Loading...

Follow PoPin Blog - POPin on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Are you struggling with keeping your workforce aligned? You’re not alone. 2 million Americans quit their jobs every month. Though there are a number of reasons why people quit their jobs, one of the biggest contributors is a lack of alignment with their company. People want to feel like they share values and goals with their companies. When they don’t, they feel disconnected. This can result in poor motivation, bad work, and low retention. Things, such as language and cultural differences, can affect your operations. Here are tips for removing these barriers to ensure workforce alignment. Read on to learn more. Language Barriers It’s no secret that language barriers make communication difficult. But Americans increasingly have to adapt to a world in which fewer people speak English at home. Did you know that 1 in 10 people living in America can’t speak English? Today’s workforce is more diverse and international than ever before. That can lead to frustrating language barriers that hurt your bottom line. Language barriers don’t just make it difficult to give direction. They also hurt productivity, add stress, and lead to less alignment. Managers must ask themselves what they can do to help communication. One such strategy is to translate work documents into the languages of their employees. This might seem time-consuming and expensive; however, there are a number of tools that let you translate the text for free. You can also use an interpreter. This will make sure you hold your employees accountable and lose nothing in translation. You can also provide language classes to your team. Your employees don’t need to be fluent. But learning a few basics can go a long way in making them more productive. Cultural Differences Workforce alignment is impossible if you don’t align with your employees’ values. Cultural differences can be just as harmful to your workplace as language barriers. How can you expect your employee to do their job if that job doesn’t match their cultural values? If you are dealing with cultural differences at work, you can ask yourself a few questions. The first is whether or not the cultural difference is part of the job. You might have an employee who has a problem with a work task. If that isn’t required in their position, you can overcome it. If it’s part of their normal job duties, you might have a problem. You should also ask yourself if you’re doing everything you can to overcome the difference. Many cultural differences can be overcome if you are sensitive and willing to meet in the middle. Of course, the best thing you can do is educate yourself on your employees’ cultures. This will give you a better idea of how you can foster engagement and alignment. Communication How can you overcome language and cultural differences? Communication. Communication affects productivity in the workplace. Make sure you are engaging with your employees and setting up open communication channels. Try engagement surveys, feedback platforms, and frequent face to face communication. Your Workforce Alignment Are you looking to align your workforce? We can help. Our crowdsourcing platform builds trust, identifies confusion, and sources improvement. Check out our producttoday.

The post How to Eliminate the Top Barriers to Achieving Workforce Alignment appeared first on POPin.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Stock Photos
Content
Have you ever worked a job you absolutely hated? It really wears away at your soul over time. Regardless of the specific reason why you hated your job, chances are it had to do with a lack of engagement. Whether it’s because you didn’t care about the work you were doing or weren’t challenged enough or given enough responsibility, you probably struggled to wake up for work in the morning. It’s a horrible trap to fall into. Now that you’re the leader of a company, responsible for staff management, you should make sure your employees aren’t falling into the same trap. Here are 5 reasons why you should care about your employees’ happiness and engagement. 1. Better Productivity Unhappy, unengaged employees are less motivated to work hard and be productive. A 2013 Gallup study found that unengaged employees were outperformed by happy, engaged employees by 21%. This discrepancy came out to about $450-550 billion in lost profits due to poor productivity. Not only is making your employees happy a tremendous moral good, it also makes your company much more profitable. Engaged employees are productive employees. 2. Less Turnover This one is simple: If your employees are happy, they’ll want to work for you for longer. In fact, a Hay Group study found that engaged employees were 87% less likely to quit their jobs. The positive effects of this employee retention cannot be overstated. If you keep your employees, you can build lasting relationships with customers, you won’t have to train new hires constantly, and your employees will actually have time to grow and get better at their jobs. It’s a staff management win-win-win. 3. Customer Satisfaction A 2016 study found that companies with superior customer service had 1.5 times as many happy, engaged employees as companies with sub-par customer services. You really don’t need a study to tell you why this is the case. If you’ve walked into any fast food chain, you know that a disgruntled employee affects your experience negatively. And they’re most likely disgruntled because they are unengaged at their job. 4. Less Sick Days If you hate your job, you’re more likely to call out with as little as a case of the sniffles. If you’re already unmotivated at work, a minor cold, or something more serious like the flu, can really bog you down. Happily engaged employees, however, have 3.5 fewer absences per year, on average. This helps your business run as smoothly as possible. 5. Better Company Reputation There is no better head-hunter than an engaged staff. If you intend to attract the best and brightest minds to your operation, you’ll want a team of people that can vouch for your company. Plus, with sites like Glassdoor and other employer review web applications, it’s easy to have your reputation tarnished by disgruntled employees. Staff Management Is Essential Hopefully, you now understand how vital employee engagement is to the success of your company. It can also make or break you as a leader, and you only get so many leadership opportunities. If you’re looking for help optimizing your leadership strategies, check out our product. It can help provide you all the staff management insights you need.

The post 5 Reasons to Focus on Employee Engagement During Staff Management appeared first on POPin.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The post Why Communication Cannot Just involve One-Way Monologues appeared first on POPin.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

As a student, you were told 5 million times how important it is to get your name on a paper.
We’ve got news for you: the benefits of authorship, specifically co-authorship, extends to business. As you share the authorship for the direction of your company and the ideas Here, we talk about how to share authorship in a way that’s beneficial and productive for all involved–and ultimately beneficial for your business. Finding Opportunities for Co-Authorship First things first: how do you find these opportunities? As a student, the easiest place to get in on important papers was working with your professors. In business, the same basic rules apply. You can work with leaders in your industry to combine insights for other professionals–it can be right for both of you. You could also work with academics if their field intersects with your particular business interests. Once you’ve found a potential candidate, you should already have some idea of what topic you’d like to collaborate on so they’re clear on the project they’re signing up for. Clarity on the topic can also help you decide if you want someone who can play off your subject matter specialty. From there, it’s all a matter of convincing them the benefits of co-authorship in general and the benefits of working with you in particular. Clear Division of Labor Once you’ve got a collaborator on board, you need to have an honest discussion about how you plan to divide labor. The road from cool idea to published final product is a long one with plenty of potential potholes. Issues related to the division of labor are a big one. For example: who will be collecting the data? Who will be going through the data for the insights you need to make the important points? Who will be doing the writing? Who will be editing? What about graphics? Will you split the time? All of these are important to talk about before you dive in and find yourself halfway through the book with someone you can’t stand working with. The division will be a little different in practice, but you should at least have an idea of what direction you’re heading. Negotiate Authorship Credit You’re both presumably going to have your names on the final product, but whose name goes first? Alphabetical works great for you if your last name is Albert, but not so much if your last name is White. It’s not just about author credit, though. It’s about who the data ultimately belongs to, what happens if one of you wants to move forward with a different project using this data, etc. An Authorship Prenup Finally, you should negotiate the co-authorship equivalent of a prenuptial agreement. You need to know who’s doing what, who’s covering what, who keeps the data if you part ways, etc. Have the less pleasant conversations early–they’ll be much worse if you find yourself in a sticky situation later. More Insights for Your Business Growth Ready to grow your business beyond authorship? Check out our blog for all kinds of posts to help your business flourish, like this post on how communication affects productivity in the workplace. Or, for a closer look at what our platform has to offer your business, take a look at our product page.

The post How to Share Authorship for Micro Improvements appeared first on POPin.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The post How Organizational Alignment Can Mitigate Problem Areas for Leaders appeared first on POPin.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview