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Whether it’s helping to avoid a startled deer or an unseen vehicle, advanced safety features are making a real difference, according to motorists.

In a Consumer Reports survey of the owners of cars with driver-assist technology, 57 percent reported at least one feature kept them from crashing.

Blindspot warning was most effective, with 60 percent of these owners saying the system helped to prevent an accident. Rear cross-traffic warning, forward-collision warning and front and rear automatic emergency braking also proved valuable.

Findings from the study, which gathered information on 72,000 vehicles, along with an explanation of each feature are highlighted below.

 

Advanced safety features that helped prevent a crash

Blindspot warning

The difference: 60 percent of owners said this technology helped them avoid an accident.

How it works: Indicates when another vehicle is potentially in the blindspot either side of your car, letting you know it may be unsafe to change lanes or merge into traffic. Visual alert is usually given on the side mirror, mirror frame or near the base of the front pillar, while some systems also provide audible warnings.

Rear cross-traffic warning and rear automatic emergency braking

The difference: 52 percent of owners said this technology helped them avoid an accident.

How it works: Typically includes a rearview camera to indicate the presence of objects when backing up. Depending on type, it may include a screen with lines to show how close you’re getting to any objects; on-screen guidance for steering; a 360-degree, top-down view, and automatic braking when people or vehicles are crossing.

Forward-collision warning and/or front automatic emergency braking

The difference: 47 percent of owners said this technology helped them avoid an accident.

How it works: Provides visual, audible and/or tactile warning of a potential collision with a vehicle or object ahead. Automatic emergency braking activates if the driver doesn’t react in time, in order to prevent or limit the effects of a crash.

Lane-departure warning and lane-keeping assist

The difference: 31 percent of owners said this technology helped them avoid an accident.

How it works: Drivers with lane-departure warning get a visual, audible and/or tactile alert when their car approaches or crosses lane markings, unless they’re signaling. Lane-keeping assist provides steering and/or braking to correct such a departure and keep the car on track.

Adaptive cruise control

The difference: 19 percent of owners said this technology helped them avoid an accident.

How it works: Maintains a constant distance between you and the car ahead by adjusting the speed of your vehicle. Some systems will bring the car to a halt when traffic stops and accelerate to get up to speed when traffic is moving again.

 

Most and least satisfying features

Among this range of features, owners reported most satisfaction with automatic emergency braking, adaptive cruise control and blindspot warning. Least satisfying were the lane-keeping systems, attributed to annoying chimes and alerts and overly aggressive steering correction. This resulted in owners disabling these features more often than others.

 

The post Drivers reveal which safety features stopped them from crashing appeared first on RoadLoans.

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The art of making a great car purchase actually lies with a little science. Or a lot, according to the Automotive Science Group, which aims to help consumers make informed car-buying decisions through its objective, data-driven analysis.

To that end, it has created the Automotive Performance Index, enabling shoppers to find the best new models across a range of categories. “You define the size and class of automobile that meets your needs, and we’ll differentiate the best-performing model in the segment,” says the group.

For 2019, the index has identified 33 best-in-class vehicles in 11 categories based on economic, environmental and all-around performance assessments. Nine overall winners are highlighted, too.

The leading 2019-year models, from 1,640 variants of car, crossover and SUV, are below. Two-seaters, convertibles and vehicles exceeding $100,000 were excluded from the study.

The 2019 Kia Sorento is the leading full-size SUV for all-round and economic performance, according to the Automotive Performance Index.

Best cars of 2019

Mini compact

Toyota Yaris – all-around performance

BMW i3 – environmental performance

Chevrolet Spark – economic performance

Compact

Mitsubishi Mirage – all-around performance

Toyota Prius C – environmental performance

Mitsubishi Mirage – economic performance

Midsize

Toyota Prius Prime – all-around performance

Toyota Prius Prime – environmental performance

Honda Fit – economic performance

Full-size

Hyundai Ioniq Plugin – all-around performance

Hyundai Ioniq Plugin – environmental performance

Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid – economic performance

Wagon

Subaru Outback – all-around performance

Subaru Outback – environmental performance

Fiat 500 L – economic performance

Best cars overall

Toyota Prius Prime – all-around performance

Hyundai Ioniq Plugin – environmental performance

Mitsubishi Mirage – economic performance

Best crossovers of 2019

Mini crossover

Mazda CX-3 – all-around performance

Lexus UX 250h – environmental performance

Hyundai Kona – economic performance

Compact crossover

Kia Niro Plugin – all-around performance

Kia Niro Plugin – environmental performance

Nissan Kicks – economic performance

Crossover

Toyota RAV4 Hybrid – all-around performance

Toyota RAV4 – environmental performance

Jeep Compass – economic performance

Best crossovers overall

Kia Niro Plugin – all-around performance

Kia Niro Plugin – environmental performance

Nissan Kicks – economic performance

 

Best SUVs and minivans of 2019

Midsize SUV

Mitsubishi Outlander – all-around performance

Tesla Model X – environmental performance

Nissan Rogue – economic performance

Full-size SUV

Kia Sorento – all-around performance

Toyota Highlander Hybrid – environmental performance

Kia Sorento – economic performance

Minivan

Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid – all-around performance

Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid – environmental performance

Ford Transit Connect – economic performance

Best SUVs and minivans overall

Mitsubishi Outlander – all-around performance

Tesla Model X – environmental performance

Nissan Rogue – economic performance

Many car buyers shop by brand, and Automotive Science Group analyzed 32 automakers in five categories. Besides all-around, environmental and economic performance, there were awards for most-distinguished brand and social performance, which takes into account factors such as labor policies and practices.

Best brands of 2019

Mitsubishi – all-around performance

Tesla – environmental performance

Mitsubishi – economic performance

Mini – social performance

Toyota – most-distinguished brand

The post These vehicles are best-in-class, (auto) science tells us appeared first on RoadLoans.

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A trio of Korean brands continues to set the standard for new-vehicle quality in an influential study.

Genesis, Kia and Hyundai have widened the gap between themselves and other automakers in the 2019 J.D. Power Initial Quality Study, which assesses vehicles early in the ownership experience.

It’s the second year running these nameplates, all part of Hyundai Motor Group, have filled the top three positions and they account for six of the highest-ranking models within the 20 vehicle categories.

Genesis, newcomer to the luxury segment, tops the list with fewest reported problems in the first 90 days of ownership, while Kia is the highest-placed mass-market automaker.

Eight other brands score higher than the industry average, starting with Ford and Lincoln and including three more domestics, as well as three Japanese badges.

Overall, the quality of new cars in 2019 was flat compared to 2018, although there were improvements in areas including infotainment. Problems with driver assistance systems are increasing as the technology becomes more widespread and complex, the study finds.

Kia is the highest-ranking mass-market brand for the fifth consecutive year.

Top ranking brands for initial quality in 2019

Including problems per 100 vehicles

  1. Genesis, 63
  2. Kia, 70
  3. Hyundai, 71
  4. Ford, 83
  5. Lincoln, 84
  6. Chevrolet, 85
  7. Nissan, 86
  8. Dodge, 90
  9. Lexus, 90
  10. Toyota, 90
  11. Buick, 92

Industry average: 93

Top ranking cars

Small car – Kia Rio
Small premium car – BMW 2 Series
Compact car – Kia Forte
Compact sporty car – Mini Cooper
Compact premium car – Genesis G70
Midsize car – Chevrolet Malibu / Ford Fusion
Midsize sporty car – Dodge Challenger
Midsize premium car – Mercedes-Benz CLS
Large car – Nissan Maxima

Top rankings SUVs, vans and pickups

Small SUV – Kia Sportage
Compact SUV – Chevrolet Equinox
Compact premium SUV – BMW X4
Midsize SUV – Hyundai Santa Fe
Midsize premium SUV – Lexus RX
Large SUV – Chevrolet Tahoe
Large premium SUV – Cadillac Escalade
Minivan – Kia Sedona
Midsize pickup – Ford Ranger
Large light-duty pickup – Nissan Titan
Large heavy-duty pickup – Chevrolet Silverado HD

The car with the best initial quality score overall was the Porsche 911.

The post Genesis, Kia, Hyundai pull ahead in new-vehicle quality rankings appeared first on RoadLoans.

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The dealer hands you the keys, you take the wheel and drive off the lot reveling in your shiny new vehicle purchase. What could be better?

Knowing you’ve made a great choice for your finances, as well as your driving wants and needs, could make it all the sweeter now and for the years to come.

That’s why it’s well worth using an auto finance calculator before you shop. Online tools such as RoadLoans’ affordability and monthly payment calculators give consumers a number of advantages as they search for their next car and the best financing arrangements.

Auto loan calculators will enable you to estimate:

  • How much you may be able to spend on a car in total, taking into account any down payment and trade-in
  • A monthly payment that fits your budget so you won’t have trouble paying off the vehicle
  • The right loan duration so you can find a good balance between a comfortable auto payment and total interest charges
  • How interest rates affect loan costs
Estimate a loan amount

Start by using the affordability calculator to get a better idea of how much you could spend overall. Enter a desired monthly payment, loan term in months, APR and down payment amount.

How Much Car Can I Afford?

Great question. Fill in the boxes below to help with the answer and determine what price you can afford to pay for a car.

Your desired monthly payment (Help me)
Your desired monthly payment
$
Loan term
Loan term
mo
APR*
APR*
%
Down payment
Down payment
$

Please check the numbers

You may be able to afford a loan amount up to

0

*APR is the Annual Percentage Rate or the cost of your credit at a yearly rate.

When adding the loan duration, you can see how a longer term increases the loan amount while a shorter period reduces it. Bear in mind that longer loans typically mean the borrower will pay more interest over the course of the contract.

What should you enter for APR? Annual percentage rates are affected by a range of factors, including a consumer’s credit history, and a look at average auto loan rates by credit score will provide a general reference. Even a one-point drop in your interest rate may offer a decent saving.

Lastly, a down payment can combine the trade-in value of your current car, if you have one, as well as cash you may want to add to it. Adding a figure to the down payment field will increase the estimated amount you have to spend on a car.

Here’s an example. A car shopper enters a monthly payment of $450 with a 60-month loan term, six percent APR and a $4,000 down payment, which is the value of their trade-in. The estimated amount they have to spend is $27,277. If the loan period is extended to 72 months, it increases to $31,153. Let’s say they have money saved and decide to put $2,000 cash on top of their trade-in, raising the down payment to $6,000. The affordability amount increases further to $33,153.

Calculate monthly payments

Similarly, enter loan amount, duration, APR and down payment into the car loan calculator, then adjust the values to gauge how your potential monthly payment changes.

Our car shopper likes the total amount of $27,277 but is now wondering what kind of auto payment they may get if they were to go with a shorter term so they could pay off the car quicker and save on interest.

Putting in $27,277 with a six percent APR, $4,000 down, and now 48-month term, the monthly payment rises to $547. What if they were to get a better interest rate? A three percent APR drops the car payment from $547 to $515 a month, which adds up to a much larger saving over time.

Get a preapproved loan and shop like a cash buyer

Having worked out a plausible price range for a vehicle and what sort of loan meets your needs, you’ll be able to visit the dealership with confidence. To give yourself even more control in the buying process, get approved for financing before you go. It takes a few minutes to complete RoadLoans’ short online application and you’ll receive a decision in seconds. If approved, you can shop like a cash buyer, already knowing your loan is in hand, and negotiate a great deal on your chosen car.

The post Improve your car-shopping experience with an auto loan calculator appeared first on RoadLoans.

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The trend for longer auto loans means some consumers can qualify for financing up to 96 months, or eight years, should they want it. The average loan term, meanwhile, stands at almost 69 months for new and 65 months for used vehicles, according to Experian data for the start of 2019. Rising auto prices and consumer preferences for large, costly SUVs have contributed to this pattern, and increasing the loan term is an effective way of getting an affordable monthly payment. However, while a low car payment is always appealing, it’s not always the best financial move. A longer loan will typically result in higher finance charges and a higher overall cost of purchase.

Consider someone who takes out a loan for $20,137 – the average amount for a used car says Experian – over 60 months with a six percent interest rate. Their monthly payment is $389 and they pay $3,221 in interest by the end of the contract. Extend the loan to 84 months and the car payment falls to $294, but the total interest charge is $4,573; an extra $1,352.

There are other reasons to be cautious about lengthy financing periods. Longer loans tend to have higher interest rates than shorter ones. There’s also the increased risk of negative equity, when you owe more than the vehicle is worth.

With an 84- or a 96-month loan, for example, you might still be making payments on an old high-mileage vehicle that’s fallen greatly in value. Taking into account the average length of new vehicle ownership is nearly seven years, you could find yourself changing cars without enjoying the benefits of debt-free driving, or face the hurdle of trading in while upside down.

Longer auto loans will have their place for some buyers, though, and may be the best option to get on the road in a much-needed vehicle. When it comes to your own financing needs, use RoadLoans’ auto loan calculator to estimate what length of loan may work, and how much you might be able to borrow for a car in total. Adjust the loan duration, interest rate and monthly payment to see how the suggested financing changes.

How Much Car Can I Afford?

Great question. Fill in the boxes below to help with the answer and determine what price you can afford to pay for a car.

Your desired monthly payment (Help me)
Your desired monthly payment
$
Loan term
Loan term
mo
APR*
APR*
%
Down payment
Down payment
$

Please check the numbers

You may be able to afford a loan amount up to

0

*APR is the Annual Percentage Rate or the cost of your credit at a yearly rate.

Get a quick loan decision

When you’re ready to apply for a new or used vehicle loan, complete our short online application, and get a decision in seconds. We accept applications from consumers with a broad range of credit, including bad credit,* and offer qualified applicants auto loans up to 72 months.

* “Bad” or “Poor” credit generally is considered a FICO score around 600 and below by sources including the Consumer Federation of America and National Credit Reporting Association (reported by the Associated Press), Bankrate.com, Credit.com, Investopedia, NerdWallet.com and others. The Congressional Budget Office identifies a FICO score of 620 as the “cutoff” for prime loans. FICO scores are not the sole factor in lending decisions by RoadLoans.com and Santander Consumer USA.

 

The post How long can you finance a new or used car? appeared first on RoadLoans.

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All those drivers leasing vehicles may be doing used-car shoppers a favor.

Off-lease vehicles, which typically come onto the used-car market at three years old, are offering some attention-grabbing bargains.

Research from iSeeCars.com puts the headlights on price drops of up to 55 percent for such vehicles compared to same-year versions bought new – extending to 69 percent for electrics – in a market where just-leased cars are reaching record highs.

If you have a liking for luxury, the news is even better. As many leased vehicles are high-end models, so too are many of these potential bargains.

Listed below you’ll find 35 deals based on the greatest levels of depreciation on a new car over three years. With each is the average price of a three-year-old used vehicle followed by the depreciation percentage.

Acrua’s RLX luxury sedan offers the greatest potential saving among gas-powered and hybrid cars, iSeeCars.com data reveals.

10 best bargains on 3-year-old vehicles
  1. Acura RLX, $28,259; 55.8 percent
  2. Lincoln MKZ, $19,855, 55.6 percent
  3. Mercedes-Benz E-Class, $31, 051, 55.4 percent
  4. Jaguar XF, $30,268, 54.8 percent
  5. Cadillac XTS, $26,306, 54.5 percent
  6. Lincoln MKZ Hybrid, $20, 034, 54.5 percent
  7. Kia K900, $26, 522, 54.4 percent
  8. BMW 5 Series, $30,203, 53.8 percent
  9. Cadillac CTS, $26,785, 53.8 percent
  10. Audi A6, $29,941, 53.3 percent

Excludes luxury cars over $80,000 new and electric vehicles.

10 best bargains on 3-year-old cars under $20,000
  1. Lincoln MKZ, $19,855, 55.6 percent
  2. Kia Cadenza, $19,508, 50.2 percent
  3. Ford Fusion Hybrid, $14,844, 49.7 percent
  4. Chevrolet Impala, $17,745, 49.4 percent
  5. Kia Optima Hybrid, $16,381, 49.2 percent
  6. Fiat 500L, $13,403, 49.1 percent
  7. Ford Taurus, $17,587, 48.7 percent
  8. Volkswagen Tiguan, $16,235, 47.7 percent
  9. Fiat 500, $11,469, 47.2 percent
  10. Hyundai Sonata Hybrid, $16,303, 47 percent
10 best bargains on 3-year-old SUVs
  1. Lincoln Navigator L, $37,905, 51.6 percent
  2. Infiniti QX80, $38,869, 49.1 percent
  3. Lincoln MKT, $28,441, 49 percent
  4. Ford Expedition, $30,874, 48.7 percent
  5. Lincoln Navigator, $38,426, 48.1 percent
  6. Lincoln MKC $23,006, 48 percent
  7. Buick Enclave, $26,021, 47.8 percent
  8. Volkswagen Tiguan, $16,235, 47.7 percent
  9. BMW X5, $37,196, 47.7 percent
  10. Infiniti QX60, $28,993, 46.9 percent
Five best bargains on 3-year-old electric vehicles
  1. Fiat 500e, $10,358, 69.7 percent
  2. BMW i3, $19,784, 63.3 percent
  3. Nissan Leaf, $14,070, 59.6 percent
  4. Volkswagen e-Golf, $14,758, 58.1 percent
  5. Ford Fusion $15,983, 57.7 percent

Auto research site iSeeCars.com looked at 4.8 million cars sales for their study. Each car featured has a level of depreciation well above the all-vehicle average of 38.2 percent.

Finance a new or used car online

Apply for an auto loan online with RoadLoans. Our secure application will take only a few minutes to complete and we provide instant decisions. Credit not so hot right now? Don’t worry. We accept applications from consumers with a broad range of credit profiles.

The post 35 used-car bargains to find off lease appeared first on RoadLoans.

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It’s time for a broad smile. Your RoadLoans approval means you now have a big advantage as you move onto buying your next car.

Preapproval gives you the terms of your financing before visiting the dealership so that, on arrival, you can focus on selecting the right model and negotiating a great deal on price.

Your next step is to download and print your loan packet, gather the required supporting documents, and visit the preferred dealership located nearby. You’ll find details of your dealership within your loan papers. Alternatively, you can use our dealer locator to find another. We work with 14,000 auto dealers nationwide that are able to show our customers select, high-quality cars meeting our standards for age, mileage and financing. Once you’ve chosen the model and agreed the price, RoadLoans will work with the dealership to finalize the paperwork.

Before visiting a dealership, however, there are some important additional steps to consider; whether you get your loan through RoadLoans or someone else, and whether you’re shopping for a new or used vehicle.

Know what you’re willing to pay – A preapproval will let you know the amount for which you can finance a car, but it’s still a good idea establish what you’re willing to pay for a vehicle. You may want to include any add-ons, such as a trim package or GAP insurance, within your loan amount in order to stay on budget.

Know your trade-in value – If you have a vehicle to trade in, find out its trade-in value through sources such as NADA Guides and Kelley Blue Book so you can negotiate a fair price for it with the dealer. Another option to think about is selling the car privately and then using the money for a down payment.

Prepare to negotiate – Once you’ve found your car you can negotiate with the dealership on its sale price. If you already know the type of vehicle you want, look up its market value before you go to help your negotiations. When you’re at the dealership, consider starting at the invoice price – which is what the dealer paid for the vehicle – rather than the manufacturer’s suggested retail price, which will be displayed on the window sticker. The dealership may be willing to negotiate a price between the two.

Haven’t applied for financing with RoadLoans yet?

Applying is easy and takes just a few minutes. Complete our short online application by entering some basic information, and get a decision in seconds. We accept applications from consumers with a broad range of credit, including bad credit.*

* “Bad” or “Poor” credit generally is considered a FICO score around 600 and below by sources including the Consumer Federation of America and National Credit Reporting Association (reported by the Associated Press), Bankrate.com, Credit.com, Investopedia, NerdWallet.com and others. The Congressional Budget Office identifies a FICO score of 620 as the “cutoff” for prime loans. FICO scores are not the sole factor in lending decisions by RoadLoans.com and Santander Consumer USA.

The post How RoadLoans works: I got my car loan, now what? appeared first on RoadLoans.

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There’s lots to love about SUVs. Whether it’s for ferrying family about town, enjoying a road trip in comfort or doing a spot of hauling, these vehicles have you covered.

Their growing popularity is testament to their versatility, but with so many options on the market, it’s always helpful to have some reference points, especially if you’re buying used. Take a look at the 45 most popular SUVs to buy preowned, put together by CarMax, based mainly on sales data for periods of 2018. You can browse the options by different categories across the SUV segment, from AWDs and compacts to three-row and hybrid models.

The GMC Arcadia is one of the most popular three-row utilities to buy used at CarMax.

 

Compact SUVs
  1. Nissan Rogue
  2. Jeep Cherokee
  3. Ford Escape
  4. Chevrolet Equinox
  5. Ford Explorer
Compact SUVs under $20,000
  1. Nissan Rogue
  2. Ford Escape
  3. Honda CR-V
  4. Toyota RAV4
  5. Jeep Patriot
Midsize SUVs
  1. Ford Explorer
  2. Jeep Grand Cherokee
  3. Kia Sorento
  4. Nissan Pathfinder
  5. Lexus RX350
Three-row SUVs
  1. Ford Explorer
  2. Dodge Journey
  3. Nissan Pathfinder
  4. GMC Acadia
  5. Honda Pilot
Three-row SUVs under $25,000
  1. Ford Explorer
  2. GMC Acadia
  3. Nissan Pathfinder
  4. Chevrolet Traverse
  5. Acura MDX
Crossover SUVs
  1. Nissan Rogue
  2. Ford Escape
  3. Chevrolet Equinox
  4. Honda CR-V
  5. Ford Explorer
AWD SUVs
  1. Nissan Rogue
  2. Honda CR-V
  3. Jeep Wrangler
  4. Jeep Grand Cherokee
  5. Ford Explorer
Hybrid SUVs
  1. Lexus RX-450H
  2. Toyota RAV4 Hybrid
  3. Toyota Highlander Hybrid
  4. Infiniti QX60 Hybrid
  5. Nissan Pathfinder Hybrid
SUVs with the best MPG
  1. 2015 Honda CR-V (4WD automatic, 2.4L) and 2016 Nissan Rogue (2WD automatic, 2.5L), 32/26 MPG
  2. 2015-16 Nissan Rogue (4WD automatic, 2.5L), 31/25 MPG
  3. 2015-16 Chevrolet Equinox (2WD automatic, 2.4L), 31/22 MPG
  4. 2015 Toyota RAV4 (4WD automatic, 3.2L), 27/20 MPG
  5. 2015 Jeep Cherokee (4WD automatic, 3.2L), 27/20 MPG
Shop for your next SUV

When you’re ready to buy, apply for financing online with RoadLoans and get a quick decision. If approved, you can review multiple offers, select the best one and visit the preferred dealership nearby. Alternatively, use our dealer locator to find another. We work with thousands of auto dealerships across the country, including CarMax dealerships, offering select, high-quality models meeting our standards for age, mileage and financing. RoadLoans customers can enjoy a streamlined process and purchase their next vehicle with confidence.

The post 45 most popular SUVs to buy used, ranked by CarMax appeared first on RoadLoans.

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Trading in may be a convenient way to sell your current car and put that money toward the cost of a new one. Knowing the following terms may help you walk into the dealership with the confidence to negotiate a better deal.

Trade-in value

The trade-in value of your car is the amount that your dealer is willing to offer you to buy your vehicle. This amount can be influenced by a number of factors including the vehicle’s age, mileage and condition, demand for such a model, and your location.

Trade-in allowance

Once you have agreed on a trade-in value with the dealer, a trade-in allowance should also be established. The allowance is the amount by which the dealer will reduce the cost of your new car as a result of trading in your old one. This is like a credit from the sale of your existing car that is put toward the purchase of your new vehicle.

Retail value

Retail value represents the amount of money for which the dealer can expect to sell your trade-in vehicle to another party. The dealer will be looking to sell the vehicle for a higher price than they paid for it, which may include the cost of any reconditioning work. Research the market value of your car and take that into consideration when you negotiate the trade in. An alternative to trading in is to sell your car privately, which will typically get you a higher price, although it requires more time and effort.

Loan value

When you get to the stage of purchasing and financing your new car, the loan value is the amount of financing that the lender is willing to provide toward the purchase. This amount can depend on a number of factors including your financial stability, credit score, trade-in amount, down payment, and the conditions of any unfulfilled loan on your current car.

Negative equity, “upside down” and “underwater”

Negative equity, also known as being “upside down” or “underwater” on your car, is when you owe more than your vehicle is worth. It’s a good idea to check whether you have negative equity as it may affect whether you still want to purchase a new car now or wait until you have positive equity. If you decide to go ahead and trade in with negative equity, depending on how the trade-in is handled, it could weaken your position when financing a new purchase.

Rolling over

When trading in an “upside down” car, many times the dealer will offer to “roll over” the outstanding loan balance into the new loan. Rolling over will increase the size of your next loan and the associated financing costs on that note. Your dealer should disclose all the terms of the new loan to you before signing.

Apply for a car loan before trading in

If you’re looking to trade in and purchase a new or used vehicle, RoadLoans may be able to help. Use our auto loan calculators to work out what you may be able to afford, taking into account your trade in and any down payment. Then apply for financing and get an instant decision. If approved, you can shop already knowing how much car you can afford and the terms of your loan.

The post Car terms to know when trading in appeared first on RoadLoans.

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