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Silvania | Peru Art Blog by Georgia Kirkpatrick - 1y ago

Among the postcards: a clipping from El Comercio about Silvania when my mamama closed her Miraflores shop in 2004. I was with her in Lima when they wrote the article, feeling my first sparks of inspiration not to let Silvania go.

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Three sizes.  Four colors.  All made with beautiful, durable, sustainable cork.
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Two years ago, my auntie Adriana traveled to Portugal and brought me back a cork purse. I had never heard of “cork fabric” and was quite delighted by it. My purse feels like leather, but it is made from the bark of cork trees in Portugal. Cork is harvested by periodically separating the bark from the tree without causing permanent damage to the tree. Yeah, the tree is left standing. I had no idea. The thing that surprises me most about my cork purse is how durable it is. I have uncorked more than my fair share of wine bottles, and those bottle corks break all the time. My cork purse is a different story. After using it for well over a year, it looks as good as new. Oh, and it’s waterproof.



I recently took to the internet to find a cork fabric distributor in Portugal, and just yesterday this lovely cork fabric landed in my sewing studio. I’ll start by making wristlet purses, which I will post photos of in the next few weeks. I would love to get your feedback on them.

Trunk Show at Union Rose
For those of you in Portland, please join Union Rose owner Rita Hudson-Evalt and me. We will serve bubbly and snacks while you shop the upcoming Silvania cork purse collection, the spring/summer dress collection, and take an extra 10% off the Union Rose sales rack.
Friday, June 15th
4pm - 7pm
7909 SE Stark St, Portland, OR 97215
Please RSVP here: facebook.com/events/615276355474711/

For those of you outside of Portland, find updates on new products in my upcoming blog posts, sign up for my newsletter (https://silvaniaperu.com/pages/newsletter) and by following me on social media.
Facebook: facebook.com/silvaniaperu/
Instagram: instagram.com/silvaniaperu/
Twitter: twitter.com/silvaniaperu
Pinterest: pinterest.com/silvaniaperu/

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Silvania | Peru Art Blog by Georgia Kirkpatrick - 1y ago
Nine years ago, newly graduated from college with a biology degree and an amateur interest in fashion, I traveled to Peru.  I had spent the previous four years preparing to enter the workforce in the field of environmental conservation and community development, though I had not figured out exactly how to do that.
Then, my junior year, it hit me.  My grandmother had become one of my closest friends in my teenage years, and now, heartbreakingly, she was suffering from a fatal illness.  I flew across the Atlantic a few times that year to be near her, and the rest of the time, she was on my mind a lot.  I had grown up wearing the fabrics she designed, printed in her workshop in Peru, and sewn into dresses and blouses for me.  Now, about to take the leap into my own career, and thinking so much of my grandmother, I  considered her fabrics as a means to do the conservation and development work I longed to do.
I spent my next couple of summer breaks researching the environmental and social impact of cotton farming in Peru, and found huge potential to improve the lives of farmers by supporting them in organic farming practices.  I only talked with my grandmother once about my ambitions to revive her business using organic pima cotton from the farmers of northern Peru.  She passed away a few months later.
When I graduated from college, I had spent two years reading reports on the environmental problems with cotton.  Despite all the problematic pesticides, I fell in love with this crop that, as I devised, could be instrumental in helping subsistence farmers in Peru out of poverty.  I had become a walking organic cotton evangelist to friends and family.  I was ready to devote my life to fixing the myriad of problems in the cotton supply chain in Peru, and I was thrilled about career path I had dreamed up: I would revive my grandmother's fabric business, source organic cotton for my products, grow my business until it was booming, and then I would influence the rest of the Peruvian fashion industry (and then the world!) that clothing production could take care of every person and place in the supply chain.
The first step in implementing this highly probable plan, I decided, was to get myself to a Peruvian cotton farm to better understand the problems I was setting out to solve.  So I wrote a few emails and landed an internship.  With the financial support of my generous parents, I bought a plane ticket and a few hundred plastic viles.  Halfway through the internship, I wrote home with a report.  Here it is, from May 20, 2009:
1. Abstract
I’ve been in Chiclayo for just over a week now on the first of two fieldwork trips to compare post-harvest soil conditions in organic and conventional cotton farms. I’m working with an organization called Textile Exchange which is based in a small town in Texas and works in the US, South America, western Africa, India, and Europe to promote organic cotton. The South America office is in Lima (Peru being the most important organic cotton producer on the continent, woot) and I’m working with its director, Alfonso, to carry out this project. It isn’t quite an internship because I’m doing a lot of it on my own, and it certainly isn’t a job because I’m not getting paid. It’s voluntary research and an important part of my education as a sustainable fashionista wannabe.
2. Introduction
Chiclayo is a small city on the north coast of Peru. I would call it a small version of Lima – modern, a fair bit of cultural and economic diversity, not quite beautiful but certainly pleasant. I’ve mostly only seen the city during the night. The past week I’ve left early in the morning every day for an agricultural suburb called Mórrope, a town named after the “murrup, murrup” sound the lizards here make.
On the corner of the pretty plaza (crowned in its center with a sculpture with four large lizards) is the office of APAEM, Asociacion de Productores de Algodón Ecologico Murrup or the association of organic cotton producers of Murrup. This is where I meet Aldo, technically my assistant even though he is older than I am and has a lot more experience in post-grad research than I do, not to mention knowing every cotton farmer in the area and a heck of a lot more about cotton. He also has a shiny red motorcycle.
We studied five cotton farms, each with a hectare to five hectares of del cerro cotton (a shorter staple variety), and each with a friendly farmer and his lovely family. First was Lino, an 84-year-old man who helped me install insect traps along with his 10 year old great granddaughter.
Then we went to Felipe’s farm, a conventional farm that grows pima cotton (long staple and lovely). Then we went to visit Rodolfo’s farm. Rodolfo grew up on the outskirts of Mórrope, just like most of his farming neighbors, but unlike his neighbors he is inspiringly progressive. He and his wife, Natividad, have three sons – an unusually small number of children (most farmer families here have upwards of six kids) – because they wanted them to have a good education.
Rodolfo is the president of APAEM and has traveled to Brazil and Portugal while most of his neighbors haven’t been to Lima. Arnaldo’s farm is the fourth we studied. Arnaldo is the next-door neighbor and brother of Rodolfo. Last we went to Rogelio’s farm where Rogelio’s wife, Digna, grows her own crop of native colored cottons and wove them into my new favorite coin purse.
3. Methods
Alfonso and I flew up to Chiclayo together last Monday. When I got to the airport gate I looked for him but didn’t see him. I boarded the plane and sat down and then realized that he had called me on my cell phone. I called him back and he picked up. Alfonso: “Hi, are you at the airport?”, me “yes, I’m on the plane”, Alfonso:“what? Is it leaving at six?”, me: “No it’s leaving at 4:55”. He was the last one on the plane. Being a hopelessly tardy person from a family of unpunctual people (except you, Dad), I couldn’t help but like his lateness. Once we arrived to Chiclayo we became equipment-shopping, breakfast companions, and dinner buddies. Here’s what we talked about during the hours we spent together: COTTON. The farmers, the economics, the fashion trends, the everything everything everything about COTTON. In other words, it was perfect. I admit that Alfonso can talk quite a bit and when keeping up with translating required too much energy at the end of a long day romping around in farms under the sun, there was a lot of smiling and nodding and knowing sounding “ahs”, “uhs”, and “mmmms”. I wonder how much wisdom I missed out on while I zoned out.
We met every morning for breakfast to eat breakfast and took a crowded combi to Mórrope. We would inevitably get to the APAEM office late and a punctual Aldo and the lovely Onelia, the secretary, would greet us. I would load up my arms with buckets and bags of plastic cups, medicinal alcohol, and raw fish, and hop on to the back of the bike looking like an ekeko. We would get to the farm and get to work setting up our insect traps, taking a survey of weeds, and sifting through dirt for worms. Then I would do an interview with the farmers and map out the farm. Alfonso told me that no one from out of town ever comes to the farms here so they were thrilled to have me doing a study there. I could tell. The farmers and their children dropped their work at home or in the fields to do hard and tedious work with me, digging and counting weeds. They were wonderfully welcoming.
The farms were beautiful. From a hot ride under the equatorial sun and a dusty red-brown road that reminded me of arid Kenya I’d enter a green farm with carob and guavo trees and green fields of cotton and corn. There were little red-and-black birds, egrets, bright-blue-cheeked lizards, piglets, donkeys, cows, horses, and turkeys. There was never a cloud in the sky and the sun was very hot.
4. Results
Aldo didn’t enjoy the work as much as I did. He would hurry through the set-up and collection of the traps. I was always running after him and he was always doing something not-quite-right. He got annoyed with me when I stopped to take notes, draw maps, make sure that we had collected every last speck of a bug. After Alfonso left for Lima, Aldo became extremely mumbly (Aldo: “Mumble, mumble”, me: “what?”, Aldo: “mumble”, me: “what?”, Aldo “aha, let’s go”). It got really stressful and I resented that he was raining on my limited time in the cotton fields of Mórrope. Near the end I was about ready to ask him to leave me alone, but I needed that shiny red bike to get around. At last, he got rid of himself for me by saying he had some emergency situation and could no longer help me. What a relief. I finished the collections with a mototaxi and the lovely Onelia who was much more pleasant and peered into every collection jar to see what we had caught. TONS OF FABULOUS, BEAUTFUL INSECTS! And three rats and a lizard! I’m shipping them back to Lima for identification.
5. Discussion
I spent my last day in Mórrope yesterday. I said goodbye to Lino, Felipe, Rodolfo, Arnaldo, Rogelio and waved goodbye to Onelia at the APAEM office. I am anxious to leave my hotel room filled with multi-colored tupperwares of alcohol-soaked arthropods and go see the pyramids of Túcume and get back to Lima to be in the lab with my bugs! Before I get to start identification I have to go to Chincha and do the whole thing over again.
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Silvania | Peru Art Blog by Georgia Kirkpatrick - 1y ago
When I design a new collection, I think of the inspiring women in my life. I think of my friends, my idols, my mom, and the women in my family. As I picture each woman, I wonder what kind of style would flatter her body; which features does she like to accentuate? What does her lifestyle demand from her clothing? What details might make her life easier?
 
 
I draft the clothing patterns myself and sew prototypes to check the design. I usually create three to six prototypes to get the fit just right. Then I select one of my grandmother’s fabric prints, and then a color combination. My aim is to not only choose beautiful prints in vibrant colors, but to create palettes that will flatter a variety of skin tones.
 
 
My biggest inspirations are real women who I admire, many of whom are at the peak of their careers, some are mothers, and quite a few are frequent travelers. The greatest thing about fashion, to me, is the power of clothing to make us feel confident and comfortable. Before I began designing my own clothing, I was constantly on the hunt for that rare dress that I could throw on and instantly feel great about how I looked. These are the dresses I now strive to design, to make strong women feel even stronger.
Qualities of Silvania Dresses
1. Classic silhouettes designed to flatter
Our dresses are designed to complement a range of body shapes.
 
2. Made to go from work to play
Our styles are cut to be office appropriate, yet they are festive enough for a night out on the town. Our fabrics are durable and easy to wash, so go ahead and wear them while you play with kids and pets.
 
3. Exceptionally comfortable
Not only do we use some of the softest cotton you can find, our interlock has stretch, so you will never be pinched, squeezed, or rubbed the wrong way.
 
4. Ideal for travel
Our organic pima cotton interlock is naturally wrinkle-resistent. Pull your dress out of your suitcase, shake it out, and put it on.
 
5. The highest quality materials and construction
Pima cotton is renowned for softness, luster, and durability. We print our organic pima cotton fabrics with long-lasting dyes that won’t fade in the wash.
 
6. Easy to launder
Our 100% organic pima cotton dresses are low-maintenance. Go ahead and toss them in the washing machine. Our fabrics are preshrunk (although excessive heat from the dryer can still cause some shrinking – use the cool setting or hang dry!). They are also iron-friendly, but I doubt you’ll need it.
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Silvania | Peru Art Blog by Georgia Kirkpatrick - 1y ago

I unearthed this contact sheet in an old family photo album. That’s my mom and auntie with the book, the original Silvania fabric-printing workshop, and two fabrics designed by my grandmother, inspired by ancient Peruvian art.

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Celebrate spring with elegant new dresses that are so comfortable, they are sure to become new favorites.  This weekend only, take 10% off the entire collection of dresses.  Use the code springweekend at checkout this Friday through Sunday.  Click here to shop the spring dress collection.




This true wrap dress is ultra-flattering.  The ruched skirts overlap generously to keep you covered while walking in the wind or twirling on the dance floor.  Long sleeves.  Ample side-seam pockets.  Available in forest green/cream (click here), purple/red pasto print (click here), and blue/light green pasto print (click here).

The pima cotton plant has extra-long cotton fibers, which create softer, more durable fabric.  This dress will not only feel silky against your skin, it will resist pilling and wear, wash after wash.  Printed with fiber-reactive dyes, the colors of this dress will stay vibrant throughout the years.


Silvania's spring 2018 dresses were sewn in a small, family-owned garment factory in Lima.  Georgia visited the factory regularly throughout product development and production, and was always welcomed to visit with workers as they sewed Silvania products.  This small factory has safe working conditions, offers fair pay, and never exploits child labor.
 



The original Silvania print, "fauna de la costa" means "fauna of the coast".  Silvia, Silvania's founder, was inspired by depictions of shore birds, fish, and frogs by the Chancay culture.  The Chancay culture was active on the central coast of Peru, near Lima, around 1000 - 1470 CE.
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My sweetie and I found this lovely boutique hotel, Garlands Del Río, in Puerto Vallarta last month. My bodycon dress from the new collection was a champ. It came out of my suitcase virtually wrinkle-free, I wore it to a wedding, and then stayed cool at a rustic beachside bar...admittedly, with the help of a margarita. It is 100% organic pima cotton, so it is *very* soft, breathable, and washable.

 

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Silvania | Peru Art Blog by Georgia Kirkpatrick - 1y ago
I spent the past week carrying this wristlet clutch around. Even better than the compliments was liberating my shoulders from my heavy purse! Here’s what’s in mine: cash and cards in the internal pockets, my phone, my keys, a pen, a compact mirror, lipstick, my business card case, a little coin purse, and a couple tissues. This little guy easily fits it all.
Follow me at  @silvaniaperu:
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I have been insistent that we print our clothing fabrics with fiber-reactive dyes instead of inks, even though dyes are more expensive and it is harder to find factories that print with dyes. Why do I bother? Ink sits on top of fabric, and can fade with washes. Dyes chemically bond to cotton fibers, meaning the clothes we make will not fade, and the dyes will in no way mask the softness of our pima cotton. I am maintaining my grandmother's quality standards from early Silvania.

Follow me on facebook, instagram, twitter, and pinterest @silvaniaperu

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