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Last week there was a big announcement in the developer community: the GitHub Package Registry ✨😱. In this blog post we will cover some pros and cons of the registry and the expected impact in the Node.js ecosystem.

What is a package?

A package is a reusable piece of software which can be downloaded from a global registry into a developer’s local environment and included in application code. Because packages act as reusable “building blocks” and typically address common needs (such as API error handling), they can help reduce development time. An individual package may or may not depend on other packages; for example, you may wish to use a package called foo, which depends on another package called bar. Generally speaking, installing foo would automatically install bar as well as any additional dependencies.

What is a Package Manager?

A package manager lets you manage the dependencies (external code written by you or someone else) that your project needs to work correctly.

For JavaScript, the two most popular package managers are npm and yarn.

GitHub Package Registry

GitHub Package Registry is a package management service that makes it easy to publish public or private packages and is fully-integrated with GitHub. Everything lives in one place, so you can use the same search, browsing, and management tools to find and publish packages as you do for your repositories.

Pros
  • GitHub is cooperating with npm and other services to make sure tooling and workflows are maintained. It supports familiar package management tools: JavaScript (npm), Java (Maven), Ruby (RubyGems), .NET (NuGet), and Docker images, with more tools to come.
  • It’s multi-format: You can host multiple software package types in one registry.
  • Access is entirely based on Github authentication. You can you use the same credentials and permissions for both your application code and packages. Packages on GitHub inherit the visibility and permissions associated with the repository, and organizations no longer need to maintain a separate package registry and mirror permissions across systems.
  • It is possible to use Github as a private npm registry without having to create any new credentials or use new tooling.
  • Currently, the Github Package Registry is in limited-access beta and It’s free for both private and public packages during this period. Github has pledged that it will always be free for public packages and Docker images.
  • README content and package metadata will be rendered on a package listing page, like this one
  • You can set up webhook events for a package in order to be notified when it is published or updated.
  • The registry already has GraphQL and webhook support and can be used to make Github Actions, so you can fully customize your publishing and post-publishing workflows
  • It provides analytics for maintainers.
  • Ultimately, Github’s registry is backed up by Microsoft, which means it has the resources and funds to ensure ongoing maintenance.
Cons
  • Right now the registry is in limited beta, so a number of features are expected to arrive soon, but not yet available.
  • Not surprisingly, if your application code and packages all depend on Github, it becomes a single point of failure in the unlikely --but not impossible-- case that Github's own infrastructure experiences an outage or major issue.
  • When the beta period ends and the GitHub package registry becomes generally available, users will have to pay to publish and use private packages.
  • It can be confusing (and tedious) to migrate packages from other package managers.
  • GitHub only supports scoped packages for npm. e.g. npm install @nodesource/cool-package instead of npm install cool-package. So if you have non-scoped packages on npm and are considering using GitHub as your registry, the migration can be messy.
  • If you have your packages in multiple places like GitHub and npm, it’s possible that you will have different versions of the same package in both registries (with one version being slightly newer while the other is outdated). So it is a good practice to keep packages independent of the registry, or to use only one place to store your packages.
What does this mean for npm users?

npm configuration details can be found here
- If you want to install something published to Github and not npm, you will need a Github account and to authenticate with the npm client, providing an access token

What does it mean for me as a maintainer of a public npm package?
  • It could mean that you may want to publish your public packages to multiple registries, but it is not yet clear how best to do this.
  • You now have a choice for where to publish your packages between npm and github, defined by your package.json registry field.
  • The registry is compatible with npm and allows developers to find and publish their own packages, using the same GitHub interface they use for their code.
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N|Solid for AWS Lambda has a new Modules feature! This feature provides users with an up-to-date risk, compliance and security assessment report for installed packages and dependencies, with clear indicators of the overall risk level in your application. In addition to low-impact performance monitoring for Lambda functions, NodeSource now makes it easier to better understand the security and risk for third-party public packages used in your serverless applications.

This new feature is based on the NCM 2 Certification pipeline which also powers the NCM 2 CLI.

How does this work?

The Modules feature in N|Solid for AWS Lambda ispowered by the NCM 2 Certification Pipeline. It provides actionable insights about the risk levels that are present in third-party packages used in your Lambda functions. Using a series of tests, NodeSource checks packages from the npm registry and computes a score based on a number of weighted criteria.

N|Solid for AWS Lambda continuously scans your projects for existing security vulnerabilities, license concerns, code risk and code quality.

Existing N|Solid for AWS Lambda users will see a brand-new Modules tab in your application dashboard. Navigating to this tab will show you an up-to-date risk, compliance, quality and security assessment report.

Module List View

The Module List View delivers a higher-level overview of:
Modules used in the application
Warning flags for security vulnerability, compliance concern, or deprecated modules
A code risk indicator indicating the known risk level (low, medium, high, or critical) for each installed module

If a module was added to your function as a dependency of another module, hovering over the module name in the Module List View will show a tooltip indicating which modules required the dependency.

Module Details View

From the Module List View, you can click to view more details of an individual package, presented in the Module Details View:

This view provides a detailed account of each third-party module in your serverless function:

  • Module Name and Report Summary: A high level overview that delivers a quick summary of the module’s:
    • Risk Score
    • Number and severity of security vulnerabilities
    • Number of compliance concerns
    • Number of Risk Factors identified
  • Required By: A detailed list of dependency-paths that indicate which modules in your function’s dependency require said module
  • Security Vulnerability Report: A list of known security vulnerabilities, their severity and link to the Snyk report
  • Compliance Report: A list of known compliance concerns which NodeSource believes has elevated legal and/or security implications. The license score is intended to indicate that a given module has a license which is permissible for use, allows redistribution and modification, and does not require source disclosure.
  • Module Risk: The Risk group is for criteria which are intended to indicate whether a package's usage or installation may be abnormally risky
  • Code Quality: The Quality group is for criteria which are intended to indicate whether a package is consistent with good open-source practices.
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Node.js v. 12.2.0 was shipped, and GitHub launched a package registry!

Check this week’s Need to Node to keep up to date with the latest news in Node.js project, events, and awesome articles. You are always welcome to collaborate and participate!

What’s New in the Node.js Project
  • Node 12.2.0 (Current) Released . Time flies! Node.js v.12 was shipped very recently and now v12.2.0 is here 😱. No big features in this release, but there are some minor changes:
    • Node’s REPL now supports tab autocompletion of file paths used in fs methods.
    • Updated llhttp fixing a bug that made Node.js' HTTP parser refuse any request URL that contained the "|" character
    • You can now enabling tracing on TLSSocket and when using tls.createServer() to debug TLS related problems
    • There’s also a CLI option --trace-tls to enable tracing without having to edit your code
  • If you are interested in joining the second cohort of the mentorship program of Node.js, fill out this form. Hurry up! It closes on May 17, 2019.
  • Help is wanted for some compilation issues on multiple platforms in the node-v8 repo.
  • There is an issue for aligning Node.js User-Feedback - Node.js Outreach Meetup for interested folks willing to spin up Node Meetups across the globe and not to duplicate efforts.
  • In the TSC there is a discussion on the implications on the GitHub Package Manager for the Node.js organization.
Awesome Articles, Links, and Resources One Last Thing...

If you find any awesome Node.js or JavaScript things over the next week (or beyond!), never hesitate to reach out to us on Twitter at @NodeSource to share and get it included in Need to Node - our DMs are open if you don’t want to share publicly!

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Node.js v. 12.1.0 and 11.15.0 were shipped, there is a new Cross-Project Council representative within the new OpenJS Foundation, and enrollment in the second cohort of the mentorship program of Node.js closes soon!

Check this week’s Need to Node to keep up to date with the latest news in Node.js project, events, and awesome articles. You are always welcome to collaborate and participate!

What’s New in the Node.js Project Awesome Articles, Links, and Resources One Last Thing...

If you find any awesome Node.js or JavaScript things over the next week (or beyond!), never hesitate to reach out to us on Twitter at @NodeSource to share and get it included in Need to Node - our DMs are open if you don’t want to share publicly!

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This week news it’s all about Node.js v. 12 release!

Check this week’s Need to Node to keep up to date with the latest news in Node.js project, events, and awesome articles. You are always welcome to collaborate and participate!

What’s New in the Node.js Project
  • Introducing Node.js 12. The newest ‘current’ branch of Node.js upgrades to V8 version 7.4, which provides memory and performance improvements as well as support for private class fields. Highlights also include TLS 1.3 support, a change in default HTTP parser, diagnostic reports, and worker threads.
  • Node 12's New Experimental ES Modules Support. Node.js v. 8.9.0 shipped with experimental support for ES modules, and thanks to widespread industry support for ES modules in general, Node 12 adds a new implementation. ES module support without using the --experimental-modules option is expected to land by October of 2019 when Node 12 reaches LTS status.
  • In the Community Committee, there is an issue for creating a list of companies that use Node.js, potentially in order to feature these logos on nodejs.org. This would be independent from the application showcase, which also lives on the Foundation website.
  • In the package-maintenance repo, there is a list of packages that do not past tests in the latest LTS version. It is suggested that packages and any Node.js project, should upgrade to the latest LTS version.
  • In the User Feedback Committee, a feedback session has been proposed for May 13th in Portland, OR. The theme for this proposed session would be, "How does Node.js support your daily work?”
  • On the Collaborator Summit repo, there is a Summit topic proposal for security, modules, and Node.js. If you will be in Berlin on May 30-31, you should check this Summit!
Awesome Articles, Links, and Resources One Last Thing...

If you find any awesome Node.js or JavaScript things over the next week (or beyond!), never hesitate to reach out to us on Twitter at @NodeSource to share and get it included in Need to Node - our DMs are open if you don’t want to share publicly!

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This week’s news includes discussions about a new conference: Node Atlanta! And soon, Cross Project Council (CPC) representatives will be selected.

Check this week’s Need to Node to keep up to date with the latest news in Node.js project, events, and awesome articles. You are always welcome to collaborate and participate!

What’s New in the Node.js Project
  • There is an issue for engaging the community committee for new conference: Node Atlanta. They are looking to amplify their reach on social media, find speakers for workshops and sharing a blog post about the conference.
  • There is an ongoing discussion for nominations of Cross Project Council (CPC) representatives. At the end of the month, the selected representatives will be announced. Stay tuned!
  • There is a checklist for next steps on Support levels in package.json. If you are interested in contributing to the package, check this issue!
  • Members of the security working group are discussing automating index generation to lower the barrier of entry to end-users.
  • There is a feature request for Support Map and Set in N-API and node-addon-api.
Awesome Articles, Links, and Resources One Last Thing...

If you find any awesome Node.js or JavaScript things over the next week (or beyond!), never hesitate to reach out to us on Twitter at @NodeSource to share and get it included in Need to Node - our DMs are open if you don’t want to share publicly!

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N|Solid for AWS Lambda has a new settings page! N|Solid for AWS Lambda users can now set a sample rate to customize how frequently CPU profiles are collected on serverless function executions. You can choose the frequency in which you want to collect the samples in a period of time and the sample probability of the function in percentage.

How does it work?

To minimize monitoring overhead, N|Solid for AWS Lambda samples a subset of all function invocations, instead of sampling every invocation.

The sample rate is determined by sample frequency and sample probability:

Sample frequency: determines the time-intervals in which serverless functions are sampled for a detailed profile. If the sample frequency is set to 10 minutes, N|Solid takes a profile at the beginning of every 10 minute-interval while your function is running. If it runs less often, the sample will be captured on the next invocation following this period.

Sample probability: sets the probability with which a single invocation is sampled for a detailed profile. This is independent of the sample frequency. So, for instance, if your Sample Probability is set to 10%, there is a 10 percent chance that a new function invocation will be sampled. That way, you can ensure that both long- and short-lived functions receive samples independent of how long they live.

For production instances, you might want to choose a lower sample probability to optimize the performance of your serverless application, while for staging or development instances you might lean toward a higher sample frequency and sample probability to help diagnose potential issues before they reach production.

Once adjusted, both sample frequency and sample probability are updated on the function’s next cold start.

Start using N|Solid for AWS Lambda today Create your NodeSource Account

Critically, by giving users control over both the sample frequency and the sample probability, we’ve made it easier to control the performance overhead incurred when running N|Solid as a Lambda Layer.

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In my previous blog post, I explored the differences, advantages, and disadvantages of three of the most popular Node.js frameworks: Express, Koa, and Hapi. In this blog post, I’m going to examine the differences between three more very popular frameworks: Next, Nuxt, and Nest. These three frameworks are server-side rendering, and they are closely related to React, Vue, and Angular (the three most widely used front-end frameworks), respectively.

  • The comparison is based on:
    • Popularity (GitHub Stars and npm downloads).
    • Installation.
    • Basic Hello World app.
    • Advantages.
    • Disadvantages.
    • Performance.
    • Community involvement.
Next

Next.js is a React framework that lets you build server-side rendering and static web applications using React.

Installation

Install it:

npm install --save next react react-dom

and add a script to your package.json like this:

{
  "scripts": {
    "dev": "next",
    "build": "next build",
    "start": "next start"
  }
}

After that, the file-system is the main API. Every .js file becomes a route that gets automatically processed and rendered.

Basic Hello World app

Populate ./pages/index.js inside your project:

function Home() {
  return <div>Hello world!</div>;
}

export default Home;

Then just run npm run dev and go to http://localhost:3000. To use another port, you can run npm run dev -- -p <your port here>.

Advantages
  • Every component is server-rendered by default
  • Automatic code splitting for faster page loads
  • Unnecessary code is not loaded
  • Simple client-side routing (page-based)
  • Webpack-based dev environment which supports Hot Module Replacement (HMR)
  • Fetching data is very simple
  • Can be implemented with Express or any other Node.js HTTP server
  • It’s possible to customize with your own Babel and Webpack configurations
  • Easy to deploy anywhere if Node.js is supported
  • Built-in handling of search engine optimization (SEO) for pages
Disadvantages
  • Next.js is not backend; if you need backend logic, such as a database or an accounts server, you should keep that in a separate server application
  • Next is powerful, but If you’re creating a simple app, it can be overkill
  • All data needs to be loadable from both the client and server
  • Migrating a server-side app to Next.js is not a quick process, and depending on your project it may be too much work
Performance

To measure the performance, I used Apache Bench for benchmarking, which highlights how many requests per second the app is capable of serving. I also used lighthouse to audit performance, accessibility, best practices, and SEO.

This is a basic Hello World app in Next.js. It handles 550.87 requests per second. This value is the result of dividing the number of requests by the total time taken. The average time spent per request is 18.153 ms.

Compared to the other two frameworks, Next.js scored better overall than Nuxt.js but worse than Nest.js

In the report provided by lighthouse, we can see that the performance, accessibility, best practices, and SEO scores are all above 70, which is good, but compared with the other two frameworks, it had the lowest score for Performance and has the highest score in Best Practices.

Community involvement

The Next.js community communicates through chat, slack, issues and pull request on GitHub.

Also, in the repo awesome-nextjs, there is a list of essentials, articles, boilerplates, extensions, apps, books, and videos that are useful for developers using Next.js

Nuxt

Nuxt is a Vue.js Meta Framework to create complex, fast, and universal web applications quickly.

Installation

Install it:

$ npm i nuxt

To create a basic app:

$ npx create-nuxt-app <project-name>

You can start directly with the CLI create-nuxt-app for the latest updates.
Or you can start by using one of the starter templates:
starter: Basic Nuxt.js project template express: Nuxt.js + Express koa: Nuxt.js + Koa adonuxt: Nuxt.js + AdonisJS micro: Nuxt.js + Micro nuxtent: Nuxt.js + Nuxtent module for content heavy sites

Basic Hello World app

This is the most basic example of a “Hello World!” app on Nuxt:

<template>
  <div>
    <h1>Hello world!</h1>
    <NLink to="/about">
      About Page
    </NLink>
  </div>
</template>

](https://nodesource.com/blog/Express-Koa-Hapi
Advantages
  • Its main scope is UI rendering, while abstracting away the client/server distribution
  • Statically render your Vue apps and get all of the benefits of a universal app without a server
  • Get automatic code splitting (pre-rendered pages)
  • Setup via the command line with the starter template
  • Get great project structure by default
  • Easily set up transitions between your routes and write single file components
  • Get ES6/ES7 compilation without any extra work
  • Get set up with an auto-updating server for easy development
  • Powerful Routing System with Asynchronous Data
  • Static File Serving
  • ES6/ES7 Transpilation
  • Hot module replacement in Development
  • Pre-processor: Sass, Less, Stylus, etc.
Disadvantages
  • It has a smaller community, which means fewer resources and potentially less extensive documentation
  • Lack of some common solid plugins/components. (Google maps, calendar, vector maps). Some components for that exist, but they are generally not very well maintained.
  • It is necessary to go deep in more complex components/plugins. If you want to develop something very flexible, you have to get down to render functions/jsx to do that. (e.g render the contents of a slot in another place/component).
  • Props have to be specified explicitly. There might be cases when you want to transform some CSS classes to props; you’ll have to specify these props or use $attrs / render functions or jsx.
  • Reactivity caveats like setting an item from an array directly this.items[key]=value or adding a new data property.
  • High traffic may put strain on your server
  • You can only query and manipulate the DOM in certain hooks
Performance

This is a basic Hello World app in Nuxt.js. It handles 190.05 requests per second. The average time spent per request is 52.619 ms. On this metric, Nuxt.js performs the worst compared to the other two frameworks.

Nuxt.js has the highest score in three of the four measures; performance, accesibility and SEO.

Community involvement

There is a GitHub organization where you can find modules and projects from the Nuxt.js community. There is also a curated list of awesome things related to Nuxt.js awesome-nuxt including Modules, tools, mention of Nuxt.js, showcase, tutorials, blogs, books, starter template, official examples, and projects using Nuxt.js.

The community communicates through Gitter Chat Room, Telegram, Russian community, Discord, Twitter and YouTube Channel

Nest

A progressive Node.js framework for building efficient, scalable, and enterprise-grade server-side applications on top of TypeScript and JavaScript (ES6, ES7, ES8), Nest is heavily inspired by Angular.

Nest is a framework for building efficient, scalable Node.js server-side applications. It uses modern JavaScript, is built with TypeScript (preserves compatibility with pure JavaScript) and combines elements of OOP (Object Oriented Programming), FP (Functional Programming), and FRP (Functional Reactive Programming).

Under the hood, Nest makes use of Express, but also provides compatibility with a wide range of other libraries, like e.g. Fastify, allowing for easy use of the myriad third-party plugins which are available.

Installation

Install it:

$ npm i @nestjs/cli
$ nest new project-name

Alternatively, to install the TypeScript starter project with Git:

$ git clone https://github.com/nestjs/typescript-starter.git project
$ cd project
$ npm install
$ npm run start
Basic Hello World app

After installing Nest.js with the npm cli command, and creating a new project with nest new project-name, a src/ directory will be created and populated with several core files, including main.ts.
The main.ts includes an async function, which will bootstrap our application:

import { NestFactory } from '@nestjs/core';
import { ApplicationModule } from './app.module';

async function bootstrap() {
  const app = await NestFactory.create(ApplicationModule);
  await app.listen(3000);
}
bootstrap();

And then to run the app that listens on port 3000, you execute:

$ npm run start
Advantages
  • As a TypeScript-based web framework, strict type definition is possible
  • The framework is very annotation-driven, with everything from endpoints to Swagger documentation being generated from them. The endpoints are clean and simple, and the annotations make developing simpler all around.
  • The folder structure in Nest.js is heavily based on Angular. This allows for minimal downtime when first designing a Nest service.
  • Because Nest.js is a module-based framework, it’s easyto externalize general-purpose modules and reuse code in multiple projects
  • Components get their own folders, with an application module and main file residing in the root. This simple structure allows more attention to be paid to the design of endpoints and their consumers, instead of application structure.
  • Nest.js uses the latest version of TypeScript, which helps ensure that it will remain relevant in the rapidly changing JavaScript landscape and gives developers less context switching. The transition from Angular code to Nest is relatively easy.
  • Similar to Angular, Nest also has a decent command line tool, available through Node Package Manager, nestjs/cli. The command line tool will let you scaffold the project, generate Nest architecture components, and display project information.
Disadvantages
  • The largest risk facing Nest users is the lack of documentation. The framework has great integrations with other frameworks but the documentation is minimal and doesn’t cover any issues that may arise.
  • Nest does hold an edge in its use of TypeScript and relation to Angular, but it doesn’t have the backing power of a large enterprise behind it.
  • Overall, Nest has a smaller community compared to other frameworks
Performance

This is a basic Hello World app in Nest.js. It handles 928.18 requests per second. The average time spent per request is 10.774 ms. On this metric, Nest.js performed the best out of the three frameworks we compared.

In the report provided by lighthouse, Nest.js has a very high performance, but scored comparatively lower on other key factors:accessibility, best practices and SEO.

Community involvement

There is a group of developers providing handy packages on NestJS Community organization GitHub. Some of their popular packages are: nestjs-config, a config module for NestJS using dotenv. nest-access-control, Role and Attribute-based access control for NestJS and nestjs-flub, pretty error stack viewer.

The community has a spectrum chat and Twitter

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Last week a new Enterprise Focus group of Node.js and a new release Node (v11.14.0) both launched.

If you were watching the news from #GoogleNext19, you might have also heard about the official launch of Google Cloud Run and our news that N|Solid is available for Cloud Run users!

Check this week’s Need to Node to keep up to date with the latest news in Node.js project, events, and awesome articles. You are always welcome to collaborate and participate!

What’s New in the Node.js Project Awesome Articles, Links, and Resources One Last Thing...

If you find any awesome Node.js or JavaScript things over the next week (or beyond!), never hesitate to reach out to us on Twitter at @NodeSource to share and get it included in Need to Node - our DMs are open if you don’t want to share publicly!

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As builders, many of us are accustomed to making tough architectural or technical decisions, often weighing the complex tradeoffs between two choices. Not surprisingly, we tend to get excited when a new solution helps to break this paradigm. Ultimately, we want to write code that offers interesting functionality and extensible architecture, but is easy to maintain, analyze, and monitor, and can be run anywhere. Today, we’re pleased to announce a new technology integration between Google Cloud Platform and NodeSource that will help teams make this dream a reality.

Start using N|Solid for Google Cloud Run today Create your NodeSource Account

Building modern, source-centric, and container-based applications comes with a price we must pay. These are the boring but difficult parts of developing, deploying, and managing an application, especially its infrastructure: orchestrating source-to-container workflows, routing and managing traffic during deployment, auto-scaling your workloads, or binding running services to eventing ecosystems.

The market has responded by offering new execution models such as Functions as a Service (FaaS), which empower companies to build applications faster by deploying small snippets of code without having to be concerned about the complexities of the infrastructure that runs it.

FaaS isn’t all that serverless has to offer though.

Today, Google Cloud announced a new service empowering developers to focus on their code’s business value rather than being distracted by the mundane yet necessary grind of managing your infrastructure: Google Cloud Run on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) empowers developers to run serverless workloads anywhere without having to be concerned about the underlying infrastructure complexities.

For Node.js developers, this is good news as it provides a simpler experience for deploying stateless services to GKE. To complement convenience with control, NodeSource offers our deep expertise in Node.js performance monitoring by providing a version of the N|Solid runtime for Cloud Run.

As a Google Cloud partner, NodeSource has made an N|Solid base-image available for Cloud Run on GKE, which provides developers with a drop-and-replace Node.js runtime that delivers sophisticated performance insights out of the box and in production with zero code-modification.

Deploying an application with N|Solid is as easy as:
  1. Signing up for a free account at accounts.nodesource.com
  2. Setting up your N|Solid Console on GKE, and
  3. Creating a Node.js Docker file and uploading your image to your Google Container Registry
You can view the getting started guide here.

Following these easy steps allows users to leverage the N|Solid Console and access more than 50 performance metrics and get deep insights into their Node.js processes’ host system, the process itself, the internal behavior of Node.js, and the internal behavior of the V8 JavaScript engine. This includes real-time performance monitoring, CPU profiling, heap snapshot comparisons, as well as customizable notifications that can be configured for delivery via email, webhooks, or directly to Slack.

We intend to make improvements over time to the N|Solid user experience for teams using Cloud Run, and we’re excited to support you, the user, as part of that journey. With Cloud Run providing a frictionless path to help you run your serverless workloads anywhere, we’re excited to offer a runtime and performance monitoring solution that helps you do so with confidence.

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