they liked about it and rinse and repeat.

You may also want to consider installing a forward button directly into your email to encourage more people to do this.

Here’s an example where the forward button is situated right next to the unsubscribe button for quick visibility.

While this won’t necessarily tell you the whole story, it’s a nice metric for assessing engagement.

8. Social Share Rate

You see social share buttons everywhere these days. They’re on blog posts, on website headers, navigation bars, and so on.

And many brands are now choosing to incorporate them into their emails as well.

Here’s an example.

And it’s not a bad idea.

If a subscriber is excited about an email’s offerings, they can quickly share it with their friends and followers.

If you add social share buttons to your emails, it’s a good idea to track the share rate. This is yet another indicator of engagement and can tell you which emails have been well received by the number of shares.

9. Revenue Per Email

The last of the email marketing metrics I’m going to discuss is arguably most important of all—revenue per email.

This really gets down to the nitty-gritty and lets you know straight up if your email campaign is having a palpable impact or not.

And with the average ROI for email marketing being $38 for every $1 spent, you definitely want to know how your campaign stacks up against the competition.

The formula for calculating this metric is as follows:

(Total revenue generated by your email campaign / Total number of emails successfully delivered)

Once you’ve got this number, you should have a good idea of the overall performance of your emails.

And by analyzing different campaigns and figuring out which ones were winners and which were losers, you’ll be able to fine-tune your future decision-making to gradually increase your overall ROI.

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Conclusion

There are a ton of different factors that determine how effective your brand’s email campaign is.

You’ve got everything from basic deliverability and open rate to more advanced metrics that impact profitability like conversion rate and revenue per email.

Having a firm grasp of the specific email marketing metrics listed here should paint a pretty clear picture of how well your campaigns are going and will let you know if anything needs improving.

Over time, this will help you optimize your efforts so that you can ultimately raise engagement levels and conversions for maximum impact.

How satisfied are you currently with the ROI of your email campaigns?

The post 9 Email Marketing Metrics You Need to Measure appeared first on Sleeknote.

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Mobile commerce, also known as m-commerce, is defined as “the buying and selling of goods and services through wireless handheld devices such as smartphones and tablets.”

It’s a big umbrella that can include everything from e-commerce and in-app purchasing to mobile banking and purchasing goods using a digital wallet.

But what I want to specifically focus on here is the e-commerce side of things.

In this article, I’m going to list 19 of the most interesting mobile commerce statistics that show just how big of a role it plays in modern e-commerce.

I’ll also include plenty of data that demonstrates why it’s so essential to create a smooth, fluid experience for mobile users.

So let’s get started.

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1. 77 Percent of Americans Owned a Smartphone in 2018

Nearly all Americans (95 percent) owned some type of cell phone as of February 2018.

And 77 percent owned a smartphone, which is a massive increase from just 35 percent in 2011.

This graph from the Pew Research Center illustrates how much growth in smartphone ownership took place in just seven years.

2. 53 Percent of Americans Owned a Tablet in 2018

In terms of tablets, over half of the US population owned one as of January 2018.

While not nearly as big as smartphones, tablets are still quite popular, and ownership could climb as high as 60 percent within the next five years.

3. Americans Spent More than 3.5 Hours on Their Mobile Devices Per Day in 2018

Not only do the vast majority of Americans use mobile devices, they use them a lot.

In 2018, the average US adult spent 3 hours and 35 minutes per day on their device—an annual increase of more than 11 minutes.

Much of this time is spent on texting, social media and entertainment. But of course there’s also plenty of shopping taking place.

4. 63.4 Percent of People Accessed the Internet on a Mobile Device in 2019

The official “tipping point” where more people accessed the Internet on mobile rather than desktop was back in 2015, where global mobile phone Internet user penetration was 52.7 percent.

In 2019, that number has grown considerably, and now more than 63 percent of people access the Internet on a mobile device.

Mobile is clearly the medium of choice and will only continue to become more popular in the future.

So these numbers demonstrate just how vital it is for e-commerce owners to provide a seamless experience for mobile users.

Editor’s Note

Converting mobile traffic into leads and ensuring a good user experience doesn’t have to be mutually exclusive. You CAN do both, and with Sleeknote, it’s never been easier. To learn how to create mobile-friendly popups, read this article.

5. Just Over Half of Americans Bought Something Online Using a Smartphone in 2016

As of December 2016, 79 percent of Americans had purchased something online.

Of these shoppers, 51 percent had completed an online purchase using a smartphone.

Now that we’re in mid-2019, that number has likely grown, showing the majority of people are comfortable doing e-commerce shopping on a mobile device.

6. Mobile Commerce Accounted for Nearly a Quarter of Digital Commerce Spending in Q4 2017

During the fourth quarter of 2017, “it was found that 24 percent of all digital e-commerce dollars were spent via mobile devices.”

This was a significant increase from just 13 percent in the fourth quarter of 2014 and shows how much mobile commerce has grown in a relatively short period of time.

7. Mobile Commerce Sales Will Make Up More Than Half of Total E-Commerce Sales By 2021

And don’t think the mobile commerce trend is slowing down.

Experts predict that by 2021, mobile commerce will account for 53.9 percent of e-commerce sales.

This makes 2021 the tipping point where more e-commerce shopping is done on mobile than on desktop.

While you certainly don’t want to neglect desktop users, this data proves that mobile users deserve the bulk of your attention in upcoming years.

8. 93 Percent of Millennials Compared Online Deals Using a Mobile Device in 2018

Mobile devices are effective tools for quickly comparing deals.

Young shoppers are especially fond of this tactic, with 93 percent using it to find savings between multiple competitors.

As an e-commerce owner, you can capitalize on this trend by offering better deals and promotions than your main competitors.

Beyond that, optimizing your site’s interface so mobile users can quickly find product specifications, pricing, shipping information, and so on can give you an edge.

For example, indoor potted plant delivery provider, The Sill, has super informational product pages that tell shoppers everything they need to know at a glance.

9. More Than 90 Percent of Mobile Coupon Users Redeemed a Coupon Code in 2018

Coupons have been popular for awhile, with 85 percent of Americans using them.

Unsurprisingly, mobile coupons are also huge, with more than 90 percent of mobile coupon users redeeming a code in 2018.

That’s why you see a lot of major brands offering mobile coupons on sites like RetailMeNot.

Here’s an example of one from American Eagle giving mobile shoppers 25 percent off by entering a code.

If you’re looking for an effective way to entice e-commerce shoppers to choose your store over competitors, this is definitely something to consider.

10. The Global Mobile Coupons Industry is Expected to Grow By 56.5 Percent By 2025

If you need any more encouragement, note that more than 25 million Americans used mobile coupons in 2018, and that number will increase by 56.5 percent over the next six years.

This is hands down one of the best ways to attract new prospects and get first-time customers to go through with their purchase.

Beyond that, it can help you quickly move inventory that isn’t selling all that well.

11. Tablets Have a Conversion Rate of 3.71 Percent, and Smartphones Have a Conversion rate of 1.56 Percent

In the third quarter of 2018, tablets had more than double the conversions of smartphones among US online shoppers.

While the exact reason for this is open to interpretation, over lengthy or cluttered copy is a common culprit, especially when there’s limited real estate on a smartphone screen.

Minimizing the “informational dump” and simplifying the design can be a big help for raising smartphone conversion rates.

12. Smartphone Users Are Most Likely to Abandon Their Shopping Carts at 85.65 Percent

Shopping cart abandonment is a major concern for e-commerce site owners.

While the abandonment rate for desktop users is roughly 73 percent, it’s significantly higher for mobile users at 85.65 percent.

In fact, people are more likely to abandon a shopping cart using a smartphone than on any other device.

The reason?

“Often, sites aren’t optimized for mobile, meaning a clunky, glitchy checkout experience that leaves customers running,” explains CreditDonkey.

Robust mobile optimization is important for all aspects of e-commerce, but it’s especially critical during the checkout process.

It needs to be smooth and friction free with no hiccups that could prevent shoppers from completing their purchase.

13. Tablet Users Have a Slightly Lower Abandonment Rate at 80.74 Percent

Shoppers using tablets are slightly less likely to abandon their shopping cart, but the abandonment rate is still considerably higher than for desktop users.

This means there’s plenty of room for improvement, and performing A/B testing is a great way to gradually decrease the abandonment rate for both types of mobile devices.

14. Roughly 90 Percent of Mobile Time is Spent on Apps

There’s a huge disparity between the amount of time mobile users spend in browsers and on apps.

Research has found that the vast majority of time (90 percent) is spent on apps, with the remaining 10 percent spent using browsers.

Going even more granular, “Mobile app users spend an average of 201.8 minutes per month shopping, compared to 10.9 minutes/month for website users,” according to JMango 360.

What’s the reason for this disparity?

It’s simple. “Consumers prefer apps over mobile sites due to user experience, speed, extra features and special offers.”

Apps tend to create a much smoother UX than mobile sites, making it easier for shoppers to find what they need and complete their purchase with minimal hassle.

15. Mobile Shoppers Make Double the Purchases on Apps Than They Do on Mobile Web

What’s really interesting is the actual sales volume that apps generate when compared to mobile web.

One particular report found shoppers made 108 percent more purchases using apps than they did on mobile web during the 2017 holiday season.

16. Apps Have a 14 Percent Higher Conversion Rate Than Mobile Web

Furthermore, e-commerce site owners can expect a far higher conversion rate with an app than with mobile web.

Shoppers convert at a 14 percent higher rate, meaning there’s way more revenue potential.

These numbers clearly prove the growing importance of e-commerce stores having an app. Though it may require a considerable investment, it’s usually worth it in the long run.

A good example of a brand that’s pulled this off well is fast-fashion clothing company H&M.

Their app has an excellent design with a book style product menu and ultra simple checkout.

17. 58 Percent of Smartphone Users Are More Likely to Buy When They Can Make Purchases Quickly

It should also come as no surprise that speed is important.

Time is of the essence, and a slow, arduous mobile shopping experience can really take a toll on conversions.

When a mobile user is having an “I-want-to-buy” moment as Think With Google calls it, you need to make the shopping process as quick and painless as possible.

Customer experience expert, Melanie Crissey, says e-commerce shops should aim for a maximum load time of three seconds because a large percentage of shoppers will leave after that.

She also recommends avoiding too many steps to complete a purchase and not requiring shoppers to fill out an excessive amount of form fields, as this creates friction.

But as long as you get it right and allow mobile users to make purchases quickly, 58 percent are more likely to buy.

18. 61 Percent of Smartphone Users Say They’re More Likely to Buy When They Receive Customized Offerings

Personalization has become a big part of providing a positive user experience in recent years and is something many people have come to expect.

And mobile users are no exception.

61 percent of smartphone users say customized offerings like similar products based on what a shopper has previously purchased makes them more likely to buy from an e-commerce brand.

So you’ll definitely want to look for ways to work personalization into your mobile commerce gameplan.

19. Less Than One in 10 Mobile Users Will Stay on a Site or App if it Doesn’t Satisfy Their Needs

And what about the consequences of not providing a positive experience for mobile users?

They’re pretty severe, with only nine percent of users saying they’ll hang around if a site or app isn’t up to par.

Even worse, it can create issues later on down the road, with 66 percent of mobile users taking actions that will have a negative impact on an e-commerce brand.

“40 percent will be less likely to come back to the mobile site or app, and 28 percent will be less likely to purchase products from the company in the future.”

In other words, users have very little patience for a poor mobile experience, and making the wrong first impression can have a lasting impact.

This proves just how important it is to take mobile optimization seriously and do everything within your power to keep users happy.

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Conclusion

There’s a mobile revolution happening where in just a few short years mobile commerce will be the norm.

As an e-commerce site owner, it’s vital that you acknowledge this fact.

You also need to understand the mindset of mobile users, their preferences and what compels them to buy.

The 20 mobile commerce statistics mentioned here cover all of the bases and should provide you with the insight needed to deliver an amazing mobile experience.

Which factors motivate you the most to buy while mobile shopping?

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As of 2019, mobile devices accounted for 63.4 percent of internet traffic, making them the clear majority over desktop users.

Given the trajectory of this graph, that number is likely to increase even more in the coming years.

And there’s a very similar trend when it comes to using mobile for e-commerce shopping.

As of 2019, 44.7 percent of US e-commerce sales came from mobile.

That number, however, is expected to increase to 53.9 percent by 2021, which is the official tipping point.

This means one thing: Creating a seamless experience for mobile e-commerce users has never been more important.

You want to make the digital shopping experience as smooth and painless as possible so customers can easily find what they need, make their way to your checkout and ultimately make a purchase.

One of the more critical aspects of enhancing that experience is following good mobile landing page best practices.

And that’s what I’m going to discuss in detail in this post. I’ll go over the most important strategies to make a great first impression and persuade shoppers to buy your products.

So let’s get right down to it.

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1. Start with Lighting Fast Speed

I’m sure you know about the importance of having a fast loading site. It’s obviously a big part of preventing user frustration. But it’s also a factor Google takes into account in their mobile search rankings.

The speed update,” which rolled out in mid-2018, was specifically geared toward mobile page speed where slow loading pages officially became penalized.

Although it “will only affect pages that deliver the slowest experience to users and will only affect a small percentage of queries,” it’s clear that a fast loading mobile site is of the utmost importance—both for appeasing users, as well as search engines.

Google also identified how the odds of a bounce increase with each additional second it takes a mobile site to load.

Here’s how that breaks down.

I personally find these numbers pretty alarming, and if a page takes any longer than five seconds to load, you’re basically dead in the water.

So this is something you definitely need to stay on top of.

To get an idea of how well your mobile landing page is currently performing, I suggest using a tool like Uptrends free mobile website speed test.

Just plugin in your URL, and you’ll receive a ton of information on your mobile site performance.

You’ll also get specific suggestions for performance improvement.

Just click “Show how to fix” for instructions on how to fix issues.

Improving the page speed of your mobile landing page is a prerequisite for everything else.

So I recommend tackling that first.

2. Use Short, Clean Copy

Needless to say, the screen size of a smartphone is much smaller than a desktop.

So it’s easy for the copy to feel cluttered and jumbled up when there’s less real estate.

The solution?

Be super lean with your copy and make it look crisp and clean.

Here’s a good example from men and women’s fashion company, Express.

They use very minimal black copy on a white background. But more importantly, it’s very concise so you can quickly find what you’re looking for without having to think too much.

For example, the “Shop Now,” “Find a Store” and “See Her Style” links help quickly direct shoppers to where they need to go.

And if you scroll down a bit more, you can find links to different clothing categories like tops, shorts, dress pants, shirts, and more.

It’s all about keeping it brief without sacrificing clarity.

3. Ensure Text and Other Vital Elements Are Adequately Sized

The last thing you want is for shoppers to squint to read important text or other key elements like a call-to-action and navigational links.

That’s going to upset the flow and create unnecessary friction.

A common reason for small text is when sites use responsive themes on platforms like WordPress where the same text from the desktop page is used but is just shrunken.

While it’s a heck of a lot more convenient than building a separate mobile landing page, it can cost you in the long run if the UX is adversely affected.

Mobile landing page best practices dictate that you ensure all text and other vital elements are large enough for shoppers to see and tap without any drama.

Italian eyewear designer, Zanzan, does this well on their landing page where they feature women’s and men’s glasses. I love the simplicity of it.

Here you see a clearly labeled section for women’s glasses where a single tap on the image brings you to that section.

And it’s the same thing with the men’s section just below that.

There’s very little effort involved, and you can quickly find the specific type of glasses you’re looking for with extremely intuitive navigation.

4. Trim Back on Visuals

Beautiful images are an integral part of wowing e-commerce shoppers and grabbing their attention.

So I definitely recommend using them on a mobile landing page.

But at the same time, it’s important to be smart about it and not overload the design with excessive visuals.

Why?

Two reasons.

First, images take data. While this isn’t a problem for shoppers who are browsing your site on a Wi-Fi connection, it certainly can be for those who are using their cellular data.

Second, like excessive copy, using too many images can make your landing page feel cluttered and overwhelm shoppers with visual stimuli.

In turn, this can create confusion when they’re trying to browse your store, which diminishes the overall UX.

One brand I think finds the perfect balance of images is Victoire Boutique—a Canadian vintage-chic clothing company.

Here’s what you see after first arriving on their landing page.

It’s got a nice fresh feel with the floral design on the right creating just a bit of eye candy. But it’s by no means overwhelming.

Scroll down a bit, and you find images of some of their featured products including pants, a blazer, and a jumper.

The images are presented nicely and give you a good idea of the specific types of products they offer. But they do it without saturating the landing page with too many visuals.

5. Avoid Videos Altogether

People have different opinions as to whether or not it’s a good idea to feature videos on a mobile landing page.

I personally suggest staying away from it for the simple fact that they’re too demanding on mobile connections and data.

Besides that, a video can be distracting if a visitor has to click to play it.

And if you set it to autoplay, many visitors will find it annoying.

Just imagine if they’re sitting at their desk at work and get blasted with a video hyping up your products. It can be a definite deal breaker and take a toll on conversions.

While I’m usually all for a brief explainer on a desktop site where there’s more screen real estate, it’s something I feel should be avoided on mobile because of the diminished UX.

But here’s the deal.

You can still get your message across and let shoppers know exactly what you’re selling without using a video.

Pura Vida Bracelets—an e-commerce brand selling artisan bracelets and jewelry—manages to do this quite well on their landing page by including links to different product categories at the very top.

One quick glance, and shoppers can be directed to wherever they need to go.

6. Use Plenty of Contrast and Negative Space

One of the most essential components of great mobile design is contrast.

A clear contrast between text or images and the background makes your page “pop” for users and makes the design more eye-catching.

But there’s another purpose, and that’s making it easier for shoppers to view your page if they happen to be outdoors.

If you’ve ever tried to browse through your phone in natural outdoor light—especially with the sun glaring—you know how tricky it can be.

Using high contrast makes it much easier on the eyes and generally creates a nice looking aesthetic.

On top of that, using adequate negative space (space around text and images) can improve your design for mobile users by letting it “breathe.”

One brand that pulls this off really well is The Horse—an Australian company selling leather goods and watches.

Just look at the beautiful contrast they create here with the images and copy for their black and red crossbody bags on a white background.

And the ample spacing between the text makes it super easy to read on a smartphone.

7. Use Mobile-Specific Popups

Popups are ugly, intrusive and above all, worse of all, hurt the user experience…

…But NOT if you follow best practices (and ignore what everyone else is doing).

In truth, mobile-friendly popups CAN convert users into leads IF they’re shown to the right user at the right time.

Take exit-intent, for instance.

You want to capitalize on your mobile traffic. But you also want to give users a good website experience and meet Google’s interstitials guidelines.

One compromise is to offer free shipping to users that exceed a certain basket value. Doing so give shoppers the nudge they need to complete their order, but hides from those who aren’t ready to buy.

Here’s an example using Sleeknote’s SiteData condition:

Mobile traffic is a goldmine waiting to be tapped. Don’t leave it to chance.

8. Reduce Taps

Say that a shopper is searching for a particular type of product. Their goal is to narrow the selection down as quickly as possible to find exactly what they’re looking for.

Mobile landing page best practices mandate that you help facilitate that process and allow them to seamlessly narrow their search.

In other words, you want to reduce the number of taps they have to make.

This is something else Zanzan does well with their mobile page.

Once arriving on the men’s sunglasses section, I can quickly filter the product selection by type, color, frame style, etc.

Here’s the list of their filters.

After tapping on “Frame Style,” I can instantly choose between rectangular, round, rectangle and wayfarer.

It’s all very smooth and seamless.

9. Use Mobile-Optimized Forms

You probably already know most people aren’t too keen on filling out long-winded forms on desktop.

But that disdain runs even deeper on mobile devices.

It can be a serious hassle where an alarming percentage of visitors end up leaving before a form is ever filled out.

So you need to take measures to streamline the process for mobile users.

One way is to simply include the fewest amount of fields possible.

Here’s an example of an ultra-simple contact section from Soul Chocolate—a Canadian-based, small-batch chocolate company.

You literally just tap on their email address “hello@soulroasters.com,” and it will open your email where you can send them a message.

On the other end of the spectrum, here’s an example of a contact form that’s a bit more involved.

While filling out this form could be done fairly quickly on a desktop with a keyboard, it’s going to be a struggle on mobile, which could cause some friction with some users.

So this is a good lesson in keeping it as simple as possible.

Or if you need to get a lot of information, set it up so mobile users can conveniently tap their way through a form rather than typing in the information manually.

That’s something that men’s grooming company Beardbrand does well on their mobile page.

They have a quiz called “What’s the Best Beard Style for You” where visitors determine what type of beard would be best for them based on their style preferences and lifestyle.

And it’s super simple to fill out.

You just tap on the option that best fits what you’re going for, and you’re quickly moved to the next question.

No sweat.

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Conclusion

Mobile users already account for the majority of internet traffic.

And it won’t be long before they make up the majority of e-commerce shoppers as well.

So it’s a no brainer that you should be following mobile landing page best practices.

The ones I mentioned here are especially important and should ensure you cover all of the bases.

That way you can make the most out of your mobile traffic, lower your bounce rate, increase the time spent on site and boost conversions.

Which mobile landing page design mistakes do you find most frustrating?

The post Follow These 9 Mobile Landing Page Best Practices to Convert More Leads appeared first on Sleeknote.

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If you’ve ever Googled “how to write product descriptions,” you’re most likely familiar with the following suggestions: focus on benefits, use power words, give detailed product information, and so on.

Don’t get me wrong, these are all useful recommendations.

But they won’t help you find the perfect approach to writing high-converting product descriptions for your online store.

Why? A few reasons:

  1. Tips like the above don’t give you actionable copywriting angles that you can replicate for your e-commerce site; and
  2. They assume that consumers are simply driven by logic.

That’s why they can’t help you nudge consumers to buy from you over and over again.

In this post, I’m going to give you a toolbox of copywriting techniques to improve the way you write your product descriptions—with real-life examples and angles you can model and learn from.

Let’s jump in.

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1. Evoke Positive Emotions

One trap many e-commerce marketers fall into when writing product descriptions is focusing too much on their products.

Naturally, you want to highlight a product’s best features and position it as a leader in its category.

But consumers are not only driven by reason. With the exception of commodities, we always buy with our emotions and only use logic to justify our purchases.

For a moment, try stepping away from your products and their features. Look at the big picture and write about the positive feelings they evoke, instead.

You might think that online shops differ a lot from physical stores because consumers don’t have the possibility to see, touch, and smell your products.

And you’re right—to some extent.

With well-written product descriptions, you can help visitors visualize the use of your products and associate them with positive emotions.

Lush is one of the brands that make the most of their product descriptions to evoke positive emotions in the readers’ minds.

Let’s take a look at one of their product pages:

How would you describe a bath bomb?

You can say that it cleans well, smells amazing, or has natural ingredients…

…Or you can describe the emotions customers will experience when they use it.

Notice how Lush subtly explains the ingredients and their benefits through emotions.

This way, they paint a more vivid picture for their visitors and help trigger the “Yes, I want this!” moment in the readers’ mind.

Luckily, you don’t only have to sell personal care products to use this approach.

Bean Box is another example from a completely different industry.

While writing product descriptions for coffee, you would naturally want to talk about the flavor and strength.

But Bean Box frames their products around the positive feelings they evoke:

The company compares the use of their product with similar emotions that will make their readers feel good.

Bean Box speaks to the feeling of being a child and initiates a conversation in the readers’ mind by asking “Do you remember?” (After all, nothing evokes strong positive emotions like childhood nostalgia.)

They also share a backstory of the product that complements the above.

You don’t have to write a page-long story and fill it with feel-goodie words. Be honest and let the reader imagine what it feels like to use your products.

2. Speak to Status

While consumers don’t always make rational buying decisions, some purchases are driven by the motive to obtain a certain status.

In other words, consumers aspire to reach a certain status and hope to realize that through the consumption of certain products—intentionally or unintentionally.

Speaking to status will often trigger the feeling of greed or evoke a sense of exclusivity in consumers’ minds, which will make your products more desired.

This doesn’t mean that you need to sell luxury items or products that openly display a status.

It’s all about speaking to consumers’ desire to have the best.

This is a powerful angle that only a handful of marketers pick up on and it doesn’t take much to apply.

One approach is including strong statements that trigger greed in your product descriptions, such as “You must have this” or “Don’t settle for anything less than the best.”

Beauty Bay is a brand that uses this angle in many of their product descriptions:

The company doesn’t simply say “This product is the best,” but rather invites you into the conversation by saying “You never have to settle for anything less than the best.”

Beauty Bay also uses idols, such as goddesses, that their customers can aspire to be, as in this example:

In this product description, they don’t claim that you will look bronzed and highlighted, but you will rather be a golden goddess. They know that the latter is much stronger than the former because it speaks to the reader’s desire to achieve that status.

These comparisons work well because they’re easy-to-understand and almost anyone can relate to them.

That’s why Charlotte Tilbury uses a “Hollywood-like” comparison in their product descriptions:

Speaking to status can mean different things for different brands.

If you’re selling men’s clothing, try promising your customers to be “the best-dressed man in the room.”

If you own a party supply store, your products can be the requirement your customers need to throw the party-of-the-year.

Try to find a status your potential customers are aspiring to and position your products as a gateway to reach that status.

3. Address Common Fears

It’s not only positive emotions that can drive consumers to make a purchase.

Finding out the common fears among your potential customers and triggering them to your advantage can help you convert more visitors on your product pages.

If you’re not sure about where to start, take an upside-down approach in your product descriptions.

First, think about the problems your products are solving and then describe life without your products.

Agitate those fears and as a final step, ease your visitors’ minds by offering your products as the solution.

This is an effective strategy almost any e-commerce brand can use. Plus, it’s a clever way to explain complex or high-end products.

Take this example from Bellroy:

If you’re somewhat a frequent traveler, I’m sure you can relate to this scenario and maybe even feel the tension as you read this product description.

Bellroy (1) wants you to imagine this uncomfortable situation, (2) agitates your fear of losing important documents, and finally, (3) comforts you with their products.

Because we all want to be free and far from our fears—whether big or small.

4. Free Your Customers from Pain

Going hand-in-hand with Strategy #3 above, we all have a natural desire to avoid pain or painful situations.

If you promise to free your customers from pain or help prevent unwanted situations with your products, you’ll trigger their need to stay away from pain and increase their likelihood to buy from you.

To make this angle work, you should help the reader imagine a painful or unwanted situation in your product descriptions.

This way, you’ll place a question mark in the reader’s mind, even if they don’t have that particular problem at this moment. Next, you can offer your products as a solution to eliminate or prevent all existing and future pain points.

Now your visitors can buy from you to prevent any unwanted situation so that they can be free from pain.

Take a look at this example by Birchbox:

This product promises to rescue you from pain by preventing certain skin issues. Naturally, Birchbox wants you to imagine how annoying it is to go through those problems.

They help you relate to the problem by saying “It can be maddening…,” and position the product as the solution with the second part that implies “this is the product you need to avoid that situation.”

Birchbox uses this angle in many of their product descriptions. And they do it by finding common pain points among their customers and agreeing with them in their product copy.

If you choose this angle, you can go beyond Birchbox’s approach and create stories. For example, you could describe a typical day in the life of your buyer persona where something unwanted happens and where you free them from pain.

5. Incorporate Humor

We all like brands that can put a smile on our faces.

Writing humorous product descriptions doesn’t only help you convert more visitors into customers. It also helps you create a more sympathetic brand and build closer relationships with your customers.

Granted, it’s not easy to make people smile, especially if you’re in a not-so-funny industry.

But even if your brand voice is closer to the serious side of the scale, you can still add a fun twist to your product descriptions and stand out among your competitors.

Using a humorous angle in your product descriptions doesn’t mean that you have to write jokes for each product page. You can easily incorporate humor in a subtle way to make your brand more approachable and likable.

If your products are already fun by nature, like Firebox, you have a good place to start:

Not every brand can pull off writing long product descriptions that their visitors would want to read. But Firebox does a great job by mixing humor with the backstory of their products:

The company knows that if you land on this product page, you’ll probably ask yourself “Why on earth would I need this?”

That’s why they describe a scene you can relate to and explain why you need this product. You become more likely to buy the product and hold a favorable image of the Firebox brand.

You don’t have to sell witty products or write long funny stories to use this angle. This strategy works for any other e-commerce business, as long as it’s in line with your brand voice.

Take a look at this product description by Barkshop:

You don’t need to crack readers up in your product descriptions. After all, they should still serve the purpose of selling more.

Add a little humor to your product descriptions where you see fit and don’t force it just for the sake of using it.

6. Handle Possible Objections

If you’re running an e-commerce store, you certainly know the strengths and weaknesses of your products.

It’s a given that not all of your site visitors will convert to customers. And chances are, you know some of the reasons that make people unsure about buying your products. Maybe it’s your pricing, delivery and return options, or consumers’ quality concerns.

If you find out the potential obstacles to buying among your prospects, you can incorporate them into your product descriptions and answer your visitors’ doubts before they have a chance to object to you.

Read your product descriptions out loud and think about the points your visitors might have objections. Then, include your answers in your product descriptions beforehand.

This angle works especially well if you’re selling higher-end products that your prospects might have second thoughts about spending money on.

Beardbrand knows that some of their visitors will be hesitant to pay a higher price for a brush that is pricier than usual…

…That’s why they overcome possible objections about the product by openly raising an objection and handling it themselves:

Beardbrand directly asks “What makes boar’s hair better than synthetic brushes?” in the description, knowing that visitors might have the same objection.

They give an answer right away to justify the product’s price tag and handle your objections by giving you a helpful explanation.

If you need some hints to apply this angle in your descriptions, look through your product reviews and find what your customers are objecting to.

7. Describe Your Buyer Persona

Some products need more open and detailed product descriptions, especially if you’re offering several different options that your customers can choose from.

That’s when you can be more direct and clearly state who your products are for.

Even if you have one or more buyer personas for your business, chances are, each one of your products speaks to different types of people.

Add a line in your product descriptions and write down who that product is perfect for: For beginner skiers? For people who love discovering new makeup? For those who can’t easily wake up in the morning?

This way, a potential customer can more easily relate to your products and make a faster buying decision.

Away is a brand that often uses this angle on their product pages.

Since the company has different product options within the same product line, they help their visitors easily understand if this item is the right choice for them or not.

They achieve this by adding a few words that start with “ideal for those…”

Away describes the ideal buyers of their different products so that you know which option is the best for you.

They’re helpful to visitors, plus, they guide them to better decisions.

Dollar Shave Club takes a similar approach, but they describe the ideal buyer in a small, separate section:

The company makes it easier to understand if this product is for you even before you read the rest of the description.

If you’re going to use this angle, make sure you suggest alternatives with product recommendations so that you can increase your visitors’ chances of finding what they’re looking for.

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Conclusion

If you’re having trouble writing high-converting product descriptions or if you feel like there’s room for improvement, give these seven angles a chance.

Combine different approaches and start with the ones that fit your brand’s tone of voice best.

All the examples above come from different industries, so you can borrow them as you wish and easily apply to your online store.

Which angle will you try first? Have you seen any other good approaches? Leave a comment below.

The post Product Descriptions: The Only Guide You’ll Ever Need appeared first on Sleeknote.

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