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Kent Beck (@kentbeck) joined Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley) to discuss product development, Extreme Programming, certifications, and his new book on software design.

Kent Beck
In this episode you’ll discover:
  • Using the 3X’s to guide your product development
  • Musings from Kent on Extreme Programming
  • What is limbo? How does it scale collaboration?
Links from the show: How to Support the Show:

Thank you for your support. Here are some of the ways to contribute that were discussed during this episode:

This pocket guide is the one book to read for everyone who wants to learn about Scrum. The book covers all roles, rules and the main principles underpinning Scrum, and is based on the Scrum Guide Edition 2013. A broader context to this fundamental description of Scrum is given by describing the past and the future of Scrum. The author, Gunther Verheyen, has created a concise, yet complete and passionate reference about Scrum. The book demonstrates his core view that Scrum is about a journey, a journey of discovery and fun. He designed the book to be a helpful guide on that journey. Click here to purchase on Amazon.
Question: Which topic resonated with you? Please leave your thoughts in the comment section below. You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Want to hear another podcast about the life of an agile coach? — Listen to my conversation with Zach Bonaker, Diane Zajac-Woodie, and Amitai Schlair on episode 39. We discuss growing an agile practice and how coaches help create the environments where agile ideas can flourish.

The post AFH 107: Explore, Expand, Extract with Kent Beck appeared first on Ryan Ripley.

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Professional Scrum Trainer (PST) Gary Pedretti (@garypedretti) and User Experience expert Jeff Gothelf (@jboggie) joined Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley) to discuss how UX/UI designers can effectively work with Scrum Teams.

Jeff Gothelf – Author of Lean UX
In this episode you’ll discover:
  • Why UX/UI design is a critical skill on a Scrum Team
  • How leaders and managers can use metrics to improve the user experience
  • How customer-centric thinking is the new competitive advantage
Links from the show: How to Support the Show:

Thank you for your support. Here are some of the ways to contribute that were discussed during this episode:

This pocket guide is the one book to read for everyone who wants to learn about Scrum. The book covers all roles, rules and the main principles underpinning Scrum, and is based on the Scrum Guide Edition 2013. A broader context to this fundamental description of Scrum is given by describing the past and the future of Scrum. The author, Gunther Verheyen, has created a concise, yet complete and passionate reference about Scrum. The book demonstrates his core view that Scrum is about a journey, a journey of discovery and fun. He designed the book to be a helpful guide on that journey. Click here to purchase on Amazon.
Question: Which topic resonated with you? Please leave your thoughts in the comment section below. You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Want to hear another podcast about the life of an agile coach? — Listen to my conversation with Zach Bonaker, Diane Zajac-Woodie, and Amitai Schlair on episode 39. We discuss growing an agile practice and how coaches help create the environments where agile ideas can flourish.

The post AFH 106: Exploring User Experience and Scrum appeared first on Ryan Ripley.

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Professional Scrum Trainer (PST) Dave Dame (@DDame) joined Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley) to discuss agile leadership, management, and how leaders impact the way teams interact and work.

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Introduction: This show will challenge you to engage your brain. We might even provoke thoughts that changed the way you work. Don't panic. Inspect, adapt to deliver. You're listening to agile for humans with Ryan Ripley. Learn more at Ryan Ripley.

Ryan Ripley: This week's agile for humans is back where with Dave. Dave, we talked a lot about agile leadership, scrum, a winding conversation. Dave's one of my heroes. This was a ton of fun. I don't get enough time with them, so it was great to spend this episode. Hope you enjoy the conversation. Everybody. Gonna. Pause here. We're going to jump into it right after the intro.

Introduction: Welcome to agile for humans. Our goal is to bring humanity back into the world of software delivery. With agile values, principles and practices, we gathered top analysts from around the globe to share insights and help you grow as servant leaders in your organizations, change hearts and deliver value into the world. Now, here is our host, professional scrum trainer and Agile practitioners, Ryan Ripley.

Ryan Ripley: Alright, welcome back. Joining me today, Dave. Dave, Dave, so happy you could make this work. It's just great to see it, brother.

Dave Dame: My pleasure. Thank you for inviting me to be a part of this. Every time I get to spend with you, I feel I walk away or roll away a lot smarter.

Ryan Ripley: It's funny you mentioned that. So Dave, um, you recently did a talk about that for Ted. So you are now. So first of all, congratulations. I, you know what, maybe I should step back. Dave is a fellow professional scrum trainer scrum.org. Dave is also a vice president in the banking industry. Dave is also now a highly sought after keynote and conference speaker, especially around ability. And Dave, I'm gonna let you take it from there, but congratulations on your Ted Talk. I'm really, that was, it was awesome to watch and maybe you could give the listeners a little flavor around that and just what I'm being able, uh, has really meant to you and how that really resonated all through your talk.

Dave Dame: Agility is a catalyst for change. It's a catalyst for what is possible and you know, from an early age I had to use that kind of inspect and adapt type of mindset to deal with the world though wasn't really ready to have somebody with a professional with cerebral palsy. So, but it started from how do I get out of bed in the morning to how do I get to go to regular school, both from an infrastructure accessibility standpoint and a mindset standpoint of inclusion for teachers and, and you know, all the way going up to university and college and I think growing up in Windsor, Ontario, which is a, a blue collar kind of, you're not going to knock us down, kind of city. Gave me the, the, the toughness I needed to be able to.

Dave Dame: Perseverance struggled through all those things. So then when I went to school, I went to school for Engineering and business, you know, those are both complimentary things because you know, in grade 13, in Canada, that's where you make your decision whether you want to go to school with. And I couldn't make up my mind, but my dad was always a tactful. He go, you know, let's be honest, a being in a wheelchair, you're not going to be a fireman, you're not going to be a police officer, a construction worker, but you know what else You're not going to be living under my roof for free the rest of your life, so you better figure it out. So that started my journey of helping companies change to the way they need it. And you know, I was doing agile before agile was the thing, got to meet Ken Schwaber , and then the rest has got to be you. And then the rest was history

Ryan Ripley: had imagined. Ken is a much, much better high point. However, I am going to put a link to the Ted talk in the show notes and this is one of those, you know, dear listener, please take, you know, the, the 15 minutes and listen and watch it. Um, it's, it's a tear jerker by the end of it. It's, it's a, it's an, a very emotional talk. It was, um, it was awesome to see my good friend Dave on that stage. Um, and what was just amazing is, um, there's just some life choices and some inspect and adapt to moments that he talks about. Um, and one of them was his parents had to make a decision on setting these creative constraints that we're gonna build dave up into, you know, these abilities to, to operate in the real world. Um, so it sounds like you have just, you have an amazing family, um, but also just tons of perseverance and I think as people are going to learn through this discussion, Dave, just a ton of insights into what it really means to have to inspect and adapt and make sure that things are super transparent. Because if they're not, I mean, I mean your day could be thrown off completely.

Dave Dame: Well, you know, it's funny, um, you know, when I first started my professional career, predominantly work in high tech and software because software and innovation has a soft spot in my heart because with that it's enabled me to do things that maybe in previous generations I never could have. What would the life of computers and technology as simple as apple pay, right You like when you think of apple pay, you probably think, yeah, I can get a coffee really quick, just walk over and top trap, but for me that was an opportunity to nail. I can go meet a friend for coffee and have the freedom where I can go pay for something on my own before I would have to trust a stranger to go into my wallet, my bank card, so then anxiety would keep me stuck in a house, but now with technology I can call the wheelchair uber, I can tap for things.

Dave Dame: I can use social media, have, a voice where maybe in previous generations I wouldn't have got that opportunity and I used to just avoid my disability because I didn't want to be lumped in as a guy with a disability. I want it to be a fantastic leader of fantastic shape and I would always try to match my disability and it wasn't until three years ago a friend Jason Little asked me to speak at spark the change and I said, well, what do you want me to speak about? Amigos Speak about that engagement agility that you talk about all the time. And I'm like, no, I'm going to do something personal. So I did a story about how my vulnerability and having to be able to work through others to achieve things, develop my leadership style and I did a, uh, I taught called weaving with them perfect feed at spark and that was the first time I embraced my vulnerability, um, and I thought it would make me weaker or made me, what path may be bias, but since I've embraced it, it's made me stronger than I ever thought I could become.

Ryan Ripley: Yeah. It was such a great leadership lesson, right Having to basically lead through influence, be vulnerable. Um, how has that played out because you're now an executive, you're to, you're a vice president at one of the largest banks up in Canada. How is that translated into just, I mean, just an amazing career in the financial industry, you know, what, how is that really shaped your theory of Agile leadership

Dave Dame: Well, it was, it was interesting because I never, I never thought in a million years I would work at a bank, but likely they were going through a big technology revolution, so it didn't seem like I was going to be dave the automatic color I was going to be doing technology, but what I've tried to embrace him in, because when you're moving tadge I'll. You're really going at the heart of innovation, which is looking at the teams and getting the best of human dynamics in human capital and smartness. You need those right kind of skills and empowerment to really get the most out of people so it's not using the traditional ways where we used to sing, which motivated them. It's really getting them to feel safe and comfortable. Where, where it's not throwaway code, it's not, it's not something to think of is a waste, but it's an opportunity to learn.

Dave Dame: So I work with them. We try to make learning first class citizen and get them to reduce the cost of learning by trying to invest in the right infrastructure so it's cheaper to release the right hr incentives, like how do we incentivize people with the behaviors that we want. We can only incentivize the mind delivery if we want to incentivize them to be able to stop a project when a noble and good leads value. It's really, you know, the technology side, they usually get in an agile way. It's getting the leadership and the way we fund projects moving from protects the product and the way we build a culture of agility, but it's working with the leaders to give them the tools they need to leave these autonomous teams like to push decision making down.

Ryan Ripley: Yeah. I'm hearing a lot of awesome trends here, Dave, and I want to pull the pull apart a few of them there. Um, so it sounds to me like your, your view of the agile leader, um, and I think we'll stay in this topic for a little bit. Um, they're working across the org chart there, visiting her. They're talking to finance about drip funding instead of annual planning, but it sounds like they're also setting the tone, right So they're saying when someone learns, let's say we have a common phrase is fail fast, which I try to move away from and let's learn quickly and then do something with the learning. Um, but when that happens, instead of getting upset that something didn't go my way, which by the way, if we're doing experiments, we don't know the outcome. Right And so

Dave Dame: I don't, I don't usually,

Ryan Ripley: so we're going to get surprised, but when we get surprised when I'm in that vice president leadership role, I try to pause and just say how fascinating and now what now What now What now What can we do with this instead of getting angry or instead of showing disappointment, I mean, and that's somebody who just these like intentional practices. Do you have any of those other kind of thoughts There were, you know, where you have to pause and remind yourself like this is how we build a learning culture or, or even just noticing opportunities where you need to go visit someone else. Across the org chart, you know, the strategy is amazing. Have you found tactical ideas where it's helped you, like realize those moments because I think awareness is important, but then also like how you actually engage in execute in those moments

Dave Dame: Well first I was simply just kidding the leaders to share their failures, right You know, they all love to say fail fast and fail often and boy, it sure feels good to say, but they don't usually follow it by sharing some of their biggest mistakes that they learned from the creative culture that were not a success because we, we, we mitigated failure. We're success because we embraced it and we recovered from it. So as simple as getting them to share their biggest learning moments, it sounds so simple, but in a culture where I only move up to the grade, it's still hard to soak in. And then two, it's funny when you mentioned go across the org chart and this is where I'm going to tie it into a accessibility. It's funny, for years it used to be the buildings were the biggest obstacles for me to get and whether it had a ramp or elevator to be able to go visit and talk to people. Now we've got this thing called an org chart that even though they're a box, they seem to be big steel wall. So we got to learn to make that org chart accessible fluid. So it does a bar entry from anybody

Ryan Ripley: I remember distinctly say. I like your comment where those lines are really big steel bars. I remember a situation I'm, I'm working with a company and working with us. Very nice leader and uh, she has three teams reporting to her and all three teams are doing customer engagement of some sort. And she was really upset because none of the teams knew what the others were doing. So customers were getting multiple calls in a day in multiple touches and, and I just stopped and I, and I asked her, Ma'am can, can your teams just do a quick like, you know, getting a, getting a quick daily scrum here and talk about the customers and show the roster. So that if people need to pair up and they can tag team on calls and it's just one touch, she goes, well, no, they're all in different departments, w.

Ryan Ripley: But man, they all report to you like these are all your departments chose. Yeah. But that would, you know. And, and it was really this huge block and it, it was finally, um, and, and I started asking these questions, you know, are they co located or are they in different cities She's like, oh no, they all just sit right over here. They were all sitting in the same space and I'm like, and for some, but there is this and I think you hit it beautifully. There are these steel walls up in place when we look at this org chart and it's like these defacto silos pop up. And eventually I just went over and grabbed a person from each team and said, can you tell me the roster of customers you're talking to today And there was overlap all over the place. We wheeled over a white board. We wrote down the customer names. We put postits of people who needed to be on those calls and instead of having 30 people make 30 individual calls, it turns out they could make eight phone calls in a day and get it done and the lady's mind was just popped like she's looking at that going, okay, this changes how we work.

Dave Dame: Dire News, we've had talks about this. The stack is crossfunctional, right They're used to working with the CFO, chief marketing officers, CEO, CPO, whatever. We're working with the teams to get them cross functional Dev, Qa, BA design, whatever. But yet there's that middle layer that for some reason protects those silos and it could be how they're right because they get broken into different cost centers and different I counting things and because of how they're being measured and evaluated is preventing from doing the right thing sometimes. So I think in an attempt to try to measure something unilaterally, we take away from, from impact that can be made of collaboratively.

Ryan Ripley: No, I totally agree. I remember being a middle manager at a orthopedic Manufacturing Company and uh, that middle layer is highly competitive and I think you hit it on the head with the incentives. Um, even to the, even to a fault where, uh, I remember distinctly I was in a, I was getting reviewed by the director I was reporting to at the time and he told me or he started questioning why I was helping fellow managers, you know, understand planning and understand how to use our tools. And he goes, that's a person that's gonna steal a promotion from you someday if you keep leveling them up. And I, and I turned to him and I go, that's awesome. Right If I'm not able to, to, to help my team because we're all trying to, we're all serving the same director. And I'm like, if I, if I'm not able to help my team and help us overall succeed and if that's not measured as, if that's not a measured benefit. And if that's not something that you value, then you're right. However, I still have to help my friends and I'm still gonna help that middle layer. I, I don't know how to. I don't want to compete with them. I want us all to win and that was really antithetical to the model of how people were operating at that middle layer

Dave Dame: and I wish I could tell you the world is change. It's funny because I think and just think about how we're measured as leaders. Ryan, we get told you need to drive this outcome. You own this. Oh, come through. I own it. Or does the team like I used to feel bad when they go, Dave, good job of delivering this product to market. That was great. I'm like, well thank you. But it was really the team. I should be measured on a score card of am I growing my team Are they're getting new skills Are they getting more soft skills Are they collaborating better Are they solving for things Actually I shouldn't be doing your job have, do they even need me anymore Because if they don't need me anymore job done. They can work at outbrain and I can fake some new problems, but as a leader we need to be measuring on how are we growing the people, how are we removing them pediments that are beyond the team and what are we doing to contribute and safeguard the culture where they can push back. We could have autonomy to do that. That's where I should spend my time and get incentivized, but if they go ryan and Dave, you own to drive this, then they're rewarding us for a different kind of boat combat. We hired really smart people to do it. We're no longer manufacturing God. God bless them. They don't have to listen to us to be successful.

Ryan Ripley: Yes, that is. That is truly appointment, but it. But it's something we talk about in the professional agile leadership class quite a bit too. I spend a lot of time talking with leaders in that class of, you know, easy, easy line of questioning, right The first question I'll ask is, do you all believe that you're hiring the best and brightest in your markets And of course they all say, yes. Everyone believes they have the best and brightest and I think for the most part, companies are really hiring for a top talent these days. It's a very competitive marketplace. Right And so the next question is, well then why are we trying to tell the best and brightest what to do Shouldn't we give them a vision Shouldn't we explain value Shouldn't we provide some, some enabling constraints and then sit back and watch the best and brightest do amazing things and they all just sit back stunned.

Ryan Ripley: I that really is an eye and someone hit me with that line of questioning and earlier in my management career, they're like, someone hit it hit me a little more direct. They said, do you believe you're the smartest person in the room when you're sitting down with your staff And I was just in a and I knew I was trapped and I'm like, well no, we've got some really bright people on the team and the person turned to me and said, then why don't you shut up and listen to them And I thought, okay, message received, and I think this is one of our challenges, Dave.

Dave Dame: No. And I was recently speaking at the maple leaf sports and entertainment and I asked them, I go, how do you define a leader And let me ask you, Ryan, how do you define a leader

Ryan Ripley: How do I define a leader Yeah. Um, I, I think there's, there's three, three characteristics that I believe are that lead, that make leadership. I think that a leader loves their teams, which means you love people. I think it means that you want those people to be wildly successful and that you're going to remove every impediment that you can, that they can't handle, that prevents them from being a, that prevents them from doing their job in their self actualization. And I think if you've got those three things, you're on that path to leadership.

Dave Dame: And that marries well with my definition, but, uh, you know, so many organizations that I've went to, it's usually title or some sense of prestige or privilege with the leadership thing. And then I think back in my life, one of the greatest leaders I've ever met was a my personal support worker bee that you've met a couple times. That is scrum.org. Go back and tell the audience what a personal support worker is. It's somebody that comes in every morning to dress me, shower me, and help me get out to work. And why I say be as one of the greatest leaders I know is he's devoted his life. Could be at my house at five in the morning, gave me up, get me on the bike. I get sweaty, shower me, get me a or bring me to work. And the way he enables me to be able to create a change. Without him, I wouldn't be able to make an impact and bring all the greatness in the world. And sadly, his role isn't looked at as prestigious. And I hate to say it's even looked down upon, but he's one of the greatest leaders I know because he enables me to do great things. So when I share that story, I usually like to ask the leaders who are you willing to shower to make your organization better

Ryan Ripley: Yeah. And that is another one of those two by four questions to the face that I think sometimes we need to use, but I mean to, to come in time, be that, that guy. And I mean, when I first met him, I think he was still kind of a kid.

Dave Dame: Awesome. Well Susie is maturity,

Ryan Ripley: awesome young man and he just, uh, I mean he fits right in with the group. He truly loves your Dave. He does his work at joyfully, which is I think another mark of a leader. He's joyful through all of his work and he truly has that servant heart. He is, he's awesome.

Dave Dame: And you mentioned it. He was visibly present, right So even when I'm doing my thing, he's in the background to make sure that everything is still flowing, but he's not front and center.

Ryan Ripley: Yep. Yeah. I think he's an awesome example. We actually struggle in the class sometimes when we get asked, you know, who is, who is your ideal example of an agile leader and it's, it's Kinda hard, you know, the tech industry has the Steve Jobs and the Bill Gates and the, you know, but those guys were very much a directive, right And especially jobs if you believed the biography is not very kind, but I think, uh, I think when, when I, when I get asked that question, next time I might tell the story of B, I think he's an excellent example.

Dave Dame: He cares for the people. He doesn't try to weed in front of the leads in back. So the world around them can be better and he's got a heart bigger than his body and the world is a better place with him in it.

Ryan Ripley: Well, I'll tell you what, he also, and, and I've, I've observed this, especially when we're in a, in Boston together, he will take direct action when it's needed. He does jump into action when you need something, if something's not going quite right. And so, you know, he put, he balances that beautifully and I think that's part of the leadership role is that ability to know that yes, we lead from behind were leading through influence where empowering and enabling, but also sometimes we got to jump up and take hit and then solve something and he just, that balance is just, he doesn't take away your agency, he doesn't take away your liberty is. But at the same time he will jump in and directly take care of something to ensure that your needs are still met. And I think that it's just such an awesome balance,

Dave Dame: but you guys what a great leader does, right Because we all jump in if we need to put the great leaders know when to get back control to the team when we give the one back to say, okay, we've. So we've helped when they'll here's back the responsibility and go. And that's a big important thing and it's hard to develop an eye and I'm guilty of wanting to solve the problem. So sometimes when you jump in, when you need to know one's got to act like a consultant of, okay team, now when can I break up with you and give you back the responsibility

Ryan Ripley: Well, I think a lot of that is awareness and we talk a lot in pal about delegation and it's something I've struggled with for a very long time last year or actually the year before I started this practice of I want to, I want to decentralize control as much as possible. Um, and so I actually ran some experiments through conference speaking where I basically decided the audience now controls my talks. Like I'm not showing up with slide decks anymore. I have to, I use liberating structures, powerful questions, whatever it is to gather what the audience wants from me. And I deliver that in an hour. And I thought this is either gonna work very badly and I'm not going to get invited to conferences again. Or people are gonna love it. And as it turns out, the, the, the highest scored talks I've ever given have been with zero upfront preparation and giving total control of the talk to the audience.

Dave Dame: How scared were you that

Ryan Ripley: the first time Terrified. The second time. I couldn't wait to do it again. So because it's, it's truly a leap. But I think people appreciated right off the bat that suddenly the talk was about them and..

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Wilber SeeleSimon BourkRalph JochamSjoerd Kranendonk, and Guido Boskaljon  joined Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley) to discuss leadership, scrum training, and our impact on the world.

An Amazing Morning in Ulm, Germany
In this episode you’ll discover:
  • Why creative leadership is important in today’s world
  • How to create space for people to thrive
  • When servant leadership can work in your organization
Links from the show: How to Support the Show:

Thank you for your support. Here are some of the ways to contribute that were discussed during this episode:

This pocket guide is the one book to read for everyone who wants to learn about Scrum.
The book covers all roles, rules and the main principles underpinning Scrum, and is based on the Scrum Guide Edition 2013. A broader context to this fundamental description of Scrum is given by describing the past and the future of Scrum.
The author, Gunther Verheyen, has created a concise, yet complete and passionate reference about Scrum. The book demonstrates his core view that Scrum is about a journey, a journey of discovery and fun. He designed the book to be a helpful guide on that journey.
Click here to purchase on Amazon.
Question: Which topic resonated with you? Please leave your thoughts in the comment section below. You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Want to hear another podcast about the life of an agile coach? — Listen to my conversation with Zach Bonaker, Diane Zajac-Woodie, and Amitai Schlair on episode 39. We discuss growing an agile practice and how coaches help create the environments where agile ideas can flourish.

The post AFH 104: Reactive vs Creative Leadership Stances appeared first on Ryan Ripley.

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Esther Derby (@estherderbyand Faye Thompson (@agilefaye) and Amitai Schleier (@schmonzjoined Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley) to discuss how to respect the agency of agile and scrum teams.

Respecting the Team
In this episode you’ll discover:
  • Why Retrospectives are critical to continuous improvement
  • How maintaining a teams agency can boost morale and performance
  • Why respect is critical to an agile practice
Links from the show: How to Support the Show:

Thank you for your support. Here are some of the ways to contribute that were discussed during this episode:

This pocket guide is the one book to read for everyone who wants to learn about Scrum.
The book covers all roles, rules and the main principles underpinning Scrum, and is based on the Scrum Guide Edition 2013. A broader context to this fundamental description of Scrum is given by describing the past and the future of Scrum.
The author, Gunther Verheyen, has created a concise, yet complete and passionate reference about Scrum. The book demonstrates his core view that Scrum is about a journey, a journey of discovery and fun. He designed the book to be a helpful guide on that journey.
Click here to purchase on Amazon.
Question: Which topic resonated with you? Please leave your thoughts in the comment section below. You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Want to hear another podcast about the life of an agile coach? — Listen to my conversation with Zach Bonaker, Diane Zajac-Woodie, and Amitai Schlair on episode 39. We discuss growing an agile practice and how coaches help create the environments where agile ideas can flourish.

The post AFH 103: Respecting Your Scrum and Agile Teams appeared first on Ryan Ripley.

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with Johanna Rothman and Gil Broza

Johanna Rothman (@johannarothman) and Gil Broza (@gilbrozajoined Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley) to discuss the Influential Agile Leader.

Johanna Rothman and Gil Broza- Influential Agile Leader

Ryan Ripley is teaming up with Professional Scrum Trainer, Todd Miller to teach the Advanced Scrum Master (PSM-II) course this year. Whether you are a CSM or a PSM, this Advanced Scrum Master Course is the next step on the Scrum master journey, created and present by trainers from scrum.org – The Home of Scrum.

In this episode you’ll discover:
  • What does it mean to be an influential agile leader
  • How do we help leaders make the shift to an agile mindset
  • Why an agile mindset adds value to an organization
Links from the show: How to Support the Show:

Thank you for your support. Here are some of the ways to contribute that were discussed during this episode:

This pocket guide is the one book to read for everyone who wants to learn about Scrum.
The book covers all roles, rules and the main principles underpinning Scrum, and is based on the Scrum Guide Edition 2013. A broader context to this fundamental description of Scrum is given by describing the past and the future of Scrum.
The author, Gunther Verheyen, has created a concise, yet complete and passionate reference about Scrum. The book demonstrates his core view that Scrum is about a journey, a journey of discovery and fun. He designed the book to be a helpful guide on that journey.
Click here to purchase on Amazon.
Question: Which topic resonated with you? Please leave your thoughts in the comment section below. You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Want to hear another podcast about the life of an agile coach? — Listen to my conversation with Zach Bonaker, Diane Zajac-Woodie, and Amitai Schlair on episode 39. We discuss growing an agile practice and how coaches help create the environments where agile ideas can flourish.

Agile + DevOps East brings together practitioners seeking to accelerate the delivery of reliable, secure software applications. Learn from industry experts how your organization can leverage agile and DevOps concepts to improve deployment frequency and time to market, reduce lead time, and more successfully deliver stable new features. Choose from over 100 learning and networking opportunities this November 4–9 in Orlando, FL to improve your agile skills in hot areas such as agile and lean development, scaled agile development, leadership, digital transformation, and more.

Agile for Humans listeners use code “AGILEDEV” to receive $400 off their conference registration Visit well.tc/agile

The post AFH 102: The Influential Agile Leader appeared first on Ryan Ripley.

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Last week I co-taught scrum.org’s new Professional Scrum Master II course with fellow Professional Scrum Trainer (PST) Todd Miller. This 2-day advanced Scrum Master class is designed to be the next step that a Scrum Master takes on their journey towards Professional Scrum.

PSM II – Advanced Scrum Master Class Indianapolis 2018

Dave West and I discussed the launch of the PSM II course on episode 97 of Agile for Humans. Check out that episode for some background information about the course and how it was released to the public.

We had a wonderful mix of students with varying levels of experience and past certifications. Our focus over the two days was to deep dive the servant leadership aspects of the Scrum Master role by exploring how a Scrum Master serves the Development Team, the Product Owner, and the organization. Empiricism and the Scrum Values were used as guide posts along the way as the situations increased in complexity.

Our 17 students did an amazing job at not only learning more about the Scrum Master role, but also taught Todd and I quite a lot about co-teaching and facilitation.

In fact, here are 5 things that really stood out from teaching the Advanced Scrum Master (PSM II) course:

#1 – Transparency When Co-Teaching is Essential

The night before the class started, Todd and I decided to that any discussion about the course or any changes that we wanted to make during the day would be discussed openly and in front of the students. We were not sure how this would work out, but by the end of day one people were really enjoying the level of openness that we displayed when we were not sure what to do next, wanted to get aligned on the next activity, or simply had a question that needed answered.

We were at times vulnerable and often used these moments to inject some humor in to the course. Todd and I both noted that by the end of day 2 our running dialogue had become an organic part of the course that helped level set expectations for the students and also helped us more naturally co-facilitate the activities. This was a fun experiment that Todd and I will continue to on in to our courses.

#2 – Liberating Structures Are Amazing

If you aren’t using liberating structures now, you will be the end of a PSM II course. Liberating Structures are 33 micro-structures that are easy to use and understand by groups of any size. These structures are created and maintained by Keith McCandless and Henri Leipmanowicz. I was amazed by both the simplicity and power of Liberating Structures. Some things that I noticed immediately:

  • Every participant was actively engaged during the entire course. Introverts, extroverts and everyone in-between were able to participate, share, and have their voices heard.
  • By using Liberating Structures we unlock the wisdom of the crowd and unleash ideas that the entire group can learn from and build upon.
  • Sharing is caring and when we care about each other we also tend to trust one another. This high level of trust in the group made complex discussions possible.
  • The intelligence of the room was not limited by the trainers. Everyone contributed to the group leveling up their Scrum Master skills.

Liberating Structures were simple enough for both Todd and I and the students to adopt and learn quickly, while leaving room for discovery and innovation. Emergence was the highlight of the 2-days. Ideas, patterns, and insights emerged over time by the students. They were creating their own discoveries which are far more meaningful than anything that I could have read off of a PowerPoint slide.

Amazing what students teach us and each other @ryanripley. https://t.co/64gIY04ntM

— Todd Miller (@todd_miller11) October 4, 2018

Here are some resources if you want to learn more about Liberating Structures: #3 – Students Have a Lot to Teach One Another

As it turns out, we can all help each other learn. Day 2 of the PSM II course involves and activity where the students break in to groups and using a provided poster they create a 2-minute “teach back” where they help the entire class learn about an aspect of being a Scrum Master. Our students took the learning and outcomes from day 1 and combined them with their own experiences to create some really interesting teaching moments for the class. Having the students teach these concepts back to the group turned out to be far more powerful than either of us initially expected.

PSM II Students Teaching Back

#4 – Trainers Must Also Inspect and Adapt

The Advanced Scrum Master (PSM II) course is difficult to teach. We are leaving a lot of space for emergence and exploration by using Liberating Structures, Training from the Back of the Room, and Learning 3.0 concepts. This means that as trainers we will have many decision points and options along the way. When Todd and I noticed that the Scrum Values were not well known by this group of students, we spent more time on this topic than planned. But we needed to make this important choice. Empiricism and the Scrum Values are the underpinnings of Scrum. Without them, you get mechanical/zombie/bad scrum.

This insight and subsequent discussion the class led us to discover an adaptation to the course flow that we are going to try out in our upcoming PSM II course in Denver, Colorado – October 17-18. The time invested on the Scrum Values ended up being very well spent:

Student Insights About the Scrum Values – PSM II

#5 – Watching a Mindset Shift is Powerful

We had a student approach us the morning of day 2 with his notebook open, wide grin on his face. Our student was excited about an insight about the Sprint Goal and completely revamped the agenda of an upcoming Sprint Planning event.

Here’s what he told us:

I couldn’t sleep after I got home from day one of the class. I realized that I had to completely change our Sprint Planning agenda. We need a true Sprint Goal that we all understand and can stay aligned with during the Daily Scrum.

We had another student express gratitude for helping her understand what “done” really means and the implications of what is both in and out of our definition of done. Another student went home after the end of the class and immediately started work on a Sprint Retrospective format that reinforces the Scrum Values.

These are some of the concrete changes that we heard about during and after the class. What we also saw during the class was real servant leadership emerge. The students were helping each other by sharing their stories, committing to help each other going forward, and by showing high amounts of grace, trust, and comfort with people they had mostly just met. This subtle, yet powerful shift in mindset and approach by the students was a joy to watch unfold.

PSM II – Scrum Values and Servant Leadership in Action

The PSM II course is an advanced scrum master journey designed to help practicing Scrum Masters experience a facilitated course.  Empiricism, the scrum values, and servant leadership are at the core of this advanced scrum master course.

Servant leaders tap in to the collective intelligence of their teams and help people grow, thrive, and prosper. These leaders help people see a version of better in the world that other many not even realize is possible yet. These students now how new ideas and tools to help them do just that. Turn up the good on their teams and in the world. If you’d like to grow your scrum mastery and take the next step on your servant leadership journey, you can join Todd and I at one of the classes below. We hope you can join us!

The post PSM II: Facilitating an Advanced Scrum Master Experience appeared first on Ryan Ripley.

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David Furio and Ben Kopel (@bckopel) joined Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley) to discuss Sprint Retrospective Ideas for Scrum Masters.

David Furio – Ryan Ripley – Ben Kopel

Ryan Ripley is teaming up with Professional Scrum Trainer, Todd Miller to teach the Advanced Scrum Master (PSM-II) course this year. Whether you are a CSM or a PSM, this Advanced Scrum Master Course is the next step on the Scrum master journey, created and present by trainers from scrum.org – The Home of Scrum.

In this episode you’ll discover:
  • New ideas to facilitate your Sprint Retrospectives
  • How new formats can help bring out new insights from your Scrum Team
  • Why following up on Sprint Retrospective actions is critical for team morale
Links from the show: How to Support the Show:

Thank you for your support. Here are some of the ways to contribute that were discussed during this episode:

This pocket guide is the one book to read for everyone who wants to learn about Scrum.
The book covers all roles, rules and the main principles underpinning Scrum, and is based on the Scrum Guide Edition 2013. A broader context to this fundamental description of Scrum is given by describing the past and the future of Scrum.
The author, Gunther Verheyen, has created a concise, yet complete and passionate reference about Scrum. The book demonstrates his core view that Scrum is about a journey, a journey of discovery and fun. He designed the book to be a helpful guide on that journey.
Click here to purchase on Amazon.
Question: Which topic resonated with you? Please leave your thoughts in the comment section below. You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Want to hear another podcast about the life of an agile coach? — Listen to my conversation with Zach Bonaker, Diane Zajac-Woodie, and Amitai Schlair on episode 39. We discuss growing an agile practice and how coaches help create the environments where agile ideas can flourish.

Agile + DevOps East brings together practitioners seeking to accelerate the delivery of reliable, secure software applications. Learn from industry experts how your organization can leverage agile and DevOps concepts to improve deployment frequency and time to market, reduce lead time, and more successfully deliver stable new features. Choose from over 100 learning and networking opportunities this November 4–9 in Orlando, FL to improve your agile skills in hot areas such as agile and lean development, scaled agile development, leadership, digital transformation, and more.

Agile for Humans listeners use code “AGILEDEV” to receive $400 off their conference registration Visit well.tc/agile

The post AFH 101: Sprint Retrospective Ideas for Scrum Masters appeared first on Ryan Ripley.

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Don Gray (@donaldegray) and Mike Coon (@mikeonitstuff) joined Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley) to discuss Wardley Maps, decision making at the leadership level, and how to visualize changes in your organization.

Don Gray

Don is a friend and mentor to me and a valued member of the agile community. He has contributed to multiple books including CENTER ENTER TURN SUSTAIN: ESSAYS IN CHANGE ARTISTRYREADINGS FOR PROBLEM-SOLVING LEADERSHIP, and AMPLIFY YOUR EFFECTIVENESS. He co-teaches one of the top agile and leadership workshops available – Coaching Beyond the Team – with Esther Derby.

Mike with more than 30 years in IT, Mike is interested in sharing the lessons he’s learned in Business, Technology, and Life at his website MikeOnItStuff. Through observation, questioning, coaching and consultation,he helps executives, managers, and teams identify their values, articulate their vision, set their strategy and incorporate continuous learning and improvement into their daily activities.

Doing a map of the things a company or director are doing – even a crappy whiteboard map showing only the biggest rocks – really adds clarity to decision making and approach to improvement.

— Mike Coon (@mikeonitstuff) July 20, 2018

Ryan Ripley is teaming up with Professional Scrum Trainer, Todd Miller to teach the Advanced Scrum Master (PSM-II) course this year. Whether you are a CSM or a PSM, this Advanced Scrum Master Course is the next step on the Scrum master journey, created and present by trainers from scrum.org – The Home of Scrum.

In this episode you’ll discover:
  • What are Wardley Maps and how can you use them in your work
  • Methods to visualize the progression of a product in a complex world
  • How to use these methods to help guide management level decision making
Links from the show: How to Support the Show:

Thank you for your support. Here are some of the ways to contribute that were discussed during this episode:

This pocket guide is the one book to read for everyone who wants to learn about Scrum.
The book covers all roles, rules and the main principles underpinning Scrum, and is based on the Scrum Guide Edition 2013. A broader context to this fundamental description of Scrum is given by describing the past and the future of Scrum.
The author, Gunther Verheyen, has created a concise, yet complete and passionate reference about Scrum. The book demonstrates his core view that Scrum is about a journey, a journey of discovery and fun. He designed the book to be a helpful guide on that journey.
Click here to purchase on Amazon.
Question: Which topic resonated with you? Please leave your thoughts in the comment section below. You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Want to hear another podcast about the life of an agile coach? — Listen to my conversation with Zach Bonaker, Diane Zajac-Woodie, and Amitai Schlair on episode 39. We discuss growing an agile practice and how coaches help create the environments where agile ideas can flourish.

The post AFH 100: Using Wardley Maps to Drive Improvement appeared first on Ryan Ripley.

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Zach Bonaker (@ZachBonaker) and Amitai Schleier (@schmonz) joined Ryan Ripley (@ryanripley) to discuss ways to improve your agile hiring practices when interviewing Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches.

Don Gray

Zach is a self-described “benevolent trouble-maker” and seeks to foster servant leadership that cultivates growth, learning, and discovery. He is a systems thinker who shares his thoughts on his blog – Agile Out Loud. Zach is great at pushing agile thinking forward and has authored many popular posts on next generation agile theories and practices.

Amitai is a software development coachspeaker, legacy code wrestler, non-award-winning musician, award winning bad poet, and the creator of the Agile in 3 Minutes podcast. He blogs at schmonz.com and is a frequent guest on Agile for Humans. Amitai has published many of his agile observations and musings in his new book – Agile in 3 Minutes on Lean Pub.

Ryan Ripley is teaming up with Professional Scrum Trainer, Todd Miller to teach the PSM-II this year. Whether you are a CSM or a PSM-I, this Advanced Scrum Master Course is the next step on the Scrum master journey, created and present by trainers from scrum.org – The Home of Scrum.

In this episode you’ll discover:
  • Combining the thinking and doing of agile
  • It’s the age of the knowledge worker…what now?
  • The importance of meeting people where they are at and helping them move forward
Links from the show: How to Support the Show:

Thank you for your support. Here are some of the ways to contribute that were discussed during this episode:

Agile + DevOps East brings together practitioners seeking to accelerate the delivery of reliable, secure software applications. Learn from industry experts how your organization can leverage agile and DevOps concepts to improve deployment frequency and time to market, reduce lead time, and more successfully deliver stable new features. Choose from over 100 learning and networking opportunities this November 4–9 in Orlando, FL to improve your agile skills in hot areas such as agile and lean development, scaled agile development, leadership, digital transformation, and more.

Agile for Humans listeners use code “AGILEDEV” to receive $400 off their conference registration Visit well.tc/agile

The post AFH 099: Improve Your Agile Hiring Practices appeared first on Ryan Ripley.

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