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Vegan baking is not difficult. At all. And here is a good example.     This cake could not be any simpler. You mix the wet ingredients first, then add the other ones into this mixture and you’re done! And you can make it by hand – you don’t need any electric mixer.       This is a small-ish cake. However, you can bake 2 cakes, spread some jam both in the middle and on top, and you can get a pretty nice, bigger cake that you can use for instance for a birthday.     I baked this cake several times and I found out that it tastes even better the next day or at least 4-5 hours later. Also, instead of jam (or together with jam) you can top it with coconut cream or any kind of vegan buttercream and make the cake even more festive. Enjoy! —   Ingredients:   Difficulty: Easy (makes 1 cake in 22cm cake pan)   Printable PDF-recipe (no photos)   2 dl + 6 tbsp + …
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These cookies are for those who love chocolate, who can’t get enough of chocolate, who can live on chocolate alone, who dream about chocolate at night.. so these cookies are for those who are like me!     Imagine biting a cookie and all the lovely feelings in this life come to you. These cookies are the embodiment of this scenario. You bite one, and you get this soft, extremely chocolatey texture and taste. It’s like biting heaven.   You get this rich, delicious taste by a very easy recipe! It’s just about mixing a few ingredients which are generally found at home. Only thing that you may not have home is good quality chocolate (i mean, i personally would love to have it all the time but I don’t buy it unless necessary otherwise I would eat chocolate like ALL THE TIME).       And, incidentally, as you can expect, chocolate is indeed the most important ingredient in this recipe. You cannot do these cookies with just any chocolate. I mean, technically you …
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Ok, lately I’ve been trying to bake healthier cakes (well, not always, but frequently!). This is such a trial. This loaf cake is only sweetened with honey and sweet potatoes, which also give colour and texture. The result is a sweet – but not “too sweet” – cake.     The cake is very easy to make. The amount of grated sweet potato used is not that much and most of the time sweet potatoes are quite massive. So, for instance, you may be making a sweet potato dish and with about 120-150 gr. of it left, you can make this cake.     The combination of almond and desiccated coconut is tasty and is also rich in texture. Add to that the texture coming from grated sweet potato, and you have a feast in your mouth with just one slice of cake.       The cake does not rise much and I used a slightly wide loaf pan. However, you can use a narrower pan if you want a bit higher cake. Other …
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This recipe combines some of my favourite things, and there is not so much fuss in making it! I saw it in a Turkish website, made some teeny meeny changes and voila!     All call this a type of “pesto” because it has basil, a type of nut and a type of cheese, together with some olive oil. Basil, as always, brings a refreshing taste, feta brings salt, pistachios add lots of flavour.       I made this spread with both toasted and not toasted pistachios. I must say that while both gave delicious results, the version with toasted pistachios was much much more flavoured. I always prefer toasting nuts and this is one of those recipes that benefit greatly from that.   Other than this, there is not much to say about this spread really. You must check how salty your feta is. Frankly, I did not need any extra salt thanks to feta, but this is one of those things that may be different for everyone. So, add more salt if …
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So, I associate ginger / ginger cake with winter mostly. That’s why I made it often in the past few months. Most of them were regular cakes but this one is gluten free!     The cake is very easy to make. It has a bit of sugar and a bit of honey for a sweet taste. I adopted the original recipe from Bon Apetit magazine, but I changed a few things, especially with the frosting.       The cake’s texture looks dense and it becomes one big piece however the taste is quite light. The cream cheese frosting has a sweet and sour taste as well, which makes the final, decorated cake even lighter.     I decorated the cake with raspberries, fresh rosemary and edible flowers but you can decorate it any way you like. You can also double the amount of frosting, cut the cake in 2 and put some frosting also in between 2 layers. The cake is thick enough to create 2 layers.     You can also eat …
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I’m writing this blog post in my sick bed right now. Or ok, more like recovering bed because the peak of flu passed and I am indeed on the path of recovery. And I can breathe again. And I feel like eating again, dreaming of pastries like this one.     So, a few months ago, I published a similar recipe with almost same ingredients but different shape: phyllo triangles. This recipe today is a slightly faster version of it, because you don’t have to individually shape each pastry.   This kind of pastry or “börek” making is fast, easy and can be applied with many different fillings. If you have a pack of phyllo, you’re good to go. Just look at what you have available in the fridge, from cheese to vegetables, and put whatever you have available in the pastry. You just need to learn – or even create your own way of – how to stack phyllo sheets and you need to make them moist so that they stick to each other …
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When I was in Istanbul last month, I tried to find out the recipe for the one dessert I missed for many many years. This orange jelly dessert, that I remembered a bit differently, was one that my mother made all the time when I was a kid. It was one of my favourite dishes in the world. And then she stopped making it. It was forgotten. Until 2 weeks ago.     So. here is what I remembered: I knew that she made it with Oralet – a hot drink alternative to tea, with, if I remember correctly, some powder and not any kind of tea leaves. You dissolved the powder in hot water, it had several flavours with orange and lemon being the ones I remember most and it was very colourful. It was also quite unhealthy. I don’t know if it still exists in Turkey. The drink was made into a jelly, probably by using some kind of starch? Yes, correct.       The second thing I remembered was that there …
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I admit. I haven’t felt inspired to write for a while. I’ve been baking & cooking as usual, so it’s not about food. But I just felt like doing other things, like reading – I purchased many books lately about food justice, feminism and seed sovereignty. So I’ve been reading them. And I also went to a 2-weeks holiday in Istanbul during new year so yes, excuses excuses, but this blog post was long overdue..     So, what is this recipe? This is one of my favourite dishes. I love it eating at any time of the day. Yes, I even ate it for breakfast many times. It is very rich in taste and it is not heavy at all.   There are many stuffing recipes in different cuisines. Some of them include meat, some are vegetarian. Among all of them, this is by far my favourite stuffing recipe.     The Turkish name for this dish is “dolma” and the peppers used for it are particularly called “dolmalik biber”, meaning “pepper for stuffing”. …
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So, I’ve never been a fan of apple pies, really. But it goes back to my dislike for heavy pie doughs. That’s why when I made this pie, using phyllo sheets as the pie dough, I absolutely loved it – it is so so much lighter and crispier, and indeed flakier than other pies.     Phyllo dough is vegan. It is only made with water, flour, corn starch. Some commercial phyllo doughs also contain vinegar and some vinegar are not 100% vegan so you might want to check the ingredients anyway.       In this recipe, I use both white sugar and brown sugar. I know that some sugar brands are not 100% vegan either, so it’s better to use organic ones to be 100% sure.   Of course, if you are not vegan, then you can be free to use any ingredients and you can also use regular butter instead of vegan. But today, in this recipe, we are going vegan.     I think one of the things that I love …
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Ever since I saw Rachel Khoo’s Little Paris Kitchen program and her salty cake recipe in there, I’ve been in love with salty cakes – a type of cake that I’ve never known before which existed. I’ve made many salty cake recipes after that myself, but this one is one of the most scrumptious salty cakes I’ve baked yet.     I’ve been thinking about using dried figs in a salty cake recipe for a while but I wasn’t sure what other ingredients should accompany it. I thought of many kinds of cheese and nuts, kind of reflecting the original salty cake idea that I fell in love with: a sweet dried fruit, a type of cheese and a type of nut.       Finally it dawned on me. I’ve used the trio of fresh figs, blue cheese and walnuts many times in salads with a few additional ingredients. So why not convert this combo into a salty cake, but with dried figs instead.     So this recipe only requires a bit of …
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