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A special restaurant out of the town of Kunming. Can you guess what it is like?

This guy was chosen from the tank four our lunch.

Into the pot on the table it went.

The fish cooked under the cone. The cover came off when the fish was done.

The last to get eaten was th head which our local friend relished. The tail was eagerly taken by another of our Chinese friends. This type of restaurant is called a “fish stone pot”.

After all the fish was eaten vegetables, tofu, and local mushrooms went into the broth to finish off a tasty meal. I was stuffed.

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A back strap loom with the finest hand spun warp. The threads are single not doubled as usual for strength during weaving. Very fine thread. We saw the woman spinning it from wool fleece.  [click photos to enlarge]

Isn’t this a wonderful bamboo stick for holding the heddles? I wanted to buy one but the weavers husband said I could make it myself.

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This little group was spinning along the road as we drove by. What they were doing was putting extra twist in synthetic yarn which had become popular. We are in Butuo County in the mountains for a few days. Interesting to see some ethnic dress especially hats and head gear along with Western clothes. This was our first sight of weaving stuff being done. [click photos to enlarge]

In the little spinning group was this grandma stitching two layers of wool fabric together. It was beautiful. She also had a toddler under her eye. I discovered that most of the young spinners had babies on their backs.

The stitching the grandma was doing. Later we saw someone in a shop stitching the cloth together with a sewing machine.

My favorite spinner had a baby under the shawl on her back I discovered when we were about to leave.

This little guy was hanging around the spinners. He and his sister were playing at weaving with two sticks holding a few “warp” threads. It was clear they were learning by being around their mothers from the beginning.

Grandpa modeling his pants.

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We are In the town of Xichang pronounced something like she Chang in SW China in the Yi Minority Autonomous Prefecture to see the Yi textiles and culture. Today we went to the market and saw lots of unusual food displayed beautifully. I thought the squashes with a few blossoms were handsome.

Furry tofu caught my attention.

This man was unwrapping individual cherries. They were wrapped separately before ripe to keep the birds from destroying the crop.
These were said to be the juiciest and best tomatoes. They looked great. I hope we get to eat some.

It looked like French fries catching the drippings under these ducks. Look carefully to see the cleaver at the ready.

WHAM!

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My treasure. from the Yi people of China. This is a case for needles. One uses a safety pin to attach it to the clothes.  [click photos to enlarge]

Close up of the needle case part.

Two needle cases opened so you can put I. The needle. Closed you pull it down to enclose the needle.

Detail of decoration the needle case is attached to Off quickly for another day of shopping.

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Last day in Hangzhou. I went to sit with my piece in the show for the last time before a busy day. I’m going to go through the day briefly. Each place could be its own post.

We took a mini bus for the day’s events. First stop was to a Chinese medicine facility. People brought in their prescriptions to be filled. Odd looking things were in cases for sale as well. It was in an old building with old character.

Nearby was a Chinese medicine museum with lots of history and old exhibits. This guy was impressive.

Then we drove to the art academy where we were treated to box lunches by the art professor who was in charge of the exhibition. He said nice things about my piece.

We were taken on a walking tour of the fantastic campus. The architect is a famous Japanese man and the campus won the top award for architecture. I hope to do a whole post on different different buildings.

The arts and craft building was stupendous. This outer wall is covered in roof tiles that are wired together.

Here is the roof tile wall looking out from the inside.

On the bus passing tea plantations on the way to an enormous temple.

Quite a special place this is.

There were huge carvings in the cliffs on path to the temple.

There are 5 huge temples each with giant statues. I was pretty exhausted and probably didn’t give them the attention they deserved.

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One evening we took a walk to see the sunset on a lake near the hotel. We weren’t the only ones.

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Our finished projects in the “ash resist workshop “. We didn’t use any ash. “Ash” is the English translation for the word for the type a paste we used on our stencils. The paste was made of soybean powder and quick lime mixed with water. Here we are with our translator. At first I thought she was saying rust but finally we figured out she was saying rice. She did a fine job though. [click photos to enlarge]

Here I am cutting my stencil. I chose a simple one that I thought I could do.

The teacher is beginning to put the paste on my stencil.

My cloth is soaking in water before dying in the indigo dye.

The cloth comes out green right out of the indigo vat. In the air it turns blue.

Here I am with the teachers. When the cloth was dry after dying we scratched off the paste.

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The workshop on safflower dying. At the end we had to dry the fabrics before cutting into samples for everyone. [click photos to enlarge]

We all crowded around the teacher. The main color we were looking for was red.

Samples were cut for everyone at the end. We were surprised to be able to get so many colors from the safflowers. Our teacher was an expert.

Orange was the last color to come. By then everyone was in a good mood. It was a wonderful workshop.

Here I am with my translator for the safflower workshop. She did great explaining everything including the changing pH.

Another workshop showed how those glorious colors on old Chinese robes were dyed with natural dyes. The color system was based on 5 colors. Red, blue, yellow, green, and purple.

Here are the colors. Different shades of colors were worn according to the rank of the person.

Translations were awkward. I finally figured out that they were talking about the tops of acorns. What they called them was “the tops of oak tree fruits”. Rhubarb wasn’t as hard as one would think. Smoked plum took awhile to “get”.

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Cathy and I took a walk in a lovely park near the Chinese National Silk Museum after breakfast.

The waterfalls was too beautiful in the morning not to forget.

A few more steps and the scene is still too beautiful to pass up.

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