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Carolina County Community Cat Conference is going on at a Resort exclusively reserved for Prime Members.

Some look-alike impostors have sneaked in. They all wear some fancy name tags which reveal their character.

Wear on Sherlock Holmes Hat and catch those cunning cats by examining their name tags closely. Initially assume all are prime cats unless you notice specific character in the name tag that reveals it is not prime.

Only basic knowledge of primality test is needed to catch the culprit.

1) was it a rat I saw

2) Tacocat

3) Madam I m Adam

4) Malayalam

5) Dammit I m mad

6) Step on no Pets

7) Never odd or even

8) Do geese see god

9) Toppot

10) Redder

11) Race fast safe car

12) Madam in Eden I m Adam

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Here’s a toughie for you-and no computers allowed!

I have created this unique chess puzzle which white mates black in many different ways, all in 5 moves, no matter what black does. Options do exist for both sides.

Basically, black is trying to prolong their life as much as possible. But no matter what move they make (not like there’s a ton if options after the first 2 moves), they shall always be mated in 5 moves.

And yes, the position is legal.

EDIT: It’s come to my attention that there is much more than 9 mates in one. In this light, just find as as you can.

White To Play And Checkmate Black In 5 Moves In Many Different Ways

Good luck solving!

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$Given$:

A, B, C, D are all distinct digits. ABCD is a concatenated number

$ABCD$ = $A^3$ + $(A+C+D)^3 $ = $D^3+ (A + D)^3$

Figure out this Number and why is it Famous?

Also provide detailed reasoning to show how you figured it out.

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From the pictures below, can you find the cartoon character?

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Here’s a toughie for you-and no computers allowed!

I have created this unique chess puzzle which white mates black in 9 different ways, all in 5 moves, no matter what black does. Assume optimal play by black. Options do exist for white.

And yes, the position is legal.

BONUS: There is also a tenth one, but that would not be optimal play by black. Feel free to find it if you wish to!

White To Play And Checkmate Black In 5 Moves In 9 Different Ways

Good luck solving!

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This puzzle is part 19 of Gladys' journey across the globe. Each part can be solved independently. Nevertheless, if you are new to the series, feel free to start at the beginning: Introducing Gladys.

Dear Puzzling,

I have finally come back to a bit of a warmer climate. I haven't really had a chance to properly work on my tan just yet, so today I went to the beach to get some sun. I might even book myself a treatment at the spa. After that it's again time to get my passport ready for the next flight...

Wish you were here!
Love, Gladys.

  1. A Scandinavian name (not a computer brand) [1,2]
  2. A scapegoat (not speedy) [3,4]
  3. Collections (not a short time, abbreviated) [2,4]
  4. A South African language (not a Cuban drum) [1,6]
  5. Diverse or various, briefly (not fogs) [1,2]
  6. A Pixar film (not monarchs) [1,3]
  7. A physician, colloquially (not punctuation signs) [2]
  8. Scatterbrained (not dangerous or uncertain) [1,2,4]
  9. Holes in the ground (not an image, in short) [3]
  10. A curve (not creative activities) [2]
  11. Thus written (not "is seated") [2,3]
  12. Tiny (not frosty) [2]

Gladys will return in "Lady G's amazing mazings".

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$Given$:

A, B, C, D are all distinct digits. ABCD is a concatenated cube.

$ABCD$ = $A^3$ + $(A+C+D)^3 $ = $D^3+ (A + D)^3$

Figure out this Cube and why is it Famous?

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This puzzle is part 18 of Gladys' journey across the globe. Each part can be solved independently. Nevertheless, if you are new to the series, feel free to start at the beginning: Introducing Gladys.

Dear Puzzling,

I had a big, history-themed tour today. There are so many fascinating things to see that it can get pretty overwhelming.

I have to admit that lately I've been spending a lot of time on a relatively small area. I have to pick up the pace a little for the rest of the trip. The final destination is still far away.

The answer to this one consists of two common 6-letter words. Have fun!

Wish you were here!
Love, Gladys.

Across
1. Required for shooting
5. Webpage styling
8. Elementary's Watson
9. Where Europe ends
10. Not least
11. A long-legged Australian
12. Spoken in Southern China
14. King of tragedy
16. Not Unix
18. Gandalf actor and 007 creator
21. Between ready and fire
22. Dracula heroine
23. Knife strike
24. Parental Arabic letter

Down
1. The enemy of my enemy
2. Disappeared soldier
3. Personified inspiration
4. Not closeted
5. A First Nation
6. Halfling gardener
7. Insult
13. A foot or a stone
14. A foot or a hand
15. Fell for Vronsky
16. Type of astronomical giant
17. Danced with John to Chuck Berry
19. – and abet
20. Unhappy Arabic letter

Gladys will return in "Drums and punctuation".

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The first time I encountered the Boy or Girl paradox I was struck by how ambiguous all of the formulations in English are. As Wikipedia notes:

Gardner argued that a "failure to specify the randomizing procedure" could lead readers to interpret the question in two distinct ways:

  • From all families with two children, at least one of whom is a boy, a family is chosen at random. This would yield the answer of 1/3.
  • From all families with two children, one child is selected at random, and the sex of that child is specified. This would yield an answer of 1/2.

Many formulations have a less technical problem: when a parent says that they have "two children and one of them is a boy", it's nearly impossible to read that in English without thinking "therefore the other one is a girl".

Can you rephrase the paradox so that the proper randomizing procedure is specified and the Bayesian logic is the crux of the problem?

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Part VII is still up for grabs!

At last! You've solved the mystery of the cards! Now that you've gotten into the hiker's computer in the hotel room, it's time to explore! Good news! There is only one file. You double-click on it, but the smile falls off your face in an instant. More ciphers...

(TRANSCRIPT BELOW)

You might just give up on this now. You've spent so much money on airfare, and for what? Another clue?! Well, you can make an exception this time.

Let's get cracking!

Hints

Coming Soon

Transcript of Cipher

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

You get the ✔️ only if you are able to explain how our hiker encoded this!
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