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Caribbean 360 announced that Ministers of Health of the Pacific and the Caribbean met to discuss opportunities for cooperation and exchange regarding good practices in climate change and resilient health systems, regulatory frameworks, health security and non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The meeting took place in parallel to the 72nd World Health Assembly in Geneva, Switzerland.

Small island states in the Caribbean and the Pacific face a number of common challenges. They are especially vulnerable to climate change and extreme weather events and have limited capacity and human resources to respond to certain health challenges.

“We do not need to reinvent the wheel. We can learn from each other and save resources and time,” said the Minister of Health of Trinidad and Tobago, Terrence Deyalsingh, who co-chaired the meeting organized by Cook Islands and CARICOM and facilitated by Regional Office of the World Health Organization (WHO) for the Western Pacific and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).

Nickolas Steele, the Minister of Health of Grenada, which hosted last year’s Third Global Conference on Health and Climate: Special Focus on Small Island Developing States, stated that addressing the issue of climate change and health together “is about our survival”. Steele also highlighted the need for more case studies and evidence on the effects of climate change on health.

The Minister of Health of Jamaica presented the campaign ‘Caribbean Moves’, which encourages the population to get regular health checks, engage in physical activity and promotes a balanced diet. This initiative could be adapted and replicated in the Pacific.

The Minister of Health of the Cook Islands, and co-chair of the meeting, Vainetutai Rose Toki-Brown, stressed the importance of continued collaboration and cooperation among island states.

“There is a season for everything under the sun and this is our season, an opportunity for the Pacific to work with the Caribbean, to join forces and work as a family, to support each other, blossom and grow. Let us all learn from each other and share best practices and resources,” said Toki-Brown.

Participating ministers and high-level health authorities from the Caribbean included the Bahamas, Grenada, Jamaica, Haiti, St Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago. From the Pacific, participating ministers and high-level health authorities included those from Fiji, Cook Islands, Solomon Islands, Kiribati, Nauru, French Polynesia, Samoa, Tonga and Tuvalu.

Representatives from the CARICOM Secretariat, the Secretariat of the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), the Commonwealth Secretariat and PAHO also took part in the meeting.

For original article, see https://www.caribbean360.com/news/ministers-of-health-join-forces-on-climate-change

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[Many thanks to Peter Jordens for bringing this item to our attention.] A conference on Paget Henry’s Caliban’s Reason—“Caliban, Knowledge Societies, Caribbean and Global African Development”—will take place on March 19-22, 2020, in Mona, Jamaica. The deadline for submission of abstracts is July 1, 2019.

Description/Guidelines: 2020 marks 20 years since the publication of the ground-breaking, seminal and pioneering Paget Henry’s magnum opus on Caribbean philosophy, Caliban’s Reason. The interdisciplinary scholarship that undergirded the effort, the reception that greeted the work, the debates that have followed the text and the endless vistas of intellectually creative research that it has opened up have been unparalleled in brilliance, exceptionally profound and commendable in institutionalizing Caribbean intellectual traditions. Numerous accolades have been garnered by the book, praises sung of the author who has straddled two disciplinary spaces in the academy, tomes generated through the insights provoked and younger and highly talented scholars bred by the new perspectives which the work has disclosed.

To commemorate this 20-year milestone, the Department of Language, Linguistics and Philosophy and the Joint Institute of African and Diaspora Studies, University of the West Indies and University of Lagos, in partnership with the Departments of Africana Studies and Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice at Brown University and Department of Philosophy, University of Connecticut are organizing an international and interdisciplinary Conference on “Caliban’s Reason and Caribbean Intellectual Traditions” in March 19-22, 2020. This event will further provide the space and time first to institutionalize the preparation of future generation of scholars and confident researchers in Caribbean and Global Intellectual traditions, while the second similarly provides a unique avenue for scholars and researchers to present scholarly essays, exhibitions, as well as showcase talents in all areas of the Caribbean and Global African humanities. Scholars and researchers, artists and creative persons are encourages to forward abstracts, proposals and synopsis of their ideas on various areas of interest germane to African and Caribbean and Global African Traditions

The Conference organizers will determine where to situate these proposals; that is, either as Institute materials, where workshops, seminars, field trips and other enriching experiences are planned to enable graduate and undergraduate students to earn 3 Credits toward their various programmes.

Subthemes: Ontologies of Caliban; Epistemologies of Caliban; Tropes of Caliban and Knowledge; Caliban-ized History of Philosophy; Philosophy of History; Philosophical Traditions of Africa and the Diaspora – Pre-Classical, Classical, Medieval, Modern and Contemporary; Metaphysics and Ontologies in Africa and the Diaspora; Epistemology and Methodologies in Africa and the Diaspora; Social and Political Philosophies of Africa and the Diaspora; Theorizing Slavery; Theorizing Race and Racism; Existentialism and Phenomenology; Being and Nothingness; Epistemicide; Thinkers, Leaders and Traditions; Alternative Justice Systems, Crime as Protest and Scapegoatism; Political Ideologies; Pedagogy of the Oppressed; The Marginalization of the Male; Educational Dissonance and Social Disintegration; Marxism in Retreat; Identity Strictures and Fissures; The Rise of Fascism and Africana Futures; Willy Lynch Syndrome; Reparations; Repatriations; Religious Diffusion and Philosophy of Religion; Rastafari; The State of African and Diaspora Studies; Spirituality, Myths and Modernity in Africa; State, Religion, and Global Politics in Africa; Sociology, Race and ethno-identity in Africa; Archaeology, Social Anthropology and Race in Diasporic Africa; AU, CARICOM and African and Diaspora Humanity; Philosophy and Science in Africa; Gender and Sexuality in Africa and the Global African Diaspora; Reggae, Dancehall and Struggle for Identity; Martyrdom, Hero(ine) and Liberation Movements in Africa.

Lead Presenters: Paget Henry, Molefi K. Asante, Leonard Harris, Lewis R. Gordon, Nkiru Nzegu, Olufemi Taiwo, John Murungi, Muyiwa Falaiye, Adebola Ekanola, Thadeus Metz, Fred Ochieng’ Odhiambo, Veli Mitova

Panel Discussions: Panel Discussions are encouraged, to brainstorm on various aspects of the task of ensuring the survival and propagation of Caribbean, African, and African Diaspora Philosophies globally. Persons interested in organizing panels are encouraged to provide a summary of the panel, panellists, relevance to the Conference, the Caribbean intellectual traditions, Global Africa and Diaspora, and overall contribution to the development of these intellectual traditions globally.

Abstract Submission and Panel Proposals: All abstracts and panel proposals should include essay and/or panel title, the author(s) name, institutional affiliation, address, telephone numbers and email addresses. All abstracts must not be more than 250 words and panel proposals not more than 400 words. Abstracts for consideration, which must be in electronic format, should be received not later than July 1, 2019 by any of the following individuals:

a) Professor John Ayotunde Isola Bewaji; tunde.bewaji@gmail.com, tundebewaji@yahoo.com, john.bewaji@uwimona.edu.jm
b) Dr. Sandra McCalla; sandymccalla@yahoo.com, oneras1973@yahoo.com,   sandra.mccalla02@uwimona.edu.jm
c) Ms. Khimaja Connell; khimquest@gmail.com, khimaja.connell@uwimona.edu.jm

Writers of papers and panel proposals selected will be advised by July 31, 2019. Completed paper presentations are expected to reach the Conference Secretariat by October 30, 2019. This will ensure that such papers benefit from careful editing and corrections by our reviewers in collaboration with the authors to ensure the highest quality of the papers and are uploaded to the Conference Website by January 30, 2020. Final revised submissions will be published at a later date under the imprint of a leading publishing house to be determined by dedicated Editors.

Conference Fees by December 31, 2019 is USA$100.00 and Graduate Students USA$60.00

Accommodation: Conference Hotels and Guest Houses will be negotiated at group rates for the duration of the Conference and communicated to participants by October 30, 2019, so that bookings, mentioning the Conference can be made online or through the Conference Secretariat.

http://ojs.mona.uwi.edu/index.php/cjp/announcement/view/71

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The Voice announced that award-winning historian and cultural theorist, Professor Paul Gilroy, was appointed founding director of University College London’s new Centre for the Study of Race and Racism (CSRR).

Starting in August 2019, Professor Gilroy will become Professor of the Humanities and will be responsible for establishing a vibrant new interdisciplinary research centre, which will be part of the UCL Institute of Advanced Studies. The CSRR will harnesses academics and expertise from across UCL in the critical study of race as well as the history, theory and politics of racism and its effects.

Professor Gilroy said: “I am thrilled to be taking up this exciting, creative opportunity at UCL. Building up a centre of this kind has been a long-cherished ambition of mine.”

Professor Tamar Garb, Director of the Institute of Advanced Studies at UCL, said: “It is with enormous pride and excitement that we welcome Paul into the UCL academic community. The Centre will be outward facing and aims to become a hub for radical scholarship and engaged thinking, drawing in scholars, activists, policy makers and students from across UCL’s faculties, from London, the UK and internationally. We reach out to our friends and colleagues across London, Britain and further afield to join him in creating a unique intellectual and pedagogic community that can help us to address the dangers and threats that confront us in an ever bifurcated and divided world.”

Along with the Director, the CSSR will be staffed initially by an administrator and two lecturers and will attract doctoral students and post-doctoral fellows as well as establishing a new MA programme for students interested in exploring processes of racialization, racialized experience and racism in global, trans-historical and multi/interdisciplinary ways.

[Paul Gilroy; photo by Lola Paprika]

Source: https://www.voice-online.co.uk/career-education-article/professor-paul-gilroy-appointed-founding-director-ucl%E2%80%99s-new-centre-study-ra

Also see https://www.ucl.ac.uk/institute-of-advanced-studies/news/2019/may/professor-paul-gilroy-appointed-founding-director-centre-study-race-racism

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The second international conference of the Caribbean Studies Forum (CSF), an institutional collaboration between East Carolina University and the University of Belize, takes place the 10th through 12th of October 2019. Building on the success of the first conference, the forum returns to the City of Belmopan and is hosted by the University of Belize at its central campus under the theme: Writing/Righting/Rite-ing/Wright-ing the Caribbean. The deadline for abstracts and panel proposals: June 24, 2019.

Description/Guidelines: The conference aims to expand awareness of Caribbean cultures, provide a platform for interdisciplinary Caribbean Studies research projects, connect a diverse body of academics (North-South and South-South), and promote the field of interdisciplinary Caribbean Studies in general. Thus, all papers related to Caribbean Studies will be considered although we encourage scholars, artists, writers, and other interested persons to think about the different manifestations of the theme:

  • ‘Writing’ as marking or inscribing, composing, filling in, involving the gamut of genres traditionally ascribed to literature, composition, and the representation of language: from essays and news columns to poetry and novels. While etymologically focused on the written word, writing here is not uncommonly expanded to include ‘social inscription’.
  • ‘Righting’ as implicated in philosophy and jurisprudence, relating to restoration, correction, redressing or rectifying wrongs, and reparations. Also distinguishing what is morally good and what is true.
  • ‘Rite-ing’, a neologism referring to the performance of religious and ceremonial acts, customary observances, social practices, conventional events.
  • ‘Wrighting’ invokes the idea of craft and art-forms, from the literary to the plastic to the dramaturgic arts; it concerns all forms of making or building. Evoking carpentry, the smithy and the forge, the word also refers to the work of the playwright and the wordsmith’s expert use of words to communicate ideas through the skillful application of literary styles, methods, and techniques.

Caribbean studies might be channeled through these themes. Caribbean scholarship refines, realigns, redresses, and rights our understanding of the region. It contests the Caribbean’s ‘evisceration from the imaginary geographies of “Western modernity”’ by declaring its ‘indisputable narrative position’ at modernity’s origin (Sheller); it redresses discourses of indigenous erasure (Forte); it insists on the centrality of small Caribbean islands within history (Deloughrey); it rehearses how the Caribbean has ‘occupied the procenium of history’ from centuries of imperial warring over islands through to the superpower standoff during the Cuban Missile Crisis and on to today (Torres-Saillant); it demonstrates how ‘Afro-Caribbean beliefs appear together with the rumba and the carnival as forms of knowledge as valid as those proper to scientific knowledge’ (Benítez-Rojo); it describes how the Caribbean nevertheless coheres, despite a sense of ‘fragmentation exacerbated by island geography’ as well as its ‘balkanisation’ by culture and language (Poupeye).

This conference hopes to spotlight traditions and trends in writing, rites, and concepts of ‘right’, examining various combinations of these as embodied actions, political statements, and individual or collective activisms. The conference looks to strengthen the activisms taking place in writing and rituals, to expose the possible weaknesses in the Caribbean’s cultural multiplicity, to address how political hierarchy in the Caribbean has worked against the region’s global interest, and to question definitions of the Caribbean and their exclusionary nature in discourse.

  • We seek papers that contribute to the broad vein of scholarship in Caribbean studies involved in the work of righting the Caribbean intellectually; this includes recovering its place within world history, respectfully acknowledging its complexity, broadening our conceptions of its borders, recognising its manifold relations, reiterating its profound influence on the world stage.
  • We are interested in papers that treat various religious traditions, secular ideologies, and global philosophies—mainline and marginalised—investigating how they work through rites on Caribbean society and culture, engendering social change, and/or creating bonds of community.
  • We also invite papers that focus on the more perverse legacies of global superpowers variously insisting on intervening to ‘right’ democratically elected governments in Caribbean territories, and papers interrogating contemporary political currents that have resulted in a string of far-right government heads representing policies and positions sometimes inimical to Caribbean life.
  • We are especially interested in individual or collaborative paper presentations and creative endeavors. We aim to engage a wide audience of scholars and practitioners researching in these areas from within a range of disciplinary fields and contexts. And abstracts from graduate students, early career researchers, and artists are very welcome.

Submission Types: Individual or collaborative (no more than 2 authors) papers: These are academic papers (to be grouped into panel sessions: each paper not to exceed 20 minutes). Creative presentations: These are 10–minute presentations of creative projects of potential impact on cultural, writing, and/or pedagogical practice.

To present a creative project or paper: please send a proposed title and abstract (of no more than 200 words) with a short CV (no more than 2-3 pages) to the conference organizing committee at cdeshield@ub.edu.bz.

Deadline for Abstracts and Panel Proposals: June 24th, 2019.

Source: http://csf.ub.edu.bz/

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“For The Love of Culture” is the theme for this year’s Festival. Crop Over, co-ordinated by the National Cultural Foundation, is Barbados’ premier summer festival celebrated this year with official events May 4–August 5. The National Cultural Foundation writes:

While music and feting no doubt drive the festival, what makes it stand apart, is the commitment to preserve Bajan culture – with the inclusion of visual art, craft, literary art, culinary art, dance and drama within the official calendar.

Get your Crop Over info for events, news, artists, tickets, bands, media accreditation and other forms (when available) at the website HERE.  Download the 2019 Crop Over Calendar calendar. Read about Crop Over’s rich history HERE

Information accessed via https://seawoman.wordpress.com/2019/05/20/national-cultural-foundation-crop-over-calendar-2019/

For more information on the National Cultural Foundation, visit http://www.ncf.bb/

Also see https://www.carnifest.com/barbados-crop-over-festival-2019/

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“Mapping Resistance: The Young Lords in El Barrio” is a public art project created by Miguel Luciano, exploring the activist history of the Young Lords in East Harlem, through the photography of Hiram Maristany (official photographer of the Young Lords and original member in New York). You can view this project until September 20. [This project is supported by the Surdna Foundation, A Blade of Grass, El Museo del Barrio, Art Bridge and local community partners.]

Description: Historic photographs of activist moments in East Harlem are installed at site-specific locations throughout the neighborhood. This location is on Madison Avenue between 111th Street and 112th Street, where the original office headquarters of the Young Lords was located. All of the photos featured here were taken on this very block, 50 years ago.

Walking tours and a reception in June, TBA. Project is up all summer, through September 30.

Image shown above: Denise Oliver, Minister of Economic Development in the original office of the Young Lords, c.1970. Other photos included in the project are: Juan González, Minister of Education of the Young Lords at the storefront office headquarters, 1969; The Takeover of the TB testing truck, 1970; Young Lords member with Pa’lante Newspaper, 1970; and Children in the Funeral March for Julio Roldán, 1970. All photos are by Hiram Maristany.

#MiguelLuciano  #HiramMaristany #MappingResistance#YoungLords #ElBarrio #Harlem #EastHarlem #publicart

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House of Nehesi Publishers (HNP) reminds us that the 17th annual St. Martin Book Fair, organized around the theme “New Ground,” takes place from June 6 through 8, 2019. Tamara Groeneveldt is the “literary ambassador” for the festival, leading the list of St. Martin writers and workshop leaders. Here are excerpts from the press release.

“Each year the book fair looks for a published writer from St. Martin to represent the writers, aspiring writers, and authors of our whole island,” said [Shujah] Reiph.

Earlier this year House of Nehesi Publishers (HNP) also accepted Groeneveldt’s manuscript of poems for publication. “The idea now is to have Tamara’s first poetry book released at St. Martin Book Fair 2019. The new book will be a highlight of Tamara’s role as a literary ambassador for the island’s writers at the festival,” said Jacqueline Sample, president of HNP.

The role of the selected writer is to interact with the guest authors from various countries and territories participating in the St. Martin Book Fair. The writer also attends as many literary activities as possible, visits a school, conducts a workshop, and either presents his or her last book for discussion, or launches a new book, said Reiph.

According to HNP, “Tamara Groeneveldt is an emerging poet from St. Martin. Groeneveldt holds a master’s degree in social work from Florida A&M University. At the University of St. Martin she joined the Young Poets Society.

“Groeneveldt has recited her poetry at official St. Martin Day programs and other presentations attended by the island’s officials and the king and queen of the Netherlands; at the ‘10,000 Men March for St. Martin’; and at ‘For A World Without Walls.’  “The former award-winning president of Soualiga Corporate Toastmasters Club has had her poetry published in Where I See the Sun – Contemporary Poetry in St. Martin, the 2013 anthology from HNP. The honor of representing St. Martin’s writers and our young and growing literature at the St. Martin Book Fair is also about encouraging the selected writer to keep writing, and to inspire unpublished writers to get their books published,” said Sample.

[Above: Tamara Groeneveldt performing her popular poem “I Know St. Martin’s Culture,” 2018. (Courtesy T. Groeneveldt. A. Blijden photo)]

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The Sea is History, curated by Selene Wendt, is on display at the UiO Kulturhistorisk museum [Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo] until August 2019. [See previous post Art Exhibition: The Sea is History.] In the context of the exhibition, there will be a conference held this week: “The Sea is History: Discourses on the Poetics of Relation,” on May 23-24; see full program at KHM.UiO. The conference is a collaboration with Goethe-Institut, Oslo (and is made possible with generous support from Goethe-Institut and The Foundation for Free Speech.)

The Sea is History features work by John Akomfrah, María Magdalena Campos-Pons, Andrea Chung, Christopher Cozier, Manthia Diawara, Isaac Julien, Naiza Khan, Hew Locke, Nyugen E. Smith, and Cosmo Whyte. Speakers include the award-winning poet and essayist, Ishion Hutchinson; Nanette Snoep; Christopher Cozier; Grace Aneiza Ali; Annie Paul; Michelle Eistrup, and many more.

Description: The Sea is History, curated by Selene Wendt, is on display at the Museum of Cultural History, UiO from March until August 2019. The title is inspired by the epic poem by the St. Lucian Nobel laureate poet Derek Walcott. The reference serves to emphasize the poetic undercurrent of the exhibition, while also highlighting the relevance of great Caribbean thinkers, such as Derek Walcott, Stuart Hall, and Édouard Glissant within a wider geographical and theoretical context. Metaphorically speaking, the works can be understood as part of an expansive sea, the ebb and flow of which is never-ending, and cyclical.

[Photo above: Still picture from the film Paradise Omeros, 2003, by Isaac Julien.]

The link to sign up for the conference is on the museum’s website: https://nettskjema.uio.no/a/114520#/page/1

For more information, see https://www.khm.uio.no/english/visit-us/historical-museum/temporary-exhibitions/the-sea-is-history.html

See full program at https://www.khm.uio.no/forskning/aktuelt/arrangementer/seminarer/the-sea-is-history-discourses-on-the-poetics-of-relation.html?

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Waterkant reports on Surinamese bassist Jason Eduwaiti, who will perform this week at the 2019 Amersfoort Jazz Festival. The festival—four days of world jazz including performances by 350 artists from 20 countries—takes place from May 23 through 26 in the historic city of Amersfoort, The Netherlands.

The Surinamese bassist Jason Eduwaiti can be seen this week at the 2019 Amersfoort Jazz Festival. He’s not there with his own band, but with the Dutch soul/jazz group DelMontis of Rolf Delfos (sax) and Frank Montis (Hammond organ/vocals). The 41st edition of the festival is taking place from 23-26 May. Jason sees his performance at the festival as “the next level” in his music career.

“It used to be that you had to go live in Europe or North America to get more chances on the podium at an international level. Now a door is opening that allows you to work abroad from a base within Suriname,” said the musician, who is from the village Futunakaba in Sipaliwini District.

Jason picked up music at a young age in his family, living at the birthplace of Saamaka [Maroon] gospel music. At the Conservatorium Suriname Jason, inspired by Richie Bona, decided to fuse his Saamaka roots with jazz and funk. After his final exams, he kept going with the fusion works.

[Article translated by D. S. Battistoli. For original article, see https://www.waterkant.net/suriname/2019/05/20/surinaamse-musicus-jason-eduwaiti-op-amersfoort-jazz-festival/]

Also see https://www.amersfoortjazz.nl/event/jason-eduwaiti-sur-meets-delmontis/

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“Somos de aquí: The Enduring Wildlife of Puerto Rico” opened officially on May 5, 2019, at the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson, Wyoming, and will be on view through August 18. This is the first fully-bilingual, large-scale art exhibition in Wyoming. It is a multimedia show featuring Puerto Rican parrots, coquí frogs, sea turtles, and bats. The exhibit is temporarily closed and is due to reopen in June.

Description: This exhibition pays tribute to four of Puerto Rico’s iconic native species of wildlife that have survived in the face of an economic collapse followed by Hurricane Maria’s 2017 devastation. The compelling photographs, videos, and interviews in this exhibit tell the story of the Puerto Rican parrot, coqui frog, sea turtle, and the island’s only native mammal – the bat. The backdrop for this exploration is El Yunque National Forest, the only tropical rainforest in the United States National Forest System, and Mona Island, an ecological reserve known as the Galapagos of the Caribbean.

This fully-bilingual multimedia exhibit, developed in partnership with guest curator and contributing artist Lina Collado García, also features life-sized rainforest trees, a soundscape, and art making for all ages!

Please check back here for opening confirmation, or call the Museum at 307 733-5771.

[Photo above: Puerto Rican Parrot by Alfredo Irrizary.]

For more information, see https://www.wildlifeart.org/exhibits/somos-de-aqui-enduring-wildlife-puerto-rico/

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