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SONY CANADA PARTNERS WITH THE NEWS PHOTOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION OF CANADA FOR FREELANCER GRANT

Photographers use their cameras as tools of exploration, documentation and ultimately, as instruments of change.

Sony Canada and the News Photographers Association of Canada (NPAC) are proud to announce a partnership to offer a $5,000 CAD grant to assist with a freelance project by a Canadian photojournalist.

To ‘Be Alpha’ is to be a leader, to be an innovator, to stand out amongst the crowd – It represents everything Sony stands for as a brand.

The goal is to celebrate the photojournalism community while also shining a light on issues that Canadians are passionate about – diversity, conservation, equality and more.

Members of NPAC can receive up to $5,000 CAD along with Sony mirrorless cameras on loan for the duration of the project that must feature Canadian content or a Canadian subject that must be completed and submitted by March 31, 2020.

“We are very excited to partner with Sony to offer this amazing opportunity to NPAC members,” said Crystal Schick, NPAC president.

“There are many reasons why projects are often tough to start or to complete and financials are definitely one of them. We’re happy that we can help at least one deserving photographer share their passion and hard work and we look forward to seeing what they produce.”

Submission forms and rules are available in English and French.

Deadline for submissions is: June 15, 2019.

SONY CANADA PARTENAIRE DE L’ASSOCIATION DES PHOTOGRAPHES DU CANADA POUR UNE BOURSE POUR PHOTOGRAPHE INDÉPENDANT

Les photographes utilisent leurs caméras comme outils d’exploration, de documentation et, à terme, d’instruments de changement.

Sony Canada et l’Association des photographes de presse du Canada (APPC) sont fiers d’annoncer un partenariat visant à offrir une bourse de 5 000 $ CAN pour soutenir un projet indépendant réalisé par un photojournaliste canadien.

Être «Alpha», c’est être un leader, être un innovateur, se démarquer parmi la foule – Cela représente tout ce que Sony promouvoit en tant que marque.

Le but est de célébrer la communauté du photojournalisme tout en mettant en lumière les questions qui passionnent les Canadiens – la diversité, la conservation, l’égalité et plus encore.

Les membres de la APPC peuvent recevoir jusqu’à 5 000 $ CAN ainsi que des appareils photo sans miroir Sony prêtés pour la durée du projet. Les projets doivent comporter du contenu canadien ou un sujet canadien et doivent être complétés et soumis avant le 31 mars 2020.

«Nous sommes très heureux de nous associer à Sony pour offrir cette incroyable opportunité aux membres de la APPC» a déclaré Crystal Schick, présidente de APPC.

«Il existe de nombreuses raisons pour lesquelles les projets sont souvent difficiles à démarrer ou à mener à bien, notamment les finances. Nous sommes fiers de pouvoir aider au moins un photographe de talent à partager sa passion et son travail acharné et nous avons hâte de voir le résultat final.»

Les formulaires de soumission et les règles sont disponibles en français et anglais.

La date limite pour les soumissions est le 15 juin 2019.

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The News Photographers Association of Canada’s 2018 National Pictures of the Year Winners

Photojournalist of the Year – sponsored by The Canadian Press

Chris Donovan / Independent


Photograph of the Year – sponsored by Sony (Selected from all category first-place finishers)

Leah Hennel / Postmedia Calgary

This picture, in late August 2018, captures an eerie evening near Nipawin, Saskatchewan, at the road-side memorial for the Humboldt Broncos’ bus crash victims. Smoke from the B.C. forest fires dimmed the sunset and created a moody atmosphere as the Broncos were about to open their 2018 training camp. (Leah Hennel / Postmedia Calgary)

Student Photographer of the Year – sponsored by the Loyalist College

Andrej Ivanov / Loyalist College

National Clip Contest Winner

Darryl Dyck / Independent

Single Images

General News – sponsored by Cision

1. Leah Hennel / Postmedia Calgary – Humboldt Memorial
2. Carlos Osorio / Toronto Star – Ford Supporters
3. Cole Burston / for Getty images – Accident Cleanup
HM. Kayle Neis / Saskatoon StarPhoenix – Humboldt Stick Memorial

Spot News – sponsored by The Camera Store

1. Jonathan Hayward / The Canadian Press – Humboldt Bus Crash
2. Jeff McIntosh / for The Canadian Press – Plane Street landing
3. Martin Tremblay / La Presse- G7 Protes

Feature – sponsored by the Winnipeg Free Press

1. Andy Clark / Independent – Smokey Sunset on the Pier
2. Andrew Ryan / Winnipeg Free Press – Couple at Folkfest
3. Mark Blinch / for The Globe and Mail – Ballet Dancers
HM. Jason Franson / for The Canadian Press – Smokey Edmonton

Sports Action – sponsored by Nikon

1. Kevin Light / for the CBC – Canadian Bobsleigh
2. Mark Blinch / NBAE Getty Images – Westbrook under the hoop
3. Larry Wong / Edmonton Journal – Steer Wrestling
4. Rich Lam / for UBC – Rugby

Sports Feature – sponsored by Sony

1. Chris Donovan / Independent – Flint Jaguars team bus
2. Mark Blinch / for The Canadian Press – Frances Tiafoe
3. Chris Donovan / Independent – Flint basketball locker room

Social Issues – sponsored by Fujifilm

1. Chris Donovan / for Maclean’s – Boil order
2. Pieter de Vos/Independent – Evidence of Habitation
3. Chris Donovan /for The Globe and Mail – Assisted Suicide

Portrait / Personality – sponsored by Beau Photo

1. Darryl Dyck / for The Globe and Mail – Blood Services Volunteer
2. Leah Hennel / Postmedia Calgary – Nya Gatbel
3. Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press – Crystal Rondeau with Muscular Dystrophy
HM. Bernard Brault / La Presse – Elton John
HM. Jason Franson / for The New York Times – Houseboat Portrait

Pictorial – sponsored by Canon

1. Darryl Dyck / for The Canadian Press – Powerlines
2. Stephanie Foden / Independent – Volcano Fuego
3. Chris Pike / for The Wall Street Journal – Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque
HM. Cole Burston / for Bloomberg – Ambassador Bridge

Picture Story News – sponsored by the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

1. Chris Donovan / Independent – Waterless Generation
2. Ben Nelms / for Bloomberg – Oil Sands Aerials
3. Jesse Winter / The Star Vancouver – Wildfires and Flooding
HM. Chad Hipolito / for The Canadian Press – Aboriginal youth Basic Training Program

View the news picture stories.

Picture Story Feature – sponsored by Epson

1. Mark Blinch / for The Globe and Mail – 2018 Youth America Grand Prix Regional Semi-Finals
2. Carlos Osorio / Toronto Star – Edna Rose
3. Jason Franson / for The Globe and Mail – Branding
HM. Martin Tremblay / La Presse – Determined to Rebound

View the feature picture stories.

Picture Story International – sponsored by Leica

1. Chris Donovan / Independent – Nairobi Ice Lions
2. Chris Donovan / Independent – Flint Jaguars
3. Kevin Light / for the CBC – PyeongChang

View the international picture stories.

Single Multimedia – sponsored by Vistek

1. Mikaela Mackenzie / Winnipeg Free Press – One dog at a time
2. Mikaela Mackenzie / Winnipeg Free Press – Sisterly Love
3. Melissa Tait / The Globe and Mail – Guardian Angels rugby team

View all multimedia.

Team Multimedia – sponsored by Thomson Reuters

1. Enough
  Director: Brent Foster / Foster Visuals
  Producer: Tammy Foster / Foster Visuals
  Director of Photography: Pawel Dwulit
  Fixers: Evelyn Kahungu & George Kihara
  Gaffer/Key Grip: Maciej Kulpa
  Sound Recordist: Ednah Bonareri Momanyi
  Editor: Shane Patrick Ford
  Music: David Chapdelaine

2. Fentanyl and the 14th Floor: The life and death of Justin Lidstone
  Photographer, Videographer, Editor, Producer: Anne-Marie Jackson / Toronto Star
  Writer, Producer: Emily Mathieu / Toronto Star

3. The Breaking Point
  Photographer, Videographer, Editor, Producer: Anne-Marie Jackson / Toronto Star
  Writer, Producer: Robert Cribb / Toronto Star

View all multimedia.

Student Multimedia – sponsored by Nikon

Shelby Lisk / Loyalist College

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2018 NPOY PORTRAIT, Finalist – Crystal Rondeau in her home in St. Andrews, Manitoba, August 17, 2018. Crystal was admitted to the Children’s Hospital over 300 times from the time she was three until she was 18 because of her muscular dystrophy. She is an advocate and speaker for people with disabilities. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)

I got the opportunity to meet Crystal while working on a feature at the Children’s Hospital. Ben Waldman was writing a story about the Children’s Hospital Television program and was talking to patients who had been following the TV show.

Since Crystal had spent her childhood in and out of the hospital, she had many stories to share about her time there. We talked about her writing, videos, and activism dedicated to demystifying illness and disability. What struck me most during my time with her was her strength and openness. Ben, Crystal, and I spent the afternoon talking while intermittently taking photos, having that time to connect really helped.

Technically, the photo wasn’t very difficult to take, when I walked into the room, I asked if I could turn off the overhead lights and open the curtains, which gave me more interesting natural light to work with. Crystal was lovely to work with. I hope that this photo shows some of her awesome personality and style.

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2018 NPOY SPOT NEWS, Finalist – The wreckage of a fatal crash outside Nipawin, Saskatchewan, is seen April, 7, 2018. A bus carrying the Humboldt Broncos hockey team crashed into a truck en route to Nipawin for a game Friday night killing 16 and sending over a dozen more to hospital. (Jonathan Hayward / The Canadian Press)

The Humboldt bus crash has been one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to cover.  To this day I still think about it.

I had just finished a week of covering the missing and murdered women inquiry in Richmond, B.C.  It was around 6pm pacific time, I was looking forward to spending the weekend with my family after an already trying and sad week of work.

As I arrived home, I thought of checking my phone once more before logging off for the weekend. That’s when I saw a CBC news alert saying something like “bus carrying hockey team in serious accident”.  It mentioned it was in Saskatchewan.  I got an immediate sick feeling in my stomach that this wasn’t good. A quick twitter search and I found a picture of a mangled bus.

I asked my wife to grab my bag as I jumped on the computer to find flights.  I found one leaving YVR in an hour and a half. I live about one hour from the airport, there was no time to waste. I was packed and out the door in 8 minutes.

I touched down in Regina and booked a hotel at the airport to organize my plan of action and get some sleep before beginning what I knew would be an arduous assignment. Incoming reports indicated there was no way anyone was going to be able to get near the crash any time soon.  I spent the next several hours in my hotel room calling every helicopter service in the area trying to secure any type of aircraft that could get me to the site.

At about 3am, I got up and started to follow up with the air craft providers while making the several hour drive to the area of the crash. By day break I was at the road block about 30km away from the crash.  Persistent phone calls and emails to every helicopter company in Saskatchewan finally paid off when I got a call back saying that I could get in the air but would have to get the chopper to come in from two hours away.  I calculated that was going to get expensive with two hours to get to my location, two hours return plus my time of coverage.   I decided to offer a pool to any tv station willing to pay into this expense.  I called CBC, CTV, Global and explained who I was and what I was doing and offered to split the cost. The chopper was on its way.

When the chopper finally arrived, it was minus 27 degrees. It was a 22 min flight to the crash, and we needed to take the doors off so I could shoot. The pilot decided we would get as close as possible, land, take the doors off then do the shoot.

I was tired and cold but when I first saw the site of the accident I felt nothing.  The scene was unexplainable, there was debris everywhere, I couldn’t tell what was what. Twenty four years in the business and I was truly overwhelmed by what I was seeing.  At that moment it hit me how big this story was and that I was the only one getting to see it and bringing the images to the world. No one else had a chopper, no one else had been able to get as close to the site. I had to document this the best I could.  I went from wide angle shots of the prairies and the roads to 400mm zoom of the crash details.  I knew this was going to be the only opportunity that anyone could see this.  While in the air and shooting, I was direct transmitting back to the office in Toronto and the picture desk was captioning my images and getting them out.

We landed and I was then hit with what the next few days of coverage were going to bring and what I would see.  To say that it was overwhelming is an understatement.  For the next 10 days, I witnessed the emotional memorial at the Broncos home arena, I met with family members and covered a birthday party for a victim the day before his parents held his funeral.  This assignment was hard, the images were hard.  However, I believe the coverage was and is needed: helping experts recreate the scene; helping parents try to make sense of the events; sharing with the world a parent worst nightmare and bringing people from around the world together to express their thoughts and prayers.

I hope I never have to witness anything like this again.

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2018 NPOY SOCIAL ISSUES, Finalist – Audrey Parker holds her friend’s hand as she says goodbye in her apartment before dying by medically assisted death.

Medical assistance in dying became legal in Canada in 2016 and the current laws require patients to provide consent while of sound mind on the day of the lethal injection. Parker had terminal breast, bone and brain cancer and decided to take her own life. However she decided to die sooner than she would have liked because she was worried that the brain cancer would eventually impede her ability to provide consent. (Chris Donovan for The Globe and Mail)

Shooting Audrey Parker’s last party before her medically assisted death was one of the strangest assignments I’ve ever done.

Obviously the subject matter was sort of strange and difficult but what was weirder was that I was able to get access to this important story because of connections made as an infant.

I first heard Audrey’s story on CTV. The story: there was a Nova Scotia woman who was to die by medically assisted death earlier than she hoped because the brain cancer that was killing her would eventually impede her ability to give sound-mind consent on the day of the lethal injection – something currently required by law. Audrey hoped to change this law and I immediately believed it was an important story.

I grew up in the Maritimes and return to tell stories from there quite frequently. So it wasn’t strange for me to decide to reach out to someone like Audrey and try to help share her story. Although when I heard her name on the news, it sounded familiar for some reason but I couldn’t quite put my finger on why.

I spoke to my parents on the phone later that night and one of the first things they said to me was, “Did you hear about Audrey Parker?” 

That’s when I realized that I recognized the name from my parents’ stories. Audrey was married to my uncle Michel, my mother’s brother, when I was a baby. The Maritimes are so small that this sort of thing is not exactly uncommon but it still felt like a strange coincidence.

This strengthened my desire to tell Audrey’s story. I reached out to her through social media and then headed to Halifax to cover her last week of life for The Globe and Mail.

Audrey had a strange relationship with my family. She and my uncle had had a very messy divorce and I only knew her from the stories. As she was entering her last week on this earth, she had pretty well come to terms with most of her life and was very happy to see me despite what I’m sure are some difficult memories.

I visited her with Jessica Leeder, a fantastic writer for The Globe based in Halifax. Later that day we attended the last party she gave for friends and family before cutting herself off from everyone but her closest loved ones as the final day approached.

The party was a weirdly intimate affair as I watched my uncle say goodbye to someone who was once the love of his life. To make things even weirder, one of my aunts-by-marriage on my father’s side was one of Audrey’s best friends and was in attendance as well.

The whole thing really put into context what a small community the Maritimes can be and how a death like this can affect so many in so many different ways.

The nominated image was taken as some old friends of Audrey’s said goodbye for the last time before heading home as the party began to wind down in the early hours of the morning.

I’m very grateful to Audrey and her family and The Globe for allowing me to cover this story as it was not just a normal assignment. It was a way for me to connect with someone from a past life and that was a truly special experience.

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2018 NPOY SPORTS ACTION, Finalist – Evan Spady competes in the Steer Wrestling event at the 2018 Rainmaker Rodeo and Exhibition held in St. Albert, Alberta, May 25, 2018. (Larry Wong / Postmedia Edmonton)

It started out as a warm sunny evening, blue skies and not a cloud in sight. I was assigned to photograph the annual St. Albert Rainmaker Rodeo.

I decided to challenge myself a little so I brought my newly-acquired Sony A7 III mirrorless camera, a 70-200mm f2.8 lens with 1.4X teleconverter, and sat in the stands with the rodeo spectators.

Photographing black animals and cowboys wearing hats is always a challenge. But the steer wrestler I captured in this photo was illuminated perfectly by the setting sun’s rays. The dry dusty conditions provided the ideal clean background to eliminate background distractions.

Shortly after I captured this image, the weather changed dramatically. Dark black clouds rolled in, the wind whipped up the dry, dusty rodeo arena, and lightning strikes began in the distance. Before I could even start chimping, it started raining.

Some of the fans left the stands and scurried for cover. Then the rain became a torrential downpour and almost everyone cleared the spectator stands. But as they say, the show must go on, and the rodeo continued. I had not brought any rain protection, for myself or for my camera and was already drenched from head to toe so I thought I might as well stay and keep shooting.

I was a little worried about damaging my new camera but also thought that this would be a perfect opportunity to test the weather sealing. I had read that these new Sony mirrorless cameras were not sealed very well for inclement weather. But after shooting in a torrential rainstorm for at least half an hour, I was surprised that my camera and lens continued to work perfectly, even on such dark and stormy night.

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2018 NPOY PICTORIAL, Finalist – The Fuego volcano in Guatemala makes an eruption, May 5, 2018, just one month before an eruption that killed dozens. Another eruption in November 2018 forced the evacuation of 4,000 residents. Fuego is one of Central America’s most active volcanoes. (Stephanie Foden)

I was doing a travel story on hiking up the Acatenango volcano (Fuego’s nonactive neighbour), a gruelling hike to the top as I didn’t have proper hiking boots. At some point, my head was spinning because of the high altitude.

I started the hike in shorts and by the time I reached the top, I was wearing multiple layers, a winter coat and a hat.

Earlier in the day, the eruptions were small, but by the time the sun set, they had increased in intensity. At blue hour (my favourite time to shoot) I set up a little Gorilla Pod I had brought with me and waited for a photograph.

I never knew when an eruption could occur so I laid down on the ground covered in layers of clothing waiting for something to happen. It seemed dangerous and I questioned our safety, as well as the well-being of the Guatemalans living nearby.

Later that night, the writer Joel Balsam (who is also my partner) and I attempted to sleep in a little tent. But from both the cold and the cracking sounds of the volcano, it was impossible.

Just a few weeks later, Fuego had a massive eruption that killed more than 190 people.

It was incredible to witness such force of nature up close but my heart aches for all those affected.

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TOP PHOTOJOURNALISTS RECOGNIZED AT LARGEST PHOTOJOURNALISM COMPETITION IN CANADA

VANCOUVER, BC: Great photos tell stories. They transcend language and cultural barriers and speak to basic human nature. A great photo is a snapshot of time that can reveal some of our most profound tales of joy, heartbreak and other telling moments of day-to-day life.

Today the News Photographers Association of Canada (NPAC) is pleased to recognize the excellence represented in submissions by 135 of Canada’s outstanding photojournalists by announcing the finalists in the twelfth annual National Pictures of the Year (NPOY) awards competition.

Over 2,000 photographs along with 22 multimedia productions from across Canada were entered in this year’s competition, representing a spectacular body of work.

The nominated photographs can be viewed online at npac.ca and as a featured exhibition during the Capture Photography Festival at the Pendulum Gallery in Vancouver, British Columbia, from April 1 – 26, 2019. Opening reception on Thursday April 11, 2019.

These images will also be exhibited as part of the Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival at First Canadian Place in Toronto, Ontario, from May 13 – May 31, 2019. Opening reception, Thursday May 16, 2019.

The winners of each category including 2018 Photojournalist of the Year, 2018 Photograph of the Year, 2018 Student Photographer of the Year, 2018 Student Multimedia of the Year, will be announced during the 2018 National Pictures of the Year Gala event to be held April 13, 2019, at the Polygon Gallery in North Vancouver, BC.

“Visuals are integral to storytelling. They humanize issues, put a face to victory, defeat, triumph and failure. Everyday, visual journalists tell these stories with great respect and dignity to those who let us into their lives. I’m thrilled to announce these nominees for Canada’s top photojournalism honours,” said Cole Burston, NPAC President.

2018 NATIONAL PICTURES OF THE YEAR FINALISTS

(Nominees listed in alphabetical order)

Photojournalist of the Year – sponsored by The Canadian Press

Mark Blinch / Independent
Chris Donovan / Independent
Leah Hennel / Postmedia Calgary
Carlos Osorio / Independent

View the nominated portfolios.

Photograph of the Year – sponsored by Sony

To be announced at the 2018 National Pictures of the Year Awards Gala on April 13, 2019, in Vancouver.

Student Photographer of the Year – sponsored by Loyalist College

The deadline for student entries is April 1, 2019, and the winner will be announced at the 2018 National Pictures of the Year Awards Gala on April 13, 2019, in Vancouver.

National Clip Contest Winner

Darryl Dyck / Independent

General News – sponsored by Cision

Cole Burston / Getty images – Accident Cleanup
Leah Hennel / Postmedia Calgary – Humboldt Memorial
Kayle Neis / Saskatoon StarPhoenix – Humboldt Stick Memorial
Carlos Osorio / Toronto Star – Ford Supporters

Spot News – sponsored by The Camera Store

Jonathan Hayward / The Canadian Press – Humboldt Bus Crash
Jeff McIntosh / The Canadian Press – Airplane Street Landing
Martin Tremblay / La Presse – G7 Protest

Feature – sponsored by the Winnipeg Free Press

Mark Blinch / The Globe and Mail – Ballet Dancers
Andy Clark / Independent – Smokey Sunset on the Pier
Jason Franson / The Canadian Press – Smokey Edmonton
Andrew Ryan / Winnipeg Free Press – Couple at Folkfest

Sports Action – sponsored by Nikon

Mark Blinch / NBAE Getty Images – Westbrook Under the Hoop
Rich Lam / UBC – Rugby
Kevin Light / CBC – Canadian Bobsleigh
Larry Wong / Edmonton Journal – Steer Wrestling

Sports Feature – sponsored by Sony

Mark Blinch / The Canadian Press – Frances Tiafoe
Chris Donovan / Independent – Flint Jaguars
Chris Donovan / Independent – Flint basketball

Social Issues – sponsored by Fujifilm

Pieter de Vos / Independent – Evidence of Habitation
Chris Donovan / The Globe and Mail – Assisted Suicide
Chris Donovan / Maclean’s Magazine – Boil order

Portrait / Personality – sponsored by Beau Photo

Bernard Brault / La Presse – Elton John
Darryl Dyck / The Globe and Mail – Blood Services Volunteer
Jason Franson / The New York Times – Houseboat Portrait
Leah Hennel / Postmedia Calgary – Nya Gatbel
Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press – Crystal Rondeau

Pictorial – sponsored by Canon

Cole Burston / Bloomberg – Ambassador Bridge
Darryl Dyck / The Canadian Press – Power Lines
Stephanie Foden / Independent – Volcano Fuego
Chris Pike / The Wall Street Journal – Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque

Picture Story News – sponsored by the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

Chris Donovan / Independent – Waterless Generation
Chad Hipolito / The Canadian Press – Aboriginal youth Basic Training Program
Ben Nelms / Bloomberg – Oil Sands Aerials
Jesse Winter / The Star Vancouver – Wildfires and Flooding

View the nominated news picture stories.

Picture Story Feature – sponsored by Epson

Mark Blinch / The Globe and Mail – 2018 Youth America Grand Prix Regional Semi-Finals
Jason Franson / The Globe and Mail – Branding
Carlos Osorio / Toronto Star – Edna Rose
Martin Tremblay / La Presse – Determined to Rebound

View the nominated feature picture stories.

Picture Story International – sponsored by Leica

Chris Donovan / Independent – Flint Jaguars
Chris Donovan / Independent – Nairobi Ice Lions
Kevin Light / CBC – Pyeongchang

View the nominated international picture stories.

Single Multimedia – sponsored by Vistek

Mikaela Mackenzie / Winnipeg Free Press – Sisterly Love
Mikaela Mackenzie / Winnipeg Free Press – One Dog at a Time
Melissa Tait / The Globe and Mail – The Guardian Angels Rugby Team

View all nominated multimedia.

Team Multimedia – sponsored by Thomson Reuters

(Nominees listed in alphabetical order of title)

The Breaking Point
  Photographer, Videographer, Editor, Producer: Anne-Marie Jackson / Toronto Star
  Writer, Producer: Robert Cribb / Toronto Star

Enough
  Director: Brent Foster
  Producer: Tammy Foster
  Director of Photography: Pawel Dwulit
  Fixers: Evelyn Kahungu, George Kihara
  Gaffer/Key Grip: Maciej Kulpa
  Sound Recordist: Ednah Bonareri Momanyi
  Editor: Shane Patrick Ford
  Music: David Chapdelaine

Fentanyl and the 14th Floor: The life and death of Justin Lidstone
  Photographer, Videographer, Editor, Producer: Anne-Marie Jackson / Toronto Star
  Writer, Producer: Emily Mathieu / Toronto Star

View all nominated multimedia.

Student Multimedia – sponsored by Nikon

The deadline for student entries is April 1, 2019, and the winner will be announced at the 2018 National Pictures of the Year Awards Gala on April 13, 2019, in Vancouver.

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2018 NPOY Photojournalist of the Year – Sponsored by The Canadian Press

(This page loads a lot of photos. Please be patient.)

Listed in alphabetical order.

All of these portfolios contain single images and picture stories.

Mark Blinch / Independent

Chris Donovan / Independent

Leah Hennel / Postmedia Calgary

Carlos Osorio / Independent

The list of all 2018 NPOY nominees.

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2018 NPOY Picture Story Feature – Sponsored by Epson

(This page loads a lot of pictures. Please be patient.)

Listed in alphabetical order.

Mark Blinch / The Globe and Mail

Backstage at the 2018 Youth America Grand Prix Regional Semi-Finals dance competition in Toronto.

Jason Franson / The Globe and Mail

Branding season starts at Westman Farms in Vermilion, Alberta. Branding is used to identify livestock and prevent cattle rustling.

Carlos Osorio / Toronto Star

The forced eviction of Edna Rose, 77 years old, is a story of how three levels of government failed to prevent the closure of over 230 Firgrove Crescent homes in Toronto, and how public housing continues to be severely underfunded putting thousands of people at risk of relocation in a city with few places to go.

Martin Tremblay / La Presse

Determined To Rebound – This story begins with a failure, that of Rodner, Ralph and their friends who failed to get selected by their high school basketball team in Montreal North, a violent neighbourhood of Montreal.

Driven by their passion for basketball, they formed a team of young fighters who did not have it easy. Neither on the ground nor in life.

The list of all 2018 NPOY nominees.

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