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Basic Life Support to replace Health Care Provider level CPRImproving the Quality of Training for Health Care Providers

The Canadian Red Cross is proud to release the new Basic Life Support (BLS) program – the only Canadian researched and developed program, and the most up-to-date on the market. Our BLS program incorporates the latest evidence-based science and research; aligns with industry standards; and meets legislative requirements.

Basic life support (BLS) is an important step in the survival of a person who suffers a cardiac arrest incident. BLS education helps individuals gain confidence in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills and provides them with the important steps to:

  • Perform a rapid assessment.

  • Initiate the emergency response system.

  • Perform BLS skills.

  • Perform rapid defibrillation.

So Who Needs BLS Training?

The revised BLS curriculum is in replacement of the old Health Care Provider (HCP) curriculum. Anyone that previously required CPR/AED with level HCP will now require CPR/AED with BLS. This change is important to note for two key audiences:

  1. “In-facility” care providers, including nursing staff, care aides, medical and dental professionals.

  2. Pre-hospital care providers, which may include professionals in a fire service, rescue team, sports-medicine professional, lifeguards and ski patrol.

An important note on BLS certifications is that, unlike CPR/AED with HCP which is valid for 3 years, CPR/AED with BLS certificates are only valid for 1 year. Your BLS certification will need to be renewed yearly. This is to ensure that all Health Care Providers are current with industry resuscitation standards. You will also now be able to take Oxygen Therapy as well as Airway Management in addition to your BLS training. This will help you save time and money.

Course Durations:
  • BLS Recertification - 2 hours

  • BLS Stand-alone course - 4 hours

  • BLS with Airway Management - 5 hours

  • BLS with Oxygen Therapy - 5 hours

  • BLS with Airway Management & Oxygen Therapy - 6 hours

We are excited to roll this program out to you and continue offering excellent training services to all of our Health Care Providers! If you have any questions about the new program and how it will affect your current certification, please contact us.

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New psychological first aid course to be offered in August 2018.

Our new Psychological First Aid (PFA) Program will be released in August 2018!

This exciting program option teaches everyone how to help others experiencing loss, grief and stress, and also self-care. Learners will come away with coping strategies to prevent, identify and deal with stressful events, and they will better understand what supports are available to them and how they can access or help others to access specialized support.

PFA is built on the latest evidence-based research from the international community and was developed in response to a growing need within our communities and to address a gap in wellness program options with a focus on resiliency.

PFA Courses
The Canadian Red Cross PFA umbrella includes:

  • Online courses (non-certification):
  • Psychological First Aid - Self-Care
  • Psychological First Aid - Caring for Others  
  • PFA Certification Course
  • 7–12-hour in-class course

Course Delivery
Flexible program options mean Training Partners and Instructors will work together to customize delivery to meet the needs of each audience. Psychological First Aid - Self-Care and Psychological First Aid - Caring for Others are both recommended pre-course assignments for the PFA Certification Course as they introduce concepts covered in the certification course, and can supplement and strengthen the in-class content.

Who is PFA for?
PFA is for everyone and also supports existing wellness programs. The courses provide a daily aid to facing the stresses of life, and help participants gain an understanding of how to recognize when a person is experiencing distress and how to offer help. In the workplace it can be useful as:

  • A tool for employee training
  • Professional development
  • General wellness training

PFA vs Mental Health First Aid (MHFA)
PFA and Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) are distinct but complementary approaches that can be used in different settings. PFA helps learners develop an understanding of the effects of stress, loss, trauma and grief on others, with an emphasis on self-care and personal protection. MHFA teaches how to help a person experiencing a mental health crisis.

If you are interested in learning more, feel free to contact us directly!

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What is an AED?

An Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is an extremely invaluable tool to use in the event of a cardiac arrest and can certainly be the difference between life and death for the victim. The basic function of an AED is to deliver a life-saving shock to the heart of the victim in order to get it beating on its own again. However, an AED will be most effective if used within a few minutes following the cardiac arrest. Thus, knowing how to use the AED ahead of time and having it readily available are very important factors in a successful rescue. 

How do I know the person is in cardiac arrest?

A person in cardiac arrest will not be breathing normally. This is a sign that the heart has stopped beating. If a person is experiencing agonal respirations, this is considered abnormal breathing and is actually a sign the heart is not beating (cardiac arrest).

Start CPR immediately and send someone to call 9-1-1 and retrieve the AED. Once the AED is on scene follow these steps:

1. Apply the AED pads. Quickly.

AED pads must be placed directly on a bare and dry chest. There should be a small kit that comes with the AED containing a pair of scissors, razor and towel/cloth. These must be used first in that order. Remove all clothing away from the chest using the scissors to cut straight up the middle of the garments covering their chest. Next, use the razor (if necessary) to shave any hair away from the locations where the pads will be placed. Lastly, dry any moisture from the chest using the towel/cloth. 

The pads will then be placed diagonally across the chest. Simply follow the diagram on the pads as to where they should be placed. For an adult, one pad will be applied on the right side of the chest and the other on the left side of the lower ribcage. For a child or baby, one pad will be placed in the centre of the chest and the other in the centre of the back. See below. 

The pads must have a minimum spacing of approximately 2.5 cm or 1 in. Same goes for clearance from an implanted medical device such as a pacemaker. If you see a scar with a raised lump under the skin, assume it to be an implanted medical device. 

 

Adult placement.

Child/Baby placement

 2. Turn on the AED. 

Press the power button. From here, the AED is going to walk you through the remainder of the rescue. Listen carefully to what is begins saying. Although there are a number of different AEDs on the market, they will all follow the same general steps:

1) Analysis    -->     2) Shock/No Shock    -->    3) CPR    -->    4) Repeat

During "Analysis" the AED is checking to see if, in fact, the person's heart rhythm is shockable. The AED will tell you not to touch the victim. Wave your hands over them and say aloud, "Everyone clear!" It is important nobody is touching the victim at this stage as it is possible the AED picks up that person's heart rhythm, prompting a "No shock".

ZOLL AED Plus

After analyzing the victim's heart rhythm, the AED will either prompt, "Shock advised" or, "No shock advised". If a shock is advised the AED will then either begin counting down from 3 (fully-automatic AED) or prompt you to press the shock button (semi-automatic AED). The fully-automatic AED will provide you 3-seconds to stand clear and then deliver the shock itself. Be sure to, once again, wave your hands over the victim and say aloud, "Everyone clear!" Alternatively, the semi-automatic AED will prompt you to, "Press the shock button now." Press the button immediately after waving your hands over the victim and saying, "Everyone clear!"

Once the shock has been delivered, the AED will prompt you to begin CPR. Begin CPR immediately and continue until the AED tells you to stop.

3. Continue CPR following the AED's prompts.

The AED will prompt you through your CPR cycles. Some AEDs provide more feedback than others. All AEDs will beep at the rate at which you should be delivering chest compressions, this is a standard feature. Some AEDs will also provide feedback as to whether or not you are pushing hard enough. Listen to these prompts and continue doing what the AED is saying. 

After 2 minutes of CPR has elapsed, the AED will, once again, go back through the steps of analysis, shock or no shock and then prompt you to perform CPR. Continue following these prompts until either the person is breathing normally or EMS arrive and take over.

ZOLL AED 3 - Inside the Rescue (AHA) - YouTube
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To celebrate the opening of our NEW Waterloo training facility, we are offering 10% off the price of any certification. Use the code WLOO2018 when registering for a course in Kitchener-Waterloo. This offer is valid for:

  • Standard First Aid & CPR/AED level A, C or HCP
  • Emergency First Aid & CPR/AED level A, C or HCP
  • CPR/AED level A, C or HCP
  • All recertifications

Click the "register now" button to redeem your offer. Don't delay, learn how to Save-A-Life today! View location on the map below:

 
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If you are reading this post the likely answer is, "yes". Anyone working in a healthcare field requires the Health Care Provider (HCP) level of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). 

Any Red Cross course on CPR provides the skills necessary to recognize and respond to cardiovascular emergencies and choking for adults (8+), children (1-8) and babies (0-1).

In addition to these basic CPR and choking skills, the level HCP also includes training on the following topics:

  • Jaw thrust (for endangered spine)
  • Pulse checks (adults, children and babies)
  • The use of a Bag-Valve Mask (BVM)
  • Rescue breathing (adults, children and babies)
  • Two-rescuer CPR with a BVM (adults, children and babies)

Common professions requiring CPR with the level HCP are:

  • Nurse (RN, RPN, LPN, etc.)
  • Doctor
  • Pharmacist
  • Personal Support Worker (PSW)
  • Dentist
  • Osteopath
  • Chiropractor
  • EMS
  • Clinical psychologist
  • Optometrist

Once again, if you think you require the level HCP for your training, the likely answer is "yes". If you are unsure, contact us and we will provide you some assistance in selecting the correct level for your CPR. 

Contact Us CPR HCP Info Name * Name First Name Last Name Email Address * Message Please provide your question as well as any additional information about your profession that may help use determine your CPR requirements.

Thank you for your inquiry! We will be back to you with a response shortly.

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"I'm taking a First Aid course next week..." 

These words can make you yawn immediately if you have ever taken a First Aid training course and spent two full days in a classroom with an instructor lecturing. This is why we have introduced Blended Learning - an innovative and interactive approach to offering First Aid training. 

What is Blended Learning?

1/2 online. 1/2 in-class. Blended Learning is different from a traditional course delivery in that participants complete online training modules before attending a shortened in-class session.The in-class session is where we go over the knowledge gained online and demonstrate the required skills. 

This not only cuts down time spent in a classroom but also offers added convenience and scheduling options for participants. The class is also much more interactive than a normal course. It is more of a discussion between the instructor and participants. This is why we have quickly adopted this training method and implemented it.

As of January 1st 2018, we will be offering 100% of our full-certification courses via Blended Learning (recertification courses will still be in-class).

Class Time Comparison (Traditional In-Class vs. Blended Learning)




Standard First Aid & CPR
Emergency First Aid & CPR
CPR/AED

Traditional In-Class Time

16 hours
8 hours
6-8 hours

Blended Learning Class Time

7-8 hours
4 hours
3-4 hours

 Benefits of Blended Learning
  1. More personalized experience - Each participant completes the training modules at their own pace.
  2. Individual progress - Since the modules are self-paced participants can progress as they feel ready. In opposition to moving at the pace of the instructor in-class. 
  3. Improved engagement  - Because participants are knowledgeable when entering the in-class session they are more open to discussion and answering questions. Further solidifying understanding of the material. 
  4. Accessibility options - The online training offers accessibility options for visual and hearing impairments. 
  5. More interesting - When participants are up and moving around performing skills and completing activities they are more engaged. Thus, they retain more information. 
Don't just take our word for it. Hear what some of our recert customers have to say about Blended Learning...
"Great course, loved the blended learning option. Great for my busy schedule."
- Colleen, Cambridge
"Good presentation skills from the trainer. Method of delivering topics are various and a lot participants' involvement are included. It was a great learning experience."
- Robert, Kitchener
"The online self-learning module was very thorough and forced understanding (rather than listening to someone present in class)."
- Company Feedback, Private Training in Kitchener
"Loved the blended course and the trainers were great. The class was very engaging. Tyler was an amazing instructor, very well spoken and a natural teacher."
- Amanda, Waterloo
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155 Frobisher Drive

Easily accessible via HWY 85 and LRT transit. 

We are happy to announce that we will be opening a new training location in Waterloo! This new location will allow us to continue delivering the best training in the tri-city area.

This location will offer all classes via the NEW Blended Learning delivery (1/2 online. 1/2 in-class). This offers participants the ultimate convenience in accessing their training. You no longer have to spend two days in a classroom! 

We will offer recertification courses for those that have a current first aid certificate. 

Training Courses offered:

  • Standard First Aid & CPR/AED level A, C & HCP
  • Emergency First Aid & CPR/AED level A, C & HCP
  • CPR/AED level A, C & HCP
  • Recertification (SFA & CPR)
  • Babysitter's Course

Courses will be offered on weekdays, evenings, and weekends (Saturdays and Sundays) to fit any schedule. 

To view upcoming courses for this location, visit our calendar/registration page HERE





Premium Canadian Red Cross Training Partner. Training Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge since 2005. Learn how to Save-A-Life today!

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In our previous two installments of the Summer Safety Series, we talked about heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Cooling off in the water is a great way to avoid these other two heat related illnesses but it can pose some very real dangers. The risk of water-related injury or death when in, on or near the water is far greater than perceived. However, being aware of these dangers is a great way to stay safe and enjoy your time in the water this summer. Here are some tips to ensure you stay safe while enjoying the water this summer:

Partner up
Swimming with a partner is one of the best, and easiest practices in staying safe around the water. Even the most experienced swimmers can become tired or experience muscle cramps while swimming. In a situation like this your partner can offer you assistance while also calling out for further help. 

Check water currents
Water currents can be powerful enough to sweep away those who enter them. Before entering the water, take in to consideration how fast the water is flowing. If you think the water is flowing quickly or are unsure, stay out of the water. Check with your local conservation authority for river flows before heading out in to the water. If swimming at a beach, look for flags indicating the power of undertows or ask a lifeguard if one is present.

Do not dive in unknown waters
Diving head first into the water should only be done if and when the depth of the water is well known. Although you may not be able to see the bottom, this does not guarantee the water is deep enough to dive. There may be hidden dangers like rocks hidden by murky waters. Oppositely, just because you can see the bottom, the actual depth of the water can be deceiving when looking from above. 

Supervise children
Children should never be left unsupervised in or near water. It only takes a few seconds for a child to drown in the absence of an adult. Any time you need to leave the children unsupervised, make sure they are well clear of the water. It takes only a few centimetres of water for a child or baby to drown. For every drowning death, there are numerous non-fatal near-drownings that require hospitalization. 

Swim within the buoys
When there are buoys indicating a designated swimming area, do not stray from their confines. Outside of swimming area may be hidden dangers such as marine life, rocks, or boating traffic. The water is just as nice inside the buoys as it is outside!

Learn how to tend to drowning and other conditions by taking a first aid and CPR course! For a list of all available courses and dates click here.
To stay current with more lifesaving skills or to receive updates from Save-A-Life sign up for our quarterly newsletter by clicking here.
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Next up in our Summer Safety Series is Heat Stroke. Heat Stroke, sometimes referred to as sun stroke, is much more dangerous than heat exhaustion and it is important to be able to distinguish between the two. Heat stroke can be life-threatening and is a condition in which a person's body is no longer able to regulate it's own core temperature (they stop sweating). 

Although heat exhaustion should still be treated as serious, there are some additional precautions that should be taken if you suspect a person to be experiencing heat stroke. Get to know the SIGNS & SYMPTOMS:

  • Red, hot, DRY skin (may still be moist)
  • Changes in their level of consciousness
  • Changes in their behaviour. May become irritable or bizarre.
  • Breathing may become rapid and shallow
  • Nausea/vomiting

If you suspect a person to be experiencing heat stroke, be sure to immediately start providing CARE:

  1. Call 911 immediately.
  2. Relocate the person to a cooler environment (shade, air conditioned house or car, etc).
  3. Apply cool sources of water to the person's torso.
  4. Fan the moisture away from the person's skin.
  5. Provide cool water for the person to sip on.
  6. If needed, rapidly cool the person with cold packs wrapped with cloth in their armpits, neck, groin, wrists and ankles.

As always, prevention is the best form of first aid. If you can, avoid exposure to the sun on hot days between the hours of 11:00am and 4:00pm. For more prevention on heat related emergencies, see our previous post. We will cover heat cramps and dehydration in the next installment of our Summer Safety Series. Stay up to date with current first aid standards and be notified when we have updated our blog by following us on Facebook, Google+ and Linkedin. 

Learn how to tend to heat stroke and other conditions by taking a first aid and CPR course! For a list of all available courses and dates click here.
To stay current with more lifesaving skills or to receive updates from Save-A-Life sign up for our quarterly newsletter by clicking here.
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Summer is here... finally, and its time to enjoy it! After a long cold winter and rainy spring, it is finally time to get outside to enjoy the warm weather and sunshine. It is important, however, to ensure you do so safely and responsibly. In this series we will go over various heat related emergencies and illnesses and how to avoid/treat them. In our first installment, we will cover heat exhaustion.

Heat Exhaustion

This heat related illness typically occurs due to heavy sweating in a hot environment, leading to a lack of fluids in the body. This is most common while performing some sort of strenuous activity like playing sports or heavy labour. It is important to pay close attention to the temperature in your environment whether inside or outside and make sure you are adequately PREPARED:

  • Be sure to hydrate continually, even if you are not thirsty
  • Avoid caffeine and alcohol, both cause dehydration in the body
  • Eat light, but well-balanced meals throughout the day
  • Minimize your need to perform strenuous activities outdoors
  • Wear light coloured clothing

Sometimes, even with good preparation, we may still experience signs of heat exhaustion or witness somebody else that is. It is important to know the SIGNS & SYMPTOMS:

  • Warm, moist, pale or flushed skin
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Weakness
  • Exhaustion

It is equally important to know how to treat this person and provide them CARE:

  1. Move the person to a cooler environment
  2. Remove or loosen any tight and sweaty clothing
  3. Cool the person. Use cool wet cloths or towels and fan their skin to accelerate evaporation.
  4. Rehydrate. Give the person cool water and have them sip it gradually. 
  5. Call 911 if the person begins vomiting or begins to lose consciousness or does not improve after cooling.

Know the difference between heat exhaustion and heat stroke. We will cover heat stroke in the next installment of our Summer Safety Series. Stay up to date with current first aid standards and be notified when we have updated our blog by following us on Facebook, Google+ and Linkedin. 

Learn how to tend to heat exhaustion and other conditions by taking a first aid and CPR course! For a list of all available courses and dates click here.
To stay current with more lifesaving skills or to receive updates from Save-A-Life sign up for our quarterly newsletter by clicking here.
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