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How to Get the Most Out of 140th Annual Meeting INTA Conference 2018

Join IP professionals from around the world for INTA Conference 140th Annual Meeting, May 19–23, 2018, in scenic Seattle, Washington. Benefit from the unmatched opportunity to examine key industry issues, gain actionable insights, forge critical partnerships, and come away energized and equipped to meet the challenges and opportunities offered by a constantly evolving IP landscape.

Download Mobile App for INTA’s 140th Annual Meeting

The mobile app for INTA’s 140th Annual Meeting is now available. It features registrant-to-registrant communication, a complete day-by-day schedule and speaker list, push notifications about special announcements and updates, and maps of the Convention Center, Exhibition Hall, and the Seattle area, as well as suggestions for exploring Seattle. INTA highly encourages registrants to download the app before leaving for the Annual Meeting and to add sessions, speakers, and exhibitors to your “favorites” list by simply clicking the (+) next to each name. The app is available on iTunes here and Android here.

Where to stay during INTA?

Choose your hotel for INTA 2018. See the attached map for a list of official INTA hotels. Housing and registration opens January 2018.

See the map here: https://uploads.visitseattle.org/2017/10/07081443/VS_INTA_CustomHotelMap_WEB_FINAL1.jpg

Get to know where to eat during INTA

From James Beard Award–winning restaurants to budget-friendly eats, Seattle is awash with fantastic dining options for whatever your taste buds desire. Nosh on fresh seafood, Asian fusion fare, classic French flavors, and everything in between. Restaurateurs and chefs here take pride in sourcing ingredients from nearby farms and local waters—some even have their own gardens and bee hives to grow fresh herbs, produce, and honey. Ready your forks—it’s time to eat like a local!

Read more about it here: https://www.visitseattle.org/food-drink/restaurants/

But what to do in Seattle?

Space Needle – The Space Needle was built for the 1962 World’s Fair. The Space Needle features an observation deck at 520 feet, the SkyCity restaurant at 500 feet, and a gift shop. It usually a long wait in the line so my suggestion is to look at it on the way to the EMP and then you can say you saw it!
Address: 400 Broad St, Seattle, WA 98109, USA

Seattle Art Museum (SAM) – this is one of my favorite museums mostly because it is small and usually has at least one great exhibit. I get overwhelmed at the New York Museums but this one if perfect for a half day trip and conveniently located downtown.
Address: 1300 1st Ave, Seattle, WA 98101, USA

Japanese Gardens – The Japanese Gardens located in Washington Park and are close to Madison Park. They are stunning and a great place for a picnic or walk.
Address: 1075 Lake Washington Blvd E, Seattle, WA 98112, USA

Gasworks Park – Gasworks park is a public park on the site of the former Seattle Gas Light Company and has large structures from the original coal plant that is amazing to view at the park and from the water.
Address: 2101 N Northlake Way, Seattle, WA 98103, USA

Whidbey Island – Whidbey Island is a hidden gem in the Seattle area that is just being discovered by tourists. It’s about an hour and a half outside Seattle with a short ferry ride but you feel like you are in another world. It’s a great place to relax or visit for the weekend. Hotels are very limited though, most people rent a house. Like all places in Seattle, peak time is July, August.

ARE YOU ATTENDING IACC AND/OR INTA IN SEATTLE? BOOK A DEMO WITH POINTER’S TEAM!

Fighting counterfeiting and piracy is a battle. The question is – are you winning? Pointer Brand Protection provides a complete and market-leading brand protection strategy that makes a difference. To ascertain if your brand is at risk or to determine the effectiveness of your current strategy, we can provide you with a free and customized risk report and live demo during INTA and IACC!

The post How to Get the Most Out of 140th Annual Meeting INTA Conference 2018 appeared first on Pointer Brand Protection.

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Top 3 South America E-commerce Platforms & How To Stop Fakes

The E-commerce Platforms in South America are still relatively small compared to those in Asia or North-America. However, e-commerce sales in South America are projected to dramatically increase in the coming years. Brazil is the market leader in terms of e-commerce sales, and has been on the US Trade Representative Special 301 Watch List since 2007. This is due to high levels of counterfeiting on e-commerce platforms. This article examines the biggest e-commerce platforms in South America, and what can be done in terms of brand protection and anti-counterfeit solutions on these platforms.

  1. MercadoLibre

The biggest e-commerce platform in South America is MercadoLibre (literally “free market” in Spanish). It is an Argentine company, with branches in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Peru, Panama, Portugal, Uruguay and Venezuela. In Brazil, where it is called MercadoLivre, it is the biggest online marketplace. It ranks as the 7th most visited website in Brazil, according to data from Alexa.com.

Recently, MercadoLibre has been under pressure to improve its IP protection strategy after a high number of fakes and counterfeit goods were discovered on the website. Adidas removed $50 million worth of products from MercadoLibre in 2015, and other companies, among which Levi Strauss, have complained about the long takedown process.

In order to report listings on MercadoLibre, you have to create an account and upload IPRs. Then you can report listings on an individual basis. Though this may be time-consuming, it does work.

  1. Americanas

Americanas is the second biggest marketplace in South America. It is located in Brazil, and is therefore only focused on the Brazilian market. Americanas is part of the B2W Digital Company that also owns Submarino, another e-commerce platform.

If businesses locate infringing content on the online marketplace, they can contact Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to resolve the issues. Moreover, an option is to contact Brazilian enforcement authorities to investigate online counterfeits.

  1. OLX

The various OLX branches (with different branches in different countries) are also large marketplaces. On Alexa.com, you can see the ranking of websites in Brazil, in order of popularity, which indicates that MercadoLivre is the 7th most visited website in Brazil. OLX Brazil ranks 13th on the list of most visited websites in Brazil. Similar to MercadoLibre, OLX also has a lot of different country websites (.com.br, .com.co, com.ec etc.).

See https://www.alexa.com/topsites/countries/BR check rankings per country. The content on the OLX marketplaces is protected by intellectual property laws and treaties.

Other online marketplaces

Other South American online marketplaces are Linio, Alamaula, and Locanto, to name but a few. However, these websites are not very big and are not widely used in South America.

How to stop fakes in South America

We have listed the most important online marketplaces in South America. Number 1 is MercadoLibre, number 2 is Americanas, and number 3 is OLX. These marketplaces have started to improve their IP policy since complaints were made about a great deal of counterfeiting and infringements on their platforms.

It may be time-consuming to report listings on these marketplaces, but it is simple enough if you follow the steps. And it is definitely worth it!

Pointer Brand Protection is a brand protection service that is always ready to help you with any problems you may have regarding intellectual property, brand protection, and online enforcement in South America, or anywhere else in the world.

Contact us to improve your brand protection strategy, and for any questions, you may have.

The post Top 3 South America E-commerce Platforms & How To Stop Fakes appeared first on Pointer Brand Protection.

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Luxury Law Summit 2018
Meet us in London!
Are you attending the Luxury Law Summit 2018?

Calling all Brand Protection and IP Specialists – come meet us in London!

Pointer Brand Protection is attending the Luxury Law Summit, 14 – 15 May 2018 in London, United Kingdom.

Let’s join forces to fight against infringements that damage your brand and put all your hard work at risk.

Get in touch with our awesome sales team Fiona Gao and Saskia van der Made to set up a meeting in the U.K.’s capital—one of the most dynamic cities in Europe.

We look forward to discussing the newest and most effective trends and strategies to help protect your brand online and offline.

2018 Luxury Law Summit

One of the most prestigious gatherings in the luxury sector calendar, the 2018 Luxury Law Summit will provide the opportunity to focus on the most exciting and challenging developments in the luxury marketplace. Join luxury business leaders, general counsel and specialist legal teams to take a legal perspective on how to manage risk, safeguard brand equity, build effective partnerships and define distribution strategies.

The Luxury Law Summit agenda will bring together the experience of luxpreneurs, designers, luxury hospitality leaders with the legal minds at the forefront of advising on strategy and business development. Book your place for this one-day event to…

  • Gain perspective on the changing luxury market dynamics and business opportunities
  • Hear how GCs from across the luxury sector are managing the developing challenges for legal teams
  • Understand the issues that luxury business leaders face and what they need from their legal teams to support their ambitions

The post Luxury Law Summit 2018 appeared first on Pointer Brand Protection.

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How to stop the illegal Parallel import?

Brand protection covers different means and tools to protect right holders. What Pointer can do is ensure that brand owners are given the best possible technology and support to help protect their intellectual property rights online. One of the ways to track and stop illegal activities is to eliminate the ongoing problem of illegal parallel import.

What is parallel import?

Parallel import, also known as the import of grey market goods, exists when genuine goods, containing intellectual property rights, are imported for sale on markets and territories without the brand owner’s explicit consent. A simple example would be an item bearing a trademark, for example a coffee maker, which is sold on and intended for the United States market, but is then imported from the United States to the European Union without the trademark owner’s permission. In that case, even though the goods are genuine, the act of importing to a country, for which the rights owner has not given their explicit consent, would constitute an intellectual property rights infringement – parallel import.

What is important to mention is that parallel import could occur for products protected by copyright[1], trademarks[2] and patents[3]. The rules in relation to parallel import depend on the territorial application of the rights in question. From European Union law viewpoint this act is prohibited as the ECJ has established in early case law.[4]

Are there any limitations to parallel import?

IPR holders’ rights are limited by the principle of the first sale doctrine. This means that once a good containing intellectual property – be it a DVD with a copyright-protected movie, or a technology product containing a patented component – has been sold, the IPR holder cannot prevent the buyer from further selling the item in the same territory. The first sale of the product ‘exhausts’ the IPR holder’s rights.

There are national differences as to what is considered as the first sale. Some jurisdictions consider as first sale a sale anywhere (international exhaustion, applied for example in the US and Australia). Other jurisdictions only consider the IP rights to be exhausted when the product has been sold in that particular territory (national or regional exhaustion). The latter is the case in the European Union, which applies regional exhaustion. Article 15 of the EU Trademark Directive states: ‘A trade mark shall not entitle the proprietor to prohibit its use in relation to goods which have been put on the market in the Union under that trade mark by the proprietor or with the proprietor’s consent’.[5]

For example, if one buys a watch in Germany and resells it in Romania, the brand owner cannot prevent the second sale, since both Germany and Romania fall under EU jurisdiction. If, however, the watch has first been sold in China, the right holder’s rights have not been exhausted in the European Union and parallel import rules can be relied upon.

How does parallel import threaten brand owners?

There are several ways in which brand owners can be affected by such an IPR infringement. Parallel imports often limit the brand owners’ capacity to exercise control over their products, and ultimately, their brand.

Pricing: Parallel imports often occur where brand owners have decided to apply diverging pricing strategies in different regions. Allowing parallel importers to import branded goods from a lower price-level jurisdiction into a higher price-level jurisdiction can undermine the legitimate and authorized sales in the second jurisdiction, and the whole pricing strategy.

Distribution: There may be various reasons why a brand owner may decide to provide to a certain market but not another. There could be strategic business, competitive, or legal reasons which lead the brand owner to decide to not sell specific products in specific markets.

Quality and service: Brand owners may also choose or be required to apply different quality and service levels in specific countries. Allowing parallel importers to import the goods where they are not meant to be sold also undermines the brand owners’ ability to provide the level of quality or service desired or needed in that market.

Safety: Some products such as technology products can contain features (for example voltage or compatibility features) which may lead to disfunction of the products or safety risks when used in a region for which the product is not intended.

Reputation: Being able to control the above aspects has a direct effect on the brand value and reputation of the brand. For example, being able to control the price level of the product directly affects the brands’ positioning among the consumers. Similarly, allowing exclusive or luxury goods to be sold on unreliable or shady marketplaces affects the consumers’ perception of the brand’s exclusivity. It can also lead to consumers confusing genuine products with fakes or knock-offs. A recent CJEU judgment has confirmed that luxury brand owners under certain circumstances can prohibit their resellers from selling their products on online marketplaces. (C‑230/16 Coty Germany GmbH v Parfümerie Akzente GmbH).

How can Pointer help?

We are dedicated to help our clients to detect and enforce illegal parallel import. Our advanced brand protection and monitoring software ‘Revlect’ scans hundreds of online market places 24/7. The system filters out cases of illegal parallel import, displays them in a dashboard, and allows the brand owner or our team of experienced brand protection analysts to send out Notice & Takedown emails to shut down the infringing listings with just a few clicks.

[1] Directive (EU) 2001/29/EC, art. 4.

[2] Regulation (EU) 2017/1001, art. 9(2)(c) and Directive (EU) 2015/2436, art. 10(3)(c).

[3] C-15/74, Centrafarm B.V. and Adriaan de Peijper v. Sterling Drug Inc., 6 IIC 102 (1975) Negram III.

[4] C-10/89, Cnl-Sucal NV SA v HAG GF AG (1990), C-9/93, IHT International Heiztechnik v Ideal Standard (1994), C-55/0 and C-57/80, Musik-Vertrieb Membran and K-tel Int. v GEMA (1981).

[5] Directive (EU) 2015/2436.

The post How to stop the illegal Parallel import? appeared first on Pointer Brand Protection.

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ARE YOU ATTENDING IACC AND/OR INTA IN SEATTLE? BOOK A DEMO WITH POINTER’S TEAM!
Meet us in Seattle!

Calling all Brand Protection, Ip Professionals and Anti-Counterfeit Specialists – come meet us in Seattle, Washington!

Pointer Brand Protection is proud to sponsor IACC in May 16-18 and participating in INTA’s 140th Annual Meeting, May 19–23, 2018 in Seattle.

Let’s join forces to fight against infringements that damage your brand and put all your hard work at risk.

Get in touch with our awesome sales team Fiona Gao, Ben Mok and Peter-Jan Dullaert to set up a meeting in Seattle or visit the Pointer’s stand at IACC.

We look forward to discussing the newest and most effective trends and strategies to help protect your brand online.

While you wait for the events feel free to book a free demo with our team: https://pointerbrandprotection.com/live-demo-inta-and-iacc/

ABOUT IACC AND INTA

The IACC Spring Conference will be held from May 16-18, 2018 in Seattle, Washington.

IACC’s Spring Conferences combine the industry’s most up-to-date information and best practices with top leaders from the frontlines of the business, security, government and legal communities. Spring Conference attendees come from around the world to network and share their views on the latest IP trends and solutions.

Join IP professionals from around the world for INTA’s 140th Annual Meeting, May 19–23, 2018, in scenic Seattle, Washington. Benefit from the unmatched opportunity to examine key industry issues, gain actionable insights, forge critical partnerships, and come away energized and equipped to meet the challenges and opportunities offered by a constantly evolving IP landscape.

The post IACC and INTA Seattle 2018 appeared first on Pointer Brand Protection.

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Anti Counterfeit Solutions for E-commerce Platform Pinduoduo
Anti Counterfeit Solutions for Booming Chinese E-commerce Platform Pinduoduo

In December 2017, a ranking of e-commerce apps in China was published, declaring Taobao as #1, and Pinduoduo, which has only existed since 2015, as #2. Today, Pinduoduo is the leading Chinese social e-commerce app, and the fastest growing app in the history of Chinese internet. But what does its future look like on a global scale, what are the risks of counterfeiting on this platform, and what could be solutions to fight this?   

What is Pinduoduo?

Pinduoduo is an e-commerce platform that can best be described as a mixture between Facebook and Groupon. The ambitious startup was founded in 2015 by ex-Google engineer Colin Huang, who believes Pinduoduo will revolutionise e-commerce. Just two years after its founding, the company was already worth around $1.5 billion. So what’s it all about?

Just like social commerce websites Amazon and Alibaba, Pinduoduo offers a wide range of products that users can browse through online, but there’s a twist. The idea is that users get the fun experience of shopping together, only instead of doing this in stores and shopping malls, they do it online. They are encouraged to make purchases together because Pinduoduo offers lucrative discounts for shoppers who buy items with a group of people.

The Pinduoduo website is almost like a game, with hidden bargains and colourful pictures. And throughout the shopping experience, users chat with each other, using the app WeChat, to discuss potential buys. Although the prices are incredibly low, many users have complained about the quality of their purchases. Yet despite this, Pinduoduo continues to grow in popularity and is one of the most downloaded free apps on Apple’s China App Store.

The Pinduoduo revolution

Pinduoduo’s immense popularity in China begs the question: will it also catch on globally? Colin Huang has said he definitely imagines expanding Pinduoduo on a global scale. However, it is unclear when he will be moving in this direction.

Moreover, the difference between the Chinese market and consumers and those in other countries could impact whether or not Pinduoduo gains similar success on a global scale. Factors like a lack of distribution channels, high mobile commerce penetration, frictionless mobile payments, attachment to a popular social platform, and access to cheap products all played a significant role in the success of Pinduoduo in China.

However, it is safe to say that Huang’s model offers an innovative take on the e-commerce experience. It certainly has the potential to merge the experience of online shopping with social platforms in a way that could convince consumers globally.

Pinduoduo and online counterfeit

With the rapid development of this app also comes a large risk of counterfeits. In fact, Pinduoduo is more at risk than other websites and apps. Since Pinduoduo indicates a new trend, social e-commerce, which relies more on its users’ social networks, brand owners are much more at risk.

On this platform, infringing products, counterfeits, or knock-offs will reach a larger amount of people much faster compared with traditional e-commerce platforms. Moreover, most of the offers on Pinduoduo can only be accessed and viewed from its app, which makes the detection of infringements much more difficult. Put simply, Pinduoduo is an easy platform for infringements to reach consumers, while simultaneously making it hard to detect them.

Anti-counterfeit solutions for Pinduoduo

So how does enforcing listings work on Pinduoduo? Unlike Alibaba, Pinduoduo does not provide any online reporting portal such as Alibaba’s IPP (Intellectual Property Protection) system.

The only way to report infringements found on the Pinduoduo app is by writing an email to copyright@pinduoduo.com, or by sending a letter to the Pinduoduo office in Shanghai.

In terms of the reporting procedures, every notice and takedown (hereinafter N&TD) request has to be attached, with copies of valid IPRs. In addition, Pinduoduo requires a form written in Chinese to be filled in, where the rights owner or authorised agents have to provide detailed information, including the name of the rights owner or the authorised agent, a contact address, a phone number, an email address, etc.

According to the guidelines published by Pinduoduo, infringements against any valid copyright, trademark, or patent right (including inventions, designs and utility models) can be reported. After receiving the N&TD requests, Pinduoduo will conduct formality examinations.

What is interesting to note is that the Pinduoduo guidelines make it clear that not all reported sellers will receive a notification after they have been reported. When it comes to very straightforward cases, for example if a seller indicates in the listing title that high-quality replicas are offered, the listings are likely to be removed directly without notification of the sellers. In the cases where the seller does receive the take-down notifications, he or she should respond within 5 working days by filing counter-notifications. Therefore, the removal of infringing listings may take up to 3 to 5 working days, or more.

Given the fact that a fair amount of detailed and complex information is required to take down infringing listings on the Pinduoduo app, it could be a good idea to turn to brand protection service providers for help. They usually have more success with this process, and could save a lot of valuable time. Particularly if reading Chinese poses a problem for the client dealing with intellectual property infringement cases, turning to brand protection service providers is a smart approach to win the fight.

How Pointer Brand Protection can help brands

In summary, Pinduoduo is a rapidly growing social e-commerce platform that offers users a social online shopping experience. However, the downside is that the platform makes it easy for counterfeiters to reach a lot of consumers at once, and also makes detection of infringements difficult. It’s a good idea to turn to brand protection service providers for help with reporting infringing listings, and getting them removed. Pointer Brand Protection is always ready to help you with any problems you may have regarding intellectual property and brand protection. Contact us for any questions, and to get the best protection for your brand.

The post Anti Counterfeit Solutions for E-commerce Platform Pinduoduo appeared first on Pointer Brand Protection.

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GDPR & WHOIS by Pointer Brand Protection
GDPR & WHOIS by Pointer Brand Protection - YouTube
SECRECY v TRANSPARENCY

Secrecy v transparency… that’s essentially what the whole GDPR v WHOIS controversy is all about. Some background is in order.

GDPR: The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), adopted on 14 April 2016 and due to take effect on 25 May 2018, is now very much in the news.   On the face of it GDPR does good things – it protects the citizens and residents of the EU from privacy and data breaches. GDPR has very wide reach, applying not only to EU companies, but also to all companies (wherever they may be located) that process and hold the personal data of EU subjects. Under GDPR consent is key: personal data can be stored if the person involved has given informed and unambiguous consent to that storage. GDPR is no laughing matter – the EU authorities will be able to impose fines of up to €20 million or 4% of turnover (whichever is the greater) on companies that fail to comply with GDPR.

So GDPR is all about privacy. Or is that secrecy?

WHOIS: What is? WHOIS is something that’s been with us since the 1980’s, ever since those early days of the internet.  WHOIS is the system whereby the companies that register domain names (domain name registries, GoDaddy would be an obvious example) not only take the personal information of those people and companies registering domain names, but also list that information in publicly-accessible WHOIS directories, making the information easy to find through free WHOIS search tools. Transparency has always been at the heart of the system.

So why exactly are the domain name registries so wedded to WHOIS?  Simple, they’re contractually required to do it. The domain name registries acquire their authority to register domain names from the international body that’s responsible for the entire domain name system, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). ICANN has licenced a large number of domain name registries to register domain names and it is one of ICANN’s requirements that they all follow WHOIS.

WHOIS is regarded as a very important, if not invaluable, tool for those involved in, inter alia, enforcement activities, security research, WHOIS data analytics and journalism. An obvious example who be brand enforcement – anyone wanting to find out who is behind the online counterfeiting of a brand would start off by establishing who registered the domain name through which the counterfeiting operation is conducted. WHOIS unfortunately also has a negative side, in that the information it contains is also a source of great interest to spammers and hackers.

So on balance WHOIS is laudable. Although it is worth bearing in mind that secrecy is still available at a cost – domain name registries do offer users an option of hiding data, but they do need to pay for that privilege.

The problem: The problem is fairly obvious – whenever anyone registers a domain name with a domain name registry the two parties are entering into a contract. So when it comes to EU subjects, GDPR kicks in and states that the person applying for registration is entitled to privacy.  Which means that the domain name registry can’t take and publish the personal information of the registrant without that person’s consent. But domain name registries have never sought consent from registrants. And even if they now start requiring consent, people will clearly have the right to decline. In short, WHOIS is incompatible with GDPR.

This leaves ICANN with a dilemma. The organisation is under pressure from various law enforcement agencies and other bodies to make sure that domain name registration information remains available. But ICANN must also accommodate GDPR.

Domain name registries are starting to get twitchy. Some European domain name registries have told ICANN that they simply won’t be complying with WHOIS in the future – insofar as there are contractual terms that require the domain name registries to do so, they argue that these terms will in future be invalid because they contravene EU law. ICANN acknowledges that there is a problem- in November 2017 it announced that it would not take legal action against domain name registries that do not comply with WHOIS.

The solution: Right now there isn’t one. ICANN has been aware of the privacy issue for years and it has been working on solutions including a complete replacement of WHOIS with a Next Generation gTLD Registration Directory Services (RDS). ICANN has suggested that domain name registries get consent from registrants, but the objection to this is that EU law requires that consents be freely given. ICANN has also come up with some fairly desperate sounding stop-gap measures. One of these is a system of self-certification, whereby people or organisations who self-certify that they have a legitimate interest in accessing the personal information of domain name registrants are able to access it. Another is a system of formal accreditation, whereby only formally accredited third party requesters can access the information of domain name registrants. The third is a system whereby only those who obtain subpoenas or other court orders are given access to domain name registrant information. These proposals are unlikely to fly. The EU authorities have said that ‘the level of abstraction’ of the models make them difficult to assess. They’ve basically asked ICANN to go back to the drawing board.

The pressure is on ICANN. On the very day that the organisation announced these interim solutions the largest domain name registry in the world, GoDaddy, announced that it would effectively redact details of its 17 million customers by withdrawing bulk searches of the WHOIS details.  Other domain name registries are likely to follow suit.

Pointer Brand Protection is in contact with major registries and registrars to overcome the issue. Identity theft and sales of counterfeit goods are at a high. Too often, we see unknowing consumers being duped by these infringers. WHOIS information provides brand owners and cybersecurity investigators the needed data to protect consumers from these fraudulent activities. To safeguard brands from online trademark and IP infringements, it is important that the involved parties step up. The best way going forward is to open up WHOIS for certain companies that can show reasonable cause. This way consumers’ privacy is protected, and brand owners are protected online from IP infringements.

The post GDPR & WHOIS by Pointer Brand Protection appeared first on Pointer Brand Protection.

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GLOBAL BRAND PROTECTION INNOVATION PROGRAMME
Meet us in London!

Calling all Brand Protection and Anti-Counterfeit Specialists – come meet us in London!

Pointer Brand Protection is proud to sponsor the GBPIP, 26 – 27 April 2018 in London, United Kingdom.

Let’s join forces to fight against infringements that damage your brand and put all your hard work at risk.

Get in touch with our awesome sales team Fiona Gao and Saskia van der Made to set up a meeting in the U.K.’s capital—one of the most dynamic cities in Europe—and visit the Pointer Brand Protection stand.

We look forward to discussing the newest and most effective trends and strategies to help protect your brand online.

While you wait for the event feel free to read our CEO, Robert Stolk, interview to GBPIP about The Challenges of Intellectual Property.

GLOBAL BRAND PROTECTION INNOVATION PROGRAMME (GBPIP)

GLOBAL BRAND PROTECTION INNOVATION PROGRAMME (GBPIP) 2018 is specially designed to cater the global security challenges faced by the brands, in particular, the issues of counterfeiting, product diversion, and look-a-like goods (passing-off) and even unsafe imitations. 4th GBPIP 2018 aims to unveil overt and covert Brand Security Measures, Global Implementation of Anti-counterfeit Technologies, Overview of Analytical Technique, Recent Technologies, Serialization, Track & Trace and Significant Strategies to secure a brand.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY SUMMIT (IP Summit) 2018 is heading off to unveil the chance of bringing together IP Owners, Experts and Investors to seek different key challenges and operational issues faced by the IP Professionals and companies these days. This Intellectual Property Summit will provide serious and important insights to the evolutions of IP, Role of IP and New Innovations & Developments, IP and its benefits to your brands and various trademark strategies to manage, protect and enforce various innovative portfolios. Designed exclusively for Chief Intellectuals Property Officers, Heads of Patents, Heads of IP, IP Managers and Patent Attorneys, Intellectual Property Summit provides the opportunity to learn from global leaders about how to balance increasing business interest in your IP portfolio.

Through 4th GBPIP and IP Summit we bring together the right people on meeting table to do business. With our strong dedication and unmatched business intelligence, we offer nothing but the best for you to take your business to the next level. This is what makes our clients come back each year to find new people to do business with.

The post GLOBAL BRAND PROTECTION INNOVATION PROGRAMME appeared first on Pointer Brand Protection.

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GLOBAL ANTI-COUNTERFEITING AND BRAND PROTECTION SUMMIT
Meet us in Amsterdam!

Pointer Brand Protection the main sponsor of GLOBAL ANTI-COUNTERFEITING AND BRAND PROTECTION SUMMIT.

Are you looking for the best brand protection strategy for your brand? Then get in touch with our Global Business Development Manager Peter-Jan Dullaert and set up a meeting or visit Pointer Brand Protection stand.

We look forward to discussing the newest and most effective trends and strategies to help protect your brand online.

GLOBAL ANTI-COUNTERFEITING AND BRAND PROTECTION SUMMIT

Counterfeiting and Brand Protection is not a new issue but the days when only luxury goods were counterfeited and unauthorized CD’s and DVD’s were sold on the street corners are now long gone. However now day’s imitators are now copying anything and everything but with more sophisticated methods which makes counterfeits more difficult to identify. Businesses are being deprived of billions in tax revenue while consumer safety is put at risk by unsafe counterfeited products. Any brand protection strategy must involve the business as a whole, with crucial questions like how to minimize brand abuse in sales, brand management, finance, marketing, legal departments and manufacturing.

With a look at the present and future Protection issues and possible ways of businesses best optimizing solutions, this event will offer attendees a platform of information exchange and networking alongside the finest and brightest minds working today. Register today and secure your place at this top-tier event.

The post GLOBAL ANTI-COUNTERFEITING AND BRAND PROTECTION SUMMIT | AMSTERDAM appeared first on Pointer Brand Protection.

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Alibaba & CBBC introduce a new promising IP protection method

The China-Britain Business Council (CBBC) has been helping Chinese e-commerce platform Alibaba develop new IP protection methods for small and medium-sized enterprises. The most recent development by Alibaba’s team is a non-registration submission channel for intellectual property infringement complaints, available online (hereinafter referred to as “Online Form”). It is designed to be a simple and effective way to report infringements on your trademarks, designs, and more.

Kick-start your brand protection online

The Online Form offers an alternative to the Alibaba Intellectual Property Protection (IPP) Platform, which requires registration, and it works across all Alibaba owned e-commerce websites. These websites are www.taobao.com, www.alibaba.com, and www.aliexpress.com.

The Online Form is extremely easy to use. You will need to provide your identity information (name, relationship with IP owner, and contact details to Alibaba), and your complaint information (IPR type, complaint reason, and infringing content).

In the end, you need to fill in the IPR information (trademark registration number, IPR name/description, place of IPR registration, contact e-mail to the seller, and contact person to the seller) and click Submit.


After submitting the form, your complaint will be processed as quickly as possible. It takes between 3 and 5 working days before Alibaba sends a reply, whether the listings are removed or not. Once the complaint is verified, the specified listings will be removed and the corresponding seller of the listing will be notified of the removal. In the event of a counternotification by the seller, this will be forwarded to you.

The form is an excellent way for brands to report infringing content without having to go through an entire registration process. However, Alibaba does encourage brand owners to register through their IPP Portal. Reporting through the IPP Portal generally leads to significantly faster response times and brand owners can check their history of reporting and reasons for rejections, if any.

Promising future for SMEs

The Online Form is designed specifically for rights owners with a small number of listings to report, or  submit notifications only occasionally, and CBBC believes it may be a good option for small and medium-sized companies (SMEs).

This is a great development in many aspects. Previously, all companies wanting to report infringing content had to go through the entire process of registering and setting up an account in the Alibaba IPP Platform. Getting an approval from Alibaba often takes time, which hampers the speedy takedown of infringing listings.

SMEs most likely have fewer listings to report and the Online Form allows them to proactively and speedily report infringing content, so the listings will be taken down much more quickly. If a notice and takedown request from a client is particularly important and urgent, this kind of an alternative reporting form provides an excellent solution.

How can companies benefit?

At Pointer Brand Protection, we advise our clients to make use of this Online Form, particularly small-sized clients. If you don’t suffer from a large number of infringing listings, this form is the way to go.

For one thing, it offers an overview of what is required to report IP infringements. It also helps brand owners to anticipate trademark and patent certifications and renewals, and gives a realistic estimation of the scope of their rights. The Online Form offers a smart solution to a market where time is precious and where efficiency rules.

About Pointer Brand Protection

We have explained about the perks of Alibaba and CBBC’s new IP protection method. This non-registration submission channel or Online Form offers a quick and efficient way to report IP infringements, without having to go through all the stages of setting up an IPP account. This is a great development in intellectual property protection.

Pointer Brand Protection is committed to helping you protect your brand. We are always at your service to help you with any problems you may have regarding IP and brand protection. If you have any questions, feel free to contact us and we will get back to you as soon as possible!

The post Alibaba & CBBC introduce a new promising IP protection method appeared first on Pointer Brand Protection.

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