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Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in American men, and this is made apparent by the statistics surrounding it. It is estimated by the American Cancer Society that in 2019 there will be about 174,650 men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer (1) which is a 6% increase from 2018. There will also be an estimated 31,620 deaths from prostate cancer in 2019 (1), a 7% increase from 2018.

According to Zero Cancer, every 17 minutes another man in the U.S. dies from prostate cancer, which is about 86 deaths per day (2). The number of deaths are increasing year after year making prostate cancer the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States (2).

Prostate cancer is a very common diagnosis, 1 in 9 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime (1). While it is a common diagnosis, most men that have prostate cancer will not die from it. In fact, only 1 in 41 men with prostate cancer will die from it and more than 2 million men in the US that have been diagnosed at some point in their lives are still living (1).

If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with prostate cancer, it is important to find out how aggressive your individual cancer is to determine the most optimal treatment plan. To learn more about your prostate cancer aggressiveness click here.

1) https://www.cancer.org/cancer/prostate-cancer/about/key-statistics.html

2) https://zerocancer.org/learn/about-prostate-cancer/facts-statistics/

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Prolaris | Patients Blog by Thomas Taylor - 2M ago

After going to a routine checkup in the spring of 2017, Ed Hoppe was told that his PSA level was elevated and was referred to a local urologist, Dr. Goodson, for prostate cancer evaluation. When his pathology report determined that he had prostate cancer, Dr. Goodson ordered a Prolaris test to find out the aggressiveness of his cancer before determining treatment.

“Given the aggressive scale of his Prolaris results, I recommended definitive treatment and outlined options including radiation with hormone deprivation therapy,” said Dr. Goodson.

Ed also had an extensive family history of cancer that included prostate, breast, and ovarian cancer. His family history combined with the aggressiveness of his disease led Dr. Goodson to order a myRisk Hereditary Cancer Test. Knowing one’s hereditary cancer risk can dramatically impact medical management. 

“We believe this ought to be obtained on anyone that has anintermediate grade or higher of prostate cancer,” said Dr. Goodson.

Ed’s myRisk results came back positive for a mutation on BRCA 1, meaning his prostate cancer was caused by an inherited faulty gene that encourages the disease to grow.  Sons and daughters of someone with a gene mutation have a 50% chance of having that same mutation. In Ed’s case, his two daughters tested positive for the gene mutation, increasing their risk of breast and ovarian cancer.

“It had affected my family as much as it had affected just me. My two daughters have since learned they are positive.”

 “Like a pebble in a pond, you know the ripples keep on coming out and in fact, there are 46 people in Ed’s extended family that may benefit from this information” stated Dr. Goodson.

Ed’s family can now take proactive steps like increased screening starting at earlier ages to prevent and reduce their risk of developing certain cancers.

If you have a family history of cancer you should providethat information to your physician and ask if you qualify for genetic testing.You could be the key to learning you and your family’s hereditary cancer risk.

“Knowledge is power I think somebody said.” – Ed Hoppe

Take our Hereditary Cancer Quiz to learn more about yourpotential risk.

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Follow Al on his journey through his prostate cancer diagnosis, the choices he made, and how this experience has shaped his life.

Learn about how the Prolaris test changed both the lives of Al and his wife, Camie by giving them critical information about the aggressiveness of his cancer.

All the things Al and Camie wanted to do were possible again, due to their decision to utilize the Prolaris test.

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Accompany Camie Piazza as she stands alongside her husband who was diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Learn how the Prolaris test results can guide a patient and their caregiver towards the best treatment option for them.

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1 in 9 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year. Approximately 90% of men will be treated for their cancer through either surgery or radiation and yet approximately half of those men could have avoided treatment and the associated side effects including urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction.

“With the new diagnosis of prostate cancer, prostate cancer has been over treated for a period of time because until now we haven’t had a very sharp tool to help separate out the men with nonaggressive types of prostate cancer that can safely be watched and those with a more aggressive type that need to be treated. We now have that with genetic testing in the Prolaris test which we can use on the prostate biopsy sample to help determine who is safe to watch and who needs their prostate cancer treated. Using this helps reduce the over treatment of prostate cancer. The numbers are that probably 50% of those men don’t need the treatment.”

Listen to Dr. Mark Edney, MD and incoming President of the American Association of Clinical Urologists as he speaks with a local Memphis TV station.

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Al Piazza had just retired and was ready to spend time with his wife and grandchildren when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer. He was devastated to hear the news that he had cancer. Al’s first impression was to remove it as soon as possible. Based on stories he had heard about cancer, he couldn’t remember the end result ever being good.

Fortunately, Al’s doctor was knowledgeable about Prolaris and had used it with other patients in the past. He convinced Al that before he made any treatment decisions to try Prolaris. Al agreed to Prolaris testing and was pleased to find out that the chance of his cancer progressing over the next ten years was less than 3%.

As soon as Al heard the news his whole attitude changed. He described it as taking a huge weight off of his shoulders. Al and his doctor decided on the treatment route of active surveillance. He now meets with his doctor every six months for a blood test and exam to make sure nothing has changed.

Al’s prostate cancer is manageable because of Prolaris. Knowing where his future was headed gave him relief in knowing he was going to be okay. Without the Prolaris test, Al would have likely gone with his first thought of removing the cancer without knowing the aggressiveness of it. In addition, Prolaris gave Al his life back by giving him his future back.

Read Al Piazza’s full story here.

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  Learn About Prostate Cancer

Many men don’t think about their health until it becomes a problem. This is particularly true with prostate issues. “Out of sight, out of mind” is a common line of thinking. In fact, in its early stages, prostate cancer may have no symptoms, so many men do not know they have the disease. Learning about prostate cancer will better equip you to cope with a prostate cancer diagnosis and become familiar with the treatment options available to you. Unfortunately, many men know very little about prostate cancer, testing options, and available treatments. Taking the time to educate yourself before or after a prostate cancer diagnosis can make you more confident during your course of treatment.

  The Prostate: What is it?

The prostate is a gland, roughly the size of a walnut, which makes a fluid that is a component of semen. It is found near the base of the penis, underneath the bladder. On occasion, the prostate can grow larger, which can inhibit urination and cause discomfort. That alone, however, does not necessarily indicate prostate cancer.

  When to Be Concerned about Prostate Issues

While prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men, it is important to know that the likelihood of dying from prostate cancer is relatively low. The vast majority of men can live with prostate cancer with appropriate management.

Cancer cells in the prostate grow faster than normal cells. This can lead to the formation of tumors. Most prostate cancer cases are adenocarcinomas, which begin in cells that line glands. When prostate cancer cells grow, they can envelop most of the prostate and even spread to nearby tissues.

In advanced cases, prostate cancer can metastasize, spreading to other parts of the body via blood vessels or lymph vessels. Many instances of prostate cancer are slow-growing, but some can be aggressive. It isn’t known why this happens, but receiving proper treatment is essential for all men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer. Understanding how aggressive your prostate cancer is can help you and your doctor create a personalized treatment plan that best manages your specific cancer.

  Prostate Cancer Risk Factors

Some men may have an increased risk of prostate cancer. Common risk factors include:

  • Age. About 6 in 10 cases of prostate cancer are found in men who are older than 65.
  • Race. While prostate cancer is found across all ethnic groups, African American men are more likely to develop it.
  • Family history. If your brother or father has had prostate cancer, then you have a higher likelihood of having it too.

While men who fit these criteria may be at higher risk, it is far from certain that they will get prostate cancer. It is important to discuss these specific risk factors with your doctor in order to decide which surveillance and prostate cancer treatment options are best for you.

  Discover Prolaris®

If you or a loved one has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, you are probably researching all available prostate cancer testing and treatment options.

Prolaris® is a novel genetic test that measures prostate cancer aggressiveness. Prolaris adds additional information, beyond traditional clinical and pathologic tools, like Gleason Score and PSA, that guides more personalized treatment.

Download a free patient brochure or find a Prolaris provider in your area today.

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Not all prostate cancers are the same. Therefore, not all prostate cancer treatment plans should be the same either. It is important to identify those patients who need more aggressive versus less aggressive prostate cancer treatment. Unfortunately, traditional markers are unable to fully differentiate between aggressive and non-aggressive cancers. Which often leads to over-treatment of patients.

Luckily, Prolaris provides unique additional information about a patient’s prognosis and may be used with other clinical factors in helping the healthcare provider make treatment recommendations. In addition, it is can help determine more appropriate treatment plans for individual patients. By providing personal risk assessment, Prolaris can accurately measure the aggressiveness of an individuals prostate cancer. In doing so, it can help protect against over-treatment.

If you have less aggressive prostate cancer, otherwise known as slow-growing prostate cancer, your doctor may suggest active surveillance as a potential treatment option. With active surveillance, your doctor will monitor you frequently (such as every 3 to 6 months) with different tests and sometimes biopsies.

Find out more information about how knowing the aggressiveness of your prostate cancer could change your treatment options.

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1 in 9 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year.  Approximately 90% of men will be treated for their cancer through either surgery or radiation and yet approximately half of those men could have avoided treatment and the associated side effects including urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction.

“With the new diagnosis of prostate cancer, prostate cancer has been over treated for a period of time because until now we haven’t had a very sharp tool to help separate out the men with nonaggressive types of prostate cancer that can safely be watched and those with a more aggressive type that need to be treated.  We now have that with genetic testing in the Prolaris test which we can use on the prostate biopsy sample to help determine who is safe to watch and who needs their prostate cancer treated.  Using this helps reduce the over treatment of prostate cancer.  The numbers are that probably 50% of those men don’t need the treatment.”

Listen now as Dr. Mark Edney, MD and incoming President of the American Association of Clinical Urologists speaks with a Nebraska TV affiliate of ABC to address this important topic.

The post Know how to best treat prostate cancer with genetic testing appeared first on Prolaris.

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