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Paddle Tail Swimbait Fishing Tips To Catch More Fish All Year! - YouTube

The BioSpawn ExoSwim is a soft plastic paddle tail swimbait designed with a unique exoskeleton to displace water and create a very desirable and realistic swimming action. Originally, we launched a 4” swimbait, and it didn’t take long for baits to begin flying off the shelves. Anglers all over the country we’re having success with the our new bait.

The 3.25″, 4″, and 4.75″ BioSpawn ExoSwims

After continued success with the 4” Exoswim, it became apparent that we needed to add more sizes to the line-up. With that being said, we’re excited to announce the launch of both 3.25” and 4.75” versions of the ExoSwim.

The 3.25” size allows for anything from finesse fishing to trailers on an Alabama Rig. The larger, 4.75” size will help get big bites when fish are looking for big meals. With these new sizes hitting the market, anglers from all over are presented with much more variation and can easily keep one of these baits tied on year round.

The Biospawn Exoswim is gator approved.
PC: Sam Kim

Let’s talk about the smaller, 3.25 inch, size first. We saw a need to make a size smaller than 4 inches in order to help not only catch those pressured finicky bass, but also for those who love to fish for smallmouth. Due to the versatility of a smaller profile, this size should find plenty of use regardless of the location. This bait can be a trailer for a finesse jig, thrown on an a-rig, or simply rigged up as any paddle tail would, with a swimbait hook, underspin, or jig head. At this size, the bait could even be thrown on a drop shot. These options allow for this bait to be thrown year round in a variety of different conditions. We believe this bait will excel especially in the spring when baitfish are a bit smaller.

I like to throw the 3.25″ in the Spring, the 4” in the summer, and the 4.75 in the fall

As the warmer weather starts to show up, the baitfish will start to increase in size. The average size of bait fish around the country is typically around 4 inches, and therefore the original 4 inch ExoSwim is a standard go to bait when fishing under typical conditions. This bait still has a multitude of rigging options and ways to fish, so you can always tie one on with confidence. I love to throw this bait on an underspin as a great alternative to a spinnerbait.

This musky nearly broke the Ohio state record and was caught on a 4” BioSpawn Exoswim. PC: Zackbhall

We knew when we talked about new sizes, that it was equally as important to go bigger as it was to go smaller. The 4.75 inch ExoSwim is a bulkier addition to the lineup for those who love to throw bigger baits. This bait will be a great fall option as anglers continue to match the size of growing bait fish throughout the year. This bait will please anglers around the country as it will help get those bigger bass that are looking for a bigger meal. The increased size and water displacement will even stand out to anglers looking to catch other species. This size will be attractive to big predators like pike and musky, while also giving saltwater anglers a great option as well.

Keel weighted swimbait hooks are excellent for fishing near weeds. Use an underspin for added flash.

As an angler myself, I very rarely used to throw paddle tail swimbaits until I started to get some practice with the ExoSwim. With a lot of hard work, we found a formula that makes this bait one of the most durable soft plastic swimbaits, while still producing very lifelike action in the water. Due to this great action and durability, I started to throw swimbaits on their own, where before I often only used them as trailers for swim jigs and chatterbaits. Now I have come to love the realistic look and colors to catch more and more bass on these baits. With the new sizes, I believe this bait will continue to produce tons of quality bass not only for me but also for anglers from all over.

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Crappie readily bite for nearly everyone in the spring, but these panfish become more of a challenge to catch in the heat of summer.

When the summertime sun raises water temperatures above the 80-degree mark, crappie seek deeper water and heavier cover. The fish still remain active though as they feed on schools of shad passing though the crappie’s hot-weather haunts.

On my home waters of Lake of the Ozarks, summertime crappie fishing poses two problems: heavy recreational boat traffic and a lack of visible cover. I solve the first problem by fishing early and late in the day to avoid traffic. Crappie tend to burrow into the middle of brush when recreational boaters churn up the water and it becomes difficult to position my boat in the rolling waves and properly present my lure through the brush.

Some fish can also be caught in the clear water early and late in the day, but mid-day action is slow as the crappie suspend over deep water. In the stained water areas of a lake, the fish stay shallower and are easier to catch throughout the day.

Summertime: Crappie Baits

Minnows are the most popular summertime bait for anglers fishing a tight line off docks or spider rigging in boats. Since a crappie’s appetite is voracious during the summer, I select larger minnows (sometimes bigger than 3 inches) for my bait. I prefer using 2/0 and 3/0 hooks because the bigger hook is easier to remove from a crappie and the fish don’t swallow it as much as they do a smaller hook.

Jigs are also productive for summertime crappie. I use either a single 1/16-ounce jig for shooting docks or a double rig for vertically jigging above brush piles. The double rig consists of a 1/16-ounce jig spaced 18 inches above a 1/8-ounce jig at the end of my line.

While my home lake lacks visible cover, Truman Lake is another one of my favorite summertime crappie fisheries that has plenty of it. Lots of standing timber was left in Truman when the Army Corps of Engineers filled the lake.

The lowland lake has more turbid water so crappie can be caught in both shallow and deep water in the summertime. A shallow-water pattern produces best when a summertime shad hatch occurs, but for most of the summer you need to fish deeper water.

Summertime Crappie Fishing: Shallow Water

The shallow pattern consists of dipping minnows with a long pole and slip-bobber system in timber along fence rows and tree lines on the main lake or creek channel. You can catch these fish less than 10 feet deep and sometimes even as shallow as 2 feet. The slip-bobber system allows you to adjust your bobber up or down to find the magic depth in which the crappie are holding. Use number 2 or 4 hooks and pinch on a couple of number 5 split shots about 2 to 3 inches above the hook. Keeping the weight close to the minnow will restrict its movement to prevent hang-ups in the heavy cover.

Summertime Crappie Fishing: Deep Water

The deep-water pattern works best in timber along main lake bluffs and channel swings during the hottest part of summer. The fish will vary in depth from 15 to 25 feet depending on the lake’s thermocline. The same slip-bobber rig used for catching shallow crappie also works in the deeper water because the fish will be suspended in the timber. If it’s too windy the bobber will bounce too much in the waves and make your presentation look unnatural. Remove the slip bobber rig then and present your minnow vertically on a tight line next to the timber to trigger a bite.

Try these patterns for crappie action as hot as the summertime weather.

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Paddle Tail Swimbait Fishing Tips To Catch More Fish All Year! - YouTube

The BioSpawn ExoSwim is a soft plastic paddle tail swimbait designed with a unique exoskeleton to displace water and create a very desirable and realistic swimming action. Originally, we launched a 4” swimbait, and it didn’t take long for baits to begin flying off the shelves. Anglers all over the country we’re having success with the our new bait.

The 3.25″, 4″, and 4.75″ BioSpawn ExoSwims

After continued success with the 4” Exoswim, it became apparent that we needed to add more sizes to the line-up. With that being said, we’re excited to announce the launch of both 3.25” and 4.75” versions of the ExoSwim.

The 3.25” size allows for anything from finesse fishing to trailers on an Alabama Rig. The larger, 4.75” size will help get big bites when fish are looking for big meals. With these new sizes hitting the market, anglers from all over are presented with much more variation and can easily keep one of these baits tied on year round.

The Biospawn Exoswim is gator approved.
PC: Sam Kim

Let’s talk about the smaller, 3.25 inch, size first. We saw a need to make a size smaller than 4 inches in order to help not only catch those pressured finicky bass, but also for those who love to fish for smallmouth. Due to the versatility of a smaller profile, this size should find plenty of use regardless of the location. This bait can be a trailer for a finesse jig, thrown on an a-rig, or simply rigged up as any paddle tail would, with a swimbait hook, underspin, or jig head. At this size, the bait could even be thrown on a drop shot. These options allow for this bait to be thrown year round in a variety of different conditions. We believe this bait will excel especially in the spring when baitfish are a bit smaller.

I like to throw the 3.25″ in the Spring, the 4” in the summer, and the 4.75 in the fall

As the warmer weather starts to show up, the baitfish will start to increase in size. The average size of bait fish around the country is typically around 4 inches, and therefore the original 4 inch ExoSwim is a standard go to bait when fishing under typical conditions. This bait still has a multitude of rigging options and ways to fish, so you can always tie one on with confidence. I love to throw this bait on an underspin as a great alternative to a spinnerbait.

This musky nearly broke the Ohio state record and was caught on a 4” BioSpawn Exoswim. PC: Zackbhall

We knew when we talked about new sizes, that it was equally as important to go bigger as it was to go smaller. The 4.75 inch ExoSwim is a bulkier addition to the lineup for those who love to throw bigger baits. This bait will be a great fall option as anglers continue to match the size of growing bait fish throughout the year. This bait will please anglers around the country as it will help get those bigger bass that are looking for a bigger meal. The increased size and water displacement will even stand out to anglers looking to catch other species. This size will be attractive to big predators like pike and musky, while also giving saltwater anglers a great option as well.

Keel weighted swimbait hooks are excellent for fishing near weeds. Use an underspin for added flash.

As an angler myself, I very rarely used to throw paddle tail swimbaits until I started to get some practice with the ExoSwim. With a lot of hard work, we found a formula that makes this bait one of the most durable soft plastic swimbaits, while still producing very lifelike action in the water. Due to this great action and durability, I started to throw swimbaits on their own, where before I often only used them as trailers for swim jigs and chatterbaits. Now I have come to love the realistic look and colors to catch more and more bass on these baits. With the new sizes, I believe this bait will continue to produce tons of quality bass not only for me but also for anglers from all over.

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As fishing pressure rises on our waterways so does the chance for conflict between anglers. From personal experience and more than 20 years of covering bass tournaments for media outlets I have seen or heard of wars of words on the water and in one case a fisticuffs battle between tournament competitors. Issues such as anglers fishing too close to one another or one angler cutting in front of another has led to these wars on the waters.

Fishing should be a fun sport all of the time, but improper manners displayed by some anglers can get a fellow angler’s dander up and lead to a shouting match or worse. When fishing in a crowd we need to remember that no fish is worth getting into a duel of words or punches.

Here are some fishing etiquette tips to help you avoid a conflict on the water with your fellow anglers.

Avoid Cutting In Front Of Others

We were taught in school not to butt in line, so we should remember this lesson when we are on the water. Despite fishing on a lake with 54,000 surface acres I constantly have seen anglers cut their boats in front of me or other anglers. Whenever I am heading towards a spot, if I see another angler close to the spot I check to see which direction his boat is heading. If he is heading towards the spot I intended to fish I will move on to another spot. If his boat is moving in the opposite direction I will go ahead and stop there.

Distance Yourself From Others

Anglers fishing too close to each other is another common problem that leads to trouble. I avoid this situation by staying at least two casting lengths away from another boat. If I am fishing down a bank and another boat is coming towards me, I will either stay in one spot to let the other boat circle around me or I will veer away from the bank and yield to the other boat.

Don’t Claim A Spot

Unless you are fishing your own private lake, you shouldn’t be claiming a spot is yours just because you caught fish there the previous day or planted a brush pile or some other type of cover there. I have frequently heard grumblings especially from tournament anglers complaining about other anglers being on “their” spot. You have to remember when fishing public waters that all spots are open to everyone. If you are a good enough angler you will have more than one spot and won’t have to worry about others fishing the same spot.

Leave No Wake Behind

When passing a stationary boat in a confined area I slow down and try to avoid leaving a wake that would rock the other boat. I also idle a safe distance away from boats near me when I am leaving a spot to prevent waves that could disturb those who are still fishing that spot.

Respect Others Property

Never trespass to gain access to a pond on private property and if you get permission to fish on private property make sure you clean up after yourself and take your trash and any other litter you see with you.
My home waters of Lake of the Ozarks features thousands of private docks where there is always the potential for disputes between dock owners and anglers. I avoid trouble with dock owners by steering away from any docks where people are fishing or swimming.

I try to avoid bumping my boat into a dock or hitting the dock with my lures. If my lure hangs up on the dock, I will step onto the dock to free my lure or ask someone on the dock to unhook the lure. If I have to get on the dock to free my lure I will immediately return to my boat once my lure is unhooked.

Obey The Law

Fish limits are imposed by state conservation departments to prevent overharvesting on a fishery, but some selfish anglers fail to abide by the law. I have heard some guys brag about how they have caught and cleaned 300 crappie (in Missouri that is 240 fish over the state possession limit) for a church or family fish fry. You can ensure good fishing on your favorite waters if you obey all the possession and length limits established by your state’s game and fish agency.

Practice Catch And Release

This one is easy for me because I don’t like to eat fish. I always practice catch and release when bass fishing and I frequently throw back a lot of crappie even if they are keeper size. I practice selective harvesting with crappie and only keep 10- to 13-inch fish which are the easiest to fillet.

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Northern Pike fishing is popular in Europe and Russia, and continues to grow in popularity in North America. This popularity is due in large part to their trophy size potential, strong fight, and great taste. These toothy monsters are often simply known as “pike” or “northern.” With green backs/yellowish white bellies, long powerful bodies, and sharp inwards pointed teeth, pike are ferocious predators known for their aggressiveness. These fish can move at very high speeds to ambush prey, making them very exciting to fish for when they slam your bait.

Catching northern pike can be a very exciting and rewarding experience. Pike will smash almost any bait you can think of from live/dead baits to a large variety of artificial lures. They are often found in thick vegetation where they can sit nearly unseen and ambush any prey that comes by. Like many other carnivorous fish, pike utilize their lateral line when looking for a meal. This lateral line allows for them to feel vibration through the water and more easily locate their prey.

Pike Aren’t Picky That’s Forsure

Many anglers throw baits that produce a lot of vibration such as inline or traditional spinnerbaits. These baits, as well as spoons, also throw a lot of light with their flashy blades and finishes to increase the appeal from the eyes of these predators.

Other baits such as jigs and swimbaits also are great options for pike fishing. In their youth, it is common for pike to feed on small fish and other small prey such as crawfish and frogs. Imitating these small profile baits can be a great way to match what they are familiar with. Pike aren’t afraid to grab big baits either, so throwing a bulky jig can be a great option to match the smaller profile but present a larger meal. The extra weight of a bulky jig also allows it to be fished both shallow and deep. Pair it up with a paddle tail or crawfish to increase the action and give it a natural presentation. Swimbaits are also good on their own as they look very realistic in the water and can be fished fast, slow, or twitched to be erratic. Don’t be afraid to try all sorts of retrieves to figure out what they are looking for.

How To Locate Northern Pike

To find the pike, the most important factor is finding what they will be eating. As predators, pike will move around throughout the seasons to follow the food. Early in the season, look for shallow weed growth next to sudden drops in depth where the pike have a lot of area to move and hunt. Fishing a bladed bait or spoon is great near these spots at this time of year as the sun will produce more flash from the blades in the shallow water around these weeds. As summer heats up, the pike will tend to venture to deeper weeds to be in the cooler oxygen rich water they provide. Now is a good time to switch to those jigs to really work the weedline, or try and retrieve a spoon with a slow flutter over the weeds. When the conditions are right for topwater, this can also be an exciting way to catch a pike. Although there are many options with artificial lures, never discount the use of minnows and leeches as well.

Bulk Up For The Big Ones

If you are new to pike fishing, it might be a good idea to take a look at your gear before heading out. While bass tackle will often work well on its own for pike fishing, it’s important to remember that they grown much bigger and have razor sharp teeth. Fluorocarbon up to 20 pounds paired with medium to medium heavy rods allow you to manage these big fighters and easily handle the bigger baits you might opt to throw. Braid is also a good option when fishing water with less visibility as the line is more hidden. Often times the most important part can be a wire leader (or very heavy mono leader) to avoid being bitten off. When throwing faster moving baits the leader will be very hard to see and will avoid being bitten off.

If you are familiar with pike, you may know it can be difficult to distinguish them from muskellunge, who are closely related. To determine the difference, there are a few distinguishable features to take a look at. The simplest ways to determine whether a fish is a pike vs a musky are their rounded tails and spots that are lighter than their body color. Although many people fish specifically for musky as they are known to be a trophy fish, northern can reach very large sizes as well and are often more easily caught. This makes them a unique and exciting fish to target when hunting for big fish. The current world record northern pike is a whopping 55 pounds, not far behind muskie at 65 pounds.

Boney But Delicious

Many anglers can have a negative attitude towards northern pike. These fish tend to be very slimy and can frustrate a bass angler who gets bitten off. Anglers who have not cleaned or eaten pike may also be leery to make a meal out of a pike. Often people argue that they are hard to clean due to the “Y” bones along their back. Doing research ahead of time can eliminate these worries and bring about a much more positive attitude toward fishing for pike. It is important that they maintain the slime on their bodies as it protects them from potential sickness. When handled correctly, the slime on their bodies will not be an issue to the fisherman and therefore will also help protect the fish. Research on the proper way to clean a pike can provide a way to avoid the bones and collect a lot of meat for a great meal. When you consider this, along with the great fight, northern pike fishing can be some of the best fishing in freshwater.

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A crayfish tops the meal menu for any bass living on rocky lakes.

Rocks provide shelter for crayfish so when you fish rocky lakes for bass you should consider selecting lures that best imitate a crayfish. Here are four mud bug imitators you should try when fishing lakes with rocky bottoms.

Jigs

A jig tipped with either a plastic chunk or craw is one of the most effective year-round crayfish imitators. You can drag a heavier jig and keep in close contact with the bottom to imitate a crayfish crawling along the rocks or you can lift and drop a lighter jig to mimic a crayfish fleeing from a predator.

Crankbaits

A crawfish-colored crankbait produces mainly for me in the spring but I have also caught bass from rocky lakes on this mud bug imitator in the late fall. In the early spring I retrieve a medium-diving crawfish crankbait slowly along chunk rock banks. As the water gets warmer I concentrate on banks mixed with chunk rocks and pea gravel where I retrieve the crankbait at a faster pace and try to frequently bump it into the bottom. I employ a steady medium-speed retrieve along chunk rock banks in the fall.

Twin-tail Grubs

A double-tail plastic grub attached to a standup jighead produces best for me late in the pre-spawn and during the spawn when bass have moved to gravel banks. A variety of retrieves with this crayfish imitator triggers strikes from pre-spawn bass cruising the shallows. You can hop it, drag and shake it on the bottom or slowly lift and drop it. When bass are on nests, you can drag the grub into the nest and let it sit there. An occasional twitch of the rod will activate the grub’s tails and annoy the bedding bass.

Plastic Craws

A Texas-rigged plastic craw worm is an ideal agitator for spawning bass. You can tempt bedding bass into inhaling this intruder by using the same presentation as I mentioned for the twin-tail grub. Bass have a hard time resisting a craw worm standing in its nest.

When bass move to deeper water after the spawn, you can catch those fish by attaching a plastic craw on a drop-shot rig or a shaky head jig. The shaky head craw works best for bottom-hugging bass while the drop-shot craw is a better option for bass suspended slightly above the rocky bottom.

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Owning a boat makes it easier to remember what to bring for my fishing trips because many of the items I use are already stored in the boat.

However, there are times when I fish with a friend in his boat or fish from the bank and need to decide what I should bring with me. I am guilty of never putting together a fishing checklist, but I would recommend making a list to prevent forgetting essential items for your fishing trips.

Here is a checklist of items you will need for your next fishing trip.

Rod and Reel

The number of rod and reel combos you take depends on what type of fishing you will be doing. When I am bass fishing with a friend in his boat I usually take four baitcast combos with different line sizes on the reels that allows me to fish a variety of lures. If I am bank fishing, I usually take two rods and for wade fishing I scale down to one rod.

Lures

I usually take a soft tacklebag holding three or four utility boxes filled with the lures I think will work for the season I am fishing.

Rain Gear

The first year I fished bass tournaments I learned the hard way about the value of quality rain gear. It’s hard to concentrate on fishing for eight hours when you are cold and wet. Now I take a rain suit any time there is even a slight chance of rain.

Hat

I always wear a hat while fishing either for warmth in the cold weather or protection from the sun.

*Sunglasses: I always wear sunglasses to reduce glare and protect my eyes from harmful sun rays and any errant projectiles.

Food

A four-course meal on the water is unnecessary but you should at least pack some snacks to munch on throughout the day to keep up your energy level. I usually take a couple of packages of fig bars and oatmeal bars that are easy to pack in my tackle bag.

Water

Usually one bottle of water is all I need when fishing in cooler weather, but during the heat of summer I take at least two bottles to prevent dehydration.

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Think big, flashy and noisy when selecting lures to catch bass on muddy water lakes.

A bass’ sight is hindered in murky water so the fish has to rely on its other senses to hone in on prey. Bass are equipped with a lateral line which works like an ear and detects vibrations resulting from water displacement. So big lures that create lots of flash are easier for bass to see and lures that create plenty of noise and vibration allow bass to detect the commotion through the fish’s lateral line.

Here are four lures you should try for catching bass in muddy lakes.

Buzz Baits

Bass usually remain shallow most of the time in muddy lakes and when the water is warm the fish will smash a buzz bait. This noisy topwater mimics either shad skipping along the surface or a fleeing duckling. The best buzz baits either clack or squeak loudly making it easier for the bass to target in the dirty water.

Flipping Jig

After a cold front, bass on muddy lakes will pull tight to cover so a 1/2-ounce flipping jig matched with a magnum-sized craw or plastic chunk is ideal for pitching to these fish. Bass want something slow moving after a front and the flipping jig and its trailer projects a larger profile for bass to see and displaces more water than a standard jig allowing bass to detect the lure better with its lateral line. Inserting a rattle into the plastic trailer increases the lure’s noise-making potential.

Creature Bait

The bulky profile and tantalizing tentacles and flappers of a creature bait makes it a dual threat for bass on muddy lakes. The flappers and tentacles create a lot of flash and vibration for bass to hone in on in the low-visibility water. You can either flip the creature bait on a Texas rig into heavy cover for inactive bass or cast it on a Carolina rig for bass holding on flats, humps or points.

Squarebill Crankbait

This lure creates a lot of flash and vibration for bass in muddy lakes as the crankbait wobbles through the water at a medium pace. It is also great for running at high speeds to crash into rocks, stumps and logs. The flash it creates as the crankbait deflects off of an object usually triggers a strike from bass holding tight to the cover.

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Choosing a spinning or baitcasting rod can be a challenge for new anglers. Generally, your skill level and the species of fish you enjoy catching will determine which type of fishing rod you should select.

The two basic types of rods are casting and spinning rods. Casting rods are designed for baitcast and spincast reels whereas spinning rods are matched with spinning reels. Let’s take a look at the differences between the two types and how to determine which one you should choose for your style of fishing.

Casting Rods FAVORITE FISHING RIGGED PHANTOM CASTING ROD

A casting rod is equipped with a reel seat that positions a spincast or baitcast reel above the rod and all the rod guides face upward. When fighting a fish on a casting rod the rod bends over with the guides facing up so the force of the fish pushes the line down on the eyelets and the rod blank. This prevents a big fish from pulling the eyelets off of the rod. Long casting rods with straight handles are designed for power fishing bass tactics and trolling or surfcasting for large fish such as blue or flathead catfish, salmon, striped bass and many powerful saltwater fish. These rods usually have larger rod guides to handle the heavier line of baitcast reels. Shorter casting rods with pistol grip handles and smaller rod guides can be matched with spincast reels filled with lighter line. This combination is ideal for beginners because it is easier to cast than the baitcast combo. The spincast outfit works best for catching panfish, trout and other smaller fish species with artificial lures or live bait.

Spinning rods DOBYNS SAVVY MICRO SPINNING ROD

Unlike the casting rod, a spinning rod holds the spinning reel under the rod with the rod guides facing downward. So when you are fighting a fish, the force of the line pressed against the eyelet is pushing away from the rod blank and could lead to a big fish pulling an eyelet off of the rod. Spinning rods vary in lengths and actions for catching a variety of fish. You can use shorter ultralight or light action spinning rods with thin line for panfish or trout. Medium and medium-heavy action 6- to 7-foot rods are ideal for finesse bass fishing tactics. Long heavy action rods with elongated grip handles for two-handed casting are best for surfcasting for saltwater fish or steelhead and salmon fishing.

Spinning rods are also popular for trolling or fishing with live bait for catfish, panfish and walleye.

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Lakes filled with aquatic vegetation are a blessing to savvy bass anglers who know how to work their lures through the grass but are a bane to inexperienced fishermen whose lures bog down in the weeds on nearly every cast.

Bass anglers consider grass any aquatic rooted plant that has most of its vegetative mass below the surface, although some portions may stick above the water and form into a mat. These submerged plants have soft stems that give the vegetation a grassy appearance.

While some conventional bass lures tend to bog down in the matted vegetation there are other baits that work well in the weeds. Here’s a look at four ideal lures for fishing grass lakes.

Lipless Rattling Crankbaits

This lure produces best in the early spring when the weeds are just starting to grow near the bottom or about halfway up the water column. You can yoyo the bait up through the weeds and let it drop to the bottom when the grass is short to trigger strikes. If the weeds are grown halfway to the surface, try retrieving the lure at a medium to fast pace and rip the bait when you feel it starting to cling to the grass.

Spinnerbaits

This blade bait is ideal for slow rolling above submerged grass in the spring. As the grass grows taller in the summer, change your spinnerbait presentation by speeding up your retrieve so the lure stays above the weeds. A double willowleaf spinnerbait works best because the willowleaf blades provide enough lift to keep the lure riding above the grass.

Swim Jigs

Swimming a jig over submerged grass and around the edges of matted grass produces bass from late winter until the grass starts dying in late fall. You should use a jig and a trailer buoyant enough to keep it swimming above the vegetation so try a 1/4- or 5/16-ounce swim jig and a bulky plastic chunk or craw.

Hollow Body Frogs

A hollow-belly plastic frog delivers some great topwater action when the grass mats form on the surface in the summer. On sunny days the frog can be skimmed at a steady pace across the mat and then paused in the holes of the mat to trigger strikes from bass suspended under the weed growth. When skies are cloudy, walk the frog next to the grass to tempt bass prowling the weed edges.

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