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From their Wikipedia page:

Google LLC is an American multinational technology company that specializes in Internet-related services and products. These include online advertising technologies, search, cloud computing, software, and hardware. Google was founded in 1998 by Larry Page and Sergey Brin while they were Ph.D. students at Stanford University, in California. Together, they own about 14 percent of its shares, and control 56 percent of the stockholder voting power through supervoting stock. They incorporated Google as a privately held company on September 4, 1998. An initial public offering (IPO) took place on August 19, 2004, and Google moved to its new headquarters in Mountain View, California, nicknamed the Googleplex. In August 2015, Google announced plans to reorganize its various interests as a conglomerate called Alphabet Inc. Google, Alphabet’s leading subsidiary, will continue to be the umbrella company for Alphabet’s Internet interests. Upon completion of the restructure, Sundar Pichai was appointed CEO of Google; he replaced Larry Page, who became CEO of Alphabet.

Trademarks Registered by Google LLC

Below, we’ve listed the active trademarks owned (or acquired by) by Google Inc, in order by filing date.

UNOFFICIAL GUIDE

Filing Date: 1992-05-08
The mark covers the following areas:

  • travel books and guidebooks in the field of travel
DOUBLECLICK

Filing Date: 1994-02-07
The mark covers the following areas:

  • advertising agency services
ZAGAT

Filing Date: 1994-12-14
The mark covers the following areas:

  • restaurant, hotel and travel guide information incorporated into computer software and CD-ROM disks
  • series of restaurant [, hotel, travel and shopping guide books
  • restaurant guide information contained in on-line computer services
ZAGATSURVEY

Filing Date: 1995-06-05
The mark covers the following areas:

  • publications, namely children’s books and restaurant, hotel, travel and shopping guide books
TM TRUEMOTION

Filing Date: 1995-08-04
The mark covers the following areas:

  • computer software for digital compression and decompression of video information
D

Filing Date: 1996-10-23
The mark covers the following areas:

  • software supplied to customers as a tool for digital video compression
DOUBLECLICK

Filing Date: 1998-02-20
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Leasing time to an interactive computer database in the field of advertising
DART

Filing Date: 1998-02-20
The mark covers the following areas:

  • DISSEMINATION OF ADVERTISING IN THE NATURE OF ONLINE ADVERTISING
DOUBLECLICK

Filing Date: 1998-02-20
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Commercial information services, namely, advertisement management by providing reports, advertisement targeting, and management of electronically stored advertising, for use on the global computer network; promoting the goods and services of others by preparing and placing on-line advertisements on a network of web pages on the global computer, as well as via e-mail; consulting in the field of on-line advertising
BOOMERANG

Filing Date: 1998-12-08
The mark covers the following areas:

  • PROVIDING BUSINESS AND ADVERTISING INFORMATION REGARDING THE COMPILATION AND EVALUATION OF DATA RELATING TO GLOBAL COMPUTER NETWORK WEB SITES AND USERS; DISSEMINATION OF ADVERTISING IN THE NATURE OF DELIVERY OF ONLINE ADVERTISING BANNERS; CONDUCTING MARKETING STUDIES IN THE NATURE OF PROVIDING TARGETING AND REPORTING SERVICES RELATED TO THE DISSEMINATION OF ADVERTISING ON THE GLOBAL COMPUTER NETWORK
QUICKSHEET

Filing Date: 1999-08-31
The mark covers the following areas:

  • computer spreadsheet software
UNOFFICIAL GUIDE

Filing Date: 1999-11-03
The mark covers the following areas:

  • PRINTED PUBLICATIONS, NAMELY, A FULL LINE OF NON-FICTION INSTRUCTIONAL BOOKS, GUIDES AND MANUALS ON A WIDE VARIETY OF TOPICS, EXCLUDING COLLEGE COMMUNITY GUIDES
ZAGAT.COM

Filing Date: 1999-11-03
The mark covers the following areas:

  • On-line retail services featuring maps, computer software and books, relating to restaurants, hotel, and travel services, by means of a global computer network
  • Providing databases featuring information of specific geographic areas, restaurants, hotels, travel amenities
YOUKNOWBEST

Filing Date: 2000-01-17
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Providing product and services information via the Internet to enable buying decisions by consumers
WIDEVINE

Filing Date: 2000-09-20
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Web search engine software for media content infringements; encryption software for providing secured web distribution of media content and information for media content providers retailers and other businesses
  • Software installation, design and maintenance for software in the fields of encryption of media content, computer search engine software for web media content infringements and efficient web distribution of information, all for media content providers, retailers and other businesses
QUICKOFFICE

Filing Date: 2000-11-03
The mark covers the following areas:

  • suite of computer application software for personal digital assistants for performing spreadsheet, word processing and charting functions
QUICKWORD

Filing Date: 2000-11-03
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Word processing computer software for personal digital assistants
ONE CLICK. ALL THE ANSWERS.

Filing Date: 2000-11-28
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Computer software for the travel industry, namely, software for air travel planning, retrieving air travel information, selecting air travel flights, and pricing air travel options, including pricing optimized for cost based on, among other things, travel origin, travel destination and travel date
  • Providing travel information, airfare pricing, and travel planning and travel arrangement services via a global computer network
FLIX

Filing Date: 2000-12-06
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Computer software for the preparing, encoding, transmitting and receiving of pictures, videos, text and audio data over local and global networks
ADWORDS

Filing Date: 2002-05-31
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Dissemination of advertising for others via the Internet
DFINE

Filing Date: 2002-09-04
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Computer software, namely image processing software for digital image enhancement and modification
PICASA

Filing Date: 2002-09-09
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Photographic and image processing services, namely, a website enabling printing photographic and digital images from [photographic negativesand uploaded DIGITAL images to imprintable surfaces; electronic image scanning, alteration and retouching of photographic images; photo enlarging[, photo REprinting, photographic film developing;] and modifying the size and color of photographic images, ALL VIA A GLOBAL COMPUTER NETWORK
PICASA

Filing Date: 2002-09-09
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Digital imaging software
I’M FEELING LUCKY

Filing Date: 2002-11-25
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Extraction and retrieval of information and data mining by means of global computer networks; providing information from searchable indexes and databases of information, including text, electronic documents, databases, graphic and audio visual information, by means of global computer information networks
B BLOGGER

Filing Date: 2003-04-01
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Electronic publishing services, namely, publication of text, audio, video and graphic works online featuring news, diaries, links, commentary photos, poetry, mini-essays, project updates, non-fiction and fiction
CHANNEL INTELLIGENCE

Filing Date: 2003-04-01
The mark covers the following areas:

  • On line services, namely, providing manufacturers with information on the sales and product distribution of their products; promoting the goods and services of others by means of operating a website with links to retail store websites of others; providing links to websites of others featuring manufactured goods for retail and wholesale store services
  • Providing search engines
PAGERANK

Filing Date: 2003-04-25
The mark covers the following areas:

  • computer services, namely organizing information, sites and other resources available on computer networks, based on perceived importance or relevance
POSTINI

Filing Date: 2003-06-18
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Electronic mail management and security services for others
CHROME

Filing Date: 2003-09-10
The mark covers the following areas:

  • computer games software; computer games; video games; video games software; downloadable computer games software supplied on-line by means of multimedia electronic broadcast or network transmission; downloadable electronic publications, namely, magazines and newsletters featuring action and adventure games recorded on computer media; disks and tapes pre-recorded with computer games software
ADSENSE

Filing Date: 2003-10-13
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Dissemination of advertising for others via the Internet; online advertising services for others, namely, providing advertising space on internet web sites
GMAIL

Filing Date: 2004-04-02
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Communications services — namely, transferring of electronic messages for groups of two or more people by means of a global computer network
DELTA CHROME

Filing Date: 2004-05-14
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Computer hardware for use in communications, graphics, extended multimedia applications, audio, video, game and television applications; computer communications software for recording, organizing, transmitting, manipulating, and reviewing text, data, photographs, video and audio files; computer graphics software; extended multimedia software recorded on magnetic media featuring educational software in the fields of math, science, social studies, history, recreation, fine arts, and language, extended multimedia software recorded on magnetic media featuring, games, stories and entertainment; software to enhance audio-visual capabilities of multi-media applications, namely for the integration of text, audio, graphics, still images and motion pictures; audio software to control and improve audio equipment sound quality; video game software; computer game software; television sets; Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), entertainment systems comprising entertainment handsets, television displays and high definition television displays, chrome programmable and three-dimensional video engines, hardware digital accelerators supporting displays, namely, rotating monitors and multiple screen configurations, featuring real-time video effects and filtering; GPS navigational displays and automotive visual displays, high definition television; handheld joy sticks and remote controls for playing interactive video games, portable and handheld digital electronic devices for recording, organizing, transmitting, manipulating, and reviewing audio, video and/or data files; interactive communications devices, namely telephones, handheld joy sticks and remote controls for playing interactive video games, handheld personal computers, related operating system software, BIOS software, computer utility programs, micro-processors, signal processors, video processors, computer expansion boards, computer graphics boards, computer interface boards, graphics cards; semiconductors, integrated circuits, computer chips, chipsets, accelerator chips, circuit boards; driver utilities for graphics, audio and video accelerators, computer peripherals and computer devices for data compression and decompression, modulation and demodulation, error correction coding and encoding, voice coding and preprogrammed memories containing processor instructions, and computer memory hardware; component devices for the aforesaid goods, and printed materials for the aforesaid goods sold as a unit
QUICKOFFICE

Filing Date: 2004-06-24
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Suite of computer application software for personal digital assistants, converged devices and smart phones for performing spreadsheet, word processing and charting functions
GAMMA CHROME

Filing Date: 2004-10-07
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Computer hardware for use in communications, graphics, extended multimedia applications, audio, video, game and television applications; computer communications software for recording, organizing, transmitting, manipulating, and reviewing text, data, photographs, video and audio files; computer graphics software; extended multimedia software recorded on magnetic media featuring educational software in the fields of math, science, social studies, history, recreation, fine arts, and language, extended multimedia software recorded on magnetic media featuring, games, stories and entertainment; software to enhance audio-visual capabilities of multi-media applications, namely for the integration of text, audio, graphics, still images and motion pictures; audio software to control and improve audio equipment sound quality; video game software; computer game software; television sets; Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), entertainment systems comprising entertainment handsets, television displays and high definition television displays, chrome programmable and three-dimensional video engines, hardware digital accelerators supporting displays, namely, rotating monitors and multiple screen configurations, featuring real-time video effects and filtering; GPS navigational displays and automotive visual displays, high definition television; handheld joy sticks and remote controls for playing interactive video games, portable and handheld digital electronic devices for recording, organizing, transmitting, manipulating, and reviewing audio, video and/or data files; interactive communications devices, namely telephones, handheld joy sticks and remote controls for playing interactive video games, handheld personal computers, related operating system software, BIOS software, computer utility programs, micro-processors, signal processors, video processors, computer expansion boards, computer graphics boards, computer interface boards, graphics cards; semiconductors, integrated circuits, computer chips, chipsets, accelerator chips, circuit boards; driver utilities for graphics, audio and video accelerators, computer peripherals and computer devices for data compression and decompression, modulation and demodulation, error correction coding and encoding, voice coding and preprogrammed memories containing processor instructions, and computer memory hardware; component devices for the aforesaid goods, and printed materials for the aforesaid goods sold as a unit
CHROMOTION

Filing Date: 2004-10-08
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Computer software and computer hardware for communications, graphics, extended multimedia, audio, video, games, television, Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), entertainment systems comprising televisions, set top box, video game players, home theater and stereo systems, media storage, namely digital video discs, video cassette recording and player machines, GPS navigational displays and automotive visual displays, high definition television, hand-held computers, namely, handheld devices having programmable capacity and capacity to communicate by electronic, digital, microwave, broadband, analog, radio, and satellite using voice, graphics, video, data, sensory, infrared, ultraviolet, and laser audio transmissions in the nature of electronic personal organizers, mobile phones, smartphones, portable and pocket-size personal computers, palmtop computers in the nature of electronic personal organizers, personal navigational global positioning systems (GPS), handheld and portable multimedia players, namely, multimedia projectors, smart computers having context, user and location awareness and which may be outfitted and adaptable with modem, memory, PC MCIA slots, disk drives, keyboard, and monitor, mobile digital devices with computer notebook functionality and connectivity in a handheld portable micro-sized form, interactive communication devices, namely telephones, handheld game units, handheld communication devices, related operating system software, BIOS software, driver utilities, and components parts therefor, devices namely, digital devices in the nature of mobile and handheld phones, handheld multimedia players, namely, portable and handheld digital electronic devices for recording, organizing, transmitting, manipulating, and reviewing audio, video and/or data files, handheld joy sticks and remote controls for playing interactive video games; extended multimedia software recorded on magnetic media featuring games and stories, graphics, animation, interactive communications, movies and music videos, remote devices in the nature of portable micro sized computers with notebook functionality for the mobile enterprise having capabilities of remote desktop, remote email and transparency access to data, portable personal navigational Global Positioning Systems (GPS), smart computers having context, user and location awareness and with integrated multidimensional data, sound, video and graphics, portable multimedia player, public kiosks in the nature of computer terminals, and portable computer terminals both allowing dial-up connectivity and personal computer access, communication devices having capacity for acquisition, multiplexing, transmission, encoding, compression, filtering, transforming, decompression, decoding, demultiplexing and reception of communications data in the nature of smart phones, portable computers, portable interactive learning computers, electronic organizers, and voice-over software for transmitting and receiving communication signals, games and other data; utility control, components and peripherals for de-interlacing signals on digital display, namely, CRT monitors, DVI displays, LCD panels, HDTV displays, processors, computer graphics boards, graphic cards; semiconductors, integrated circuits, computer chips, computer chipset for use in transmitting data to and from a central processing unit, multimedia accelerator boards, circuit boards; driver utilities for graphics, audio and video accelerators, computer peripherals for data compression and decompression, modulation and demodulation, computer memory hardware; and printed materials for the aforesaid goods sold as a unit
SAGETV

Filing Date: 2004-11-09
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Computer software for recording and playback of television broadcast, cable television and satellite television transmission, as well as computer software for searching and recording shows based on an integrated program guide, playing movies, pre-recorded videos, music and DVDs and displaying photographs and related user manuals all sold as a unit
AD ANDROID U.S.A

Filing Date: 2005-03-17
The mark covers the following areas:

  • timepieces
NEXUS

Filing Date: 2005-05-20
The mark covers the following areas:

  • personal computer
U POINT

Filing Date: 2005-05-20
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Computer software, namely image processing software for digital image enhancement and modification
NEXUS

Filing Date: 2005-10-28
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Providing telecommunication services, namely, transmission of data and voice, and enhanced calling features, namely, conference calling, call forwarding, call rejection, call return, call waiting, caller ID, caller ID block, continuous redial,specialized ringing services, fax overflow services, line hunting,speed calling, long distance telephone service, inbound toll-free service, voice mail, and high-speed access to a global computer network, all of the foregoing excluding providing multiple-user access to a global computer information network for participants in the physical oil industry
YOU TUBE

Filing Date: 2006-01-30
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Software to enable uploading, posting, showing, displaying, tagging, blogging, sharing or otherwise providing electronic media or information over the Internet or other communications network
  • Advertising and advertisement, promotion and marketing services for providing electronic media or information over the Internet or other communications network
  • Audio and video broadcasting services over the Internet or other communications network, namely, uploading, posting, showing, displaying, tagging and electronically transmitting information, audio, and video clips; providing access to information, audio, and video via websites, online forums, chat rooms, listservs and blogs over the Internet; providing on-line chat rooms and electronic bulletin boards for transmission of messages among users in the field of general interest
  • Education and entertainment services, namely, providing a website featuring audio clips, video clips, musical performances, musical videos, film clips, photographs, other multimedia materials, and information in the field of audio clips, video clips, musical performances, musical videos, film clips, photographs, and other multimedia materials; blogs featuring information in the field of audio clips, video clips, musical performances, musical videos, film clips, photographs, and other multimedia materials
  • Application service provider (ASP) featuring software to enable uploading, posting, showing, displaying, tagging, blogging, sharing or otherwise providing electronic media or information over the Internet or other communications network
YOUTUBE

Filing Date: 2006-01-30
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Software to enable uploading, posting, showing, displaying, tagging, blogging, sharing or otherwise providing electronic media or information over the Internet or other..
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From his Wikipedia page:

Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is the 45th and current President of the United States, in office since January 20, 2017. Before entering politics, he was a businessman and television personality.

Trump was born in the New York City borough of Queens. He earned an economics degree from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. A third-generation businessman, Trump followed in the footsteps of his grandmother Elizabeth and father Fred in running the family real estate company. He served as chairman and president of The Trump Organization from 1971 until his inauguration as president in January 2017, when he delegated company management to his sons Donald Jr. and Eric. Trump’s business career primarily focused on building or renovating office towers, hotels, casinos, and golf courses. Trump has also started multiple side ventures and branded various products with his name. He has written or co-authored several books, for example The Art of the Deal, and he produced and hosted The Apprentice television series for 12 years. As of 2017, he was the 544th richest person in the world, with an estimated net worth of $3.5 billion.

Trademarks Registered by Donald Trump

Below, we’ve listed the active trademarks owned by Donal Trump, in order by filing date.

TRUMP PLAZA

Filing Date: 1990-01-16
The mark covers the following areas:

  • casino services
  • hotel, bar and restaurant services
TRUMP TAJ MAHAL CASINO RESORT

Filing Date: 1990-03-06
The mark covers the following areas:

  • casino services
  • hotel services
TRUMP TAJ MAHAL CASINO RESORT

Filing Date: 1990-03-06
The mark covers the following areas:

  • casino services
  • hotel services
TRUMP TAJ MAHAL CASINO-RESORT

Filing Date: 1990-04-02
The mark covers the following areas:

  • spoons
  • sunglasses, signal bells, and magnets
  • jewelry
  • adhesive backed note paper pads, playing cards, posters, pencils, ball point pens, and stationery
  • umbrellas, luggage, hip packs, tote bags and carry-on bags
  • non-metallic money clips, plastic key chains, and ornamental novelty pins
  • mugs, beer steins, and glasses for drinking liquor
  • towels
  • clothing; namely, T-shirts, jackets, sweatshirts, sweatpants, sweaters, hats, visors, socks, boxer shorts, robes, shorts, golf shirts, night shirts, and beach cover-ups
  • plush toys, board, card and parlor games, dice, and gaming equipment; namely, gaming wheels
  • ash trays and cigarette lighters
TRUMP TOWER

Filing Date: 1990-04-09
The mark covers the following areas:

  • real estate services; namely, selling, leasing and managing commercial and residential property
THE MAR-A-LAGO CLUB

Filing Date: 1995-10-11
The mark covers the following areas:

  • entertainment in the nature of night club acts and live vocal and instrumental musical performances, and country club services
  • resort hotel services, health resort services, restaurant dining services and social club services
UNITED STATES POKER CHAMPIONSHIP

Filing Date: 1996-09-19
The mark covers the following areas:

  • entertainment services featuring games of chance, namely, card tournaments
TRUMP MARINA

Filing Date: 1997-04-29
The mark covers the following areas:

  • casino services
  • hotel services
TRUMP INTERNATIONAL GOLF CLUB

Filing Date: 1997-05-23
The mark covers the following areas:

  • golf club services
TRUMP NATIONAL GOLF CLUB

Filing Date: 1997-05-23
The mark covers the following areas:

  • clothing, namely, pants, shorts, shirts, caps, visors, blouses, skirts, slacks, and jackets
  • golf club services
  • social club and restaurant services
TRUMP

Filing Date: 1997-08-08
The mark covers the following areas:

  • hotel services
THE TRUMP ORGANIZATION

Filing Date: 1998-01-20
The mark covers the following areas:

  • real estate planning, laying out, development and construction services of residential, industrial and commercial properties services
TRUMP INTERNATIONAL HOTEL & TOWER

Filing Date: 1998-03-16
The mark covers the following areas:

  • stationery, postcards, note cards, greeting cards
  • clothing, namely, t-shirts, polo shirts, long-sleeved shirts, caps, shorts, sweat pants, sweat shirts, bathrobes
  • real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing commercial and residential property
  • hotel services, restaurant services, and health spa services
THE TRUMP SPA

Filing Date: 1998-06-25
The mark covers the following areas:

  • clothing, namely, slippers, hats, visors, t-shirts, tank tops, sweatshirts, sweat pants, shorts, bathing suits, polo shirts, jackets, warm-up suits, socks, leotards, tights, bibs, and rompers
THE TRUMP SPA

Filing Date: 1998-06-25
The mark covers the following areas:

  • fitness classes in the nature of aerobics, calistenics, kick boxing, step training and yoga; personal fitness training
  • health spa and beauty salon services, namely, massages, mud body treatments, hydrotherapy and facials
THE TRUMP SPA AT MAR A LAGO

Filing Date: 1998-06-25
The mark covers the following areas:

  • fitness classes in the nature of aerobics, body sculpting, step training, water fitness, yoga; and personal fitness training
  • Spa services, namely massage, reflexology, mud body treatments, aloe vera body treatments, cellulite treatments, exfoliating treatments, hot rock treatments, body wraps, body bronzing, hydrotherapy, aromatherapy, manual lymph drainage, facial treatments; and beauty salon services, namely, haircuts, blow dry hair styling, hair coloring, hair glossing, hair highlighting, hair perming, hair relaxing, hair foiling, make up application, eyebrow grooming, manicures, pedicures, aromatherapy manicures and pedicures, acrylic nails, nail wraps, and nail fill-ins
THE TRUMP SPA AT MAR A LAGO

Filing Date: 1998-07-01
The mark covers the following areas:

  • clothing, namely, slippers, hats, visors, t-shirts, tank tops, sweatshirts, sweat pants, shorts, bathing suits, polo shirts, jackets, warm-up suits, socks, leotards, tights, bibs, and rompers
THE TRUMP WORLD TOWER

Filing Date: 1998-07-16
The mark covers the following areas:

  • real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing commercial and residential property including condominiums
THE TRUMP WORLD TOWER AT UNITED NATIONS PLAZA

Filing Date: 1998-10-19
The mark covers the following areas:

  • real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing commercial and residential property including condominiums
TRUMP CARD

Filing Date: 1999-06-30
The mark covers the following areas:

  • customer recognition program in the nature of an incentive card for use in hotel, casino and resort facilities
TRUMP

Filing Date: 1999-12-14
The mark covers the following areas:

  • SPRING WATER
TRUMP PLAZA

Filing Date: 2000-03-09
The mark covers the following areas:

  • HOTEL, BAR AND RESTAURANT SERVICES
TRUMP

Filing Date: 2000-03-09
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Golf club services
TRUMP PALACE

Filing Date: 2001-12-12
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely listing, leasing and managing residential condominiums
  • Real estate development and construction of residential condominiums
TRUMP ROYALE

Filing Date: 2001-12-12
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing and managing residential condominiums
  • Real estate development and construction of residential condominiums * in the nature of renovation services *
TRUMP PARK AVENUE

Filing Date: 2002-01-17
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing condominiums
TRUMP ICE

Filing Date: 2003-07-07
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Bottled water
T

Filing Date: 2004-01-16
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Model and talent management services
TRUMP MODEL MANAGEMENT

Filing Date: 2004-01-16
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Model and talent management services
TRUMP GRANDE OCEAN RESORT & RESIDENCES

Filing Date: 2004-03-17
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing commercial and residential properties
  • Real estate development and construction of commercial and residential properties
TRUMP TOWER AT CITY CENTER

Filing Date: 2004-05-17
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing commercial and residential property; Real estate development of commercial and residential property
THE DONALD J. TRUMP SIGNATURE COLLECTION

Filing Date: 2004-08-18
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Clothing, namely, men’s suits and suit separates; outerwear; jackets; pants; shorts; vests; shirts, namely, dress shirts, casual shirts, polo shirts, tuxedo shirts; sweaters; ties; belts; suspenders
DONALD TRUMP

Filing Date: 2004-08-19
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Fragrances
DONALD TRUMP THE FRAGRANCE

Filing Date: 2004-08-19
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Fragrances
THE DONALD J. TRUMP SIGNATURE COLLECTION

Filing Date: 2004-10-22
The mark covers the following areas:

  • EYEWEAR
DONALD J. TRUMP SIGNATURE COLLECTION

Filing Date: 2004-12-08
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Manicure sets
  • Tie clasps; cuff links ; clocks; clock with pens sold as a unit
  • Letter openers; desk sets
  • Shaving kits comprising shaving brushes, shaving brush holders and shaving mirrors flasks
  • Cigar implements, namely, cigar cutters, bands and tubes; cigar cases, not of precious metal
T TRUMP TOWER TAMPA A DONALD J. TRUMP SIGNATURE PROPERTY

Filing Date: 2004-12-10
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing residential property including condominiums
  • Real estate development of residential property including condominiums
TRUMP PLAZA

Filing Date: 2005-04-20
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing residential property
  • Real estate development of commercial and residential property
TRUMP PLAZA

Filing Date: 2005-04-20
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing commercial property
TRUMP PLACE

Filing Date: 2005-09-28
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing and managing residential condominiums
TRUMP OCEAN CLUB

Filing Date: 2005-11-29
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing commercial and residential properties
  • Real estate development and construction of commercial and residential properties
TRUMPTINI

Filing Date: 2005-12-06
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Prepared alcoholic cocktail
TRUMP HOLLYWOOD

Filing Date: 2006-01-05
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing commercial and residential properties
  • Real estate development and construction of commercial and residential properties
TRUMP

Filing Date: 2006-02-07
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Toy model cars, namely, die-cast cars and radio control cars
T TRUMP HOLLYWOOD

Filing Date: 2006-02-24
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing commercial and residential properties
  • Real estate development and construction of commercial and residential properties
TRUMP HOME

Filing Date: 2006-05-05
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Furniture
TRUMP

Filing Date: 2006-05-16
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Jewelry
TRUMP PARK

Filing Date: 2006-08-08
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, financing, and managing commercial, residential , and hotel property
  • Real estate development and construction of commercial, residential , and hotel property
DJT

Filing Date: 2006-08-30
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Restaurant services; bar services; food and drink services
TRUMP PARC

Filing Date: 2006-09-07
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, brokerage, financing, and managing commercial, residential, and hotel property
  • Real estate development and construction of commercial, residential, and hotel property
DONALD J. TRUMP SIGNATURE COLLECTION

Filing Date: 2006-09-08
The mark covers the following areas:

  • luggage; business cases; briefcase-type portfolios; duffel bags; tote bags; wallets; business card cases; cases for carrying ties
  • shoe shine kits consisting of polishing cloths, shoe horns, shoe brushes, shoe polish; grooming and personal care kits consisting of lint brushes, combs, cuticle pushers, nail clippers, razors, tweezers, scissors
  • Leather belts
TRUMP

Filing Date: 2006-09-08
The mark covers the following areas:

  • luggage; business cases; briefcase-type portfolios; duffel bags; tote bags; wallets ; business card cases; cases for carrying ties
  • shoe shine kits consisting of polishing cloths, shoe horns, shoe brushes, shoe polish; grooming and personal care kits consisting of lint brushes, combs, cuticle pushers, nail clippers, razors, tweezers, scissors
  • Leather belts
TRUMP HOME

Filing Date: 2006-09-08
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Lighting fixtures and lamps, namely, indoor lighting fixtures, wall sconces and chandeliers; portable lighting, namely, floor lamps and table lamps; mini-pendant lamps; vanity lighting; billiard lighting; flush and semi-flush lighting ; outdoor lighting fixtures
TRUMP

Filing Date: 2006-09-20
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Lighting fixtures and lamps, namely, indoor lighting fixtures; wall sconces; chandeliers; portable lighting, namely, floor lamps and table lamps; mini-pendant lamps; vanity lighting; billiard lighting; flush and semi-flush lighting; outdoor lighting fixtures
  • Furniture; shelving; storage racks
TRUMP

Filing Date: 2006-10-25
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Apparel, namely, shirts, jackets, sweat shirts, sweat pants, sweaters, headwear, socks, boxer shorts, robes, belts, suits, pants, shorts, vests, ties, suspenders, scarves, coats, and gloves
TRUMP INTERNATIONAL HOTEL & TOWER

Filing Date: 2007-01-26
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate development and construction of commercial, residential, and hotel property
WESTCHESTER

Filing Date: 2007-02-07
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Billiard lighting, namely, electric light fixtures; chandeliers; electric candelabra; flush and semi-flush lighting, namely, electric light fixtures; floor lamps; indoor lighting fixtures; table lamps; lamps; electric lighting fixtures; mini-pendant lamps; portable lighting, namely, desk lamps; vanity lighting, namely, electric lighting fixtures for vanities; wall sconce lighting fixtures
  • Armchairs; beds; bookcases; breakfronts; buffets; benches; bed frames; bedroom furniture; non-metal bins; wood carvings; furniture chairs; chests of drawers; furniture chests; corner storage racks; corner tables; corner desks; credenza; couches; cocktail tables; filing cabinets; furniture cabinets; desks; desk-chests; dressers; drop leaf tables; drawers; end tables; footstools; picture frames; picture frame mouldings; furniture frames; bedroom furniture; living room furniture; office furniture; headboards for beds; home furniture; love seats; lamp tables; furniture mirrors; night tables; occasional tables; ottomans; pillows; furniture recliners; furniture screens; storage racks; shelving; wood sculptures; plaster sculptures; sofas; stools; furniture seats; settees; shelves; tables; umbrella stands; vanity tables; wood and upholstered furniture; furniture, namely, units for use in either living rooms or bedrooms
  • Rugs not for use in bathrooms
TRUMP CARD

Filing Date: 2007-02-08
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Magnetic-coded cards used in connection with a player tracking, marketing, and customer incentives, rewards, and rating program
THE ESTATES AT TRUMP NATIONAL GOLF CLUB

Filing Date: 2007-02-08
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, and managing residential property
TRUMP SOHO

Filing Date: 2007-04-03
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate development and construction of commercial, residential, and hotel property * in the nature of maintenance and renovation services. *
  • Hotel and temporary accommodation services; temporary lodging; hotel management; restaurants; serving food and drinks; coffee shops; bistros and bars; catering; provision of conference facilities and social facilities for special occasions; health spa services, namely, providing temporary accommodations and meals to client of a health or beauty spa
  • Health spa services, namely, health-related and cosmetic body care services
TRUMP

Filing Date: 2007-04-16
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Entertainment services, namely, ongoing unscripted television programs in the field of business, business disputes, and dispute resolution
AFFORDABLE LUXURY COMES HOME

Filing Date: 2007-04-17
The mark covers the following areas:

  • indoor lighting fixtures; lamps; electric lighting fixtures; portable lighting, namely, desk lamps
  • breakfronts; buffets; benches; bedroom furniture; non-metal bins; furniture chairs; furniture chests; credenza; couches; furniture cabinets; footstools; picture frames; furniture frames; bedroom furniture; living room furniture; office furniture; home furniture; mattresses; pillows; furniture mirrors; furniture screens; storage racks; shelving; tables; wood and upholstered furniture
  • Rugs
TRUMP T

Filing Date: 2007-04-23
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Vodka
TRUMP

Filing Date: 2007-04-23
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Vodka
TRUMP ONE

Filing Date: 2007-05-29
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Customer recognition program in the nature of an incentive card for use in hotel, casino and resort facilities
REBAR

Filing Date: 2007-08-13
The mark covers the following areas:

  • * HOTEL * Restaurant services; * HOTEL * bar and cocktail lounge services; * HOTEL * catering services; preparation of food for consumption by hotel patrons in their rooms
TRUMP

Filing Date: 2007-08-14
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Real estate services, namely, listing, leasing, financing, and managing commercial, residential, and hotel properties
  • (( Real estate development and construction of commercial, residential, and hotel properties ))
MAR-A-LAGO

Filing Date: 2007-09-06
The mark covers the following areas:

  • Lighting fixtures for playing billiards; chandeliers; electric candelabra; flush and semi-flush lighting fixtures; floor lamps; indoor lighting fixtures; table lamps; lamps; electric lighting fixtures; mini-pendant lamps; portable lighting, namely, floor lamps and table lamps; vanity lighting fixtures; electric lighting fixtures, namely, wall sconces
  • Furniture, armchairs; office chairs; beds; bookcases; breakfronts; buffets; benches; bed frames; bedroom furniture; non-metal bins; wood carvings; furniture chairs; chests of drawers; furniture chests; corner storage racks; corner tables; corner desks; credenzas; couches; cocktail tables; filing cabinets; furniture cabinets; desks; desk-chests; dressers; drop leaf tables; drawers; end tables; footstools; picture frames; picture frame moldings; furniture frames; bedroom furniture; living room furniture; office furniture; headboards for beds; love seats; lamp tables; furniture mirrors; night tables; occasional tables; ottomans; pillows; furniture recliners; furniture screens; storage racks; shelving; wood sculptures; plaster sculptures; sofas; stools; furniture seats; settees; shelves; tables; umbrella stands; vanity tables; wood and upholstered furniture; furniture, namely, wall units for use in either living rooms or bedrooms
TRUMP

Filing Date: 2007-09-10
The mark covers the following areas:

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After a several weeks-long closure, the Amazon Brand Registry reopened in May 2017 with several changes. The Amazon Brand Registry offers protections to private sellers who have registered trademarks. It offers such protections as predictive automation upon Amazon’s receipt of your report about trademark infringers and gives you added control over the listing of products on the site that use your registered mark. In order to sign up for the Amazon Brand Registry, you will first need to register your trademark and then follow the steps that Amazon has outlined for sellers. If you are a seller that already registered a trademark with the Amazon Brand Registry before April 30, 2017, you will also be required to re-enroll.

New Changes for 2017 and On

Amazon now requires sellers who register their marks with the Amazon Brand Registry to have current and active registered trademarks. Eligible marks must be registered character marks, illustrations that include numbers, letters or words, stylized numbers or words or typeset numbers, words or letters. The marks must also have a text component and be registered with the USPTO or corollary federal body in the following:

  • The United States – USPTO
  • Canada
  • France
  • Germany
  • The U.K.
  • The European Union
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • India
  • Spain
  • Mexico

In order to participate in the Amazon Brand Registry, you will need to submit proof that your mark is active and registered. You will need to submit the government-registered trademark registration or serial number. You will also be required to submit images of your logo, images of the products that are covered by your mark and a list of the countries in which your products are manufactured and sold. If you have previously registered your brand, the company recommends that you reapply for the Amazon Brand Registry for every individual brand.

The new Amazon Brand Registry offers added protection to your products from counterfeiting and trademark hijacking. Some of the new features that Amazon is offering include the ability to upload your proprietary videos and photos to your product page, receiving your own Amazon URL and more. In addition, the company offers sellers who have registered their brands with the Amazon Brand Registry with new features that can help you to protect your intellectual property. You will be able to conduct image and text searches and to take advantage of predictive automation tools for suspected violations of your intellectual property rights.

Before you can register your brand with the Amazon Brand Registry, you will first need to secure a registered trademark through the United States Trademark and Patent Office. If you previously registered your brands with the Amazon Brand Registry but do not have a federally registered trademark, Amazon’s new requirements mean that you will need to go through the federal trademark registration process. While this may seem onerous, there are numerous benefits that obtaining federal trademark registration for your marks can offer. In addition to protecting your intellectual property on Amazon, federal trademark registration also offers protections in all other commercial arenas across the U.S.

The Benefits of Trademarking Your Brand

Business owners can enjoy multiple benefits by trademarking their brands. When you register your trademark, your business will be legally presumed to be its rightful owner, giving you the exclusive rights to use your mark in trade and across the country. When your mark is protected through the federal trademark registration process, you will be able to control how it is used and who can use it as well as to prevent others from using your trademark or one that is too similar to it.

When another individual or entity infringes on your trademark, you will have the right to file a lawsuit, potentially collect damages and to seek an injunction against the infringing party to prevent its continued use of your mark. Once it is registered, your trademark will also appear in searches through the United States Patent and Trademark Office. When people want to register a trademark, they first conduct searches in the USPTO’s database so that they don’t apply for marks that are too similar to those that are already registered.

With Amazon brand trademark registration, you will also receive some added benefits. Registering your trademark can help to protect your company and your customers against counterfeit goods. It can also protect you against trademark hijacking so that another entity or individual is not able to steal your mark and register it themselves. While trademarks provide national protection, they also can be used to prevent international companies that export goods to the U.S. from selling them under your trademark.

The Trademark Process

In order to register a trademark, there are four main steps that you will need to complete. It is important for you to make certain that your mark is not already registered and that it is not too similar to another registered trademark. You will need to conduct a comprehensive search of the USPTO’s trademark database. It is important for you to understand the standards that are employed by the USPTO. You will need to determine the likelihood of confusion that your mark might present to customers. This means that you need to search for marks that are very similar to your proposed mark. After this step, you will then need to file your trademark application. The application is extremely complex, and if you make mistakes on it, it may be denied. When you file your application, you will also need to pay the application fee. If your application is denied, you will not receive a refund and will have to start the process over.

After you have filed your trademark application, you will then need to monitor it on the website. This is so you can check whether or not there have been any updates in your trademark application process. In approximately four to six months, you will hear from the USPTO. There are a couple of possibilities at this point. If the assigned examiner has found no problems with your application, it will be sent through to the fourth step. If a problem was found, you will receive a notice of an office action by the USPTO. In many cases, you will be given an additional six months to correct and amend your application and resubmit it for further consideration. If the mistakes on your application were glaring, however, you may receive an outright rejection of your application.

Once your application is sent through by the examining attorney, it will then move to the publication phase before your registration will be finalized. This gives other entities that already have registered trademarks the opportunity to file objections to yours based on similarities. Many businesses aggressively prosecute their trademarks and may file objections based on minute similarities. If an objection is filed, you will need to defend your trademark. If there are no objections, or if you successfully defend your trademark, you will receive your registration. The trademark process may take anywhere from less than a year to up to 18 months.

How an Attorney Can Help

While you are not required to have an attorney to help you with the trademark registration process, most businesses that successfully register their marks do so with the help of experienced trademark lawyers. The application is very complex, and if you make errors, you will be forced to start over and pay new application fees. People who get help from trademark attorneys are up to 50 times likelier to succeed with their applications.

Trademark lawyers are able to research your proposed mark to ensure that it is not too similar to other marks and that it complies with the federal trademark law. Experienced trademark lawyers understand how to conduct in-depth searches and to thoroughly research your potential marks. They also work to stay current on changes to the intellectual property law so that your mark and your application will comply with current law. A lawyer can help you to complete your trademark application so that it is error-free. Even small errors or omissions on your trademark application can be fatal to it, making it vital that your application is mistake-free and complete. When you submit your trademark application, you will need to add a description of all of the goods or services to which your mark will apply. Your attorney can help you with the description so that your mark will provide the most protection. After submitting it for you, the lawyer may then defend your mark against objections and assist you with any office actions that might be issued.

Securing Your Trademark

Securing your registered trademark can help you to protect your intellectual property and your brand from infringers, hijackers and counterfeiters. Without protection, your brand could suffer serious damage from others, harming your company and your profits. Registering your trademark with the USPTO can offer you protection in all of the states in the U.S. and also allow you to sign up for the Amazon Brand Registry. Since Amazon has become ubiquitous in the world of commerce, gaining protection on the site from bad actors can offer you additional ways to protect yourself from others. Getting the help of an experienced trademark lawyer may make it likelier that you will succeed with your application so that you can secure the protection that you need.

When you are trying to choose a trademark lawyer for help with registering your mark, it is important for you to research the potential trademark attorneys and then to interview several of them when you have narrowed your list. You will want to find an experienced attorney who has successfully submitted numerous trademark applications for his or her other clients. To learn more, contact the Law Office of Xavier Morales today to schedule your consultation.

Begin your Trademark Search Online

Or call now to get started: 1-866-618-2517

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Taylor Swift exploded into national attention when her debut country music album reached the top 5 on the Billboard list in 2006. She has released six albums in total, beginning as country music before transitioning to a pop icon. Her albums are:

  • Taylor Swift (2006)
  • Fearless (2008)
  • Speak Now (2010)
  • Red (2012)
  • 1989 (2014)
  • Reputation (2017)

Aside from her incredibly successful music career, the twenty seven year old is involved in several other ventures, spanning philanthropy, politics, and product endorsements.

She has pledged $4 million to build a new education center at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, TN. She has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to help support the music departments of various schools and universities, and has also donated to cancer research and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (among other donations.) Swift expressed support for former President Barack Obama, and has also spoken out against LGBT discrimination. Among the products and companies she has endorsed are Verizon Wireless, Sony, Diet Coke, and Keds.

When it comes to trademarks, Ms. Swift has mainly stuck to her name, initials, and album names. However, in 2014, she secured the trademarks to a few unique phrases from her songs. She has also trademarked a term that’s been frequently used as a hashtag.

Below is our list of the live trademarks registered by Taylor Swift.

Taylor Swift

Unsurprisingly, the first mark she registed was simply “Taylor Swift.”

Initial Application Date: March 27, 2007

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Clothing, namely, shirts, T-shirts, sweatshirts, jerseys, hats and caps.
  • Entertainment services in the nature of the rendition of live musical performances by an individual.
  • Series of musical sound recordings; pre-recorded audio cassettes, compact discs, DVD’s and video tapes featuring performances by an individual; mouse pads.
  • Digital media, namely, downloadable audio files and downloadable audio and video recordings featuring musical entertainment; downloadable musical sound recordings; downloadable video recordings featuring musical entertainment; musical video recordings; video recordings featuring musical entertainment.
  • And more
Swift

Next, Taylor went back to her name, trademarking a stylized form of her surname.

Initial Application Date: September 2, 2010

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Stationery; notebooks.
  • Clothing, namely, shirts, t-shirts; headwear; caps; hats; bandanas.
TS

Along with the stylized version of Swift, she also trademarked a stylized version of her initials at the same time.

Initial Application Date: September 2, 2010

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Stationery; notebooks.
  • Clothing, namely, shirts, t-shirts; headwear; caps; hats; bandanas; footwear.
Taylor Swift Fearless

The second mark secured by Taylor Swift stemmed from her second album, Fearless.

Initial Application Date: November 4, 2010

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Digital media, namely, pre-recorded digital discs, downloadable audio files, downloadable audio recordings featuring music and musical entertainment; Digital music downloadable from the Internet; Downloadable musical sound recordings; Musical sound recordings; Series of musical sound recordings.
  • Guitars.
  • Printed materials and publications, namely, photographs, posters, songbooks, tourbooks.
  • Backpacks.
  • Plastic key chains.
Speak Now

As with her previous mark, her album Speak Now sparked the registration of a mark across several categories.

Initial Application Date: May 14, 2011

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Bed blankets; Blanket throws.
  • Audio and video recordings featuring music and musical entertainment; Digital media, namely, pre-recorded digital discs, downloadable audio files, downloadable audio recordings featuring music and musical entertainment; Digital music downloadable from the Internet; Downloadable musical sound recordings; Downloadable video recordings featuring musical entertainment; Fitted plastic films known as skins for covering and protecting electronic apparatus, namely, mobile telephones, portable media players, laptop computers, mobile computers; Musical sound recordings; Musical video recordings; Series of musical sound recordings.
  • Jewelry.
  • Drumsticks; Guitar picks.
  • Art prints; Lithographs; Photographs; Posters; Sheet music; Song books; Souvenir programs concerning musical and entertainment events.
  • On-line retail store services featuring digital media, printed publications, printed materials, paper materials, clothing, headwear, collectibles, memorabilia, consumer products in the field of music, and a wide variety of products related to a musical artist.
  • Clothing, namely, casual clothing, namely, tops for men, women, and children; Shirts; T-shirts; Headwear; Caps; Hats; Gloves; Scarves.
  • Entertainment services, namely, providing a website featuring information in the fields of music and musical entertainment; Entertainment services, namely, providing a web portal in the fields of music and musical entertainment; Entertainment services consisting of providing a website featuring non-downloadable pre-recorded musical performances, news, articles, reviews, photographs, and other information and multi-media materials in the fields of music and musical entertainment; Providing entertainment information in the fields of music and musical entertainment; Providing entertainment information in the fields of music and musical entertainment via electronic communications, telephone communications and digital transmission.
SwiftStakes

What do you do when you’re going to hold contests for free concert tickets? Coin a new term and trademark it.

Initial Application Date: August 28, 2014

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Arranging and conducting contests and sweepstakes; Entertainment services, namely, contests and sweepstakes; Contests and sweepstakes services; Contests and sweepstakes provided via global communications networks.
Party Like It’s 1989

Along with her album 1989, Taylor trademarked this phrase.

Initial Application Date: October 25, 2014

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Musical instruments; Guitars; Accessories for musical instruments, namely, stands, cases, carrying bags and storage bags; Guitar accessories, namely, guitar stands, guitar cases, guitar carrying bags and guitar storage bags; Guitar picks; Guitar straps; Drumsticks
  • All-purpose carrying bags; Beach bags; Cosmetic bags sold empty; Handbags; Backpacks; Tote bags; Textile shopping bags; Reusable shopping bags; Luggage; Luggage accessories, namely, luggage tags, plastic luggage labels, straps for luggage, and luggage inserts in the nature of packing organizers; Wallets; Key wallets; Purses; Drawstring pouches; Textile pouches; Leather pouches; Imitation leather pouches; Key pouches; Knitting pouches for carrying and holding knitting supplies; Leather keychains; Imitation leather keychains; Umbrellas; Beach umbrellas
  • Lanyards for holding badges; Lanyards for holding laminates; Lanyards for holding cards; Lanyards for holding keys; All-purpose nylon straps; All-purpose straps comprised of synthetic textile materials; Cloth bags for laundry; Cloth bags for storage; Canvas bags for laundry; Canvas bags for storage of electronic accessories, ornaments, toys, memorabilia, household linen, clothing accessories, hair accessories, and footwear
  • Retail store services featuring a wide variety of consumer goods; On-line retail store services, namely, retail store services provided through electronic and digital means, featuring a wide variety of consumer goods; Computerized on-line ordering services featuring a wide variety of consumer goods; Retail store services featuring consumer products in the fields of music and musical entertainment; On-line retail store services featuring consumer products in the fields of music and musical entertainment; Computerized on-line ordering services featuring consumer products in the fields of music and musical entertainment; Retail store services featuring a wide variety of products relating to a musical artist and an entertainer; On-line retail store services featuring a wide variety of products relating to a musical artist and an entertainer; Computerized on-line ordering services featuring a wide variety of products relating to a musical artist and an entertainer; Providing consumer information regarding the selection of products and services to be purchased; Providing consumer information regarding membership club services; Facilitating the exchange of information to assist in the selection of products and services to be purchased
  • And more
T. S.

Continuing the trend of stylized initials, another version of TS was also registered.

Initial Application Date: October 25, 2014

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Metal keychains; Metal rings and chains for keys; Ornaments and decorations, namely, metal key chain tags, Metal tags, novelty metal tags.
  • Jewelry.
  • All-purpose carrying bags; Handbags; Backpacks; Tote bags; Drawstring pouches; Textile pouches.
  • Beverageware.
  • Hair accessories, namely, ties; Hair ornaments; Ribbons.
  • Toy battery-activated light sticks; Toy battery-activated batons that glow; Christmas tree decorations; Christmas tree ornaments.
  • Musical sound recordings; Series of musical sound recordings; Audio recordings featuring music and musical entertainment; Digital media, namely, pre-recorded digital discs, downloadable audio files, downloadable audio recordings, featuring entertainment, music and musical entertainment; Digital music downloadable from the Internet; Downloadable musical sound recordings; Downloadable music files; Digital media, namely, downloadable multi-media files featuring music and musical entertainment; Downloadable multi-media content containing images, graphics, artwork, text, hypertext, and audio featuring entertainment, music and musical entertainment; Ring tones; Downloadable electronic publications in the nature of songbooks and sheet music; Cases for mobile telephones; Fitted protective covers for mobile telephones; Eye glasses; Sunglasses; Cases for eye glasses; Cases for sunglasses.
  • Bed linen; Household linen; Bed blankets; Throws; Bedding, namely, bed spreads.
  • Retail store services featuring a wide variety of consumer goods; On-line retail store services, namely, retail store services provided through electronic and digital means, featuring a wide variety of consumer goods; Computerized on-line ordering services featuring a wide variety of consumer goods; Retail store services featuring consumer products in the fields of music and musical entertainment; On-line retail store services featuring consumer products in the fields of music and musical entertainment; Computerized on-line ordering services featuring consumer products in the fields of music and musical entertainment; Retail store services featuring a wide variety of products relating to a musical artist and an entertainer; On-line retail store services featuring a wide variety of products relating to a musical artist and an entertainer; Computerized on-line ordering services featuring a wide variety of products relating to a musical artist and an entertainer; Providing consumer information regarding the selection of products and services to be purchased; Facilitating the exchange of information to assist in the selection of products and services to be purchased.
  • Cloth bags for laundry; cloth bags for storage; canvas bags for laundry; canvas bags for storage.
This Sick Beat

Stemming from a line in “Shake It Off”, the phrase raised some eyebrows when it was registered.

Initial Application Date: October 26, 2014

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Tops; Tops for men and women; Athletic tops for men and women; Shirts; T-shirts.
  • Guitar picks; Drumsticks.
Cause We Never Go Out of Style

Another mark stemming from a lyric, the fall of 2014 saw the application for this phrase.

Initial Application Date: October 26, 2014

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Tops; Tops for men and women; Athletic tops for men and women; Shirts; T-shirts.
  • Paper products, namely, notebooks, notepads, journals, note paper, writing paper; Stickers; Stationery.
Could Show You Incredible Things

Another phrase from the fall of 2014 trademark spree also stemmed from another song lyric, this time from Blank Space.

Initial Application Date: October 26, 2014

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Paper products, namely, notebooks, notepads, blank journals, blank writing journals, note paper, writing paper; Stickers; Stationery.
  • Tops for men and women; Athletic tops for men and women; Shirts; T-shirts; Scarves; Neckties; Bandanas; Headwear.
Nice to Meet You. Where You Been?

Another phrase from Blank Space.

Initial Application Date: October 26, 2014

The mark covers the following categories:

  • Tops for men and women; Athletic tops for men and women; Shirts; T-shirts.

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One of the common questions I get from potential clients revolves around how to trademark a logo. When a small business is launching, taking the time to ensure your logo doesn’t infringe on someone else’s trademark is an important step.

How important is it for a business to trademark its logo? Consider the case of Coca-Cola, one of the most visible brands in the world. Sold in over 200 countries, Coca-Cola is such a successful company that it can survive almost anything.

If you were to burn down half of its manufacturing plants, the company would still be able to rebuild and recoup. If Coca-Cola somehow ran into a severe cash drain, most banks would willingly issue out loans based on the company’s identity.

The one thing the company would struggle to recover from is the loss of its brand. If Coca-Cola lost its trademark brand, it would become just another nameless soft drink company in a sea of options. It’s likely that the company would begin to suffer shortly after that. Coca-Cola as a company might have an annual revenue of nearly $50 billion, but the brand—an intangible asset—is worth a lot more.

Your logo is your corporate identity. It is what distinguishes your business from others. So it makes perfect sense that you would want to trademark your logo. Unfortunately, far too many companies postpone the trademarking of their logo for different reasons, few of which are valid.

The Risks of Not Trademarking Your Logo

Should a company worry about protecting its logo? That depends. Do you have big plans for your company? Because if you do, you need to take steps towards securing the uniqueness of your brand from the get-go.

Your logo is the most powerful marketing weapon in a small business’s arsenal. It represents everything your brand stands for and wordlessly describes what it is exactly that your company does. It gives a face to your brand and provides your customers and partners with a flag to rally around. A good logo distinguishes you from your competition – and that’s exactly why you need to protect it.

Every day small businesses find themselves on the receiving end of a lawsuit because the logo they spent $15,000 designing infringes on someone else’s trademark. Worse, they might discover that one of their competitors has ripped off their logo and there’s little they can do about it, because they never took the proper legal steps to protect themselves.

Don’t let this happen to you. When it comes time to create and trademark a logo for your company, make sure it passes legal muster before you sign on the dotted line. Here’s how.

The Steps to Protecting Your Logo 1. Decide on Your Logo Concept

The first step to getting a logo trademarked is—as you might expect—to create your logo. Your logo can be a shape, symbol, images, words, or a combination thereof. The most important factor is ensuring that your logo is distinct.

You cannot simply pick a dictionary word that is connected to the product or service you are offering and use that as your logo. For instance, if you own a milk company, your logo cannot be “MILK” just by itself.

This is where working with a trademark attorney offers some benefit. An attorney can guide you through the design process to ensure that the logo is unique enough for trademark approval. At the same time, you can focus on creating a logo that aligns with your company’s vision. Once complete, your attorney can make sure the logo is in compliance with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) directives.

2. Check for Existing Trademarks Before You Approve the Design

It’s pretty obvious that you shouldn’t rip off your competitors when you design a logo, but simply separating yourself from your obvious competitors might still land you in hot water. Before you approve the final design of your logo, you or your trademark attorney should search through the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s TESS system to see if any existing trademarked logos conflict with yours.

Companies protect their trademarks with a heavy hand. Even though your logo might be unique as a whole, it could contain shapes, symbols, or even colors that another company has trademarked.

Trademark owners will have the chance to oppose your trademark filing if they feel your logo infringes on any aspect of theirs. So why not simply file your trademark application and wait for any potential objections?

Logo designers cost money. The trademark application fee is at least $275, plus attorney fees if you retain one. If the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) upholds a trademark owner’s objection to your logo, you will need to pay again for each of these services. A trademark search can save you time, effort, and money.

3. Ensure a Design Distinctive Enough to Trademark

Companies and institutions often use a generic or archetypal symbol to represent their brand. Think about all of the stars, hearts, and paw prints you see in advertising material. Using these common symbols makes sense to many marketing executives – they’re universally understood and effective at characterizing a brand thanks to the cultural meanings we’ve attached to them. When you see a heart, you think love. When you see a tree, you think wilderness and nature. However, these symbolic logos are never as generic as they seem.

In order to receive approval from the USPTO, you must design a logo that possesses a distinctive character. In other words, there must be something unique about your logo that sets it apart from all the other stars, pine trees, light bulbs, etc. that exist as registered trademarks.

Some companies, such as Macy’s, add their word mark to a generic symbol. Others incorporate design twists that make generic symbols distinctive. Examples include the bite missing from the Apple logo. If you want to use a common symbol for your logo, then it must possess similarly distinctive characteristics.

Here are some examples that better illustrate what is acceptable when trademarking a universal or symbolic logo:

While each of these logos is based on a five-pointed star, they are all visually distinct; it is difficult to mistake one for the other. Even the Macy’s and Heineken logos, which both feature a red star preceding a word mark, are considered distinct because these companies work in different industries – retail and food and beverage, respectively. Therefore the trademarks can bear some resemblance to each other. Additionally, Heineken’s trademark features green lettering while Macy’s features a star as an apostrophe.

For an example of four entities using similar but distinctive logos in the same industry, take a look at these university paw print logos.

Each paw print is a registered trade mark of its respective university. While they are all visually similar, they manage to differentiate themselves through various means. Clemson’s and Penn State’s paw marks feature unique colors and notches in the bottom “pad” that help identify them as registered marks. The University of Missouri’s mark is visually similar to Clemson’s paw print, but is distinguished by its color scheme, its positioning, and the school’s block “M” logo on the bottom pad. The University of New Mexico’s paw mark is modeled after a wolf rather than a cat. It is therefore more slender than the other marks and distinguished by the use of claws and a grey border.

If you plan to use a common symbol for your company logo, it is crucial that you make it distinct like these businesses and institutions have done. Separate your brand from the competition by attaching a word mark, adding a design flourish, or using a unique color scheme to signify that your mark is your own. Doing so will strengthen your ownership of the mark and will also help protect you from trademark infringement in the future.

4. Apply for Your Trade Mark as Soon as Possible

Even if your product or service isn’t market-ready, you should consider filing a trademark application. Why spend money to trademark something that doesn’t yet exist? Because doing so offers you a greater level of protection.

For the USPTO to approve a trademark application, the applying company must prove it currently uses the mark in commerce, or that it intends to use the mark in the near future. Filing an “intent to use” application helps ensure that the logo you just designed will be safe and totally protected before you roll out a full branding and marketing campaign.

Once approved, you have six months to take one of two actions. If you begin using your logo in commerce within the six-month window, you must submit proof to the USPTO. Otherwise, you must file for an extension. Each extension application is subject to a fee.

To apply for an “intent to use” trademark you simply need to file a standard Trademark Application. There is a section where you can note that your application is based on bona fide or good faith intent to use in commerce. After the application is received, the government will issue you a Notice of Allowance. You then have six months (or longer if you pay for an extension) to put your trademark to use and to file a supplemental “Statement of Use” form.

Once that’s done, your trademark will be published to the official USPTO database.

5. Wait for the trademark to be approved

After you submit your application, a Trademark Examiner will review it. The examining attorney will then approve or reject your application. Trademark refusal happens for several different reasons. For example, the USPTO does not register marks that appear to carry the image of any deceased U.S. President whose spouse is still living. (Unless it is done with the consent of the spouse.)

Your mark may also be turned down if it is perceived to contain images or words that degrade national symbols. You will also have a hard time registering marks that can be viewed as scandalous or immoral. Your mark could also be declined if it is considered to be generic. The list goes on. Unfortunately, the USPTO does not award refunds for failed applications, so it is best to get it right from the start.

Once your logo is approved, the USPTO will give you the guidelines that you must follow to maintain your logo. It is also a good idea to set up a trademark watch service at this point. A watch service will be charged with preventing other businesses and organizations from using your logo illegally.

As these steps have shown, learning how to trademark a logo is fairly straightforward. With a good attention to detail and a good trademark attorney, any small business can protect its brand by registering its logo. Don’t let the process scare you. Once you have your trademark secured, the effort will be well worth it.

Design to Protect

The ocean of commerce is full of sharks. Don’t throw your new logo out there without a life preserver. Protect your logo, your brand and your profits by locking down your new identity with a trademark. It might take a little bit more work, but it will be worth it once your brand becomes an industry leader.

The post How to Trademark a Logo appeared first on SecureYourTrademark.com.

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If anyone can attest to the nightmare of waging a trademark battle against a corporate giant, it’s Amy Brooks, a Rochester-based entrepreneur. Ms. Brooks is the proprietor of Bubbles by Brooks, a distributor of therapeutic soaps for cancer patients. After surviving cancer treatment herself, Brooks began handcrafting skin care and soap products that minimize irritation for cancer patients undergoing therapy. Running the business out of her home, Brooks has managed to nurture her brand over the past 10 years into a modest but profitable operation with annual sales of $100,000.

Imagine Brooks’ confusion and fear when she received a letter one day from clothing juggernaut Brooks Brothers demanding that she withdraw her application to register the trademark “Bubbles by Brooks.” Brooks Brothers told her that, although “Brooks” is her surname, she does not have the right to infringe on their mark or compete with their products. Attorneys told Ms. Brooks that it would cost about $200,000 to fight the infringement claim.

Fortunately, Ms. Brooks’ case has a happy ending. Unable to afford the requisite legal fees, she received pro bono assistance from an intellectual property firm in Minneapolis. Her lawyers moved for summary judgment, or a dismissal, and Brooks Brothers finally dropped the suit after a year-long battle. Sadly, Ms. Brooks’ outcome is uncommon in the trademark world. All too often, small businesses relinquish their rightful brand identities in the face of large corporate threats. Here are six steps that you can take to spare your small business that fate.

Step 1: Do Your Homework

Image via Flickr

Before you adopt or register your trademark, perform a thorough search of the Internet and state and federal trademark databases to identify similar marks. A Google search can help you turn up similar marks, and searching databases like the Trademark Electronic Search System (TESS) will help you avert objections from registered trademark holders.

Consider the case of Robert Muller-Moore, a Vermont artist who attempted to trademark his “Eat More Kale” T-shirt company. Chick-fil-A, the restaurant behind the “Eat Mor Chikin” campaign, contacted Muller-Moore to demand that he withdraw his trademark application due to the likelihood of confusion.

This past December, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) ended up approving Muller-Moore’s application. According to Muller-Moore, he hadn’t even heard of Chick-fil-A until the company contacted him. Had he done his due diligence in searching for extant marks, he might have avoided this lengthy and expensive hassle altogether.

Step 2: Use Your Mark

Entrepreneurs who have yet to secure federal trademark protection sometimes hesitate to use their mark for fear that it will be stolen. Ironically, not using a mark in commerce actually vitiates ownership rights, so don’t wait to put your mark out there once you’ve done your research. Even without federal registration, using a mark in commerce confers common law protection. This means that other companies, even with federal trademark registration, cannot use the mark in your geographic area if you were the first to use it in commerce in connection with the goods or services that it identifies.

Step 3: Consult a Trademark Attorney

Image via Flickr

Typically, entrepreneurs are strapped for cash and thus balk at the cost of hiring a trademark attorney. This attitude, while understandable, is a risky path to take. If a large company accuses you of infringement, you usually have three options: 1) abandon your mark, 2) change your mark and thereby lose some or all of its benefit, or 3) fight the claim in court.

Before you consider option #3, consider that trademark battles can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Moreover, Kenneth Port, director of the Intellectual Property Institute at William Mitchell College of Law, estimates that small companies entangled in trademark-bullying disputes prevail only 5.5 percent of the time. An experienced trademark attorney can help you forestall infringement claims altogether and give you trademark registration advice specific to entrepreneurs. The cost of hiring an attorney upfront pales in comparison to what you would pay for a protracted court battle.

Step 4: Register Your Mark

While unregistered marks have some protections under common law, federal registration confers benefits that startups can’t afford to sacrifice. Registration itself costs between $275 and $375, which is paltry in comparison to the following benefits:

  • Prevents the use or registration of the same or similar marks for related types of products and/or services
  • Puts companies nationwide on notice of the mark’s use and ownership, thereby depriving infringers of the ability to claim that their use of the mark was in good faith
  • Gives you national protection against infringement
  • Confers the right to use the ® symbol
  • Creates an evidentiary presumption of the mark’s validity, meaning that the burden of proving ownership shifts to the alleged infringer
Step 5: Police Your Mark

Once you have registered your trademark, you are responsible for enforcing the rights that flow from it; the USPTO will not do this for you. Some courts even regard a failure to police a trademark and prosecute infringement as evidence of abandonment, in which case the owner could lose ownership rights in the mark. For example, Anheuser-Busch’s failure to protest the use of the term “Budweiser” by DuBois Brewing for 35 years precluded the company from barring DuBois from using the term in connection with its beer in Anheuser-Busch v. DuBois Brewing Co. (1947).

To police your mark adequately, periodically conduct Internet searches for your mark. You might even set up a Google alert to receive an email anytime your mark or something similar appears online. You can also regularly check federal and common law trademark databases for newly filed trademark applications that may infringe upon your trademark rights. One of the many benefits of an attorney is that he/she can do this for you, possibly by setting up a trademark watch service.

Step 6: Know When to Raise the White Flag

Sometimes, no matter how many precautions a startup takes in protecting its mark, a trademark battle can still arise. When this happens, small businesses need to weigh the benefits associated with preserving their marks against the costs of pursuing litigation. At some point, settling out of court may be the financially prudent option as changing your mark may be necessary if you wish to keep your business. Situations like these are where legal counsel can prove invaluable.

With startups, how distinctive a product is in the marketplace can make or break the business’s viability, and a registered trademark safeguards that distinctiveness. Entrepreneurs can protect against major corporations with deep pockets bullying them into relinquishing their brand by implementing the six steps mentioned here.

The post How to Prevent Major Corporations from Stealing Your Trademark appeared first on SecureYourTrademark.com.

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Recently, Disney-owned Lucasfilm filed an opposition trademark dispute against New York-based Empire Brewing Company for the company’s latest bottled brew, named “Strikes Bock.” Obviously, it’s not difficult to see where this is going. It’s “Empire Strikes Bock” beer, which is similar to George Lucas’ wildly popular 1980 film, “The Empire Strikes Back.”

Now, Disney’s behemoth litigation team is pointing its Death Star directly at the small Syracuse-based brewery. Is there truly a dark side in this battle, or does Disney have the right to protect its empire from all trademark rebel forces?

The Intergalactic Battle of Brands

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Disney and Lucasfilm contend that the name, Empire’s “Strikes Bock,” is too similar to the film’s name, which could confuse customers into believing that the golden German lager is actually a Stars Wars licensed product. Disney is opposing the filed trademark to stop the beer’s sale in bars, restaurants, and stores. Disney asserts that the beer’s full name infringes Disney’s and Lucasfilm’s trademark of “The Empire Strikes Back” movie title.

In the legal filing, Disney states, “Applicant’s EMPIRE STRIKES BOCK mark is virtually identical in sound, appearance, and connotation to Lucasfilm’s THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK mark, differing by only one letter in the respective last words ‘BOCK’ and ‘BACK,’ and the initial word ‘THE.’”

However, the Empire Brewing Company has rebutted the allegation, asserting that the name is “Strikes Bock,” by Empire Brewing Company. In all fairness, the brewery pulls its company name, Empire Brewing Company, from New York (the Empire State) and not from the imperialistic dark forces of a galaxy far, far away. Empire Brewing Company had never filed a trademark prior to filing for its trademark of Strikes Bock beer. Although the brewery has been serving the beer for seven years on tap, the company sought to trademark the beer for bottling and selling Strikes Bock in stores.

Skywalking a Thin Line

Disney’s filing does not dispute the name of Empire Brewing Company, its packaging, or its logos. In the statement, the company only names “Empire Strikes Bock” as the grounds for infringement. However, the owner of Empire Brewing Company, David Katleski, denies the allegation. It’s important to note that the filing does not mention the use of “Empire’s Strikes Bock” as an infringement. In this instance, in which the phrase includes the company’s possession of the beer, the filing does not make a case. These are the murky areas and thin lines of trademark law.

However, Lucasfilm’s fight with Empire Brewing Company is not the first inter-branding war in which George Lucas has been involved. In the past, the company unsuccessfully sued an artist who constructed Stormtrooper outfits, and it also set its Jedi trial-tricks on a company who created videogame headsets that could, reportedly, control characters in the game with the game user’s mind.

Does “Strikes Bock” Deceive the Customer?

Further into Lucasfilm’s official complaint, the Stars Wars producers continue to explain that the Star Wars franchise has a long history of marketing in connection with food and beverages, among other products, for the benefit of its fans. For this reason, the argument states that customers of the brewery would be easily confused into believing that Empire’s Strikes Bock is an officially licensed Stars Wars beer. This idea of brand confusion is the crux and foundation of Lucasfilm’s claim of infringement.

It should be noted that the beer company makes constant homages to the Star Wars franchise through its packaging and advertisement of Strikes Bock beer. Marketing materials include the iconic, stylized crawl of the opening credits preceding all Star Wars movies, and the materials use phrases such as, “May the hops be with you.” Although the owner of Empire Brewing Company argues against the infringement, he does not deny paying homage to Star Wars, admitting his affinity for the franchise.

Lucasfilm Is Not in the Beer Business

Stars Wars is one of the most famous, iconic film franchises in history. As such, the franchise has a long history of trademarking a variety of goods. As the official trademark opposition notes, Lucasfilm has trademarks on “toys, games, apparel, video/computer games, personal-care products, paints, trading cards, confections, pre-recorded films and music, books, magazines, music, and entertainment services.” To date, Lucasfilm does not have any trademarks for beer. However, Lucasfilm did allude to licensing the name “Skywalker” to Skywalker Vineyards, which makes Skywalker wines. Beer is not found in the company’s statement.

Can the Disney Empire Strike Back with a Dilution Claim?

Since, currently, Lucasfilm does not sell beer, they may choose to pursue a dilution claim and not an infringement claim. Settling between “Empire Strikes Bock” and “Strikes Bock” by Empire Brewing Company may be a bit tricky. However, dilution may offer another opportunity for Disney litigation. Trademark dilution is a trademark law concept that refers to one company tarnishing another — always more iconic — company by using a similar mark on a non-competing product. As the argument states, the lesser-known company dilutes the uniqueness of the more widely known brand or trademark.

Dilution is also sometimes divided into two related concepts: blurring, which blurs a mark of one trademark to associate with other, dissimilar products, and tarnishment, which weakens a mark because of unflattering associations. In the case of Empire Brewing Company, does Strikes Bock blur the lines of dissimilar products with a common mark? Perhaps, but Lucasfilm is not currently in the beer business. In any case, dilution arguments are hard to prove and rarely won.

As the case progresses between Disney-owned Lucasfilm and Empire Brewing Company, who has also sought the assistance of legal counsel, it will be interesting to see how the legal proceedings move forward. Is it a case of the big guy pushing around the little guy? Or does Lucasfilm have the right to use the Death Star, which it built, in any way that it chooses?

The post Trademark Disputes: LucasFilm Versus Empire Strikes Bock Beer appeared first on SecureYourTrademark.com.

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This week’s roundup includes an EDM artist, a potential battle over burgers, and news on an uptick in companies registering a trademark for a hashtag.

Deadmau5 Sues Vape Company for Trademark Infringement

The similar name of deadmodz (vs deadmau5) and near identical logo design landed an e-cigarette company in hot water with the electronic dance music artist and his legal team.

Electronic dance music master Joel Zimmerman says West Coast Vape Supply is intentionally infringing on his deadmau5 trademark, according to a federal lawsuit filed on Thursday in California.

The deadmodz electronic cigarette line is trying to capitalize on Zimmerman’s fame, and according to the lawsuit the products “overlap with, are closely related to deadmau5’s goods and services and/or represent a natural zone of expansion for deadmau5, and such goods are or would be marketed and sold to the same types of consumers through the same channels of trade.” (Source)

McDonald’s Beware? Chipotle Has Filed To Trademark “Better Burger”

Could we see burgers coming to Chipotle? A recent trademark application seems to hint that we may, and it will be interesting to see how the dominant players like McDonald’s and Burger King respond.

Burrito chain Chipotle is now taking a look at the burger business.
The Denver-based company has filed to trademark “Better Burger” with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The filing, which was first reported by Bloomberg News, suggests Chipotle could be considering founding or investing in a burger concept. (Source)

Companies Increasingly Trademark Hashtags

The WSJ highlights how more and more companies are filing trademarks around their social media hashtags.

Companies are increasingly trying to “join the conversation” with consumers on social media services including Facebook and Twitter, but they’d rather their competitors didn’t join the conversation too.

In an attempt to protect their intellectual property on social media sites and across the wider Internet, companies are increasingly filing trademark applications for hashtags related to their products and brands. (Source)

The post Trademark Roundup – Week of April 3 appeared first on SecureYourTrademark.com.

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Creating a unique name, logo or slogan for your product or service business comes with the responsibility to trademark the name, logo or slogan to ensure that another company or person does not use the idea for their own financial gain. The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB) is tasked with hearing appeals of trademark application denials and determining who has the right to a trademark when two or more people or businesses are in a dispute. Understanding how to ask the TTAB to hear a case and the resulting trial that will occur can help people who are facing a denial of their trademark application.

What is the TTAB?

The TTAB was created by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office for the purpose of hearing disputes between people who apply for, or already own, trademarks. The proceedings that take place through the TTAB in order to determine who owns a trademark include the opposition of a trademark application and the cancellation of a trademark registration (in the case that a registration is found to violate the trademark rights of another entity).

If the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office refuses an application for a trademark, the TTAB oversees appeals trials. Any applicant who is refused a trademark has the right to file an appeal.

Appealing Trademark Refusals

When a trademark application is refused, those who are trying to protect their names, logos or slogans can feel frustrated and confused about why their application was denied. Fortunately, it is possible to appeal the decision. Here is what trademark applicants need to know about filing an appeal.

Responding to an Office Action

The Trademark Office will issue an Office Action when there is a problem with the application. If an application is denied due to reasons like the possibility that the new trademark will be confused with a trademark that is already owned by another entity, this reason will be cited in the Office Action. It is also possible for an applicant to receive an Office Action when certain requirements of the application, like a disclaimer for a descriptive term, are not met. The Office Action cites each problem in order to explain why the application is being refused.

Applicants are given six months from the date that the Office Action was issued to respond to the refusal. This response should either include changes to the initial application that ensure it is in compliance with regulations and requirements, or arguments that outline why the trademark should have been approved.

If the Trademark Office agrees with the response, it has the option to approve the application. Alternatively, a Final Office Action may be issued to inform the applicant that the application is formally denied. Applicants are given six more months to write a response to the Final Office Action or file an appeal.

What Happens If Your Registration Attempt Is Refused?

When an application for a trademark is refused and the response to the Office Action does not result in an approval, applicants have the option to appeal the refusal. The TTAB will hear arguments in favor of registering the trademark from the applicant, and an Examining Attorney who works for the Trademark Office will present evidence outlining the reasons for the Trademark Office’s decision to refuse the trademark application.

Well-Known Trademarks That Were Initially Denied

People who are applying for a trademark may feel frustrated when they receive a denial, but they are not the only ones who have gone through the process of being denied and having to appeal. There are instances of famous trademarks that were initially refused when the application first reached the Trademark Office.

Apple’s “TOUCH ID” trademark was denied by the Examining Attorney during the initial application phase because it was believed that the mark could be confused with a trademark that was already registered by another party. The Examining Attorney also claimed that the wording of the mark was merely descriptive, meaning that the applied-for mark merely described an ingredient, quality, characteristic, function, feature, purpose or use of the specified goods and/or services.

Apple responded to the Office Action with arguments in favor of approval their trademark application. The company asserted that the term “TOUCH ID” was not merely descriptive because it had acquired distinctiveness, and it also presented arguments against the claim that the trademark would be confused with another prior-registered trademark. After responding to the Office Action with arguments in favor of approval, the refusals were withdrawn and the application was approved.

Google’s “NEXUS ONE” trademark was also denied by the Examining Attorney due to the possibility of the trademark being confused with another mark. The Trademark Office claimed that the trademark could be confused with the use of NEXUS in relation to telecommunications by a prior applicant. Google responded to the Office Action by outlining the instances of confusion that might exist according to the Trademark Office, and providing arguments against these scenarios.

The Trademark Office then sent a Final Office Action to Google, and amendments to the initial application were made to strengthen the company’s argument in favor of the application. The trademark was accepted after Google submitted additional arguments.

The Trademark Trial Process

If a trademark dispute goes to trial, applicants can expect the process to follow a formula set forth by the TTAB. After the initial Office Action and response, a Final Office Action may be sent denying the application. This is the point at which an applicant has the option to appeal.

If an appeal is filed, the TTAB will evaluate the application and read the arguments made by the applicant in favor of approving the application. The TTAB will also examine evidence for the denial that is submitted by the Trademark Office to make a final ruling on the application. It is best for the applicant to have a legal professional with trademark experience review the documents related to the application in order to form a solid argument. Denials of appeals are common, so legal help is essential.

The TTAB may also inform the applicant that another person is opposing the applicant’s attempt to register a trademark. Others are also able to ask the TTAB to cancel a trademark registration. As with appealing an application, it is important for trademark owners and applicants to hire an attorney for help with TTAB trials.

The post Trademark Trials and Appeals appeared first on SecureYourTrademark.com.

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Patent-related litigation made up more than half of all lawsuits filed in America last year, a forty percent increase from three years before. With so-called patent troll lawsuits on the rise in a big way, I thought it’d be a good time to highlight the interesting, funny, and little-known side of American patent, trademark, and copyright law.

A Note on Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights

I’ve heard people misuse these three words for too long, so I thought I’d clear it up. Patents, trademarks, and copyrights are three distinct legal tools used to claim ownership in different ways. They’re also handled by different government agencies and require different methods to claim them.

  • Patents are limited-duration rights related to an invention. The US Patent and Trademark Office distributes these rights in exchange for public display of the invention.
  • Copyrights are designed to protect “works of authorship,” generally referring to works of literature, music, and art that have been “tangibly expressed.” The US Copyright Office handles the distribution of this particular right.
  • Trademarks are a bit more complicated – I’ll share with you the definition I found at the US Patent and Trade Mark Office – “a trademark is a word, phrase, symbol, and/or design that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others.” Other forms of mark exist – a service mark is any “… word, phrase, symbol, and/or design that identifies and distinguishes the source of a service rather than goods.” Registering a trademark gives you legal ownership and the sole right to use the mark nationwide.

Chapter 1: Twelve Historic US Patent Law Cases

Chapter 2: Twelve Famous Infringement Cases from the World of Music

Chapter 3: Thirteen Ludicrous Celebrity Trademark Stories

Chapter 4: Nine High-Profile Patent Infringement Cases from the Tech Industry

Chapter 5: Eight Fascinating Tales of Infringement from the Literary World

Chapter 6: Eleven Insane Examples of Trademark Lawsuits

Chapter 7: Twelve Contemporary Infringement Cases to Watch

Twelve Historic US Patent Law Cases

American patent, trademark, and copyright law is a dense and complex blend of codes and traditions that go back hundreds of years. The following twelve cases are among the most instrumental in developing our modern practice of determining ownership.

  1. The US Patent Act of 1790 – the first-ever patent statute enacted by the US government.
  2. O’Reilly vs. Morse, 1853 – finds that an abstract idea cannot be patented beyond a specific use of that idea.
  3. Gorham Company vs. White, 1871 – produced the basis of tests for design patent infringement.
  4. Schillinger vs. United States, 1894 – as a result of this case, patent infringement lawsuits cannot be brought against the federal government.
  5. The Incandescant Lamp Patent Case, 1895 – used to justify the invalidation of vague patents.
  6. Graver Tank & Manufacturing Co. v. Linde Air Products Co., 1950  – introduced the doctrine of equivalents, used in common law around the world.
  7. Aro Manufacturing Co. v. Convertible Top Replacement Co., 1961 – a pivotal case in In which the Supreme Court redefined the distinction between “repair” and “reconstruction” of a patented item.
  8. Diamond v. Chakrabarty, 1980 – was the first case to determine that a man-made living organism is a protectable manufactured good.
  9. Phillips vs. AWH, 2005 – A reference case now commonly used to decide how to interpret language in a patent.
  10. KSR vs. Teleflex, 2007 – Another reference case, used now in patent cases where the “obviousness” of a proposed invention is in question.
  11. Bowman vs. Monsanto, 2012 – A modern case reaffirming the old idea that copying a patented material and re-producing it is infringement, in this case even when the material is a seed produced by a plant grown from a patented seed.
  12. Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International, 2014 – An important eligibility case in which a certain software product was found to be “too abstract” to be patentable.
Twelve Famous Infringement Cases from the World of Music

Copyright cases in the music industry are big news, in part because of hero-worship, in part because nostalgia for the past makes us angry when a new artist rips off an old beloved tune. See how many of these famous music copyright infringement cases you remember.

  1. Robin Thicke’s 2013 hit “Blurred Lines” was found to infringe on a Marvin Gaye copyright.
  2. George Harrison was forced to pay more than $500,000 in a copyright case involving “My Sweet Lord.”
  3. Michael Bolton was fined nearly $1 million for violating an Isley Brothers copyright.
  4. Two recording giants, Queen and David Bowie, take on upstart Vanilla Ice.
  5. John Fogerty gets sued for ripping off … John Fogerty.
  6. The Turtles take on SiriusXM over pre-1972 records.
  7. Tom Petty was given songwriting credit for a tune he had nothing to do with, and you’ll be glad he was.
  8. Avril Lavgine settled out of court after accusations of plagiarism. She claims she’d “never heard” the other song before in her life.
  9. Ray Parker, Jr. also settled out of court, this time for plagiarizing Huey Lewis & the News while writing the Ghostbusters theme song.
  10. John Lennon was forced to record three Chuck Berry songs to settle a copyright suit against him.
  11. Radiohead was forced to share credit for their smash hit “Creep” due to plagiarism questions.
  12. Singer Lady Gaga is very protective of her brand, as the creator of Baby Gaga ice cream found out.
Thirteen Ludicrous Celebrity Trademark Stories

Though we love to laugh at stories like these, they involve serious matters of ownership law. Read the cases below (in full this time, not just for the pictures) and decide for yourself whether the applicant has a legitimate argument. You may be surprised at how many of these are based on valid claims.

  1. Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi attempts to trademark her nickname.
  2. The New England Patriots attempt to trademark “19-0,” fail, lose the 19th game anyway.
  3. Paris Hilton successfully sues Hallmark for infringing on her “That’s hot” trademark.
  4. Sarah Palin’s attempt to trademark her name fails (temporarily) because she forgot to sign her name.
  5. Twitter loses ownership of trademark on the word “tweet” to a subsidiary.
  6. Boise State University owns the exclusive right to use blue turf on a football field.
  7. Harley Davidson attempted to trademark the sound of a Harley’s engine revving.
  8. McDonald’s fails in an attempt to shut down a Malaysian restaurant called McCurry.
  9. Facebook owns the trademark for the word “face.”
  10. Donald Trump’s failed attempt to trademark his catch phrase: “You’re fired!”
  11. Taylor Swift has applied for a wide range of lyrical trademarks, including the phrase “this sick beat.”
  12. Jay-Z and Beyonce are trying to win the right to trademark their baby’s name.
  13. The band LMFAO wants the US Patent Office to know that their name isn’t dirty, but is patentable.
Nine High-Profile Patent Infringement Cases from the Tech Industry

High tech businesses present special problems for trademark and patent offices. Not only is there a high amount of overlap between development across all markets, but often the item up for ownership is too abstract or complex for laypeople to understand. See how this has affected patent law in the following nine examples.

  1. The long and complex story of Amazon’s one-click patent.
  2. Google’s fight for the right to sell other company’s marks as keywords.
  3. The Recording Industry Association of America shuts down Napster.
  4. Apple is forced to pay more than $500 million in a patent dispute over iTunes software.
  5. Cisco Systems lost a major infringement case on the steps of the Supreme Court.
  6. Nintendo paid a fine of $30 million for allegedly stealing crucial pieces of its 3D tech.
  7. As I’m writing this list, Microsoft and Google are duking it out over a potentially serious patent issue.
  8. The Supreme Court is consistently ruling against “patent trolls,” the scourge of the tech industry.
  9. Disney faces patent infringement lawsuit over Magic Band technology.
Eight Fascinating Tales of Infringement from the Literary World

“Good writers borrow, great writers steal.” I don’t know who said that, but I just stole it. If you love books, you’ll love these stories of literary intrigue and backstabbing.

  1. The author of The Da Vinci Code was accused of copyright infringement for “non-literal” copying.
  2. Harper Lee had to sue her agent to retain the rights to the classic To Kill a Mockingbird.
  3. Kathryn Stockett, author of The Help, was sued unsuccessfully by her brother’s maid for allegedly stealing details of the maid’s real life to create the book’s main character.
  4. Oprah Winfrey beat a $100 million claim against her made by a man who says she plagiarized lines from his book on her talk show.
  5. Random House settled a class action lawsuit on behalf of readers of James Frey’s A Million Little Pieces after it was discovered he’d made up most of the supposed biography.
  6. Famous recluse JD Salinger sued to stop the North American publication of an unauthorized sequel to his Catcher in the Rye.
  7. When a fan planned to publish a Harry Potter lexicon, author J.K. Rowling sued for copyright infringement and won.
  8. In the days before proper copyright lawsuits, the great scientist Isaac Newton was involved in a lifelong struggle with his colleague Gottfried Leibniz over the authorship of a book.
Eleven Insane Examples of Trademark Lawsuits

Some of the examples below are sad, some are just plain funny. If you need a break from all the serious legal stuff we’ve been looking at, check out these crazy claims and defenses for incidents of trademark abuse.

  1. Both Monster Cable and Hansen Beverage think they should own the rights to the word “monster.”
  2. T-Mobile seeks (and wins) action against anyone who dares use the color magenta.
  3. KFC tried to claim ownership of the phrase “Family Feast.”
  4. Game design firm Edge owns every conceivable use of the word “edge” in video game titles.
  5. Composer John Cage’s publisher owns the copyright to silence.
  6. Entertainer Jay Z is being sued over his use of a hand gesture.
  7. Bill Cosby threatened to sue the operators of CosbySweaters.com and successfully forced them to change their URL.
  8. John Waters took on Nickelodeon in a truly smelly case over a children’s cartoon.
  9. Clint Eastwood took on a tiny furniture company to protect his global brand and name recognition.
  10. A woman accused of impersonating Miss Ukraine is now suing recording artist Carly Rae Jepsen for ripping off her song “Hunky Santa,” about falling in love with Santa Claus.
Six Contemporary Infringement Cases to Watch

Though it appears the US Supreme Court is finally stepping in to put an end to the most aggregious patent troll cases, infringement issues have always been and will continue to be an issue in the fields of science, business, industry, and the arts. Here are some cases currently in the courts that could end up making big changes to the law.

66. B&B Hardware Inc. v. Hargis Industries Inc. et al. – the first trademark case being heard by the Supreme Court in over a decade.
67. Hana Financial Inc. v. Hana Bank – a major intellectual property case related to the obscure “tacking” doctrine.
68. Converse (multiple lawsuits against multiple companies) – Nike-owned Converse is suing at least a dozen entities for allegedly copying their sneaker designs.
69. Google Inc. v. Oracle America Inc. – the possible end to a long and public battle over copyrights.
70. The Authors Guild et al. v. Google Inc.– an appellate court will hear what could be the most important ruling of the year regarding copyright law.
71. McRO Inc. v. Index Digital Media Inc. – covering the legitimacy of patent eligibility for technical innovations.

The post 71 Notorious Patent, Trademark, and Copyright Infringement Cases appeared first on SecureYourTrademark.com.

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