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Win a ProCook Professional Ceramic 8-piece cookware set worth £249!

For peace of mind that you’re cooking with both your health and the environment in mind there is no better cookware than ceramic, and ProCook’s Professional Ceramic range has everything you need to create fantastic dishes at home.

This 8-piece set of Professional Ceramic cookware includes a 14, 16 and 18cm saucepan, 20cm stockpot, 20cm steamer insert, 20 and 28cm frying pans and a 24cm shallow casserole, and we’re giving it away to one lucky reader!

So why choose ProCook Professional Ceramic? Made from lightweight, thick aluminium with a stainless-steel base, the coating is derived from sand and is free from PFOA and PTFE. It requires significantly less oil to cook with and has a robust scratch resistant surface which is fantastic for everyday use. The range also boasts a manufacturing process with a significantly lower curing temperature than regular cookware using a third less energy, making it better for the planet. 

To win be in with the chance of winning an 8-piece  Ceramic cookware set, simply fill in your details below

Closing date is midnight on Wednesday 14th August 2019.

Standard Terms and Conditions of entry can be found here.

[contact-form-7]

The post ProCook Competition appeared first on PlantBased Magazine.

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Tomato Galette with Pea and Mint Pesto

By using the coconut oil as the fat in this Tomato Galette with Pea and Mint Pesto, the pastry will be extra crispy and crumbly. The pea and mint pesto gives a sweet freshness to the galette, which is complemented by the roasted tomatoes.

Find lots of information on the ingredient in our glossary.

Subscribe to the magazine for more essential guides.

The post Tomato Galette with Pea and Mint Pesto appeared first on PlantBased Magazine.

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Essential Guide To Tempeh

Here’s why fermented soya should be your new staple

What is tempeh?

Tempeh is essentially just soya beans – the beans are cooked and then fermented, to form an oblong-like shape that is usually sliced before frying and serving. It’s a delicious meat-alternative and is packed full of protein.

Where did it come from?

Tempeh originates from Indonesia – the first documented uses of it were in the 1800s, though it was not popularised across Europe until the latter part of the 1900s. Thanks to the area’s weather conditions, soya beans grow prolifically; meaning tempeh is an easy-to-source, cheap and extremely popular food. It’s believed that the fermented dish was invented as an alternative to meat for the poorer citizens, and is less regularly seen listed on menus in the capital because it’s dubbed a ‘peasant food’.

Nutrition 101

According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), 100g of tempeh contains approximately:
Calories: 192 kcal
Carbohydrates: 7.64g
Protein: 20.29g

It’s also said to be a great source of:

  • B vitamins, riboflavin and niacin – which support your metabolism and are believed to help improve eyes and skin health, too.
  • Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids – these healthy fats help stabilise blood pressure and maintain heart health.
  • Copper and manganese – both of which are said to help improve collagen synthesis and make wounds heal faster, as well as assisting brain function, also.
Cooking with tempeh

Tempeh is most commonly seen marinated and fried, but it can be cooked in a whole myriad of ways. Why not try grilling, steaming, boiling, or roasting – or crumble it into a salad or sauce, to give your dish an added protein boost.

Sweet and sour tempeh

A simple Asian-inspired sauce can take away the subtle bitterness that plain tempeh is occasionally guilty of, and replace it with an abundance of rich, zingy flavours. Mix together soy sauce, rice vinegar, a little crushed garlic, ketchup, a sprinkle of brown sugar, a little water and a sprinkle of cornflour to create a sticky sauce. Thinly slice a slab of tempeh, and add it to a pan along with a little vegetable broth. Allow it to simmer for a few minutes, to soften the tempeh, then remove the broth, and add small chunks of pineapple, red, green and yellow bell pepper slices and a finely diced red onion to the pan. Once the vegetables have cooked, stir through the sweet and sour sauce, and cook for a further few minutes, before serving on a bed of freshly-cooked rice.

Tempeh chilli

A good bowl of chilli ‘warms the cockles’, as they say. For tempeh chilli, add a little olive oil, a diced red onion, a few crushed garlic cloves, and a crumbled packet of tempeh to a large pan (make sure you’ve got a lid for it, as you’ll need it later). Cook the ingredients over a medium heat until they’ve softened slightly. Add a tin of red kidney beans, a tin of black beans, some diced tomatoes, diced red chilli, a little black pepper and your favourite mild spices, then pour in around 500ml water. Leave the chilli to simmer for an hour, with the lid on the pan. Once cooked, sprinkle with fresh coriander and serve.

Lemon and garlic tempeh salad

For a fresh, summery take on tempeh, whisk together lemon juice, a little tamari, some crushed garlic, a pinch of black pepper, a good glug of olive oil and a small spoonful of agave syrup to create a zesty marinade. Cut a block of tempeh into small cubes and stir them into the marinade. Leave the tempeh to sit for an hour or two. Then bake the cubes in the oven, until they are soft and lightly browned on the edges. Mix together shredded lettuce, rocket, baby spinach leaves, tenderstem broccoli, grated carrot and finely sliced tomatoes, and top with the cubes of lemony tempeh. Drizzle with a little pesto, before serving.

Tempeh Tacos

For a healthy take on a Mexican classic, add soy sauce, lemon juice, maple syrup, crushed garlic, salt and pepper to a bowl and stir well. Lay small chunks of tempeh in the mixture and leave for a few hours to marinade. Cook the tempeh over a medium heat for 10 minutes, until browned. Lay the tempeh chunks over large lettuce leaves, and top with vegan cheese, avocado, tomato salsa and serve with a chunk of lime.

How homemade tempeh works

Making tempeh at home isn’t as difficult as it may seem, as it only take three ingredients: soya beans, vinegar (usually apple cider vinegar or average white vinegar) and a spoonful of tempeh starter. The tempeh starter is a culture called Rhizopus oligosporus, which, when mixed with the vinegar and beans, will cause the mixture to ferment and hence create tempeh.

It’s not all soya

Though the original version of tempeh calls for soya beans, you can easily mix things up and use another bean or legume. Why not try:

  • Black beans
  • Chickpea
  • Lentils
  • Sunflower seeds

Find lots of information on ingredient alternatives in our glossary.

Subscribe to the magazine for more essential guides.

The post Essential Guide To Tempeh appeared first on PlantBased Magazine.

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Step by Step Beetroot Ravioli with Almond Ricotta and Chives

This stunning, magenta Beetroot Ravioli with Almond Ricotta and Chives makes a lovely dish for entertaining. Filled with creamy almond ricotta and flavoured with fresh chives, it needs nothing more than a drizzle of olive oil and some freshly cracked black pepper to finish it off.

Not sure of an ingredient? Check out out our glossary.

Subscribe to the magazine for lots more recipes!

The post Step by Step Beetroot Ravioli with Almond Ricotta and Chives appeared first on PlantBased Magazine.

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Meals in Minutes – Smoky Jackfruit Cowboy Chilli

This rich, smoky jackfruit cowboy chilli is perfect for a crowd. It also makes an ideal dish to freeze and have on hand for an easy, microwavable lunch for home or work. Serve with rice, tortilla chips or warm flatbreads.

Top Tip – Any leftover, cooled chilli can be frozen, in tubs or bags, for up to 3 months. Defrost thoroughly and reheat until piping hot before serving.

Not sure of an ingredient? Check out out our glossary.

Subscribe to the magazine for lots more recipes!

The post Meals in Minutes – Smoky Jackfruit Cowboy Chilli appeared first on PlantBased Magazine.

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Plant Milks

These three tasty plant-based milks offer a variation on the standard varieties available in supermarkets. The beauty about making your own milk is knowing exactly what it contains – plus, you’re eliminating waste at the same time. No need for any tetra packs here!

The post Plant Milks appeared first on PlantBased Magazine.

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Golden Turmeric Milk

Turmeric has a lot of beneficial health-boosting properties. Try making this golden milk at home, to soothe your body from the inside out.

The post Golden Turmeric Milk appeared first on PlantBased Magazine.

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Chocolate, Lemon & Turmeric Cookies

Try making these tasty Chocolate, Lemon & Turmeric cookies at home. Turmeric has a lot of beneficial health-boosting properties. These are also gluten-free and nut free, so perfect for putting in your kid’s lunchboxes.

The post Chocolate, Lemon & Turmeric Cookies appeared first on PlantBased Magazine.

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Focaccia

Make this delicious focaccia at home to impress your friends and family.

The post Focaccia appeared first on PlantBased Magazine.

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Keep your skin happy and healthy throughout the summer and protect your skin

When the sun comes out, we’re all guilty of digging out our favourite pair of shorts and dusting off a trusted tank top to ensure we can enjoy the hot weather in all its glory. However, over time the sun’s UV rays can seriously harm our skin, which can lead to chronic diseases, such as cancer. Although it is vital to take precautions, such as limiting time in direct sunlight, wearing hats and sunglasses, and of course smothering our skin in factor 50, our diet can also help to keep us safe in the summer sun.

Nuts and seed
Snacking on a handful of nuts and seed each day can bring a variety of benefits, such as supplying your body with fibre, protein, and vitamins, while also delivering slow-release energy. Walnuts, hemp seeds, flax seeds all contain omega-3 essential fatty acids, which help our bodies cope with stress caused by prolonged sun exposure. Omega-3 also works as an anti-inflammatory, too.

Watermelon
Lycopene is a natural pigment that gives certain fruit and veg, such as watermelon, tomatoes and papayas, their bright red colour. As lycopene absorbs both UVA and UVB radiation, scientists have suggested if enough is consumed over a number of weeks, it can act as a sunblock. This means that reaching for a slice for a healthy snack or blending a few cubes up in a juice can help to protect your skin against sun damage. However, it is important to still wear sunblock and to take other necessary precautions to protect yourself from the sun.

Avocados
Is there anything this delicious fruit cannot do? Avos are well known for being high in good fats, which are essential for maintaining healthy, flexible and moisturised skin. Studies have suggested that they contain compounds that can protect your skin from UV light and sun damage. Avocados are also high in vitamin E, which protects skin against oxidative damage and combines with vitamin C – a vitamin essential for the production of collagen.

Green tea
In 2010, a study found that a flavanol – known as EGCG – found in both green and black tea led to fewer tumours induced by UV light in mice (ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). EGCG has been linked to preventing DNA damage from UV rays, while also killing systemic bacterial inflammation for smoother, toned skin. Green tea will also keep you hydrated in warmer weather; each day, we should aim to drink 1.2 litres of water to reduce the appearance of dark under-eye circles and dry skin.

Blueberries
These small-but-mighty berries are packed with antioxidants that fight off free radicals that can damage skin through sun exposure. By neutralising some of the harmful free radicals, blueberries help to safeguard DNA, preventing the development of diseases, such as cancer. As they contain high levels of vitamin C, they will also work to prevent wrinkles. If you want to eat particularly powerful blueberries, go foraging to find a wild variety.

The post 5 foods to protect your skin appeared first on PlantBased Magazine.

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