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Business Daily Podcast by Bbc World Service - 3d ago
Wine exports from California's Napa Valley have dried up amid an intensifying US-China trade war. In some cases, prices have doubled, dealing a blow to an industry that has already seen young people shun wine for bourbon and beer. The BBC's Regan Morris speaks to third generation wine makers Michael and Stephanie Honig of Honig Vineyard & Winery, who say the trade spat has reduced their Chinese sales to zero. We also hear from Honore Comfort, Wine Institute vice president of international marketing, who says cultivating export markets will ensure the industry keeps growing. It's not all doom and gloom. Vivien Gay, Silver Oak Cellars director of international sales says it's been business as usual for high-end wine makers like hers. Picture: People toasting with red wine (Credit: Getty Images)
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Business Daily Podcast by Bbc World Service - 4d ago
It's more than a decade since the global financial crisis. Central banks have pumped trillions of dollars into the financial system to support markets and the broader economy. But there are warning signs that major risks may be re-emerging in the financial markets. This month, fund manager Neil Woodford suspended trading in his largest fund after rising numbers of investors asked for their money back. Could this highlight a vulnerability in the financial system that runs right through the investment management business? The BBC's Manuela Saragosa and Laurence Knight speak to two veterans of the investment community: Mohamed El-Erian, chief economic adviser at Allianz and former head of Pimco in California; and Lord Paul Myners, the former head of Gartmore in the UK. Both worry that investors are unaware of the risk they are running that they won't be able to access their money when they most need it, and warn that regulators could be blindsided by the next big crisis. (Picture: A trading screen flashes red; Credit: Getty Images)
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Is the focus on economic growth misguided, and should governments make public happiness their ultimate policy goal? That's the contention of economist Lord Richard Layard. Ed Butler looks at two countries seeking to do just that. Bhutan has long measured and prioritised what it calls "gross national happiness", and Tshoki Zangmo, a senior researcher for Bhutan's National Happiness Commission, explains what this means in practice. Meanwhile New Zealand's prime minister has required that ministries in her government justify their spending on the basis of how it will improve general public wellbeing. Jess Berentson-Shaw, a senior researcher at the Public Policy Institute at the University of Auckland, says not everyone is convinced the new approach is as transformational as billed. And why are the Finns so happy? We ask dancer and choreographer Minna Tervamaki, who has been nominated one of Finland's happiest people. (Picture: Happy woman; Credit: kumikomini/Getty Images)
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Business Daily Podcast by Bbc World Service - 6d ago
Facial recognition technology is a powerful tool that can unlock phones and help you speed through airport security. But many warn that a system designed to make our lives easier is open to abuse. Ed Butler talks to one office worker who has launched a groundbreaking legal battle against its use. We also hear from China, where hundreds of millions of CCTV cameras have already been installed, many of them with specialist facial recognition capabilities. And, with the technology moving faster than the law can keep up, what type of restrictions should we place on it? Picture: A security camera is pictured with police officers in the background (Credit: Getty Images)
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Business Daily Podcast by Bbc World Service - 6d ago
Asian countries have told the West to stop dumping its plastic waste on them - and it could spell the end of the recycling industry. China imposed a ban on imports last year, and now Malaysia and others are returning the stuff back its senders. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Jim Puckett, founder of the Basel Action Network, who has successfully lobbied for the international trade in recyclable waste to be curtailed, because he believes it is actually bad for the environment. Arnaud Brunet, director of the Bureau of International Recycling, explains why he thinks that's an unfair depiction of his industry. (Picture: A man scavenges for plastic for recycling at a garbage dump site in Bachok, Malaysia; Credit: Mohd Samsul Mohd Said/Getty Images)
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Business Daily Podcast by Bbc World Service - 1w ago
America wants allies to follow its lead and stop doing business with the Chinese telecoms giant, which it accuses of espionage. Not everyone thinks the Trump administration is dealing with the company in the best way. Brianna Wu, a software engineer and a 2020 US congressional candidate believes the challenge with Huawei is around cyber security and not about trade. Meanwhile, technology analyst Carolina Milanesi says that for some countries, it’s simply too expensive to consider removing the company’s technology from their mobile data network. Our Asia business correspondent, Karishma Vaswani joins Manuela Saragosa from Singapore. (Picture: An Android logo in front of a displayed Huawei logo. Credit: Reuters)
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Could an advertising campaign featuring a bear help sell more washing machines? Looking to shake up the video advertising world, Matt Smith launched The Viral Factory back in 2001. We hear how getting consumers to create buzz by sharing your content online became central in selling products. But, Matt says the dominance of social media platforms and how they allow content to be shared is a concern for viral marketers like him. (Picture: A bear holding a guitar in an ad. Credit: Viral Factory/Jellyfish Pictures)
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Business Daily Podcast by Bbc World Service - 1w ago
The Niger Delta is Africa's biggest oil producing region. It has also become a security and environmental nightmare thanks to dozens of spills and theft by armed rebels. Oil and gas giant Shell has long been criticised for its operations in the region. Igo Weli, one of the company's directors in Nigeria, tells Manuela Saragosa how the threat of violence makes it hard for them to clean up their act. But while Shell claims it is trying its best in challenging circumstances, Mark Dummett of Amnesty International says the company could be doing a lot more and is still under-reporting the extent of the problem. Manuela also speaks to Jumoke Ajayi of Nigerian oil conglomerate Sahara Group, and Erabanabari Kobah, who acts as a spokesperson for one of the Niger Delta communities. (Picture: A member of the Nigerian navy forces patrols on an abandoned site of an illegal oil refinery in the Niger Delta region; Credit: Stefan Heunis/AFP/Getty Images)
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Business Daily Podcast by Bbc World Service - 1w ago
With ever more jobs at risk of automation, should the automatons be taxed the same as humans? Ed Butler speaks to Dr Carl Frey of the Oxford Martin School, who co-authored a report five years ago claiming that almost half of US jobs could made redundant by emerging technology in the next 30 years. His new book, The Technology Trap, looks to the history of the Industrial Revolution as a guide to current developments. He worries that millions of workers could soon find their careers devastated, while the ultimate benefits of technology may only felt decades in the future. It is perhaps then not surprising that many politicians, academics and businessmen - including Microsoft founder Bill Gates - now advocate a tax on automation to level the playing field with humans. We pit an advocate of such a tax - Ryan Abbott of the University of Surrey - against critic Janet Bastiman, chief scientist at StoryStream, which provides AI services to the automotive sector. (Picture: Robot call centre; Credit: PhonlamaiPhoto/Getty Images)
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Once considered a luxury, we now consume 17 billion meals of the fish each year. Vivienne Nunis explores how it has become so popular and what impact salmon farming is having on the environment. Today you can even get salmon from a vending machine. The BBC’s Jonathan Josephs tries to buy some fish for his dinner in Singapore. However, concern is mounting over welfare standards on commercial salmon farms off the coast of Scotland. Dr Bryce Stewart is a marine ecologist and fisheries biologist who says there are considerable issues with sea lice, which damage salmon, especially if the chemicals used to treat the fish leak out into open water. Paul Greenberg, author of Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food, takes us through the story of how salmon farming grew so much that it started to compete with commercial meat production. The Scottish Salmon Producers’ Organisation says that their welfare standards are some of the highest in the world, though there are areas for improvement. CEO Julie Hesketh-Laird says medicine usage levels have fallen, though farmers still need access to tools to prevent disease. (Picture: A salmon vending machine in Singapore. Credit: BBC)
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