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Success Predictor: Knowing You Have Buy-in Before Launching New Initiatives

There is no shortage of tools being introduced to help drive better engagement in your organization – surveys, collaboration tools, enterprise social network tools, crowd-sourcing tools, etc.  These tools can help associates weigh in on documents, share ideas for innovations or solving problems, and generally connect teams to get answers quickly.

70% of Initiatives Fail

But there is untapped potential with these various engagement tools; we aren’t leveraging them to improve the overall success rate of initiatives.  We’ve all heard the stat “70% of initiatives fail” and that a primary driver of that failure is lack of buy-in and adoption. What if you could leverage engagement tools to assess buy-in before you’ve even spent a dime on rolling out the initiative? 

To date, understanding and driving buy-in is done in different ways. Innovation teams often do it best, at least when they’re in the pilot phase. They drive buy-in by leaning in to the personal discussions and feedback loops.  As innovation teams in healthcare are piloting new programs, whether in a clinical unit, a specific care site, etc., they’re utilizing relationships with the core pilot audience to have deep conversations about the plan, what will work, what the challenges are, and how to make the plan most successful as it is being piloted.  They’re optimizing the solution as they go to ensure it meets the audience’s needs and they have buy-in.

However, this approach for understanding buy-in and optimizing the solution is not scalable for large audiences or system-wide initiatives.  It is impossible to have deep conversations with such a large group of people and, if you could, making sense of that much information would be extremely difficult.

Gaining ‘Buy-in’

Currently, initiative leaders, project and program managers, and change managers alike are tackling the challenge of widespread buy-in through communications.  To simplify it, part of the theory is that sharing details about the initiative – what is it, why are we doing it, what’s in it for me – creates buy-in.  Therefore, the project in which you’ve already invested hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars will succeed. 

It’s also important to note that these leaders that are pushing communications are doing so after money has been committed, teams have been formed, consultants have been hired, and the plan is being executed.  The ship is sailing and changing course can be difficult, if not impossible.

Get Buy-in While the Ship Is Still at Port

The opportunity to flip the narrative lies in this – measuring buy-in while the ship is still at port. Operationally, this means communicating the initiative to the impacted audience, and then asking them how confident they are that it will be successful. If confidence is low, it requires taking it a step further and digging into why their confidence is low and what can be done to shore up the plan, then adjusting the plan accordingly.

This more iterative or agile knowledge sourcing approach gives you an opportunity to optimize the plan before you’ve invested heavily into it.  It also gives you an opportunity to pull the plug completely if necessary, saving you the money you would have invested in a failed initiative. 

Key to Ensuring Success – Change in Mindset

Effectively executing this approach demands both a shift in mindset and a change in how you leverage the engagement tools you have at your disposal.

The change in mindset needs to happen at the leadership level.  Today, when an initiative is announced to the organization, it is announced with a plan that is 100% baked and in which everyone has full confidence in its success. 

In this new paradigm, leaders need to confidently communicate the initiative, but must be willing to accept that there may be flaws in the plan – perceived or real.  Leaders need to not only know if the initiative has buy-in, they must be willing to hear the reasons why it does not.  They need to accept that audience perception is reality and embrace the power in knowing what that perception is.  And they must be willing to adjust the plan to optimize its success or be willing to be held accountable for the inevitable result.

New Use of Engagement Tools – Drive Buy-in

If leaders accept this new mindset, the next step is to determine which engagement tool(s) will be most effective for this approach.  A simple survey can help you predict success – giving you that score that tells you what level of buy-in you have.  But surveys don’t make it easy for you to sift through the answers to identify what the broad audience or majority think the roadblocks are if confidence is low. 

You may consider pairing the survey tools with your collaboration tools as these give the team the ability to weigh-in on each other’s answers, so you have a stronger sense for the predominant reasons why there is a lack of buy-in. Just note the lack of anonymity in some of these tools may influence the honesty of the answers provided.

Another alternative may be the new generation of business-oriented crowd-sourcing or “knowledge-sourcing” tools.  Many of these enable you to capture both the quantifiable data point (level of buy-in) and the roadblocks/improvement ideas quickly and concisely. 

Outcome:  Greater Initiative Success Rates

Regardless of the engagement tools you use, the goal is the same – know whether or not you have buy-in before you’ve invested a significant amount of money or effort into your initiative.  Then use it as an opportunity to optimize your initiative to make it more successful.  Or make the hard decision to delay or even stop the initiative completely until such time you can determine the investment is justified.  Increasing your 30% success rate is worth it.

The post New Use of Engagement Tools- Drive Buy In appeared first on POPin.

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Success Predictor: Knowing You Have Buy-in Before Launching New Initiatives

There is no shortage of tools being introduced to help drive better engagement in your organization – surveys, collaboration tools, enterprise social network tools, crowd-sourcing tools, etc.  These engagement tools can help associates weigh in on documents, share ideas for innovations or solving problems, and generally connect teams to get answers quickly.

70% of Initiatives Fail

But there is untapped potential with these various engagement tools; we aren’t leveraging them to improve the overall success rate of initiatives.  We’ve all heard the stat “70% of initiatives fail” and that a primary driver of that failure is lack of buy-in and adoption. What if you could leverage engagement tools to assess buy-in before you’ve even spent a dime on rolling out the initiative? 

To date, understanding and driving buy-in is done in different ways. Innovation teams often do it best, at least when they’re in the pilot phase. They drive buy-in by leaning in to the personal discussions and feedback loops.  As innovation teams in healthcare are piloting new programs, whether in a clinical unit, a specific care site, etc., they’re utilizing relationships with the core pilot audience to have deep conversations about the plan, what will work, what the challenges are, and how to make the plan most successful as it is being piloted.  They’re optimizing the solution as they go to ensure it meets the audience’s needs and they have buy-in.

However, this approach for understanding buy-in and optimizing the solution is not scalable for large audiences or system-wide initiatives.  It is impossible to have deep conversations with such a large group of people and, if you could, making sense of that much information would be extremely difficult.

Gaining ‘Buy-in’

Currently, initiative leaders, project and program managers, and change managers alike are tackling the challenge of widespread buy-in through communications.  To simplify it, part of the theory is that sharing details about the initiative – what is it, why are we doing it, what’s in it for me – creates buy-in.  Therefore, the project in which you’ve already invested hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars will succeed. 

It’s also important to note that these leaders that are pushing communications are doing so after money has been committed, teams have been formed, consultants have been hired, and the plan is being executed.  The ship is sailing and changing course can be difficult, if not impossible.

Get Buy-in While the Ship Is Still at Port

The opportunity to flip the narrative lies in this – measuring buy-in while the ship is still at port. Operationally, this means communicating the initiative to the impacted audience, and then asking them how confident they are that it will be successful. If confidence is low, it requires taking it a step further and digging into why their confidence is low and what can be done to shore up the plan, then adjusting the plan accordingly.

This more iterative or agile knowledge sourcing approach gives you an opportunity to optimize the plan before you’ve invested heavily into it.  It also gives you an opportunity to pull the plug completely if necessary, saving you the money you would have invested in a failed initiative. 

Key to Ensuring Success – Change in Mindset

Effectively executing this approach demands both a shift in mindset and a change in how you leverage the engagement tools you have at your disposal.

The change in mindset needs to happen at the leadership level.  Today, when an initiative is announced to the organization, it is announced with a plan that is 100% baked and in which everyone has full confidence in its success. 

In this new paradigm, leaders need to confidently communicate the initiative, but must be willing to accept that there may be flaws in the plan – perceived or real.  Leaders need to not only know if the initiative has buy-in, they must be willing to hear the reasons why it does not.  They need to accept that audience perception is reality and embrace the power in knowing what that perception is.  And they must be willing to adjust the plan to optimize its success or be willing to be held accountable for the inevitable result.

New Use of Engagement Tools – Drive Buy-in

If leaders accept this new mindset, the next step is to determine which engagement tool(s) will be most effective for this approach.  A simple survey can help you predict success – giving you that score that tells you what level of buy-in you have.  But surveys don’t make it easy for you to sift through the answers to identify what the broad audience or majority think the roadblocks are if confidence is low. 

You may consider pairing the survey tools with your collaboration tools as these give the team the ability to weigh-in on each other’s answers, so you have a stronger sense for the predominant reasons why there is a lack of buy-in. Just note the lack of anonymity in some of these tools may influence the honesty of the answers provided.

Another alternative may be the new generation of business-oriented crowd-sourcing or “knowledge-sourcing” tools.  Many of these enable you to capture both the quantifiable data point (level of buy-in) and the roadblocks/improvement ideas quickly and concisely. 

Outcome:  Greater Initiative Success Rates

Regardless of the engagement tools you use, the goal is the same – know whether or not you have buy-in before you’ve invested a significant amount of money or effort into your initiative.  Then use it as an opportunity to optimize your initiative to make it more successful.  Or make the hard decision to delay or even stop the initiative completely until such time you can determine the investment is justified.  Increasing your 30% success rate is worth it.

Learn more about POPin and how you can leverage this unique crowdsourcing software to drive buy-in.

The post New Use of Engagement Tools: Drive Buy-In appeared first on POPin.

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Have you ever heard the term “presenteeism”? It refers to employees who are physically present at work, but disengaged and distracted — and it costs the United States some $344 billion every year.
Employees who come to work when ill, or who are just going through the motions, can seriously hamper workforce productivity. All hope is not lost, however. Check out these ways to engage your employees, improve morale, and boost your bottom line. Be a Mentor, Not a Manager The traditional hierarchy of upper management, middle management, and — for lack of a better term — managees is rapidly falling out of favor. It fosters a culture of buck-passing, blame, and resentment. Of course, every company needs to designate people who will make decisions, implement policies, and ultimately be responsible for a department’s success or failure. However, you can engage employees more effectively by mentoring them, rather than just managing them (or worse yet, micromanaging them). Start by finding out what your employees would like to achieve in their position or their career. Then strategize a path to reach those goals together. Chances are that employee productivity will improve as a result. Mentoring means sharing your experience, but also asking employees to draw on their own experiences. Instead of implementing top-down rules and enforcing them with punitive action, involve workers in the decision-making process. Communicate with them and give them a voice, and you will get great results in return. Try Twenty Percent Time This concept, famously put into practice by internet juggernaut Google, is responsibleGmailGMail, AdSense, and a host of other innovations. If your company can’t afford to grant employees 20% time, try 10% time, or schedule regular company “Hack Days.” Letting employees use the company’s time and resources to pursue their own passions might sound counterintuitive. Wouldn’t it slash workforce productivity, not improve it? It turns out that allowing little bit of leeway and freedom actually drives increased employee engagement. Engaged employees are productive employees. Employee Engagement Starts with Office Environment Some of the smallest changes can reap the biggest rewards. To engage employees, try offering some perks — free snacks in the break room, a monthly happy hour, or a dog-friendly office policy. Encourage cubicle-dwellers to dress up their space by hosting a decorating contest. Bring in a ping-pong or foosball table. Treat employees to premium Spotify accounts, or regular chair massages. Perks like these aren’t a panacea, and can’t make up for truly poor management or working conditions. But they will definitely send the message that you truly value your human capital. Consider Flexible Hours or Work-from-Home Policies In the past 10 years, the number of people who work remotely has increased by 115% — and for good reason. The ability to telecommute, or to set one’s own hours, is a fantastic way to improve workforce productivity. When people can choose where and when they work, they will choose the places and times that allow them to do their best work. It’s pretty simple. (Bonus: it can help cut down on overhead, too.) Even offering just one day a week as “office optional” can have a huge trickle-down effect on the overall productivity. Workforce Productivity Within Reach Naturally, there are many pieces to the productivity puzzle. These are just a few of the techniques for boosting engagement that you can try. For more ideas, or to learn about how our crowdsourcing platform can work well for your team, give us a call!

The post Improving Workforce Productivity Through Engagement appeared first on POPin.

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Are you struggling with keeping your workforce aligned? You’re not alone. 2 million Americans quit their jobs every month. Though there are a number of reasons why people quit their jobs, one of the biggest contributors is a lack of alignment with their company. People want to feel like they share values and goals with their companies. When they don’t, they feel disconnected. This can result in poor motivation, bad work, and low retention. Things, such as language and cultural differences, can affect your operations. Here are tips for removing these barriers to ensure workforce alignment. Read on to learn more. Language Barriers It’s no secret that language barriers make communication difficult. But Americans increasingly have to adapt to a world in which fewer people speak English at home. Did you know that 1 in 10 people living in America can’t speak English? Today’s workforce is more diverse and international than ever before. That can lead to frustrating language barriers that hurt your bottom line. Language barriers don’t just make it difficult to give direction. They also hurt productivity, add stress, and lead to less alignment. Managers must ask themselves what they can do to help communication. One such strategy is to translate work documents into the languages of their employees. This might seem time-consuming and expensive; however, there are a number of tools that let you translate the text for free. You can also use an interpreter. This will make sure you hold your employees accountable and lose nothing in translation. You can also provide language classes to your team. Your employees don’t need to be fluent. But learning a few basics can go a long way in making them more productive. Cultural Differences Workforce alignment is impossible if you don’t align with your employees’ values. Cultural differences can be just as harmful to your workplace as language barriers. How can you expect your employee to do their job if that job doesn’t match their cultural values? If you are dealing with cultural differences at work, you can ask yourself a few questions. The first is whether or not the cultural difference is part of the job. You might have an employee who has a problem with a work task. If that isn’t required in their position, you can overcome it. If it’s part of their normal job duties, you might have a problem. You should also ask yourself if you’re doing everything you can to overcome the difference. Many cultural differences can be overcome if you are sensitive and willing to meet in the middle. Of course, the best thing you can do is educate yourself on your employees’ cultures. This will give you a better idea of how you can foster engagement and alignment. Communication How can you overcome language and cultural differences? Communication. Communication affects productivity in the workplace. Make sure you are engaging with your employees and setting up open communication channels. Try engagement surveys, feedback platforms, and frequent face to face communication. Your Workforce Alignment Are you looking to align your workforce? We can help. Our crowdsourcing platform builds trust, identifies confusion, and sources improvement. Check out our producttoday.

The post How to Eliminate the Top Barriers to Achieving Workforce Alignment appeared first on POPin.

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One of the biggest annual costs for businesses each year is having to pay for new employee recruitment and training due to high turnover rates.
This can mostly be avoided through several ways. One is by keeping your employees happy with their job, so they don’t have to leave in the first place. To keep employees satisfied, you need to receive regular feedback from them about what can be improved in the office. Getting accurate feedback from your employees isn’t always easy. Luckily, there are some great strategies that HR can utilize to get staff feedback, such as an employee satisfaction survey. In this blog, we’ll discuss how HR can get feedback from their employees to maintain employee satisfaction and engagement. How You Can Get Honest Feedback From Employees It’s crucial for HR to engage with employees about what needs to be improved in the office. This helps to keep the employees satisfied, and it also boosts staff productivity. Here are a couple of the best ways HR can get honest feedback from employees on a regular basis. Employee Satisfaction Survey Surveys are a great way to get feedback from your staff because it gives them time to think about each question and allows them to say exactly what they need to say. Also, it allows your employees to be anonymous when answering, which generally leads to much more honest responses. Many people are hesitant to voice their opinions to their bosses, so allowing them to give anonymous feedback can be very insightful and helpful to HR. Be sure to ask quality, open-ended questions, so you get valuable replies from your employees. Simply asking yes or no questions will make your staff feel like you don’t actually care about their feedback. Weekly Meetings Employee satisfaction surveys are given out quarterly, at most, so it’s important to maintain engagement with your staff between those surveys. At the end of every week, management should be having a staff meeting and allow employees to voice any concerns they may have. Your employees need to feel comfortable with giving feedback and voicing their concerns, so always allow them the time to do so at the end of each week. This will make your staff feel valued and appreciated. Face-to-face communication can be awkward when it’s about issues going on in the office, but it’s necessary. Being able to have open and honest communication is essential to maintain employee satisfaction and improve productivity. For More Information Getting feedback from your staff is necessary if you want to maintain their satisfaction, increase productivity, and lower employee turnover rates. The best ways to get feedback are by giving out an anonymous employee satisfaction survey every quarter and by conducting weekly meetings that allow the staff to voice their questions and concerns. With both approaches to suggesting feedback, it’s crucial to ask insightful and open-ended questions. This helps you to get a real sense of what your staff needs and how you can improve. For further help in improving employee satisfaction and productivity, try our service for free today to learn more.

The post The Best Ways HR Can Get Relevant Feedback from Employees appeared first on POPin.

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Have you ever worked a job you absolutely hated? It really wears away at your soul over time. Regardless of the specific reason why you hated your job, chances are it had to do with a lack of engagement. Whether it’s because you didn’t care about the work you were doing or weren’t challenged enough or given enough responsibility, you probably struggled to wake up for work in the morning. It’s a horrible trap to fall into. Now that you’re the leader of a company, responsible for staff management, you should make sure your employees aren’t falling into the same trap. Here are 5 reasons why you should care about your employees’ happiness and engagement. 1. Better Productivity Unhappy, unengaged employees are less motivated to work hard and be productive. A 2013 Gallup study found that unengaged employees were outperformed by happy, engaged employees by 21%. This discrepancy came out to about $450-550 billion in lost profits due to poor productivity. Not only is making your employees happy a tremendous moral good, it also makes your company much more profitable. Engaged employees are productive employees. 2. Less Turnover This one is simple: If your employees are happy, they’ll want to work for you for longer. In fact, a Hay Group study found that engaged employees were 87% less likely to quit their jobs. The positive effects of this employee retention cannot be overstated. If you keep your employees, you can build lasting relationships with customers, you won’t have to train new hires constantly, and your employees will actually have time to grow and get better at their jobs. It’s a staff management win-win-win. 3. Customer Satisfaction A 2016 study found that companies with superior customer service had 1.5 times as many happy, engaged employees as companies with sub-par customer services. You really don’t need a study to tell you why this is the case. If you’ve walked into any fast food chain, you know that a disgruntled employee affects your experience negatively. And they’re most likely disgruntled because they are unengaged at their job. 4. Less Sick Days If you hate your job, you’re more likely to call out with as little as a case of the sniffles. If you’re already unmotivated at work, a minor cold, or something more serious like the flu, can really bog you down. Happily engaged employees, however, have 3.5 fewer absences per year, on average. This helps your business run as smoothly as possible. 5. Better Company Reputation There is no better head-hunter than an engaged staff. If you intend to attract the best and brightest minds to your operation, you’ll want a team of people that can vouch for your company. Plus, with sites like Glassdoor and other employer review web applications, it’s easy to have your reputation tarnished by disgruntled employees. Staff Management Is Essential Hopefully, you now understand how vital employee engagement is to the success of your company. It can also make or break you as a leader, and you only get so many leadership opportunities. If you’re looking for help optimizing your leadership strategies, check out our product. It can help provide you all the staff management insights you need.

The post 5 Reasons to Focus on Employee Engagement During Staff Management appeared first on POPin.

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Your employees are the backbone of your business, and it’s important for your company’s survival that they are happy working at their job. In order for employees to be satisfied with their job, they need to feel engaged and challenged by the work they are doing. Upper management is responsible for keeping employees engaged by motivating them and keeping the work interesting. If you’re having problems with your employees, it’s probably because you’re not doing enough to keep them engaged. In this blog, we’ll discuss exactly why employee engagement is important to the success of your business. Why Employee Engagement is Important It can be easy to take your employees for granted and not do the right things to keep them interested and excited about their job. But this is a huge mistake and can actually cost your company big time. Here are the top three reasons why employee engagement is important for your company’s survival. 1. Lower Turnover Rates One of the biggest issues a company can face is high turnover rates. If you are unable to retain your staff for an extended period of time, it will cost you money, time, and resources. People spend the majority of their day at work, and if they aren’t challenged or stimulated, they will become unhappy with heir job, leading them to leave your company. Having to train and re-train employees over and over again will really be detrimental to your business. You need to keep your employees engaged and excited about work so they don’t start looking for other alternatives. 2. Higher Production Frequently engaging with your staff and effectively communicating is an easy way to boost productivity around the office. If your staff is excited and challenged by the work they are doing, they will work harder and spend less time being unproductive. Keep your staff motivated, engaged, and productive by giving them incentives and rewards for working hard and going above and beyond what is asked of them. Not only will this present a challenge to your employees and keep them engaged, but they’ll feel more satisfied with the work they do because they know it’ll be recognized and rewarded. 3. Encourages Teamwork When employees are engaged in their work, not only will they become more productive, but they will also be more communicative. People who want to do a good job and enjoy their work will be more likely to engage with their coworkers and managers about the tasks they are performing. Employee engagement will increase the team mentality that every company should strive for, and will also improve the quality of work because your staff will be working more as a team. For More Information Employee engagement is crucial to your company’s success because it will decrease turnover rates, lead to higher production, and encourage teamwork in the office. If you want to learn more about why employee engagement is important to your business, please try out our services for free today

The post 5 Reasons Why Employee Engagement is Important appeared first on POPin.

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The post Why Communication Cannot Just involve One-Way Monologues appeared first on POPin.

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The post Why Clarifying Confusion is the Key to Staff Engagement appeared first on POPin.

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As a student, you were told 5 million times how important it is to get your name on a paper.
We’ve got news for you: the benefits of authorship, specifically co-authorship, extends to business. As you share the authorship for the direction of your company and the ideas Here, we talk about how to share authorship in a way that’s beneficial and productive for all involved–and ultimately beneficial for your business. Finding Opportunities for Co-Authorship First things first: how do you find these opportunities? As a student, the easiest place to get in on important papers was working with your professors. In business, the same basic rules apply. You can work with leaders in your industry to combine insights for other professionals–it can be right for both of you. You could also work with academics if their field intersects with your particular business interests. Once you’ve found a potential candidate, you should already have some idea of what topic you’d like to collaborate on so they’re clear on the project they’re signing up for. Clarity on the topic can also help you decide if you want someone who can play off your subject matter specialty. From there, it’s all a matter of convincing them the benefits of co-authorship in general and the benefits of working with you in particular. Clear Division of Labor Once you’ve got a collaborator on board, you need to have an honest discussion about how you plan to divide labor. The road from cool idea to published final product is a long one with plenty of potential potholes. Issues related to the division of labor are a big one. For example: who will be collecting the data? Who will be going through the data for the insights you need to make the important points? Who will be doing the writing? Who will be editing? What about graphics? Will you split the time? All of these are important to talk about before you dive in and find yourself halfway through the book with someone you can’t stand working with. The division will be a little different in practice, but you should at least have an idea of what direction you’re heading. Negotiate Authorship Credit You’re both presumably going to have your names on the final product, but whose name goes first? Alphabetical works great for you if your last name is Albert, but not so much if your last name is White. It’s not just about author credit, though. It’s about who the data ultimately belongs to, what happens if one of you wants to move forward with a different project using this data, etc. An Authorship Prenup Finally, you should negotiate the co-authorship equivalent of a prenuptial agreement. You need to know who’s doing what, who’s covering what, who keeps the data if you part ways, etc. Have the less pleasant conversations early–they’ll be much worse if you find yourself in a sticky situation later. More Insights for Your Business Growth Ready to grow your business beyond authorship? Check out our blog for all kinds of posts to help your business flourish, like this post on how communication affects productivity in the workplace. Or, for a closer look at what our platform has to offer your business, take a look at our product page.

The post How to Share Authorship for Micro Improvements appeared first on POPin.

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