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In the Times Union, Dave Lombardo take a look at the state’s Census 2020 Complete Count Advisory Commission, tasked with recommending how the state should promote census outreach efforts. From the report, Lombardo writes “Long overdue recommendations from a special commission tasked with shaping New York’s Census outreach effort may materialize in a few months.

The delay is just one aspect of the drama encircling the state’s Complete Count Commission, which was formed months late, has devolved into factions and generated concerns that it’s a symbolic vessel steered by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo.”

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In the Gotham Gazette, from Ethan Geringer-Sameth “Established during budget negotiations earlier this year, the Public Campaign Finance Commission is mandated to create a voluntary system for statewide and state legislative candidates to receive public matching funds in exchange for meeting certain fundraising and spending criteria.

The commission is responsible for issuing a report with recommendations by December 1 and holding a public hearing on its findings. The recommendations become binding if lawmakers, who will be out of session, don’t act to modify them within 20 days of their release.”

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At State of Politics,  Nick Reisman reports “(t)he future of the state’s campaign finance laws will be in the hands of 10 people, including the state Democratic Committee chairman, a top former attorney for Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Bronx civil court judge and a longtime election law lawyer.

Cuomo, along with the top lawmakers in the Assembly and Senate named the bipartisan commission that will determine how to implement a system of publicly financed campaigns, with a report due by Dec. 1. The report has the force of law unless lawmakers return to Albany within 20 days of the report being issued to alter it.”

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In the Times Union, from Rachel Silberstein “A nine-member “fair elections” commission tasked with designing a statewide public matching system for political campaigns will be convened by the end of the week, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s office has confirmed.

Language in the 2019-2020 state budget created a panel of experts — to be appointed by the governor and leaders of the Senate and Assembly — to outline by Dec. 1 the parameters of a public financing program for all legislative and statewide elections, with an estimated cost of $100 million a year.”

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In Roll Call, Michael Macagnone takes a look at what New York and Texas are doing to prepare for the 2020 census: “New York and Texas could have the biggest swings in congressional representation after the 2020 census. New York is projected to lose two seats, and Texas could gain as many as three, according to forecasting by the nonpartisan consulting firm Election Data Services.

With the stakes so high, New York has organized a statewide effort backed by public funds to counter potential falloff. At the same time, Texas is taking a much less aggressive approach, with state officials largely leaving response drives to independent groups and communities.”

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In the Times Union, Rachel Silberstein discusses the impact of the Supreme Court’s decision to send the census citizenship question back to the federal district court.

“A failed census could miss as many as 350,000 New Yorkers,” said Jeffrey M. Wice, a fellow at SUNY Buffalo Law School and adviser to New York Counts 2020 coalition. “People are already distrusting of government. We really need to develop as great an effort as possible at the block and community level. We have only one chance to do this and the results last for a decade.”

Immigrant advocates and civic organizations have expressed concern that the state’s census outreach effort got off to a late start, and that $20 million allocated in the 2019-2020 state budget for census outreach funding was insufficient.”

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Mayor deBlasio and Speaker Corey Johnson agreed to add $14 million to the city’s  budget from the Mayor’s original proposal of $22 million. The city had already approved $4 million last year, bringing the new total to $40 million for census outreach, staffing, publicity and other purposes. Council Members Carlos Menchaca and Carlina Rivera, chairs of the council’s Census Task Force, helped develop the proposal to increase spending with the assistance of New York Counts 2020 and other advocates.

While New York State has appropriated $20 million for the census, no spending allocations have been announced.

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Gotham Gazette summarizes  the 17 ballot questions to be presented to voters, including a move to ranked choice voting and modifying the city councilmanic redistricting timetable in order to meet new deadlines for a June primary. Read Caitlyn Rosen’s account here.

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From David Lombardo at the Times Union: “It was an odd twist of New York law that resulted in Cynthia Nixon’s third-party bid in November against Assemblywoman Deborah Glick.

After losing the race for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, Nixon was looking for a means of getting off the Working Families Party line for governor. Her  options, under state law, were essentially limited to running for another office, moving, or dying.”

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From State of Politics, “a bill introduced this week by Sen. Mike Gianaris would schedule New York’s presidential primary for April 28.

https://www.nystateofpolitics.com/2019/06/bill-would-set-new-yorks-presidential-primary-for-april-28/

The primary would be the first presidential nominating contest in New York that takes place under the state’s new early voting law.”

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