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Just to share a little bit of a context. I just got married in the begging of June and me and my wife are planning to buy a 2 bedroom apartment in the city we live in (Cluj-Napoca, Romania, Europe). We both have very good jobs (me in IT, her in marketing) and were wondering about the context of buying a house now.

What would you guys say?

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I recently started making good money and looking for ways to invest my money. I'm looking into buying some index but I am anticipating the market to at least dip quite a bit. Are other people waiting for a possible crash or dip for a good moment to buy in?

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I love the concept of passively investing spare change from everyday transactions. Why isn't it available in Europe? Is it because of regulations or something else?

I've tried searching quite a lot and have only found an Estonian bank 'LHV' have something like this - but I think its only available if you're below 25.

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So i'm a FIRE novice from Croatia and since i realistically can't invest into anything here, i had an idea. Why wouldn't i invest into Vanguard index fund or something like that, via Revolut which is based in UK. Would that be possible and what would be the down side?

I know Revolut said last year they would offer investing baked right into their app with no commission per trade, but to this day there's still nothing of the sort...

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I am particularly interested in BAC and Wells Fargo given their current valuation. I am not sure if I am exposing myself to too much currency risk than the global ETF that also trade US stocks. What are your thoughts on this? do you own US banks in your portfolio?

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Right now, I am able to set aside 450€ monthly - Living in my home country.

But recently it became some-what of trend for young people from my country to move to Germany/Ireland and work low-skilled jobs, usually for minimum wage or maybe a bit higher than mw.

I'm doubtful I'd be saving much more than 500€ per month, and I'm hesitant to accept such proposals from my friends asking me to come there.

Taking in to a consideration housing/food/necessities would I be able to save more than 500€ monthly living some-what frugally in Ireland or Germany? Thanks.

(I'm not college educated and have no special skills or knowledge)

My goal is to apply for a college in the next 2-3 years. That's why my main priority is to save as much money as possible to support myself through my studies.

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Hi all.

I live in Germany and would like to open a Sparplan to keep things nice and simple.

Invest around €500 monthly at Consorsbank is the plan.

The two I have my eye on are:

Xtrackers MSCI World Index UCITS ETF 1C - 80%

and

Xtrackers MSCI Emerging Markets UCITS ETF 1C - 20%

Does this seem ok? Are these two fine? How about the percentage I am putting into each?

Your help is much appreciated!

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Hi there helpful and knowledgeable people,

Sorry for the very basic questions - but I'm trying to get my head around some investment principles and also a foreign language at the same time. Would anyone mind giving me a few pointers?

I'm looking at les Fonds d'épargne-pension on Spaargids/guide-épargne: https://www.guide-epargne.be/epargner/fonds-d-epargne-pension/comparer.html?order_by=performance10&order_dir=desc

I'm not clear on the following:

  • The "rendement annuel" over 1, 3, 5, 10 years. Is this telling me what my annual return on the total invested will be after e.g., 10 years? Does this mean that if I contribute 960 EUR each year, and the return in year 10 is 8.17%, then in year 10 I will receive (960 x 10 x 0.0817 =) 784.32 EUR into the fund?

  • Depending how this all works, I'm not sure how to figure out which is the 'best' one. I *think* that I can get an approximate comparison in a sense by taking each fund's annual return percentage and subtracting the "frais sur encours" (TER) percentage. For example, 8.17% - 1.32% = an approximate 'real' return of 6.85 for that year. Is that correct, or too easy? [Edit: realized that I would NOT subtract the 'frais d'entree, because that is a percentage of the contribution (e.g., 3% of 960), if I have understood correctly].

Thank you!

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I bumped into this question, "What financial information do you wish was more commonly known?", in the bogleheads forum. I found it a really interesting read and am curious of what the community in this subreddit thinks.

here is the comment from the OP

With personal finance and investing information (index over active, fees matter, etc) becoming more widespread, what are some areas in finance that you wish more people knew about or paid attention to?

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