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SLCeats by Ryan Kendrick - 2w ago

Let’s get a few things established right off the bat.

  1. There is a disco ball, posters of Saved by The Bell, and a DJ station at Ginger Street
  2. There is a lot of neon
  3. The servers wear fanny packs
  4. This is not a place I will take my mother in law, who thinks the Red Iguana experience is a bit “out there”
  5. The food in incredible

In the food blogger/writer world these days, unfortunately the trend is that it’s more about speed and less about quality. She or he with the first review rules the world. I tend to shy away from that approach. Not for any reason other than I don’t like opening week crowds and I like to give the front and back of the house a little time to settle in. But Melissa and I found ourselves with an extra hour or two after a wedding reception sans kids, so we decided to pop over to Ginger Street for a quick second lunch to see what all of the fuss is about. 

The first tip: the entrance is on the 3rd South side of the building. We tried entering from the porch, but the door was locked. Then we walked along State Street. No dice. Then we found the hard-to-miss pink “red carpet” that welcomes you to the large space with tall ceilings and plenty of room. You’re greeted by a host or hostess and given a menu, and you place your initial order with them. Once paid, they then will give you a number and help you choose a table. Ours happened to be made out of an old bowling alley lane. I say “initial” order, because the intent of Ginger Street is that this is “hawker style.” Hawker stalls are prevalent in Singapore, and the idea of them is sort of like a food court where you order from the various vendors and then sit down and enjoy the varying dishes. A bit of a conundrum at Ginger Street, since there’s only one purveyor, so I’m not totally convinced they really get what hawker stalls are about. But it does follow along the hawker model in that the intent is that you order numerous different plates of dishes to share (or not) throughout your stay. I wasn’t a huge fan of feeling the pressure of walking in and feeling like you had to make a quick decision since there’s a line of people behind you, and I can’t imagine I’m the only one that feels that way. I’d much rather be able to sit down and settle in before deciding on what I want to eat. Maybe their intent is to help turn tables by eliminating that initial 10 minute “settling in” period. I don’t know. I’m curious to know if they stick with that approach or not. I’m hopeful they don’t.

Even at 2 pm, the dining room was steadily busy. Michael McHenry, one of the owners of Ginger Street, mentioned that within the first day or two of them opening, they had a line of 140 people waiting for lunch. I’d say there’s a bit of hype with this one. And after our meal, I’d say the hype is very well justified.

Varying textures are prevalent throughout your experience at Ginger Street. Textures in music (yes, they have a DJ booth and a disco ball), décor (they have posters featuring Saved By The Bell and pillows with a distinct Indian flair), and tastes. I have a feeling that this spot will be a bit of a chameleon as the day and week progresses. Downtown white collar workers will find it suited well for a quick lunch, but as the night progresses and the bar crowd emerges, I have a hunch that this place will get a bit crazy. In a good way. But maybe not a 40-year-old-with-two-kids-in-diapers good way. I’ll likely stick to lunchtime or early dinner.

Ginger Street is in a good location, centrally located between the Main Street bar scene, Gallivan, and Broadway theater. They are also in the late stages of opening a walk-up dessert and small bites window, where you will be able to order a quick bowl of rotating soft serve flavors, ice cream sandwiches, and on late nights during the weekend, small hot bites of pork buns and other items. The window is expected to open in the next two weeks. I find it interesting that two similar concepts (walk-up Asian-inspired food) are launching at nearly the exact same time, within a block of each other. Ginger Street’s window, and Ryan Lowder’s latest idea: a walk-up window named @hotbunsnfun on the side of Copper Common, where you can get noodle dishes as well as various steamed buns.

Future Dessert and Hot Bites Walk-Up Window

We ordered a starter of pork dumplings, perfectly cooked and filled with napa cabbage, garlic chive, and accompanied by a very nice chili soy sauce. The Crispy Fish Cha Ca La Vong was a standout dish: pieces of white fish breaded in their version of a panko coating with a hint of citrus, laid on a bed of cold rice vermicelli, peanuts, scallion, and topped by a hearty helping of dill. The fish was accompanied by the best sauce I’ve had in a while: a pineapple nam prik, laced with bird’s eye chili for a bit of heat. This dish had sweet, sour, warm, cold, crunchy, soft. Chef Tyler Stokes understands textures and contrasts.

Ginger Noodles

The Ginger Noodles dish was perhaps my favorite dish. It’s a simple dish, and screams “humble,” but it was so good in so many ways. Ramen noodles are accompanied with a salty scallion relish as wells as pickled cucumbers and sauteed baby spinach and topped with peanuts. The dish had great balance and the noodles were perfectly cooked. Just an all-around great dish, and a bargain at $13. 

At this point in our lunch I was spotted by Ginger Street co-owner Michael McHenry. McHenry, who has formerly worked at Blue Lemon, cofounded Even Stevens sandwiches, and recently took over Oak Wood Fire Kitchen in Draper, has a track record of establishing unique concepts backed by solid operations and excellent service. After speaking with him, you begin to understand how each of his concepts are able to execute his vision so well, and each one so uniquely. He gets it, and is passionate about bringing a new type of culinary experience to Salt Lake. McHenry sent out a few other dishes for us to try. The steamed Snake River Farms pork belly buns were pillowy soft, and the hoisin, pickled cucumbers, and scallions provided a nice counter balance to the rich pork. 

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SLCeats by Ryan Kendrick - 4M ago

Head up to the very top of Park City’s main street and you will find Park City Provisions, a project of dining mainstay Riverhorse on Main. The building is an interesting setup, with the restaurant on the bottom level, a grocery market and grab-and-go deli on the second level, and the beautiful Imperial House on the top levels. Recently Provisions unveiled their new dinner menu for the restaurant.

“We’re excited to unveil our refreshed focus on Provisions by Riverhorse’s full-service restaurant experience,” says Executive Chef Seth Adams. “The addition of our dinner service gives our guests a chance to enjoy our casual take on a sit-down dinner menu without sacrificing the exceptional service our guests come to expect at any of our Riverhorse establishments.”

The menu offers a nice selection of options, with dishes like fries with parmesan, garlic, herbs, and fry sauce, and other selections like nachos, wild game chili, and crispy Buffalo chicken bites.

For the main entrées, diners have the choice of halibut tacos, smoked BBQ baby back ribs with a delicious apple fennel slaw, Provisions burger on a brioche bun with a truffle mustard aioli, goat cheese stuffed chicken breast, and my favorite dish: the super-rich buffalo short rib stroganoff, with cognac cream and wild mushrooms.

Provisions could be a place where locals go to get away from the crowds and enjoy a nice low-key dinner without paying Main Street prices.

Park City Provisions by Riverhorse is open 7:30 am – 9:00 pm daily. The “Provisions after
Dark” dinner menu is available nightly to guests from 4:00 pm – 9:00 pm.

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SLCeats by Ryan Kendrick - 4M ago

After 18 months, Alamexo Cantina, the sister project of Matt Lake’s Alamexo downtown, is shutting its doors. I am personally very sad about this, since I admire Matt’s passion to create a neighborhood gathering place and his devotion to innovative dishes, and scratch cooking using only the best ingredients. Sadly, it seemed like the Cantina could never gain the traction necessary to succeed.

Their announcement, posted to Instagram, says in part: “With the months of upcoming construction that will surround our restaurant and the tight margin that all restauranteurs operate on, we can no longer continue on in this space. We have made every accommodation to insure the jobs of our staff members, who are like family, and they will all be joining us at our location on 268 South State.”

RIP, Alamexo Cantina.

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You really just can’t go wrong with any chocolate chip cookie recipe. Crispy, thin and crunchy, or thick and bready, I’ll take all comers. But that said, my favorite chocolate chip cookies are those that have a crispy exterior and are dense, rich, sweet and salty.

I made a mash-up recipe that used portions of Alton Brown’s famous chocolate chip cookie recipe, and the traditional Toll House recipe that you can find on the back of the Nestlé chocolate chips bag. Where Alton’s original recipe called for bread flour for chewiness, I used all-purpose to keep things a bit lighter, and I couldn’t bring myself to melt the butter instead of creaming it with the sugar. The little bit of saltiness from the kosher salt is the perfect counterpart to the sweet chocolate chips.

And this recipe uses weighed ingredients instead of the standard cups. With baking, measuring via weight is a necessity, so if you haven’t already got one, treat yourself to a high-quality kitchen scale.

Ingredients

8 oz room temperature butter
12 ounces all-purpose flour (use bread flour if you prefer a chewier cookie)
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 ounces granulated sugar
8 ounces brown sugar (light or dark)
1 large egg
1 large egg yolk
2 tablespoons whole milk
1.5 teaspoons vanilla extract
12 ounces of semi-sweet, milk, or dark chocolate (whatever you prefer. I did a “pantry cleanout and used a combo of milk, semi-sweet, and chopped-up dark chocolate bar and it turned out amazing)

  1. Add butter and sugars into a stand mixer bowl. Cream together until light and fluffy, 1-2 minutes.
  2. Sift the flour, salt, and baking soda together in a separate bowl.
  3. In another bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, and vanilla.
  4. Set mixer to low and pour the eggs, milk and vanilla into the butter/sugar. Mix until combined; about 30 seconds.
  5. Slowly pour in the dry ingredients while the mixer is on low. Allow to combine, but don’t mix too much or you will overwork the flour and make it tougher.
  6. Dump the chocolate in the dough and allow to mix together.
  7. Place pieces of parchment on 2-3 baking sheets. Scoop out balls of dough (about 2 tablespoons per cookie) and shape them into a ball. Place on cookie sheet and give them plenty of room to expand. Once portioned out, place the baking sheets in the fridge and allow to chill for at least 1 hour. 2-3 hours is even better. Don’t skip the chilling step. It might seem overkill, and we all want instant cookies, but allowing the dough to chill for some time will allow the cookies to retain their structure better while baking, yielding a taller cookie with better structure.
  8. Preheat over to 375 degrees. Bake cookies for around 10-15 minutes, checking for doneness, and rotating the baking sheet halfway through to make sure the cookies bake evenly.
  9. Remove from oven and scoop cookies over to a cooling rack to cool
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SLCeats by Ryan Kendrick - 5M ago

There’s something really cool happening in an old stucco’d building at 10th South and Main Street. The building that houses newly-opened SLC Eatery was formerly a rock shop. Apparently you could go in and buy rocks of all shapes and sizes, in varying colors, and from pretty basic to very fancy. Who knew.

The building is situated right between a motel and a used car dealership, in a (what should I call it) unique part of town for a restaurant. The area is slowly filling in with dining and drinking options, such as Proper Burger, Tinwell, and Fisher Brewery, but there is a way to go before this area is thought of as a culinary stronghold in SLC. At the restaurant there isn’t much in the way of parking (just plan to park on the street) and the restaurant’s website isn’t even done yet. Yet this quirky little spot has managed to generate more buzz in the few short weeks it’s been open that just about any other restaurant in my recent memory. And for good reason, because co-chefs and business partners Paul Chamberlain and Logan Crew are putting out some of the most unique, boundary-pushing food that we’ve seen in the city since the going-away of Forage. And did I mention they have a dim sum cart?

Putting the quirky location aside, once inside the restaurant diners will be impressed by a very open space, warmed by hand-built tabletops by Chamberlain himself as well as a beautiful woodwork tapestry wall framing the kitchen, built by Chad Parkinson at The Furniture Joint. The space seats around 70, but the L-shape helps to break the restaurant into smaller sections to keep things a bit more intimate. Fun music is playing, louder than what you might be used to at other restaurants, but not too loud. Enough to encourage people to have some fun, but not so loud you need to shout to be heard. The chefs want this to be a fun, casual place, but want their food to be taken seriously, and their approach with décor and glassware shows that. The former rock shop was completely gutted, walls torn down, and brick exposed to create a welcoming space. The kitchen is split in two, with the cold side (prepping seafood, salads, and cocktails) at the front of the restaurant, with the hot side as the centerpiece of the restaurant.

Chamberlain and Crew have cooked together at various restaurants for the past 15 years, going back to Fresco Italian Café. Logan has spent some time with the Trio restaurant group, Current Fish & Oyster, Stanza Italian Bistro, and Trio Park City. The two have always wanted to start their own thing going back to their time together at Fresco. Chamberlain has spent time at Bambara, Log Haven, and Avenues Proper.

When asked to describe the menu’s regional or cultural inspiration, Chamberlain said they are kind of “everywhere” with their approach. They wanted a restaurant where “they could could whatever they wanted to cook” without being beholden to any specific cuisine. And that shows on the menu, with items ranging from southeast Asian to Mexican to Spanish cuisine. Sometimes all within one dish.

“In my culinary school days [fusing different cultural foods] was a total no-no. You don’t put nori on bucatini; that just doesn’t happen. And then David Chang happened and it exploded and everybody is now like “you can do whatever you want.” And that’s kind of our philosophy, too, is that we’re just trying to make interesting flavors in ways that people already understand. Like our tamalitos are basically tamales, but they’re smaller, they’re fried. They come with everything, but they’re deconstructed. That dish has a lot of latin-American influence with the lime-cilantro aioli, jalapeños, green onions, and then you have tajin and jalapeño powder which is  one of those things where the ingredients all go together but it’s not something your abuela would cook.” Paul Chamberlain

The restaurant features something that, unless you’ve been to a dim sum place, may make you do a double-take at first sight. Every 15 minutes or so, a server will stop by your table with a trolley cart that is bearing a selection of small plates. These are small three- or four-bite dishes, costing between $3 and $6. A visit by Chamberlain to innovative dining spot State Bird Provisions in San Francisco, which was the first restaurant to offer American dim sum to diners, inspired him to offer this same service to Salt Lake diners. Right now, SLC Eatery is rotating three or four items per night, with plans to expand that to six to twelve items as they get busier. The cart give the chefs an outlet to express their culinary creativity on a daily basis and avoid the funk that tends to happen when offering just a static menu.

Culinarily, Salt Lake has generally been at least two years behind the more culinarily-daring parts of the country, but Chamberlain feels like that gap is shrinking. According to him, they could never have done a project like SLC Eatery in the past.

“We never could have done this ten years ago. Like Forage, they tried doing something completely different for people, but it had to have been so hard getting people into their place without having the kind of dining hype that is in the city now…I think the dining scene is ready for something that’s going to be a bit different. We really want to be as comfortable as possible with the cart, but we want to give a different experience than the tapas craze, for example.”

You will find some hints of molecular gastronomy. They have an anti-griddle that they use to freeze yogurt, among other items, and you will find some foams on your plate, but these items are complementary and additive to the experience and do not distract from the overall goal of the plate. Lecithin is used in the tamalito crema to give the cream more structure and improve the mouthfeel. As they settle in, they plan to start playing around more with gels and spheres. Liquid nitrogen is also in the plans, but requires city approvals. The goal is to not be a molecular gastronomy place, but utilize the techniques when it will be additive to the overall dish.

The cocktail program is on-point. I don’t drink alcohol, but I had a few drinks prepared sans-alcohol and the balance of flavors was spectacular. I particularly enjoyed the Beetlejuice, which has gin, clarified beet purée, lemon, and fig and walnut bitters.

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SLCeats by Ryan Kendrick - 5M ago

Santo Tacos sits in a nondescript building with strip-mall vibes. It’s in an odd part of town: north of the fair park, and right off the 1000 North exit of I-15. If you’re not looking for it, you’d likely miss it, camouflaged in with the barber shop, smoke shop, and quick stop convenience store.

The interior is light and bright, and is set up quick-service style. Signs point diners to the various locations along the line to order (“tacos order here,” “nachos order here,” etc.). The staff is busy, grilling various meats and building orders. Their menu states “tortillas recien hechas” (fresh-made tortillas), and that isn’t just lip-service: one employee stays busy full-time making the masa, putting it into the tortilla press, and bagging up for service.

The menu is clean and simple. Almost In-N-Outesque. You have your choice of tacos, quesadillas, mulitas (quesadilla made from corn tortillas), asada fries, nachos, and burritos. Pretty simple. The fun begins once you notice the amount of meat choices you have: I counted sixteen different choices, with three of them vegetarian. The more adventurous diners may gravitate towards their tacos de cabeza (head meat tacos), tripa (tripe), and lengua (tongue), leaving carnitas, carne asada, grilled chicken, and brisket to everyone else. Sadly, when I arrived, they were still putting together the al pastor spit for the day, so I was unable to try it. However, I am sure that this impressive rotating mound of meat, rotating on a vertical spit and shaved off to order, will be the star of the show. I can’t wait to go back and try it out.

I tried the chicken mole taco, carne asada, and the carnitas. The mole is made by Puebla, Mexico native Agustina, who has been making mole from the age of 6, and learned the craft from her grandmother. The dark, rich, chocolately flavor is exactly what you would expect from a mole Poblano. The carne asada wall well-cooked, tender, and had a nice “right off the grill” smokiness. Carnitas were a bit dry, and not as tender as I generally expect carnitas to be, but were easily fixed up with the addition of some pickled onions and salsa. Santo Tacos understands the importance of presentation, and the impact it can have on a diner’s overall experience. I was blown away by the beauty of what is typically a pretty plain three-taco plate. Other nearby diners’ meals looked just as impressive. Accompany your meal with some chips and salsa, fresh-made guacamole, or some rice and beans. Beverages offered include various aguas frescas, bottled sodas, fountain sodas. Finish your meal with a milkshake or a café con leche.

Prices are fair, with tacos between $2 and $2.50, meat-filled quesadillas at $6, and burritos at $8. For $6 I filled up with three tacos. Definitely a fair price, especially considering these are essentially street-cart prices with the added overhead of brick and mortar.

Alfonso Brito, the owner, can be seen running the register, mopping the floors, and saying hi to guests. After I had paid, he asked me if my toddler wanted to eat some rice, and proceeded to dish her out an adult-sized portion of rice (not the size of an adult, just what an adult would eat). He is warm and affable, and his enthusiasm for his restaurant shines through. What was once a food cart, then a food truck, has now blossomed into a full-fledged restaurant. To celebrate the new restaurant, they are hosting a grand opening on February 15th, featuring free tacos and a mariachi band.

Santo Taco
910 N 900 West, Salt Lake City
(801) 893-4000

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SLCeats by Ryan Kendrick - 5M ago

Pork is the unsung hero of the protein world. It’s inexpensive, delicious, and accessible. I’ve been following a low-carb diet for the past six months or so, and have utilized Carolyn Ketchum’s cookbook Easy Keto Dinners for the majority of my meals. They are easy to prepare and delicious, and even if you’re not doing the keto thing, but still want to cut some carbs, this cookbook is a great resource. The following recipe is adapted from her book.

In my version I cook the pork sous-vide, but if you don’t have a sous-vide, you can roast the tenderloin in a 450 degree oven until internal temperature of the meat reads 145 degrees. That said, I’d highly recommend looking into a sous-vide cooker (my preference is the Anova Bluetooth & Wifi model. They are fairly inexpensive and have completely changed the way I prep and cook meat, which comes out perfectly cooked every single time.

  • 1/4 cup avocado or olive oil
  • 4 cloves minced garlic
  • 4 tablespoons dried rosemary
  • 3 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons Kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • Two 1-pound pork tenderloins
  • 2 tablespoons chicken stock
  • 2 tablespoons butter

Whisk together the oil, garlic, rosemary, mustard, salt, and pepper. If cooking sous vide, place the tenderloins in separate Ziploc or vacuum-seal bags. Put half of the liquid in each bag and agitate to mix and cover the pork. If roasting, pat the tenderloins dry, place them in a large baking pan, and cover with the liquid. Roast the pork for about 20-25 minutes, or until the pork internal temperature reads 145 degrees. Remove from oven, let rest 10 minutes, then slice and serve. While resting, add chicken stock, butter and salt and pepper to taste to the pan juices and whisk to combine to create a sauce.

If cooking sous vide, cook the pork at 145 degrees for 1.5 to 2 hours. Once cooked, remove the pork (reserve the liquid from the bags), pat dry, and sear the meat in a ripping hot (500-600 degrees if possible) cast iron pan or grill. Allow meat to rest.

In the cast iron pan, reduce temperature to low, put the reserved liquid in, add chicken stock or water and 2 tablespoons of butter, whisk to combine and allow to cook down while the pork rests, about 5-10 minutes. Add salt and pepper to the sauce to taste.

Serve pork alongside rice or mashed potatoes. I serve mine with riced cauliflower.

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SLCeats by Ryan Kendrick - 5M ago
Image courtesy Seabird

“Bar” and “Draper” aren’t two words you’ll usually hear in the same sentence. But Josh Rosenthal, founder of La Barba Coffee, has made it a bit more common now.

Josh and his partners have opened up Seabird Bar & Vinyl Lounge–a different take on your usual bar. You won’t see any TV’s on the wall playing football, and Affliction shirts and bedazzled mens’ jeans will probably be kept to a minimum as well (who am I kidding; this is Draper so bring on the leased BMW’s and decorated jeans!). This bar features handmade furniture from local carpenter Salted Grain. Vinyl records selected from a huge collection displayed on the wall are played through beautiful speaker boxes, and the dark walls and light wood all provide nice contrasts to create an open and welcoming area to hang out, enjoy some craft cocktails, craft beer, and small plates.

Seabird Bar is located above the La Barba coffee shop in Draper, and is open from 5pm-12am seven days a week.

The second Seabird Bar is slated to open at The Gateway later this year.

13811 Sprague Lane, Draper.

seabirdutah.com

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SLCeats by Ryan Kendrick - 5M ago
Derek Kitchen and Moudi Sbeity of Laziz Kitchen

As you may have seen on social media, Guy Fieri and his hit show “Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives” recently passed through Utah, stopping at Hruska’s Kolaches, Proper Burger, and Laziz Kitchen. The Laziz episode airs Friday February 8th, and Laziz is hosting a party to celebrate. Tickets are $45.

From their Facebook Event page:

We will be hosting a private watch party on Friday February 8th from 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm. Join us for sips, a small plate supper and to watch the episode LIVE with us at 7:00 pm!

Price Includes: Prix Fixe Buffet & Beer or Wine* + All The Salt Lake Foodie Community You Can Handle!

Menu:

Our famous hummus

*New* Featured Beet Dip

Lebanese Salad

Potato Kibbeh Bites

House-made Falafel,

Chicken Fajita Strips

Lebanese Rice

Selection of Beer or Wine (one per person, additonal drinks avalible for purchase)

Options include a good mix of food that is vegan, vegetarian and flexitarian friendly!

Tickets are limited and will sell out in advance – so be sure to purchase ASAP as we will be closed for the evening and entry will not be permitted without an RSVP for the prix fixe meal. Click the “Get Tickets” Button to purchase now!

FAQs

Are there ID or minimum age requirements to enter the event?

* Guests MUST be over 21 to attend and all attendees must have a valid photo ID to enter. Guests without photo ID will be turned away at the door.

What are my transportation/parking options for getting to and from the event?

Parking is limited to street parking at Laziz Kitchen – we strongly suggest that you take public transportation or a ride share.

What’s the refund policy?

Do to the limited nature of this event, we are not able to offer refunds after 7 days from event date.

Do I have to bring my printed ticket to the event?

You do not – we will have a list at check in. However, do bring a photo ID – you will not be admitted without it or if you are under 21.

For more info go to their event page here.

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SLCeats by Ryan Kendrick - 5M ago

Hoof & Vine is offering a dinner for two for $100, which includes a starter to share, salad course, a steak flight featuring a 44 Farms bavette, C.A.B. tenderloin, and Piedmontese top sirloin. Dessert is a chocolate caramel tart. Optional wine pairing is $50 per guest. Give them a call at (801) 569-4645 or online at hoofandvine.com

Tin Angel is offering a four course dinner, with one of the courses served in the dark. This special menu will run 2/14-2/16 and is $50 per person and $25 for a four-course specialty wine and cocktail pairing.

Pago is offering an $85 per person tasting menu, with an optional $40 wine pairing. Tax and gratuity not included. See menu below.

pago vday 2019

Laziz Kitchen just rolled out a brand-new menu two weeks ago so there won’t be any special entreés on Valentine’s Day. But there will be a special dessert.

Hearth and Hill in Park City will be offering a special molten lava chocolate cake with fresh strawberries, in addition to their regular menu.

Avenues Proper:

The Copper Onion will be offering the following menu (subject to change):

Baked Oysters – Leek Soubise, Pancetta Breadcrumbs
Celeriac Risotto – Sottocenere, Shaved Truffle
Whole Roasted Branzino – Shiso & Blood Orange Kosho, Red Coconut Broth, Bok Choy, King Trumpet Mushrooms
Almond Milk Tres Leches – Dried & Fresh Strawberries, White Chocolate, Pistachio
Stanza Italian Bistro & Wine Bar is offering the following menu beginning at 5pm on 2/14
Current Fish & Oyster is offering a special menu, including an apple and fennel salad, clam chowder, local burrata, shrimp cocktail, grilled calamari, Double R Ranch New York steak, lobster tail, and pan roasted scallops. Prices weren’t provided.
SLC Eatery is offering a prix fixe menu. Menu below.
Table X
Table X will be offering a seven-course tasting menu for $85 per person. Wine pairing an additional $35 per person. Non-alcoholic beverage pairing $20 per person. To make a reservation go to tablexrestaurant.com
Pallet
Pallet is all booked up, but has some bar seating available. Seven course tasting menu for $65, with an optional $35 beverage pairing.

Park City/Deer Valley Offerings:

BLIND DOG

Park City’s famed destination for inventive American meat, seafood and sushi will be open Valentine’s Day and serving its regular award-winning menu.

 BUTCHER’S CHOP HOUSE

Share a delectable three-course prix fixe at this favorite steakhouse on Main Street. Start with a choice of beet salad or soup, followed by filet mignon, buffalo filet or mahi-mahi. Lobster tail or king crab legs can be added to any entrée. Dessert is a classic shared chocolate molten cake with vanilla ice cream. $89 per couple. 

DEER VALLEY GROCERY~CAFÉ

For Valentines enjoying the holiday at home, Deer Valley’s go-to spot for gourmet delights is spicing up the holiday with Indian-spiced Wagyu beef, featuring seared Wagyu beef sirloin with curried cashew sauce, fresh cilantro, pine nut and fig couscous, and roasted butternut squash. $15.75.

 ELEMENT KITCHEN & BAKERY

Park City’s culinary concierge is offering a pair of specials sure to delight for those celebrating Valentine’s Day at home: Between Feb. 11-16, enjoy smoked “salmon” pistou (smoked steelhead trout, served in a light, brothy soup with a creamy texture and flavor reminiscent of pesto). The dish is gluten-free and kosher. Also take home a Sweetheart Bakery Box, featuring a slice of coconut almond gooey butter cake, two mini chocolate cupcakes with pink vanilla buttercream, and two mini heart-shaped cookies.  Not only can you enjoy these items at home but you can dine in at the Element Kitchen & Bakery Café.

GRUB STEAK

The locals-favorite steakhouse is serving a prix-fixe for two that’s sure to delight. Start with a choice of baby romaine Caesar salad, wild rice and mushroom soup, or Grub Steak’s famed salad bar, followed by coffee-rubbed New York steak with crème fraiche. For dinner, enjoy a classic chocolate lava cake with fresh raspberries and vanilla ice cream. $47.75 per person.

POWDER AT WALDORF ASTORIA PARK CITY

Modern mountain-inspired seasonal fare is on offer this Valentine’s Day at Powder. Enjoy a three-course prix fixe starting with a choice of oysters on the half shell, wagyu bavette tatakem or organic frisee and mizuna. After a champagne intermezzo, enjoy a choice of grilled swordfish, rack of lamb or New York steak, followed by passion fruit mousse for dessert. $69 per person.

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE

The steakhouse will be open for Valentine’s Day serving its popular regular menu. Seating begins at 3 p.m., making it a perfect destination for a romantic apres-ski date, or a can’t-miss dinner date.

SHABU

Park City’s home for refined Japanese fare is open serving its regular, raved-about menu on Valentine’s Day. Enjoy a range of selections, including plenty plates to share, such as sushi, shabu-shabu and sake, plus nightly specials.

VERSANTE HEARTH+BAR

This Italian destination is serving its raved-about menu plus a selection of specials including steak and lobster with Brussels sprouts and fingerling potatoes; porchetta with creamy polenta and olive tapenade, and Versante scallops with parsnip puree and pomegranate reduction. Each special also comes with a complimentary chocolate-dipped strawberry. A trio of specials at the bar will also be on offer: Old Town Cellars rose, a candy cane martini, and the Utah Royale cocktail with prosecco and Chambord.

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