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Simplicity 8014 striped shirt dress
Simplicity 8019 midi length floral skirt (worn with Simplicity 8014 modified to be a shirt).

Hi Everyone!

Summer is (hopefully) fast approaching and I have been in the mood to make easy to sew and easy to wear pieces in viscose, one of my favourite fabrics to wear in warm weather (or any time of the year for that matter!) In case you didn’t know, viscose is a breathable man made fabric made from cellulose wood pulp. I personally love the drape, movement and flow of viscose. It’s more forgiving over curves than some other fabrics can be.

Simplicity 8014 striped shirt dress

Anyway, I took two patterns that I have made before and, heavily influenced by pieces I have seen hitting the high street stores, whipped up these two items. I don’t have much to say about either piece so I thought I would combine the two in a single blog post.

Simplicity 8014 striped shirt dress
Simplicity 8014 striped shirt dress

You all know Simplicity 8014 is one of my favourite patterns by now! I have made both views that come in this pattern multiple times, and have also made this pattern my tried and true shirt pattern. You can see the last version I made of this dress here. Since I made that version I have also made the collar smaller.

Simplicity 8014 striped shirt dress
Simplicity 8014 striped midi length shirt dress modifications
  • This is view C with the collar from A/D
  • I added 25 cm to the length
  • I left the side seams open by 36 cm for the side slits
  • I added thread belt loops 38 cm up from the slit opening
Simplicity 8014 striped shirt dress
Simplicity 8019 midi length floral skirt (worn with Simplicity 8014 modified to be a shirt).

As for the skirt, that was made using Simplicity 8019 and this bright floral print viscose purchased from Sew Me Sunshine (sorry, my fabric has now sold out but there are other options). Again, this is a pattern I have made before – you can see the last version I made here – but I made some fit modifications this time round.

Simplicity 8019 midi length floral skirt (worn with Simplicity 8014 modified to be a shirt).
Simplicity 8019 midi length floral skirt (worn with Simplicity 8014 modified to be a shirt).
Simplicity 8019 midi length floral button front A-line skirt modifications
  • I added 4 inches to the length of the skirt
  • I measured 3.5 inches down from the waistband and did a 1 inch full tummy adjustment
  • I measured 3 inches down from the waistband and did a 1 inch full bum adjustment
  • I used 2.25 inch for the hem. Really this skirt would benefit from a facing to hem neatly
Simplicity 8019 midi length floral skirt (worn with Simplicity 8014 modified to be a shirt).

So those are two pieces that I am happy to have added to my wardrobe. I am always a little wary of adding to much to my wardrobe for summer unless we are specifically going somewhere hot (our summers are just so hit and miss here!) but this year we are headed to India where I won’t be able to wear clothes like these, so I think I am just happy to indulge myself for now.

Until soon!

Simplicity 8019 midi length floral skirt (worn with Simplicity 8014 modified to be a shirt).
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Paper Theory Patterns Zadie jumpsuit in linen

Hey hey!

It’s not very often that I will purchase and make a new pattern close to it’s release. More often than not I will hang back to see the pattern start to appear in the wild on different body types before jumping in. But once I started seeing versions of this jumpsuit basically looking pretty amazing on everyone that has made it so far, I decided to take the plunge. This is the Paper Theory Patterns Zadie jumpsuit, and I love it!

Paper Theory Patterns Zadie jumpsuit in linen

Let me back up first and tell you about the beautiful linen that was gifted to me to make this pattern up. This is the Portrush Chilli Powder 100% linen from a new-to-me online fabric store, Patterns and Plains. This linen is really beautiful quality; heavy weight with a true, saturated colour which did not fade after washing. It washed, pressed and sewed like a dream with minimal fraying. Really, one of the better quality linens I have come across in this country. Definitely worth checking out the website and great customer service too.

Paper Theory Patterns Zadie jumpsuit in linen

Now, back to the details on the pattern. As ever, a full pattern review appears below. I wanted to point out that the eagle eyed among you may notice that I did not bind the wrap edges to finish them as suggested in the pattern. I had seen a few people complaining of either the bias binding finish not resulting in a clean finish and being rather fiddly, and also some complaining that the binding was flipping out to the outside. I cannot be on with readjusting my clothes once they are on my body! So I chose to draft nice sturdy facings which I topstitched into place.

Paper Theory Patterns Zadie jumpsuit in linen
Paper Theory Patterns Zadie jumpsuit in linen

Really….it has been so many years since I last wore a jumpsuit and I was rather dubious before finishing this garment, but now it is done I feel very chic and comfortable wearing it. BTW, I did add a press stud at the cross over point of the bodice, but honestly, it all feels pretty secure. I did make some modifications to this pattern to make it fit me, but I am so glad I took the time to do them.

Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

The Zadie Jumpsuit is a relaxed and easy to wear one piece that comes with the option of wide 3/4 length sleeves or sleeveless with a dropped shoulder. It wraps around the body and fastens with a tie with so there is no need for buttons or a zip – making it quick and to easy sew, and quick and easy to get on and off. The legs are cut wide and skim above the ankle. There are deep slant pockets on the front, with small pleats at the waist on the front and back. The neck edge is finished with a bias binding.

Pattern Sizing:

Sizes 6 – 28

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes. I would recommend to follow the single layer cutting layout as suggested in the pattern for maximum fabric cutting economy.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I have not worn a jumpsuit for years but I LOVE this one. It feels very comfortable and chic. The wrap idea is so clever. Nothing to dislike as such, although I did omit the bias binding finish on the wrap edges and drafted a facing which I topstitched into place.

Fabric Used:

Heavy weight chilli coloured linen which was gifted to me from Patterns and Plains.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • I cut a size 16 through the bust, shoulders and arms, and graded out over the hips.
  • FYI I am 5’3″.
  • I shortened the rise (above the crotch) by 2 inches, both front and back.
  • I further shortened the legs and sleeves by 3 inches and used 1.5 inches for hemming.
  • I added 3/8ths inch seam allowance to the bodice fronts, back neckline and front of pants, upto the drill hole, to facilitate attaching the facing that I drafted.
  • My facings were drafted to be 1.5 inches deep, with 3/8ths inch used as seam allowance. I interfaced the facings.
  • I did a 5/8ths inch full bust adjustment and closed the resulting bust dart and rotated into the waist pleat. (Used the method for a cut on/ kimono sleeve bodice from Fit for Real People).
  • I did a 5/8ths inch full bum adjustment.
  • I moved the waist tie position down by 1 inch (my hole through which the tie passes is in the waist seam).
  • I added a snap at the bodice cross over point.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

I would definitely love to sew this maybe in a plain black crepe. I definitely recommend.

Conclusion:

Ultra clever design and just so easy to wear and feel amazing: definitely the surprise hit of the year for me so far.

Until soon my friends!

Paper Theory Patterns Zadie jumpsuit in linen
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Vogue 9186

Hi Everyone!

Today’s post is about OOP Vogue 9186 by Kathryn Brenne, which is hot off the sewing machine. Let me rewind. Before my brain haemorrhage, I decided that I wanted to enter this year’s Tessuti Fabrics contest, which, for this year, is called Colour in Thirds. I have entered once before, in their Gridlock competition, and got a small runners up prize that year. But then this year I was in hospital, and couldn’t really sew for a while and time passed. This last week I thought: either I do this or I will regret it, so I got down to the business of sewing.

Vogue 9186

The idea behind the competition is that you have to buy whatever fabric Tessuti have chosen for that particular years contest, and make whatever you want using the fabric. I personally love seeing all the ways people get creative using the fabric that’s chosen. This year, the fabric on offer was a Japanese polyester crepe de chine, which was available in three colourways. I elected to get the indigo colourway. This is a high quality fabric, with a fabulous drape and movement as I hope is evident in these photographs, and I love the rich colour.

Vogue 9186

Now for the pattern. This is a different take on a pullover shirt dress. Designed to be loose fitting, it has a wide elastic in the front of the dress (sewn into a casing on the reverse of the dress), which provides some shaping, an asymmetric shaped hemline, dropped shoulders/ cut on cap sleeves and a hidden button placket. I found the instructions to be very good.

Vogue 9186
Vogue 9186
Vogue 9186

My only word of caution about this pattern is the sleeves. I had read other reviews about this pattern which warned the sleeves were too big for the armhole. I pinned the pattern piece for the sleeve into the armhole and estimated it to be approximately 1 inch bigger. So I decided to make the armhole 1 inch bigger, by deepening it 0.5 inch in the front and the back. This meant I didn’t have any issues setting the sleeve in. The sleeve doesn’t feel restrictive at all: it’s fine. But if I was ever going to make this pattern again I might have to look at redrafting the shoulder/ sleeve/ armhole area.

Some details:

Vogue 9186
Vogue 9186
Vogue 9186 inside details: overlocked finish and inside casing.
Vogue 9186
Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Very loose-fitting, pullover dress has mandarin collar, front band, partially elasticized waist with casing, side pocket, and shaped hemline, wrong side shows. Narrow hem. A: Cap sleeves. B:Long sleeves with placket and button cuffs.

I made view B.

Pattern Sizing:

XS – XXL (4 – 26).

I cut a size L through the bust, arms and shoulders and graded out to an XL over the hips.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes. The sleeve placket and hidden button placket were suprisingly simple compared to some other Vogue plackets I have sewn.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I like this is a different take on a shirt dress. It’s very different with some unique features. The only thing to be wary of is the sleeves as drafted are about 1 inch bigger than the armhole. I chose to make my armholes 1 inch deeper to account for this and the sleeves are fine, but if making again I might chose to do some redrafting.

Fabric Used:

A polyester crepe de chine.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • Removed 2 inches from the sleeve length. I think I could even stand to remove another 1 inch? Maybe?
  • Added 3 inches to the front length at the shortest point, tapering to 1.5 inches extra length at the longest point of the shaped hem.
  • Deepened armholes by 1 inch. I deepened the front and back armholes by 0.5 inches to allow the sleeve to go in more easily.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

I don’t know if I need another one of these in my wardrobe, but I do recommend.

Conclusion:

If you want to stand out from the crowd this dress will definitely make heads turn.

Vogue 9186

Go check out all the other entries for the competition on Instagram using the hashtag #tessuticolorinthirds or find the Tessuti fabrics Pinterest board.

Until soon friends!

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Simplicity 8014 printed polyester crepe de chine shirt

Hey Everyone,

Thank you so much for all the love, encouragement and support you guys showed me following my last post. I am making steady progress and feeling so much better. I have even managed to sew a couple of easy projects!

Anyway, today is basically me sharing a couple of shirts that I sewed up in February (really? So long ago already?!) and didn’t get a chance to share on the blog. One was made for myself using my TNT shirt/ shirt dress pattern, Simplicity 8014 (search on my blog for all the different versions I have made using this pattern!) I made this shirt using a printed polyester crepe de chine purchased on eBay. I basically love this, very of-the-moment print, and it’s already been worn loads.

Simplicity 8014 printed polyester crepe de chine shirt
Simplicity 8014 printed polyester crepe de chine shirt

The second shirt was made for Philip using this faded pastel cotton shirting from Fabworks, and my TNT shirt pattern for him, McCalls 6613 (again, search this blog to see all the different versions). I cut the pocket, button placket and back yoke on the bias, and used a contrast plain cotton for the inner collar and button placket.

McCalls 6613 men’s shirt in checked cotton
McCalls 6613 men’s shirt in checked cotton

That’s all I got for you today!

See you soon. x

Simplicity 8014 printed polyester crepe de chine shirt
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Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat – Waterproof version with quilted lining and fur trim
Life Update

Hey Friends,

It’s been a short while. In case you are not on Instagram, I wanted to let you know what’s been happening with me, and why I might not be sewing and blogging quite as much for a brief period. 10 days ago, whilst I was at the gym, I had a brain haemorrhage. Sounds scary right? Well, at the time it was. All I can say is thank goodness for the amazing health care system we have in this country.

I was rushed to hospital for tests and, following various scans and angiograms, it was established as a venous, as opposed to arterial bleed. Apparently this was the best possible outcome. It means that I am no more likely to have another occurrence than anyone else. It also meant that I did not require any further surgical intervention, and it is just conservative management. I did not have any predisposing factors…this could have happened to anyone. It is relatively rare.

I was discharged from hospital after a week and have been at home since then slowly recovering. I am making improvements every day. I don’t have any neurological deficits. So I have much to be thankful for. I have not been in my sewing room since this happened….I am just taking it slow. But it’s a chance to get caught up on my blogging and think about future projects (and maybe buy some fabric :-)) I am sure it won’t be long before I am ready to do some sewing therapy!

Waterproof Cascade Duffle
Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat – Waterproof version with quilted lining and fur trim
Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat – Waterproof version with quilted lining and fur trim

So, anyway, before all this drama (!), I managed to make a second version of the Grainline Cascade Duffle coat, but this time using a waterproof outer fabric that I purchased from the now defunct Paron Fabrics in New York (2.5 years ago! Wow!) I should mention that this waterproof fabric appeared to be needle ready, with a knit interfacing already fused to the reverse side of the fabric, which did speed up the process of preparing to sew this coat quite considerably. Here’s a link to my first Grainline Cascade Duffle coat.

p.s. all these photos were taken before I went into hospital, in case anyone was wondering!

Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat

I have been wanting to make a new waterproof coat in forever! I have made other, lightweight waterproof coats, but I wanted to make one which was a little warmer. I had all the supplies to make this new version sitting in my sewing room, but for whatever reason, I just kept putting this project off. I am so pleased that I finally pushed myself in to making this project.

Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat – Waterproof version with quilted lining and fur trim
Pattern Modifications

Only very minor ones, essentially to get the look I wanted:

  • I added 0.5 inches to the side seams front and back from the waist down
  • I overlapped the lower body pieces front and back and cut the fronts and backs as single pieces
  • I added a fur trim to the hood. That’s the only slight niggle with this coat: the hood feels rather large and the fur pulls the hood further forward. Don’t know if I might need to go back later on and modify it somehow…
  • I drafted and added pocket flaps
  • I drafted storm flaps for the front and back. I basically just traced off the front and back shoulder/ armscye pieces and extended the length to be approx. 1.5 inch below the yokes. The flaps extend into the armscyes and front bands
  • I added sleeve heads made from poly fleece and shoulder pads
  • I catch stitched the lower hem facing to the coat. This is something I had to go back and do retrospectively to my first wool version too. Otherwise the back hem facing wants to sag down
  • Replaced toggles with snaps and added snaps to the pocket flaps and the back storm flap
Details
Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat – Waterproof version with quilted lining and fur trim
Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat – Waterproof version with quilted lining and fur trim
Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat – Waterproof version with quilted lining and fur trim – close up of front storm flaps
Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat – Waterproof version with quilted lining and fur trim – lined pocket flap
Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat – Waterproof version with quilted lining and fur trim – interior quilted lining
Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat – Waterproof version with quilted lining and fur trim – interior quilted lining
Conclusion

During the christmas sales I picked up a RTW down filled waterproof jacket which is very practical, and has been worn. However, I don’t love the colour (bright blue) or the fit (makes me feel dumpy!) Whilst I will always need a down filled jacket in my wardrobe for the very coldest of months, this coat feels more stylish and, I think, fits me better. And that is why I have all but stopped buying RTW garments.

So good to be back with you all! Have a great weekend.

Grainline Cascade Duffle Coat – Waterproof version with quilted lining and fur trim
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Nina Lee Patterns Camden pinafore in navy corduroy

Hey Everyone,

Back again with another new-to-me pattern company: Nina Lee patterns. When I saw this new release, the Camden pinafore, pop up on my social media feed I thought it looked worth a try. There are so many pinafore patterns around at the moment, but I liked the look of this one, with its princess seams, V-neck, waistband and A-line skirt.

Nina Lee Patterns Camden pinafore in navy corduroy

On the whole I think this is a cute style, and a good match for my body shape. However, let’s address the one thing which I am disappointed in: the excess fabric in the high bust area. I think this could be due to the fullness being too high for my bust? i.e. the pattern being drafted for someone with a very high bust (sighing for my youth right now). Now, normally, on Big 4 patterns the bust apex would be marked on the pattern, and before doing a FBA I would move that apex point down to suit me (maybe an inch or so). In case there are some readers not familiar with the concept let me show you:

Example of a Butterick princess seam bodice pattern with bust apex marked

The cross inside the circle which I have marked with the red arrow corresponds to where the bust apex should lie. And, in case anyone doesn’t know, those crosses inside circles appear on Big 4 patterns (not always) to signify things like waist position, hip position and where the fullness of the bicep should be. Unfortunately on this pattern the bust apex was not marked and I went ahead and did a 1 inch FBA. If I was going to make this pattern again I would definitely want to address that excess fabric and I think the way to do that would be to move the fullness down? As this is a relatively new release I haven’t been able to see if anyone else has encountered the same issue or not, and if they have, how they have dealt with it.

Nina Lee Patterns Camden pinafore in navy corduroy

I don’t think this issue will stop me from wearing this pinafore dress though. I think the fit every where else is good. Aside from fit alterations I did make some other changes to the construction of the dress.

I added an exposed zipper to the back of the dress (the instructions call for an invisible zipper). In my experience invisible zippers and bulky fabrics like denim and corduroy are not a great match.

Nina Lee Patterns Camden pinafore in navy corduroy

The instructions have you fully line the dress. I decided to draft all in one facings to finish the neckline and arm hole, and I also used a facing to finish the lower hem and the inner waistband.

Nina Lee Patterns Camden pinafore in navy corduroy – all in one facing – front
Nina Lee Patterns Camden pinafore in navy corduroy – all in one facing – back
Nina Lee Patterns Camden pinafore in navy corduroy – all in one facing
Nina Lee Patterns Camden pinafore in navy corduroy
Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Fun, versatile and fully-lined, Camden is a joy to sew and wear! Choose between the full pinafore or the skirt option (with two lengths); both are lined and feature stylish patch pockets! The pinafore has a deep V-neckline and princess seams that pleasingly flow into the lines of the skirt. The close-fitting bodice and waistband make the Camden pinafore perfect for layering over finer tops, or wearing on its own in the summer! The simple skirt on the other hand is there for you all year round, ready to be paired with chunky knits and woolly tights through to camis and espadrilles!

Pattern Sizing:

UK 6 – 20

I cut a size 18 in the upper body and graded out over the waist and hips.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes. Mine is knee length though.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

I didn’t really follow them. I did my own thing. I did notice that I think there may be a step missing in the pocket instructions?

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I do like the overall shape and design. I think there are plenty of fit opportunities with the front and back princess seams. I like the waistband and the V-neck and also the A-line skirt. The shaped, angled pockets are edge and top stitched into place. On me at least, there seems to be excess fabric at the top of my bust. I think this is because I need to move the bust fullness down. I will still wear this pinafore but if I make this again it’s something I need to address. It’s a shame the bust apex was not marked on the pattern.

Plus points for being a layered pattern so you only need to print the size(s) you want and for providing finished measurements. Also, this is a relatively small PDF pattern so few pages if you printing at home.

Fabric Used:

Cotton corduroy.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • I did a 1 inch FBA, and took the extra inch down through the waistband and the front of the skirt.
  • I also added 0.5 inch to the front and back side seams below the waistband.
  • 0.5 inch full tummy adjustment.
  • 0.5 inch full bum adjustment.
  • Drafted all in one facings to finish neckline and armholes inside of lining the pattern.
  • Added 1 inch to the length.
  • Finished the skirt hem with a facing (1 inch depth).
  • Interfaced the waistband and finished with a facing.
  • Changed from invisible zipper to exposed zipper (ended up only taking 3/8ths inch seam allowance for this due to the width of my zipper tape).

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

I might sew again. I recommend. With any pattern it’s a starting point.

Conclusion:

This is fun, feminine and on trend. It is a perfect layering piece and I can see me wearing it even into spring with bare legs and trainers. I do like the overall shape a lot.

See you all soon!

Nina Lee Patterns Camden pinafore in navy corduroy
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Vogue 8825 blush pink bishop sleeve fixed wrap tunic top

Hi Everyone!

Today I am sharing my version of a pattern that I have had in my stash for a few years. It’s Vogue 8825, which, at the time of writing, has more than 50 reviews over on PR.com, which is testament to how popular this pattern has been. Why did it take me so long to make this pattern? A couple of reasons. First, it requires fabric with two way stretch (stretch both width and length-ways), and I really wasn’t sure which fabric to go for. Second, it is a fabric hog, requiring 3.5 metres even for just the tunic version.

Vogue 8825 blush pink bishop sleeve fixed wrap tunic top

The inspiration for my version came from Trine Schroeder over on Instagram. I adore everything that Trine makes anyway, but I just loved her version of this particular pattern. So much so, that I might even have used the same fabric as her. Speaking of which, the fabric that I used is this crepe jersey fabric from Minerva Crafts, in the colourway dark blush. This fabric washes, sews and presses well enough. This fabric is thick enough to skim over lumps and bumps, but not so thick it feels unpleasant to wear (it is a polyester spandex mix). Originally I thought I would be making the dress version of this pattern, but once I had the fabric in front of me I felt that in this particular colour, a dress version would have been worn rarely. I decided a top would be worn more frequently over jeans or my faux leather leggings etc.

Vogue 8825 blush pink bishop sleeve fixed wrap tunic top
Vogue 8825 blush pink bishop sleeve fixed wrap tunic top

As ever, you can read my full review below, but in short, I am so glad that I gave this pattern a shot. I love the colour, the shoulders, the sleeves, the way the pattern is so cleverly designed and how the neck and collar are formed. It is an empire line top, which I am not a fan of, and that is why if you are making this top/ dress, you really need to make sure you do a FBA if you need one, otherwise the empire line will not sit in the right place. Thank goodness for the generosity of other bloggers: Cenetta had a photograph of how she did her FBA on her blog and that’s exactly what I did. So thank you, Cenetta!

Vogue 8825 blush pink bishop sleeve fixed wrap tunic top
Pattern Review

Pattern Description:

Pullover tunic or dress has front extending into back collar, fitted, pleated, surplice bodice front, raised empire waist, tie ends, two-piece blouson sleeves with barrel cuffs, and stitched hem. Fitted, straight-leg pants (below waist) have elastic waist.

Pattern Sizing:

8 – 24

I cut the size 18 through the bust, arms and shoulders and graded out over the waist and hips.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I love the shoulders and their curved front seam lines, I love the sleeves. I think the design is so clever; the way the neck and collar is formed. I love the whole bodice/ sleeves from the bust up. I don’t love the empire line, but I figured out a way to wrap the tie which makes it wearable (for me).

Fabric Used:

A polyester/ spandex crepe jersey with two way stretch.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • I did a 5/8ths inch FBA, following the advice on The Mahogany Stylist’s blog. The FBA is crucial if you think you need one, otherwise the empire line will not sit in the right place.
  • I did a 5/8ths inch full tummy adjustment.
  • I did a 5/8ths inch full bum adjustment.
  • I cut a size smaller for the cuff size and the belt (the belt is long!)
  • I shortened the sleeve by 1.5 inches.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

I don’t know if I need another one of these in my wardrobe, but the dress version in a solid neutral might be good. Yes, I definitely recommend.

Conclusion:

Easy to sew (I mainly constructed on my overlocker, basting some parts on my machine first), but with maximum style points. A great pattern to have in the stash.

This tunic top also fits into Meg’s #sewtwistsandties challenge. Check out the hashtag on Instagram for lots more fun and inspiring makes!

Vogue 8825 blush pink bishop sleeve fixed wrap tunic top
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Peppermint Magazine Wide Leg Pants made in heavy brushed cotton twill

Hi Everyone,

I am back today sharing my second make using a pattern from Peppermint Magazine. You can see my first make using one of their patterns here (the ruffle sleeve top). Like the first, this pattern is also a completely FREE pattern to download, and comes in a decent size range (24 – 45.5″ waist and 33 – 54.5″ hips). Again, this pattern is beautifully drafted by In the Folds.

Peppermint Magazine Wide Leg Pants made in heavy brushed cotton twill

The shape of these pants is very on trend, with their high waist and wide leg. I did not think I would like them as much as I do, but they have already been worn several times to work. Couple of things I would say:

  1. You need a fairly heavy, non-stretch, bottom weight fabric for these to work. Mine are made in a heavy brushed cotton twill. A heavy linen, denim or corduroy would also be good.
  2. In terms of styling, you need to wear something fitted or tucked in on top IMO. I have worn them here with a RTW merino wool polo neck but I have also worn them with a button down shirt and a V-necked blouse, tucked in.
Peppermint Magazine Wide Leg Pants made in heavy brushed cotton twill Peppermint Magazine Wide Leg Pants made in heavy brushed cotton twill

Unbelievably I actually made a muslin for these pants! I had to do minimal adjustments. Check out my full review below.

Peppermint Magazine Wide Leg Pants made in heavy brushed cotton twill Pattern Review 

Pattern Description:

The Wide Leg Pant is a high waisted pant with fly front and button closure, shaped waistband, back darts and curved pocket. The pants are drafted to be fitted around the waist and hips, before dropping into a wide legged, slightly cropped pant.

Pattern Sizing:

24 – 45.5″ waist and 33 – 54.5″ hips

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes and no. There is an error in the instructions for the fly construction. Basically, one of the pattern pieces (in the text) has been labelled with an incorrect number. However, I ignored all the numbers and just followed the text and the diagrams and thought the instructions were good. Unlike the Closet Case Ginger Jeans (for example), the fly for these pants is not a cut on fly; it is a separate, sewn-on fly, so expect to tackle the fly a different way if this is your first time sewing this kind of fly.

I will be honest and say that I ignored all the other instructions. The first seam you are instructed to sew up are the side seams. I prefer to sew those up last to give some fit opportunities. So I just went my own way.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

I am surprised at how much I like wearing these. They are warm and comfortable and very on trend. I thought the fit was very good from the outset. I also love the fact that a curved waistband was included. Nothing to dislike.

Fabric Used:

Heavy weight brushed cotton twill.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • I graded from a G at the waist to an I at the hips.
  • I shortened the length of these pants by 5 inches in total (they are drafted for someone of 5’7″; FYI I am 5’3″) and took a 1.5 inch hem.
  • I did a 0.25 inch sway back adjustment to the waistband, so I added a centre back seam to the waistband, and added the removed length back to the top of the waistband.
  • I did a 0.5 inch full tummy adjustment (including to the pockets and pocket facings).
  • I removed about 3 inches (?) from the depth of the pockets and modified them so they did not extend into the front fly. Personal preference. Be warned that these pockets are absolutely huge!
  • I added 0.5″ to the length of the front crotch.
  • I used lining fabric for the pocket facings.
  • I ended up slimming the leg openings down by a total of 2 inches, which I removed from the outer seam but have modified the pattern for next time so that that comes off both inner and outer seams.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

I might sew again. A coloured heavy weight linen for summer might be good. Yes, I recommend.

Conclusion:

This is so good for a free pattern. So much thought and attention has been spent on making it; some other pattern makers should take note, lol. Don’t be frightened to try out a different style once in a while: you might just surprise yourself!

Peppermint Magazine Wide Leg Pants made in heavy brushed cotton twill

See you soon!

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Jalie Eleonore pull on faux leather leggings

Hi Everyone,

At the beginning of January I decided I was going to spend the rest of the month making items which I needed to make, rather than wanted too. Items which I needed either in my wardrobe (like jeans!) or in my home (like curtains…still not done). Anyway, in the month of January I managed to make four pairs of jeans/ leggings/ pants, and here I am sharing two of them. I will say from the outset that one of the pairs of (Jalie Eleonore) jeans was a dud due to fabric selection. More on that in a moment. But I am very pleased with the other three items.

Jalie Eleonore pull on faux leather leggings

Let’s start with these pull on faux leather leggings (fabric bought local to me) which I made using a modified version of the Jalie Eleonore pull on jeans pattern. Can I just say that I think this is the seventh pair of these pull on jeans I have made (which should tell you how much I love the pattern), however, out of those seven pairs only three pairs have been truly wearable? Huh? As much as I love this pattern, the really, really hard part is finding the right fabric to make them. Three of the seven pairs have been made with denim which just hasn’t had enough stretch. Which is why the pair I made a few weeks ago have been classed as a wadder. The fourth pair was also made a few weeks ago from a faux leather, but I found that not only did they have a lot of wrinkles along the outer knee, but they were sliding down my backside every time I tried to sit down in them. Not a good look.

Jalie Eleonore pull on faux leather leggings

For this second attempt not only did I do my first knock knee adjustment (oh! the labels we assign to our bodies!), but I also did a 2 inch full bum adjustment to the back pattern piece. At last! Success! What a difference to the fit of these leggings now. I have worn these out a couple of times, styled just like this, and I have felt comfortable, warm and stylish. Love them!

Faux Leather Leggings Fitting Notes:
  • You can read about the last pair of Jalie Eleonore jeans I made here, and that will also take you to other fitting notes. It’s been a process of tweaking the fit to get to this point.
  • For this pair I did a 0.5 inch knock knee adjustment, added 1 inch to the length at the ankle and did a 2 inch full bum adjustment.
  • I used this great resource from Closet Case Patterns to find out how to do the knock knee adjustment.
  • I used this resource from Colette Patterns to find out how to do the full bum adjustment.
  • I modified this pattern so there are no faux front pockets, no back pockets and no faux fly. They are essentially just pull on leggings.
Jalie Eleonore pull on faux leather leggings
Closet Case Ginger Jeans in dark denim

Now on to the Ginger jeans. These are view B which I have previously made here and here. This version is made in a dark denim which I purchased in Birmingham when I went to the Sew Brum meet up a couple of years back. I can’t remember the name of the shop…it was close to New Street and might have been silk something? Anyway, it’s good denim. That shop is also where I got the denim to make my denim jacket.

Closet Case Ginger Jeans in dark denim

Again, see my fitting notes below but overall I am super happy with how these turned out. One alteration I made to the pattern on these was a 0.5 inch full tummy adjustment. I made that alteration only to the jeans, and not to the pockets, and the pockets are (only very slightly) pulling forward. When I went back and checked the pattern, it looked as if I hadn’t added to the side seams of the pockets when I had added to the jeans side seam. So I have corrected that now, and also taken the full tummy adjustment through the coin pocket and pocket facing.

Closet Case Ginger Jeans in dark denim
Ginger Jeans Fitting Notes

I think this is a comprehensive list of all the adjustments I have made to date on this pattern to get to this third version:

  • 0.5 inch full tummy adjustment
  • 3/8ths inch full calf adjustment
  • 0.5 inch knock knee adjustment
  • Scooped out front and back crotch by 0.5 inch
  • Added 0.25 inches to the front and back side seams and 0.5 inch to the waistband to compensate for scooping out the crotch
  • Omitted the pocket stays
  • Curved the waistband to remove approximately 2 inches
  • Narrowed the legs
  • Don’t forget to check the Closet Case jeans fitting guide for help with all these adjustments

So two great, functional and wearable pieces added to my wardrobe. I am dying to sew some more exciting things, but I am glad I took time out to make these pieces.

Until soon.

Closet Case Ginger Jeans in dark denim
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