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Are you a fan of a toasted bagel smeared with cream cheese and draped with lox? Or what about a breakfast frittata or quiche filled with eggs, cheese, asparagus, and smoked salmon? Maybe you’ve enjoyed a toast point with just a small, savory slice of gravlax and a fresh sprig of dill? Before we continue, let’s agree that the above meals are delicious and that, yes please, we’ll have another. Now let’s agree that we all love the smoky, buttery, and rich flavor of smoked salmon… and lox… and gravlax. And we haven’t even mentioned pastrami salmon!

While their flavor profiles are similar, there are several key differences that distinguish these smoked seafood selections. Let’s explore the contrasts among smoked salmon, lox, gravlax, and pastrami salmon including how they’re made and what meal preparations are better suited for each smoked seafood fish variety. We’ll also share a handful of links to our favorite recipes that feature smoked seafood.

Are you as fired up as we are to talk about smoked fish?

Smoked Salmon
Lox
Gravlax
Pastrami Salmon
Smoked Salmon Recipes

Smoked Salmon

Smoked salmon is a term that is commonly used to describe any preparation of smoked or cured salmon including lox and gravlax, any part of the salmon including fillet or belly, and any type of salmon – wild or farmed, Atlantic or Pacific. In other words, “smoked salmon” is a pretty global term.

Let’s start by narrowing it down to hot-smoked and cold-smoked salmon.

Hot-smoked salmon is fully cooked in a smoker at a temperature ranging from 130°F to 180°F. Firm and flaky, it retains a smoky flavor that is preferred in hot dishes since it’s already cooked.

Cold-smoked salmon, on the other hand, is smoked at a lower temperature, typically 70°F to 85°F after being cured in salt. The resulting product is silky and smoky, and is best suited for cold dishes like salads or cold appetizers.

Lox

Is lox hot-smoked or cold-smoked? Neither. Made from the belly meat of a salmon, lox is actually never cooked but is, instead, cured in a salty brine mixture for several weeks. Compared to smoked salmon, lox is saltier with more of a raw texture, making it the perfect addition to a toasted bagel with cream cheese.

Nova lox, specifically, is made from Nova Scotian salmon that is cured then cold-smoked. Nova lovers value its saltiness and smokiness.

Gravlax

Like lox, gravlax is cured in a salt brine but, in the style of Scandinavian tradition, is seasoned with dill, salt, and sugar. Some gravlax preparations include horseradish, white peppercorns, juniper berries, and even aquavit!

As you’d expect from the ingredient list, gravlax has a strong flavor. Its dry texture makes it suitable for many recipes, including cold on crackers or just sliced plain onto a cold plate.

Pastrami Salmon

If you are a fan of deli pastrami, you’ll love pastrami salmon. Featuring pastrami’s traditional blend of herbs and spices, pastrami salmon can be prepared from smoked salmon or from gravlax. Either way, it can be enjoyed any way that you would prepare traditional pastrami, including as a sandwich with rye bread, grainy mustard, and tangy sauerkraut.

Smoked Salmon Recipes

We’ve rounded up a few of our favorite recipes featuring cold-smoked salmon, lox, gravlax, and pastrami salmon. Enjoy!

Smoked Salmon & Spinach Salad

This recipe combines the silkiness of smoked salmon with the crunch of fresh cucumbers in a refreshing spinach salad. It’s an impressive addition to a potluck, too!




Gravlax with Dill Sauce and Toast

Let gravlax shine in this super easy appetizer recipe. It’s perfect for cocktail parties!



Pastrami Smoked Salmon & Rye Sandwich

If you love a classic pastrami sandwich, give this recipe for a pastrami smoked salmon sandwich a try. We guarantee it will up your sandwich game.



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Studies show that seafood is essential for childhood development and has numerous benefits for health and IQ growth in kids. So much so that experts are encouraging parents to introduce their kids to seafood because it's such a healthy choice.


A 2017 Pennsylvania School of Nursing study revealed that a steady diet of seafood advances a 9-11 year old’s IQ by five points more than kids who eat the usual proteins like red meat and chicken. And seafood-eating kids sleep better as well.

Now, a new report by the American Academy of Pediatrics reaffirms the considerable short- and long-term, positive health and enhanced IQ benefits when children eat seafood. Namely, the report suggests seafood consumption may improve infant neurodevelopment and decrease cardiovascular disease risk. It also indicates that introducing fish early in a child’s diet may help prevent autoimmune disorders such as asthma and eczema.

But, the study goes on to note that child consumption of seafood has declined every year since 2007. It seems parents resist introducing their kids to seafood for a number of reasons:

  1. Having not been raised on seafood themselves, some parents aren’t fond of seafood and therefore don’t introduce it to their children.
  2. Concerns about possible mercury contaminants in seafood have led some parents to avoid serving seafood to their families at all, without considering the possible health benefits their children may be missing out on by avoiding it.
  3. Some parents are concerned about the sustainability of seafood, and opt out of seafood dishes for their family – even though there are sustainable options on the market.

The study’s authors assert that it’s important for parents to embrace the benefits of seafood for their family’s health. With regard to mercury, Aaron Bernstein, the AAP study’s lead author, says for most types of fish, “the benefits far outweigh the risks.”

“For families who eat meat, fish should be a welcome part of a child’s diet,” he said. “We’re encouraging pediatricians to ask families about fish and shellfish consumption – since most children don’t eat much beyond the occasional fish sticks – and advise them on the healthiest choices.”

Families can address sustainability concerns by choosing seafood wisely, like looking for NOAA-certified seafood, or choosing species that are marked as Monterey Bay Seafood Watch Sustainable Choices.

Shopping for tasty, sustainable seafood for parents and kids alike used to be an impossible task. But FultonFishMarket.com delivers trusted, safe and fresh seafood options to our customers. Our curated selection of fresh and sustainable seafood is sure to delight both grown-ups and kids alike.

So do yourself AND your kids a favor and add a couple of fresh, delicious seafood meals per week to your schedule, and have it delivered direct to your door!

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Whether it's a backyard barbeque or a picnic under the fireworks, the Fourth of July is all about celebrating independence with good friends and great food. Sure, you can expect hamburgers, hot dogs, and pasta salad to make an appearance on the buffet table, but why not try a tasty new summertime recipe featuring fresh seafood?

We know how to make seafood an integral part of any and every celebration. That's why we've rounded up some of our favorite seafood dip recipes that not only taste good but are easy to make. From briny clam dip to hot crab dip, your fellow Fourth of July partygoers won't make it past the appetizer section of the buffet table when they savor these superstars!


With delicious, fresh seafood to enjoy in our favorite dip recipes, you can spend less time in the kitchen and more time celebrating the Fourth of July with friends and family. These dip recipes will have everyone celebrating the red, white, and blue the Fulton Fresh way! Here are a few of our favorite seafood dip recipes:

Hot Crab Dip
Avocado Shrimp Salsa
Hot Crab and Oyster Dip
Lobster Guacamole
Clam Dip with Cream Cheese

Hot Crab Dip

This recipe for hot crab dip is so good that we wouldn't be surprised if it didn't make it out of the kitchen to your summer celebration… It might be just too good to share.

Jumbo lump crabmeat is combined with pepper jack and parmesan cheeses in this dip recipe. The creamy texture comes from mayonnaise – not cream cheese – which makes for a lighter dip that we recommend serving hot with crackers. Don't be shy with the hot sauce either!

Our jumbo lump crabmeat is perfect for this recipe because it's already picked clean of shells and cartilage, so all you have to do is savor the whole, large lumps of sweet crabmeat.

Avocado Shrimp Salsa

When you think of seafood dips, you probably think of cream cheese-based recipes. But since salsa can be eaten with a chip or a cracker, just like creamy dips, we're happy to share this incredible recipe for avocado shrimp salsa! This recipe is nothing but refreshing on hot, humid summer days since it features fresh vegetables like tomatoes, avocado, cucumber and fresh shrimp. A good kick of flavor comes from the cilantro and diced jalapeno peppers, so feel free to adjust to your liking.

Need shrimp? We've got fresh shrimp ready for home delivery that will make this recipe taste as dazzling as those Fourth of July fireworks are bright!

Hot Crab and Oyster Dip

Yes, we're including another crab dip: Hot crab and oyster dip. We can't resist! Get ready for this recipe, seafood lovers. It's hot, it's creamy, and it's got crab, oysters, cheese, and crème fraiche. It's a potluck pick for those of you want to bring some luxury to your Fourth of July fête, and sure, a little goes a long way but we recommend you indulge.

This recipe is also a great introduction to oysters for newcomers. For those of you who may not have experienced the joy of eating a raw oyster, this recipe bakes them into a hot and bubbling masterpiece.

Get a head start on this recipe with our jumbo lump crabmeat and shucked Atlantic oysters. They're convenient and delicious.

Lobster Guacamole

There are many ways to enjoy fresh lobster in the summer – boiled, grilled, or baked, just to name a few. But how about trying lobster in a dip?

This lobster guacamole is quick and easy to prepare, and it's destined to be the hit of the party. Featuring fresh lobster meat and a variety of fresh vegetables, chopped cilantro and minced chiles give this guacamole recipe a spicy kick.

We offer a variety of lobster, from lobster tails to live lobster, but if you're looking for convenience, our frozen cooked lobster meat will make this recipe a snap. You can mix any leftover lobster meat into scrambled eggs for a luxe brunch, too.

Clam Dip with Cream Cheese

This savory clam dip with cream cheese is definitely not short on flavor. Briny clams are blended with cream cheese, Tabasco, and lemon juice for an irresistible and easy party appetizer.

While this recipe calls for minced clams, we recommend upping your game with littleneck clams. Because of their small size, littlenecks are less firm than other clam varieties, which makes them a tender addition to creamy dips. Approximately a dozen littleneck clams equals a small can of chopped clams.

Our littleneck clams are always fresh and ready for delivery from dock to door. Any leftover clams that you don't use in your clam dip can go right onto the grill – shells and all! Just place them on a grill rack, cover, and grill until just open. Make sure you discard any that do not open.

What to Serve with Seafood Dips

These dip recipes all pair perfectly with tortilla chips, toast points, toasted pitas, bagel chips, and crudités like sliced cucumbers and carrot sticks. Let's honor the stars and stripes by bringing the most delicious seafood dips to your Independence Day gathering. We'd love to be invited to your Fourth of July celebration, but we'll settle for sending you some of the best seafood the oceans offer! Have a safe and happy Independence Day!

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What are scallops? Scallops are a popular seafood around the world, but many seafood lovers would not be able to tell you much about this remarkable sea creature. Here at FultonFishMarket.com, we know you are curious to try scallops. We’ve put together a primer: your one-stop-shop for all things scallop, including information on scallops as a species, types of scallops, scallop production information, and scallop nutrition information. Last but not least, we rounded up popular methods for cooking scallops. We are pleased to provide fresh, sustainably produced scallops with delivery right to your door.

What are scallops?
Types of Scallops
How are Scallops Produced?
Scallop Nutrition Information
How to Cook Scallops
Shop Fresh Scallops at FultonFishMarket.com 

What are scallops?

Scallops are a type of mollusk, the phylum (species category) that also includes clams, mussels, oysters, squid, octopus, snails, and sea slugs. Scallops have two hinged shells called bivalves which the scallop opens and closes using a large adductor muscle (called the scallop’s “scallop”) -- the white, meaty part of the scallop most easily recognizable on your dinner plate. (Scallops also have soft, red or white “roe” [egg masses] that is a popular delicacy.) The scallop uses its adductor muscle to swim by clapping its shells together quickly, propelling itself through the water! Scallops also have up to 100 eyes along their mantle which allow them to sense light, dark, and motion. Scallops eat by filtering algae, krill, plankton, and larvae from the water.

Types of Scallops

From a seafood chef’s perspective, there are two types of scallops: wet scallops and dry scallops. Wet scallops are aptly named; when they are harvested at sea, they are treated with a preservative solution of water and sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP). Often, wet scallops are then frozen. Conversely, dry scallops are not preserved in this manner.

Many chefs prefer dry scallops over wet scallops, because while the STPP retains wet scallops' moisture, it also impacts the scallops' taste and texture. The process of freezing scallops can also impact the texture if care is not taken in the thawing process. Conversely, dry (untreated) scallops retain a sweeter, fresher flavor.

That said, there is a "hack" chefs use when cooking wet scallops to enhance their flavor: just soak the scallops in a quart of cold water with ¼ cup lemon juice and two tablespoons of salt. Let the scallops soak for 30 minutes, and you'll likely be unable to tell the difference between wet and dry scallops.

How are Scallops Produced?

In the wild, scallops live in saltwater environments worldwide. In the US, there are two types of scallops sold as food: the Atlantic sea scallop (which is larger -- up to nine inches long -- and harvested from the Canadian border to the mid-Atlantic) and the Bay scallop (which is smaller and harvested along the coast from Florida to New Jersey). While scallops are farmed using sustainable aquaculture in locations all over the world, scallop farming is an emerging practice in the US which is gaining traction due to the environmental benefits of aquaculture over some wild-harvesting methods. FultonFishMarket.com carries both wild scallops (sustainably produced) and farmed scallops.

Scallop Nutrition Information

Three ounces of raw scallops contains the following:

  • Calories: 90
  • Fat: 0.5 g
    • Saturated fat: 0 g
    • Trans fat: 0 g
  • Cholesterol: 35 mg (12% Recommended Daily Value [RDV])
  • Sodium: 570 mg (24% RDV)
  • Carbs: 5 g (2%RDV)
  • Protein: 17 g
  • Vitamins A, C, D, and Calcium: 0% RDV
  • Iron: 2% RDV
  • Selenium: 25% RDV
How to Cook Scallops

In Western cuisine, there are two popular ways to cook scallops: sauteing and frying.

Sauteed Scallops
  • Total cook time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: 2 servings
  • Nutrition per serving:
    • Calories: 409
    • Fat: 25 g
    • Carbs: 7 g
    • Protein: 39 g
    • Cholesterol: 136 mg
    • Sodium: 530 mg
  • Equipment:
    • Medium saucepan
  • Ingredients:
    • 1 lb fresh scallops
    • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
    • ¼ cup butter
    • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • Steps:
    1. In the saucepan, melt the butter over medium-high heat
    2. .When the butter is melted, add the garlic and whole sprigs of rosemary. Then add the scallops.
    3. Cook the scallops over medium-high heat until they are done, flipping them over halfway through (ie. about two minutes on each side). The scallops will be opaque when fully cooked. If you want to brown the scallops, let them cook a bit longer on each side.
    4. When the scallops are finished cooking, discard the rosemary and serve your scallops. Enjoy!
Fried Scallops
  • Total cook time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 3 servings
  • Nutrition per serving:
    • Calories: 769
    • Fat: 31 g
    • Carbs: 85 g
    • Protein: 37 g
    • Cholesterol: 83 mg
    • Sodium: 1915 g
  • Equipment:
    • Large saucepan
    • Two large bowls
    • Large plate, lined with paper towels
  • Ingredients:
    • 12 large fresh scallops
    • 2 cups flour
    • 2 cups buttermilk
    • Olive oil for frying
    • ½ Tbsp salt
    • ½ Tbsp pepper
  • Steps:
    1. In the saucepan, heat the oil over high heat until it is hot.
    2. While the oil is heating, pour the buttermilk into one of the bowls. Set aside.
    3. In the other bowl, combine the flour, salt, and pepper.
    4. Dip each scallop first in the buttermilk, then in the flour mixture. Place the flour-coated scallops in the oil.
    5. Cook until the scallops are lightly browned and crispy (about 4 minutes).
    6. When the scallops are finished cooking, remove them from the saucepan and place on the paper-towel-coated plate to drain.
    7. Serve and enjoy!
Shop Fresh Scallops at FultonFishMarket.com

FultonFishMarket.com delivers fresh, sustainably-sourced scallops right to your door. Shop our online store for all your seafood needs.

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In honor of International Ceviche Day on June 28, FultonFishMarket.com would like to celebrate ceviche as the raw fish phenomenon it is. A Latin American dish steeped in tradition, traditional ceviche recipes feature raw fish or shellfish marinated in citrus -- typically lime or lemon juice. The dish has achieved worldwide popularity, giving rise to a vast plethora of ceviche recipes reflecting regional variations (and modern adaptations) of this time-honored delicacy. How did ceviche originate, and how does one go about preparing ceviche at home? Discover the origins of the ceviche dish and how it gained its romantic allure. We’ve also included three ceviche recipes expressing this dish’s versatility. Enjoy!

Origins of Ceviche
Enjoying Ceviche at Home
Ceviche Prep - Getting Started
Ceviche Recipes

Origins of Ceviche

The precise geographic origins of ceviche are both mysterious and hotly debated. Mythology runs rampant, with Incan emperors, Polynesian voyagers, and North African Moors all laying claim to the dish's invention, as legend has it. Whatever ceviche’s origin, modern Latin America prepares the dish with the full force of regional flair. (Ceviche is even modern-day Peru’s national dish!) Broadly speaking, Peruvian ceviche features citrus-chilli-marinated fish served with yam; Ecuadorian ceviche features lime-tomato marinated shrimp served with corn; Costa Rican ceviche features lime-vinegar marinated sea bass; and Mexican ceviche features a puree-style marinade with shrimp or tilapia served with tortillas.

Enjoying Ceviche at Home

In the US and internationally, seafood lovers enjoy ceviche and celebrate its unique characteristics: a unique flavor profile featuring fresh seafood, herbs, and vegetables, with flexible recipe options arising from regional differences in how ceviche is prepared. Moreover, for raw fish lovers, ceviche’s citrus-based flavor profile makes it an excellent alternative to the flavor profiles present in sushi recipes, for example. You’ll find options to experiment with in the recipes provided below.

Ceviche Recipes and Preparation

Part of ceviche’s appeal is its versatility. You can tweak the marinade ingredients, toppings, and the type of fish itself to achieve the flavor effect you’re looking for. We’ve pulled together some pro tips to help you prepare ceviche without a hitch.

Selecting Your Fish: Oily vs. Flaky

Ceviche recipes often call for fish that is either “oily” or “flaky.” Here is your cheat sheet to tell the difference:

Oily Fish:

Flaky Fish:

Selecting Your Flavor Profile: a Word on Ceviche vs. Poke

A word on semantics (in case you need to label your fish dish for a summer potluck): Although ceviche and a dish called poke have many similarities -- both feature raw, marinated fish served with toppings -- they are not identical dishes. Unlike ceviche, which has its roots in Latin America, poke finds its roots in the Hawaiian coast. Unlike ceviche, which features citrus flavors, poke typically features Asian-influenced flavors and ingredients. Poke and ceviche also differ in their preparation. In its traditional form, poke is chopped raw fish served with soy sauce, sesame oil, and green onions. Meanwhile, since ceviche features a citrus base, the citrus denatures the fish proteins, creating an acid-cooked effect that transforms the texture and taste of the fish.

Preparing Ceviche

Once you’ve selected your flavor profile, select the type of fish or shellfish that will maximize the flavors. If it’s your first time making ceviche, you might stick to following a recipe until you get a feel for making the dish. The following guidelines will keep your fish fresh and flavorful:

  • Storing raw seafood. Once your seafood delivery arrives, store it properly by keeping it refrigerated (at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or lower), preferably on ice. When refrigerated properly, seafood can keep for up to two days in the fridge.
  • Cleaning raw seafood. When you are ready to begin marinating the ceviche, remove the seafood from the refrigerator and clean it thoroughly under running water. Keep your hands, preparation area, and utensils clean, and avoid cross-contaminating other surfaces.
  • Marinating raw seafood. Marinate seafood in the fridge in a covered dish. Do not save the ceviche marinade for future use, since it is contaminated with raw seafood juices. Be sure to thoroughly wash the marinade containers, utensils, and all surfaces before reuse.
  • Storing leftovers properly. Since seafood deteriorates more quickly than other foods, refrigerate leftovers within two hours of your meal. Seafood will keep for about two days in the fridge.
Serving Ceviche

Ceviche is served chilled or at room temperature. When it comes to toppings, the world is your oyster. Top ceviche with fresh ingredients like citrus juice, avocado, red onion, tomato, or chillies to compliment your recipe.

Ceviche Recipes

Fulton Fresh Ceviche FultonFishMarket.com’s own recipe, this ceviche dish features fresh citrus and aromatic herbs to enhance the flavor of fresh, sustainably-sourced fish.



Classic Peruvian Ceviche This classic Peruvian ceviche recipe features fresh fish (mahi-mahi or tilapia) with clam juice, lime, fresh spices, and yams on the side.



Mango-Avocado Shrimp Ceviche This recipe is reminiscent of Mexican ceviche, featuring shrimp marinated in citrus, mango, and avocado and served with tortillas.


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Seafood aficionados and amateurs alike appreciate the diversity of our seafood selections. From lobster to oysters to salmon and tuna, there’s no lack of love for the ocean’s bounty that we deliver from dock to door.

But one of our selections that doesn’t garner the enthusiasm of our other fresh favorites is tilapia. Sentiments range from a mild-mannered “so-so” to the more opinionated “not a real fish.”

Why does tilapia have such a negative reputation? Is it warranted?

Let’s explore some of the more popular opinions of tilapia – both good and bad – and answer some of your frequently asked questions about the ocean’s most controversial “frenemy”.

Is Tilapia a Real Fish?
Where Does Tilapia Come From?
Is Tilapia Bad for You?
Is Tilapia Good for You?
How Does Tilapia Farming Effect the Environment?
Does Farmed Tilapia Taste Good?
What Tilapia Does FultonFishMarket.com Carry?

Is Tilapia a Real Fish?

Yes, tilapia is a real fish – not a “franken-fish.” Stories of tilapia go back to the Roman Empire in 1500 B.C., with biblical scholars even hypothesizing that Jesus fed the masses on the shores of the Sea of Galilee with two tilapia and four loaves of bread!

Fast forward to the 21st century, tilapia is actually one of the most popular fish served in restaurants. Ranking behind tuna, salmon, and Alaskan pollock, it’s the fourth most commonly consumed type of seafood in the United States.

The most popular varieties of tilapia include Nile tilapia, blue tilapia, and Mozambique tilapia. While their flavor profiles are similar, the quality and taste are affected by the growing conditions including feed type and water conditions.

Where Does Tilapia Come From?

Although tilapia hails from Africa, its surge in popularity has led to the development of commercial tilapia farms around the world. Over 135 countries, including the United States, produce farm-raised tilapia in indoor recirculating tanks, ponds, freshwater net pens, and raceways. China leads global tilapia production at over 50%.

Is Tilapia Bad for You?

The quality of tilapia aquaculture systems can have impacts on both flavor and the nutritional profile.

Tilapia quality and taste are affected by the feed type, which is typically pellets made of corn and soy. A high-quality, vegetable-based diet is imperative because it satisfies the population’s appetite, ensuring that the fish do not eat algae, mud, or effluence (aka fish poop.)

Overcrowding results in the excess of effluence, which, if not managed property, is consumed by the fish population. This can lead to disease, which can lead to the irresponsible use of antibiotics and antimicrobials. This cycle ultimately leads to a poorer quality product which can actually can promote antibiotic resistance.

Is Tilapia Good for You?

Yes! Responsibly-sourced tilapia is a delicious source of lean protein that is low in calories, fat, and carbohydrates and high in vitamins and minerals like selenium, vitamin B12, niacin, and potassium.

While tilapia is lower in the omega-3 fatty acids that are characteristic of salmon and sardines, it is comparable to other popular fish selections like cod, mahi mahi, and yellowfin tuna.

How Does Tilapia Farming Effect the Environment?

One benefit of tilapia farming is the sustainability of the wild population; responsible aquaculture provides a cost-effective product that supports global demand without depleting the native stock.

The discharge of waste from tilapia farms also presents some issues. Conscientious aquaculture systems collect the effluent to use as fertilizer, whereas more reckless farms release the waste into the natural habitat which can cause illness to other species as well as tilapia. Escaped fish also present critical population challenges, as they are quick to procreate and could potentially choke out other native species.

Third party certifications recognize responsible, sustainable, and safe tilapia farming, including the Aquaculture Stewardship Council and the Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI). The Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch also makes recommendations for wild and farmed tilapia selections based on their environmental impact.

Does Farmed Tilapia Taste Good?

Tilapia’s sweet, mild taste and flaky texture makes it a great fit for recipes calling for white fish. Its lean fillets absorb flavors easily, so we recommend using a light hand with spices and sauces. Tilapia is versatile across many cooking methods including pan frying, broiling, baking, or braising.

What Tilapia Does FultonFishMarket.com Carry?

We are committed to safe, sustainable seafood here at FultonFishMarket.com. That’s why we have partnered with Regal Springs to bring healthy, delicious tilapia to your dinner table. Regal Springs tilapia are responsibly raised in spacious floating pens in Honduras. Shop for tender, firm tilapia fillets from FultonFishMarket.com.


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It’s no secret that Omega 3 fatty acids are good for you! Fatty fish are VERY rich in Omega 3 thus making seafood an EXCELLENT choice for maximum absorption!

Why is Omega 3 important to your diet? Omega 3 helps replenish the fatty acids in your brain, making it an effective natural remedy to fight depression and promote healthy brain activity. Studies show that Omega 3 fatty acids can improve vision by protecting adult eyes from macular degeneration. Lifestyles that include Omega 3 rich foods can decrease risk for heart disease by lowering triglycerides and also reduce blood pressure. Since Omega 3 fatty acids aid in healthy brain activity, they can also help fight age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Dementia… need we go on?

According to mainstream healthcare sources, a healthy adult should consume 250-500 mg of Omega 3 per day!

Here is a list of the 13 MOST Omega 3 Rich Fish and Seafood! (based on 3 oz. serving)

  1. Mackerel

    At over 2,200mg of Omega 3 per serving, Mackerel is an INCREDIBLE source of this healthy fatty acid! It’s also easy to prepare! Check out this great recipe for a delicious way to add more Mackerel to your diet.

    — SPICED BOSTON MACKEREL
  2. Salmon

    Who doesn’t love Salmon? It’s easy to prepare in a variety of ways and has a whopping 1,200mg of Omega 3 PER SERVING! Enjoy this tasty, citrusy recipe that we just love.

    — HONEY MUSTARD CITRUS SALMON
  3. Sardines

    Most of us have eaten canned Sardines which are incredibly high in sodium. Fresh Sardines are a WHOLE different story. These little Omega 3 powerhouses pack over 800mg per serving! Sardines are incredibly versatile and can be dressed up into quite the glamorous dish. Don’t believe us? Check out this recipe!

    — CHEF NATE EDLBECK’S SARDINES IN GARLIC CREME SAUCE
  4. Oysters

    Ooh-lala, could it be that our fair Oysters also pack a mean Omega 3 punch? You betcha! At 700mg per serving, Oysters can be one of the EASIEST ways to take in more of the healthy Omega 3 fatty acid. Enjoy Fulton Fresh Oysters raw, or try this AWESOME recipe!

    — BROILED OYSTERS
  5. Tuna

    Good ol’ Tuna, always our best friend! Tuna can be consumed raw or cooked and one of its great benefits is its meaty taste and texture. Another excellent advantage is that it boasts over 500mg of Omega 3 fatty acids per serving. Check out this recipe, you won’t be disappointed!

    — TUNA TARTARE
  6. Swordfish

    EN GARDE! You didn’t think we’d leave out our delicious, nutritious and MEATY friend the Swordfish, did you? He won’t fight you but he WILL supply you with over 700mg of Omega 3! We love it on the grill, or try it baked!

    — BAKED SWORDFISH
  7. Trout

    Trout is a wonderland of healthy fats including Omega 3! With its meaty flavor and texture, similar to Salmon, it’s a great alternative if you’re a little tired of white fish! Don’t forget, a Trout serving contains about 600mg of Omega 3 fatty acids! Check out this recipe, there’s a remoulade involved!

    — BLACKENED STEELHEAD TROUT
  8. Flounder/Sole

    We love flatfish such as Flounder, Sole and Fluke for their delicate texture and ability to side with many flavors. We also love Omega 3 fatty acids, and these fish will surely serve up 200-500mg! This is a simple recipe for Flounder that can be easily substituted for Fluke or Sole!

    — ITALIAN STYLE FLOUNDER
  9. Squid/Calamari

    Squid can be intimidating for amateurs but rest assured, FultonFishMarket.com will send you Squid that is ready to prepare without all the messy cleaning that is usually involved. We’ll also be sure to send you the generous portion of 500mg Omega 3s. Courtesy of the Squid, not us. Check out this recipe for a deviously tasty dish.

    — FRIED CALAMARI
  10. Mussels

    Our shelled friends strike again! Mussels contain more Omega 3 fatty acids ounce-for-ounce than Clams, Lobster, Shrimp or Scallops! These delicious guys contain nearly 700mg! This recipe has a little more than just Mussels to surprise you, check it out!

    — CHEF MASSIMO GAFFO'S ZUPPA DE PESCE
  11. Scallops

    Just because Mussels have MORE Omega 3, does not mean the 300mg that Scallops have to offer is anything to scoff at! We love Scallops! They couldn’t be easier to prepare, order some and try this recipe!

    — SEARED SCALLOPS WITH CHIMICHURRI
  12. Cod

    While not at the top of the list, Cod is a wonderful choice for healthy eating with its Omega 3 content of 100mg per serving. Additionally, it’s lean with an adaptable flavor! Check out this great and easy recipe!

    — BROILED BLACK COD WITH BUTTER-WINE SAUCE
  13. Crab

    There are many different species of Crab with one thing in common — they’re good vehicles of Omega 3 fatty acids! On average between 200-500mg per serving, it’s a good choice if you’re trying to up your health! We love Crab cakes, everybody does! Next time, try this yummy recipe!

    — CRAB CAKES

Omega 3’s can help your body function better in many ways. Fight depression, improve vision, promote healthy brain activity, decrease risk factors for heart disease, reduce blood pressure, fight age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Dementia.

It’s no secret that seafood is good for you. The added benefit is that there are over 33,000 species of fish and seafood meaning you can literally try something new all the time! Start your adventure towards health, happiness and delicious food! We’ve got more recipes — check them out here!

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Foodies and health nuts alike have good reason to love seafood, given the wide range of seafood health benefits and culinary masterpieces you can cook up. Want more reasons to eat healthy seafood? Check out the top five health benefits of getting enough seafood in your diet.

Top 5 Health Benefits of Eating Seafood
Purchase Healthy Seafood at FultonFishMarket.com

Top 5 Health Benefits of Eating Seafood

1. Eating seafood helps your heart. The heart health benefits are so pronounced that heart healthiness is one of the more well-known seafood health facts. The American Heart Association confirms that eating 3.5 ounces (about ¾ cup of flaked fish) of (oily) fish or shellfish twice a week reduces the risk of heart disease, heart failure, congestive heart failure, stroke, and sudden cardiac death -- oh my!! The AHA recommends selecting fatty fish or shellfish to maximize seafood’s heart health benefit. How, exactly, does seafood benefit the heart? It's seafood's Omega-3 fatty acid content that does the trick. Omega-3's work to reduce cholesterol while decreasing inflammation in the body. This anti-inflammatory effect reduces damage to the blood vessels, thereby protecting against heart disease and stroke. Omega-3's may also decrease triglycerides, lower blood pressure, and reduce blood clotting, all of which have a protective effect for the circulatory system.

When you're preparing seafood with your heart on your sleeve, be sure to cook it without frying (ie. steam, bake, saute, etc.), and don't add too much salt or sugar. Eating a variety of fish is also key, so feel free to go crazy when you're perusing FultonFishMarket.com’s selection of fresh, sustainable salmon, tuna, finfish, and more.

2. Eating seafood helps your brain. Seafood’s brain-boosting action is perhaps one of the lesser-known seafood health facts. But, lest we forget (pun intended), the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics reports that we actually have Omega-3 fatty acids to thank, yet again. Specifically, a type of Omega-3 called docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, is not just helpful for the brain; it is required to keep the brain functioning normally. The mechanism is simple: since the brain and nervous system tissues are partially comprised of fat, they have a hunger and thirst, shall we say, for DHA. In fact, low DHA consumption is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in later life. So, preempt brain malfunction by consistently consuming enough seafood.

3. Eating healthy seafood can help you lose weight. Seafood lovers, go ahead and rejoice; eating healthy seafood can help you drop pounds. The logic is pretty simple: when you replace unhealthy, high-fat, high-calorie foods with healthy seafood (which is naturally high in protein and low in calories), you fill up more quickly without piling on the pounds. There is also a bit of psychology involved. Since seafood is a versatile culinary option, with the sky being the limit as far as recipe ideas and healthy cooking methods, you can incorporate healthy seafood into your diet without feeling deprived. Go ahead. Order some fresh seafood with that next meal. Seafood is a guilt-free indulgence any day.

4. Eating healthy seafood during pregnancy can aid brain development in developing fetuses. Seafood’s heavy metal content is the subject of much confusion amongst seafood lovers and health fanatics alike. Let’s get to the bottom of these oft-misunderstood seafood health facts. Harvard University reports that yes, pollutants contaminate the foods we eat each and every day -- animal, vegetable, and mineral. Seafood is no exception, so we're wise to be having this conversation.

When it comes to seafood, the contaminants most likely to be present are mercury, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), dioxins, and pesticides. Let's be clear that yes, very high mercury levels can damage a young child or developing fetus' nervous system. Meanwhile, lower mercury doses have been shown to have mixed results -- i.e. subtle-to-nonexistent impacts on nervous and cardiovascular system development. Meanwhile, the impact of PCBs and dioxins is even less clear. In the US food supply chain, more than 90 percent of PCBs and dioxins come from non-seafood sources like meat, dairy, and even vegetables. In fact, the impacts of seafood on fetal health are so ambiguous that the Institute of Medicine called the risk to fetuses from eating fish "overrated." So, instead of eliminating seafood from a pregnant woman's diet altogether, the Harvard report suggests striking a balance by first recognizing that cutting out seafood is likely to harm a developing fetus’ brain development. To strike a balance, pregnant women, nursing mothers, and women who could become pregnant should eat two servings of seafood a week, just like everyone else. Meanwhile, follow the EPA's advice on avoiding "heavy metal seafood" including shark, swordfish, mackerel, and golden snapper. Instead of these sea creatures, select low-mercury seafood like shrimp, salmon, pollock, catfish, and canned light (not Albacore) tuna.

5. Doctors recommend eating seafood twice each week. While we’re talking about seafood health facts, let’s go ahead and discuss what the medical community recommends as far as weekly seafood consumption. Harvard University reports again on the medical community's consensus. The votes have been tallied, and the results are clear: complete with Omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, selenium, and protein, with little to no saturated fat, seafood is a quintessential part of a healthy diet. In fact, medical experts combed no fewer than 20 studies on the impact of fish-sufficient diets on heart disease, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, depression, and other conditions. The results confirmed that eating seafood twice a week does in fact do the body good.

Purchase Healthy Seafood at FultonFishMarket.com

FultonFishMarket.com provides fresh, sustainably produced seafood, with delivery right to your door. Shop our online market for all your seafood needs. Seafood with the Most Omega-3s

The health benefits of seafood can be greatly linked to their Omega-3-rich composition. Here are some of our healthy seafood options, along with their Omega-3 content.

Salmon: 4,504 mg
Anchovy: 3,600 mg
Trout: 1,743 mg
Sardines: 1,668 mg
Tuna (Yellowfin): 1,466 mg
Mussels: 1,330 mg
Oysters: 1,170 mg
Swordfish: 1,157 mg
Pollock (Atlantic): 843 mg
Halibut: 740 mg
Crab: 700 mg
Scallops: 620 mg
Shrimp: 534 mg
Clams: 482 mg
Catfish (farmed): 300 mg
Mahi Mahi: 221 mg
Cod (Atlantic): 284 mg
Lobster: 142 mg

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There is something about potlucks that has near-universal appeal. Maybe it’s the fact that other people do (at least some of) the recipe planning, cooking, and clean-up. Maybe it’s also the fact that, since everyone brings something different, you get a world of variety without a world of hassle. Whether you’re throwing a potluck or have merely been invited to one, it’s likely you’re in the market for easy, delicious seafood potluck ideas. Here are some recipe ideas to get you started, along with pro-tips on picking a summer potluck dish. FultonFishMarket.com delivers fresh, sustainably-produced seafood right to your door, so all you have to worry about is the party planning.

Strategic Summer Potluck Ideas - Seafood for the Win
Summer Potluck Ideas - Seafood Recipes for Large Groups 

Strategic Summer Potluck Ideas - Seafood for the Win

When party planners dish on how to plan for a potluck, their bottom line is clear: seafood fits the bill to make your party (and recipe) planning easier. Here are the perks of including seafood in your summer potluck ideas:

  • Seafood is packed with flavor, so everyone will remember your dish. One of the fun perks about attending a potluck is showing off your culinary tastes and skills. When you bring a dish featuring fresh, sustainably-produced seafood from FultonFishMarket.com, you’ll make your mark as the life of the party.
  • Seafood fits with a range of dietary restrictions. When you're throwing a big party, it's almost guaranteed that your guests will have different dietary needs and restrictions. Unless your guests are vegan or non-pescatarian vegetarians, seafood will be compatible with their diet. That is, you can serve seafood gluten free (ie. with non-glutinous grains), dairy free (ie. without cheese or milk products), and even reduced-fat (ie. prepared without added fats), just to name a few.
  • Seafood can be "themed." Choosing a theme for your potluck is a popular way to create memories and a cohesive menu. Think: global street food, Grandma's favorites, beating the heat, and seasonal party themes. Whatever your potluck theme, seafood is versatile to not only fit the theme but enhance it.
  • Seafood helps you organize the menu. One of the challenges of throwing a summer potluck is organizing the menu so that party-goers bring a variety of dishes. When you include seafood in your potluck ideas, the seafood dish becomes the centerpiece of your event. Go ahead and tell partygoers what your seafood potluck entree is, and ask guests to bring something that will compliment the flavor profile.
Summer Potluck Ideas - Seafood Recipes for Large Groups

The following seafood recipes are optimal summer potluck ideas since they can be shared and enjoyed by large groups.

Shrimp-Alfredo Pasta Bake

When it comes to summer potluck ideas, who can refuse shrimp alfredo in casserole form? This recipe is straightforward to make and can be prepared ahead of time; just warm it up in the oven in time for the party.

EQUIPMENT:

  • Large skillet
  • Whisk
  • Baking sheet
  • 8"x8" baking dish
  • Nonstick spray
  • Medium bowl
  • Large bowl
  • Large pot (for cooking pasta)

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 pound medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 8 ounces whole wheat penne pasta
  • 1 (14.5-ounce) can petite diced tomatoes, drained
  • ½ cup reduced fat mozzarella cheese
  • 2 Tbsp freshly grated Parmesan
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil, divided
  • ½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes, optional
  • 2 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley leaves
  • Salt and pepper to taste

For the alfredo sauce:

  • 2 Tbsp unsalted butter
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 1 (6-ounce) can 2% evaporated milk
  • 1 ounce light cream cheese
  • ¼ cup chicken broth
  • Salt and pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Begin by preheating the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. First, make the alfredo sauce:
    1. In the large skillet, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant (about 2 minutes), stirring frequently.
    2. Whisk in the flour and continue cooking until lightly browned (about 1 minute).
    3. Slowly whisk in the milk until thickened (about 2 minutes).
    4. Stir in the cream cheese and chicken broth, stirring until smooth (about 1 minute).
    5. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.
  3. Second, make the remaining ingredients:
    1. Coat the baking sheet with nonstick spray. Set aside.
    2. In the medium bowl, combine the shrimp, one tablespoon of the olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Toss gently to combine.
    3. Spread the shrimp mixture onto the baking sheet. Bake just until the shrimp is pink, firm and cooked through (about 6 minutes). Remove from the oven and set aside.
    4. Cook the pasta according to its package instructions. Set aside.
    5. Reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
    6. Coat the baking dish with nonstick spray. Set aside.
    7. In the large bowl, combine the shrimp mixture, pasta, tomatoes, Mozzarella, red pepper flakes, and alfredo sauce. Place this mixture in the baking dish and top with Parmesan. Bake until golden brown (about 10 minutes).
  4. Serve immediately. Enjoy!
Cream Cheese Crab Spread

Bringing an appetizer is another excellent option for summer potluck ideas. The spread can be enjoyed alone as an appetizer or paired with non-seafood dishes to add some flair. You can make this crab spread ahead of time if desired; just warm up in the oven before the party starts.

EQUIPMENT:

  • 9-inch pie plate
  • Cooking spray
  • Medium bowl

INGREDIENTS:

  • ½ pound fresh crab meat, flaked
  • 2 (8-ounce) packages cream cheese, softened
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp fresh dill, chopped
  • Crackers, for serving (optional)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Coat the pie plate with cooking spray. Set aside.
  3. In the medium bowl, combine all ingredients, mixing well.
  4. Spoon the crab mixture into the pie plate. Bake until hot and bubbly (about 25 minutes).
  5. Serve hot and enjoy!

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Copper River King Salmon is now in season! A great tasting product and a fabulous story. Direct from F/V Amulet!

FultonFishMarket.com works directly with a family of long time fishers right on the river. This family has invested heavily in their craft, and feature the most advanced on-board processing equipment in the Copper River fishing fleet. Outfitted with an immersion tank, refrigerated seawater and flake ice storage systems, the fish are fully prepared to keep them fresh, right on board.

There are only so many of these beauties, and they are only available through FultonFishMarket.com!
The season started the May 17th and it runs through mid June!
Images: TEAL BARMORE PHOTOGRAPHY

Our partner family picks only the best of the days catch to send fresh to FultonFishMarket.com and our customers. You won’t find fresher, more beautiful or better tasting Copper River King Salmon anywhere.

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