Loading...

Follow ModSquad | Customer Support Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

With a global workforce of 10,000+ Mods situated in more than 70 countries around the world, you’d be safe to assume that ModSquad works in a variety of languages. And you’d be right: Our Mods provide local, native-speaking support in more than 50 languages and dialects. Language is a key element in our staffing process, in more ways than one. For even if you’re speaking someone’s language, are you speaking their lingo?

We approach this thought in two ways. First, by assigning regional Mods, who live and work locally to the clients to which they’re assigned, we can ensure that they get the local vernacular and have their fingers on the pulse of their community. This allows for better communication, in a more collaborative vein, with the person they’re assisting.

The other element of understanding lingo is industry-based. Whether you realize it or not, your vertical, your company, and your brand have a language all their own. And if the people you have representing you online and on the phone don’t understand that, it can create barriers between them and your audience.

Think about it this way: You’ve probably seen movies like Crimson Tide or Apollo 13. They’re filled with technical jargon that the majority of us don’t fully understand. While a talented screenwriter can help you understand the gist of each bit of dialogue, there’s still that element of unfamiliarity that creeps over us, reminding us that we’re not a part of that world, merely observers. That’s all well and good when you’re watching a piece of entertainment. But when you’re trying to get assistance from, or communicate with, someone at a company, you don’t want to have to decipher what they’re saying.

It holds true in every industry; whether overt or subtle, each has a lingo of its own that must be mastered if you’re to have a real dialogue with an end user. That’s why ModSquad emphasizes our tradition of assigning fans and brand enthusiasts to related assignments. Not only do they speak the lingo, but they have an innate understanding of the product and the mindset of the person to whom they’re speaking, because they too are users of that product.

To that end, keep these simple rules in mind to ensure you’re speaking your customers’ language:

  • Get the lingo. Utilize support agents who speak the lingo because they themselves have a history with the product, brand, or activity.
  • Skip the jargon. Stay away from overly complicated acronyms, deep-industry speak, or internal nomenclatures. While it’s good to use terms or phrases that resonate with that particular audience, it’s wise not to rely too heavily upon jargon and parlance. Identify the fine line and tread carefully.
  • Take time to listen. Follow the customers’ leads. If they don’t seem to understand what you’re telling them, or your agents find themselves hearing dead silence as a response, reel it in. The customers aren’t getting it. Use this feedback to craft your ongoing dialogues with the end users.
  • Above all else, be helpful. Speak in terms of how the product or brand will ultimately help or enrich the customer. After all, that’s what it’s all about. Discuss the benefits of the product and help the customer understand how to make it work for their needs, whether it’s broken or damaged, or the user simply lacks a comprehensive understanding of the product. By opening up a genuine conversation, the agent can get a fuller grasp of the customer’s situation and best determine how they (and the product) can be of help.

When it’s time to contact a company to gain an understanding of their product, or to get resolution with an issue, people want a sympathetic, helpful person to assist them. A person with a commonality of interests and understanding, someone who makes it easy to comprehend what you need to know. Someone who gets you. Someone who speaks your language.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Before social media content began to consume our daily lives, before reading the paper and traditional advertisements were replaced with thumb scrolls and clickable ads, there was a distinct delineation between brands and their followers.

Enter the digital age, where brands can create relationships that speak to, engage with, and inspire their core audience — their community. You might roughly define “community” as a group of people. They can live together, work together, or simply be interested in the same things. Have you ever held a conversation with a group of people passionate about one topic? They don’t have to know one another, but their devotion or disdain for something will surely make you think their ties are deep.

These communities, when they come together because of a shared dedication to a brand, product, service, or entertainment offering, can have an notable amount of power. Not that a community can make or break a brand based on the tone of its conversation, but smart companies will want to take the time to build and nurture their brand community. Here are some ways to make that happen.

Pay attention to authentic feedback. A group of unpaid people chatting about something on the internet is the textbook definition of an authentic conversation. The support of these impassioned communities can create real-world repercussions with their favorite brands. This happened recently with the die-hard fans of Marvel Studios, when the poster for Marvel’s Avengers: Endgame was adjusted just hours after intense fan backlash over a presumed slight of one of the film’s performers. It’s a perfect example of community interacting with — and affecting the decisions of — a major brand.

Build a team of brand ambassadors. If people will talk about your brand for free, a little recognition or a retweet here and there doubles as an unsolicited endorsement and shows that you are engaged with your audience. Build credibility and trust by carefully bringing your favorite customers into the fold of your social content and communities.

Get help getting noticed. It can be hard to get a leg up on the competition. One way to stand out is through the proper building and moderation of a thriving online community. Getting a large base of enthusiasts up and running will help your product or service break through the chatter. This dedicated, focused group of organic fans will make you a front-runner in your industry with each and every conversation and positive mention.

It’s safe to say, if your brand has an online presence you need to be strategic about building a vibrant and engaged online community. Be aware that building and maintaining communities takes smart, practiced work; if you build it, they may not necessarily come. We pride ourselves on assembling, growing, and supporting communities that become ideal brand extensions. In the best instances, these communities reflect the values and interests of the brands they represent.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Since their inception over 20 years ago, blogs have and continue to serve a wide variety of purposes, and they’re more than just reading material. Whether by an average Joe or Jane logging their daily experiences, a popular artist sharing new work, or a company making its latest announcement, most blogs have one thing in common: they help shape one’s brand.

Of course, blogs take time and energy to maintain, as posting infrequently can make it hard to keep an active audience. Do you need a blog for your business? Maybe, maybe not (we’d need to know your brand to say for sure). But if you’re ready to start one – or for tips to improve your current one – here are four approaches to building content and readership.

Be an Industry Resource

Use your blog to share your expertise in your field. By sharing regular, insightful posts, readers will return to your site because they know they can rely on you for information that’s relevant to them. Sprout Social and Buffer are great examples of this, with their consistent posts on the world of social media and how brands can make the most of various platforms. Notice also how they’ve named their blogs: Not Blog, but Insights and Resources, respectively.

By sharing content that benefits social media managers and marketers, Sprout and Buffer (and others like them) build trust with the core audience that would want to use their product. When those people need a social scheduling and/or monitoring platform, they’re more likely to think of one who they already know has a finger on the pulse of their industry.

Provide Exclusive Perspective

A blog can serve as a direct line to the people from individuals who maybe don’t see the spotlight as often as, say, a community manager or brand ambassador. Think of how many game companies use “developer diary”-style posts to share details about the game: what went into the design of a new zone, or a new character or skin players can look forward to, all from the perspective of someone working to create it.

TV channels like Bravo and AMC provide perspective with sneak peeks, behind-the-scenes footage, episode recaps, and interviews. Viewers come back for content they won’t see as part of regular programming but give them deeper looks into their favorite actors, characters, and shows.

Add Personality

Your blog should be more than corporate announcements and white papers. In the same way as you can use your blog to give the CEO a direct line to your audience, you can also use it as an opportunity to celebrate the people behind the screen. Showing off your company culture and the passions of your employees allows current and potential customers to connect with you on a personal level.

Engage Meaningfully

This goes for both the content you create and the way you respond to comments: write in a voice your readers can relate to. You can still keep things professional without filling your blog with jargon and corporate-speak. Your customers are more likely to read something that “speaks their language” and to comment back because they feel like they can have a conversation with you.

Blogs are going the same way as influencer marketing, trending away from huge names and more towards micro-influencers whose followers may not be as many but are more loyal and thoughtfully engaged. Take the time to respond to and moderate the comments on your blog so they reflect the community you want to foster.

We’ve written before about how customer service and engagement drive brand loyalty, and brand loyalty can help increase sales. Blogs work the same way, but with the added benefits of SEO. Strategic content writing drives SEO (search engine optimization), which in turn drives web traffic, and ultimately sales. By building trust in your brand’s industry expertise, readers are more likely to spend with you when they require your products or services. Those sales ultimately lead to referrals from the customers who now value you as more than just a service provider. And from there, well, just watch that referral snowball keep rolling.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Think of the last time you made a digital sale, and all that went into closing it. You put your content and message in front of your target audience. You provided value to someone who needed what you were offering. Hopefully you offered them an easy checkout experience. Congratulations! Now that you’ve done it once with that customer, wouldn’t it stand to reason you’d want to do it again? Remember, it’s easier to keep an existing customer than acquire a new one.

That’s why seeking out customer feedback is so important. Getting feedback from your audience is how you retain customers; it helps you give them more of what they like and less of what they don’t. Taking a long, hard look at what’s working and what isn’t will ultimately lead you to improving your user experience and attracting new customers. But what’s the best way to get that valuable information? Let’s look at the five best ways to collect customer feedback.

Follow up after they buy. Once your customer has made a purchase online, check in to see how you did. Solicit feedback on both the product and your customer service during the sales process. This gives you insight into what originally won you their business and informs you of what you could have improved. A pop-up survey available at your checkout page (or one that appears when they log into your site) can check this box for you. But what will entice them to fill out that survey? Read on…

Give them free things. When looking for customer feedback, it doesn’t hurt to tempt your customers with a little something for their efforts. Offering freebies in return for feedback is a great way to trade value for value. You might offer store credit or a discount on a future purchase. Perhaps you’ll send a free informational product or eBook on a topic related to your industry; this gives you the added benefit of looking like a trusted, credible expert in your field. In return, they give you valuable intelligence about the sale that helps you tweak your approach going forward.

Monitor social media. Your social media channels are one of the best ways to stay in close contact with your customers. Don’t overextend yourself trying to keep up with every social network. Focus on the channels that the majority of your customers frequent. There are two ways to gather feedback through social media engagement:

  • Proactively, by asking your followers for their comments and opinions
  • Reactively, by responding to customers who reach out to you

Both forms of communication are important. Proactive engagement allows you to get valuable data on your product and service. Reactive engagement lets you get ahead of any potential issues or complaints. By responding to their questions quickly, you’re showing your customers you care.

Use your email list to ask for feedback. Your electronic mailing list should be comprised of customers who want to hear from you often. Take the opportunity to ask for feedback during some of your regularly scheduled emails. This can take the form of polls, surveys, or open-ended questions. Don’t overdo it — you should still be providing relevant updates and valuable information to your customers. But throwing in a question or two related to feedback at the end of an email can’t hurt.

Use chat. Using a live chat feature as part of your website’s user interface is a great way to receive prompt customer feedback. It’s a valuable tool in your customer service team’s toolbox. Your customer may have a problem that requires escalation; if so, that’s okay. There are a lot of issues your customers are going to bring to your website that a chat tool can quickly resolve. Give your customers fast, easy access to your customer support team as soon as they visit the site. Customers appreciate that kind of convenience and flexibility, and it gives you an opportunity to “surprise and delight” them. This builds trust and will keep them coming back for more.

Once you make the effort to collect customer feedback, you’re on the road to providing superior service and user experience. Whether you follow one or more of the approaches listed above or simply want to better serve your customers, ModSquad can help. We’ll work with you to develop a customized plan, guiding you through the process step by step. Intrigued? Contact us today!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

If you’re like us, you’ve already got March 18–22 marked off on your calendar, and you’re planning to be in San Francisco during that time. Why, you ask? It’s the 2019 Game Developers Conference, of course, one of the major events of the year for those of us who live, play, and work in and alongside the video game industry. Since our founding, ModSquad has provided empassioned player support and moderation for everything from desktop games to AR-heightened play experiences.

For us, it’s always “Game on!” We show that passion in the work we do for awesome video game publishers like EA, Activision, Wooga, Neowiz, Bandai Namco, Konami, and Zynga. (Not to mention a good number of other big-name projects that we would love to tell you about, but just can’t — darn those non-disclosure agreements!) When we have the opportunity to meet with clients, partners, and peers in the industry, we jump on it. This year’s GDC expo, held at SF’s Moscone Convention Center, promises to continue the bigger-and-better streak that defines this show.

As a precursor to the expo, GDC recently released its 2019 State of the Industry Survey, which touched upon topics like the unionization of game industry professionals and the dominance of game storefront Steam. While these issues will no doubt be chewed over at March’s event, it’s the previews of upcoming releases that will fill gamers’ newsfeeds. Also of note: keynote events from industry powerhouses, such as the Google announcement that may or may not reveal details about the company’s Project Stream (a gaming streaming service) and Project Yeti (a gaming console and controller).

In addition to taking the opportunity to check out new products and play a few arcade games, our own Rich Weil, SVP, Global Operations, will be on hand to check in with familiar faces and spread the good word about ModSquad. If you’re in town, take a few minutes to meet up with Rich, share your news, and hear about how ModSourcing saves game publishers more than a few arcade coins while offering top-ranked, flexible player support. If you’re lucky, maybe Rich will share some of his favorite cheat codes with you! See you in San Francisco.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It’s almost here… That’s right, SXSW 2019 begins this Friday, and ModSquad will be exhibiting for the third year in a row. Whether you’re attending for the insightful panels, first looks at new movies, music performances, or just the endless opportunities for selfies and swag, this year’s event will be one for the books. With so much to do, we recommend reading through our tips below before heading into the action.

Panels We Wouldn’t Miss

If you’re a reader of our blog, you probably share our interest in digital engagement. And if you share our interest in digital engagement, you’ll probably be just as psyched for these upcoming panels as we are. See you there!

Creating “Sound-On” Content in a Sound-Off World
Saturday, March 9, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Why we’re excited: Why bother with background music when most videos are watched on mute? We love seeing how creators compel viewers to pump up the volume. Find out more…
Is Social Media the New Fast Food?
Sunday, March 10, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Why we’re excited: As moderators and social strategists, we see a lot of content (some more meaningful than others). Will digital detox trends mean less social media use or just a shift in what people feel compelled to engage with? Find out more…
Transforming the Workplace Through Remote Work
Sunday, March 10, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Why we’re excited: We at ModSquad are no strangers to the remote work model (after all, we’ve been doing it for 10+ years). We’re glad to see more organizations embracing the value of flexibility. Find out more…
Wacko World and the Rise of Memelord Brands
Sunday, March 10, 5:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Why we’re excited: With endless accounts vying for your ❤️s and retweets, we love seeing the creative ways brands are standing out. More are learning how to do memes right and avoid ending up on r/fellowkidsFind out more…
Realigning ROI and Community
Sunday, March 10, 5:30 – 5:45 p.m.
Why we’re excited: Building community isn’t just about increasing followers. It’s about the long-term value engaged, loyal customers bring to your brand. Find out more…
What Now? Brand Success in a New Privacy Landscape
Monday, March 11, 9:30 – 10:30 a.m.
Why we’re excited: With our history working with kids brands and our focus on brand trust, digital safety is always on our minds. Is an hour enough to unpack everything pertaining to online privacy? Maybe not, but it’s a good start. Find out more…
How to Build and Maintain Online Game Communities
Friday, March 15, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Why we’re excited: It’s where it all started for ModSquad. We’re always keen to hear insights on how community is evolving for MMOs and gaming in general. Find out more…
Visit ModSquad

During a day full of walking, you’ll be ready for a break. Come by and chill out at ModSquad’s Tropical Getaway on the Trade Show floor, Booth #1433. We’ll be there all day from March 10-13.

Be sure to stop by our Tropical Happy Hour on Sunday, March 10 from 3–4 p.m. Umbrella drinks will be had. Need we say more?

Click here to learn more or to set up a time to come by and chat.

4 Tips for Making the Most of the SXSW Experience

At ModSquad, we’re all about strategic planning and digital safety, so we’ve applied our knowledge to helping you stay safe and make the most of your time at SXSW.

  1. Plan ahead. Check schedules ahead of time and decide which speakers, performances, and exhibits are most important to you. Set reminders for yourself that give you plenty of time to arrive early and get in the door for what you want to see.
  2. Bring your business cards. You never know who you’ll meet at SXSW. Whether or not you’re there to network, we highly recommend carrying some business cards so you can trade and reconnect after the event.
  3. Bring an empty bag! SXSW (unofficially, Swag by Swagwest) is all about free stuff. Your pockets can only hold so much, so tote an empty bag (and leave plenty of room in your suitcase if you’re flying in) for the many goodies you’re bound to come by.
    • Pro Tip: Stop by our booth (Trade Show #1433) for a fun-in-the-sun beach ball!
  4. Leave time to recharge and stay healthy. Don’t leave your hotel without a (reusable) water bottle, and keep it topped off throughout the day. And as tempting as it’ll be to attend too many panels and snack on junk food, don’t underestimate the importance of a good night’s sleep and a nutritious meal. Listen to your body, and take time to sit and relax indoors or in the shade if you start to feel tired. Lastly, you’ll be shaking a lot of hands, so bring along some travel-size hand sanitizer for periodic use.

If you can’t make it to SXSW in person this year, be sure to follow us on Twitter and Instagram, where we’ll be sharing all the highlights. Enjoy the show!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Valentine’s Day has come and gone, but we’re not done spreading love just yet! So grab some of that discounted candy we know you picked up on the 15th, and help us celebrate our February Mod of the Month, Robert R!

After working in customer service roles for over ten years, Robert started as a Mod Contractor in July 2015. His first project was with our client National Geographic, providing moderation and support for their kids’ game Animal Jam. Since then, he’s worked on a number of customer support projects, combining his passion and skill for helping others.

I have worked in many positions over the years and do very well on the phone, as I’m able to work a customer through their issue and get them what they need. I’m able to work with upset customers and make sure they know I understand their frustrations and keep them calm.

On his current projects, Robert provides customer support via phone, email, and live chats. Whether a customer has a question about the mobile game they’re playing or needs to return an item they purchased, Robert is on the case and eager to assist. His proudest moments are those in which he not only gets to help a customer resolve their issue, but also impresses the client in the process.

Being a Mod Contractor has given Robert the opportunity to work from home and manage his schedule around his home life. That’s an especially nice perk for him and his wife, who have four kids, two dogs, and four cats. In his spare time, you can find him gaming late into the night or enjoying his growing comic book collection.

Comics are a fitting hobby for Robert, as many of the Project Managers who’ve worked with him can attest to his superhero-like qualities:

“I’ve worked with Robert on multiple projects and he has ALWAYS helped out whenever he can. He’s a Mod I can trust and rely on all the time.”
— Heather Corwin, Assistant Project Manager

“I’ve had the pleasure of working with Robert on one of my previous projects, and he’s always been excellent at everything from working with his fellow Mods, to helping customers via phone and email support, to working closely with our client. He’s an extremely hard worker, adaptable to changes, and ensures that his job is done to the best of his ability — a truly invaluable Mod to have on your team!”
— Cassie Daley, Project Manager

“Robert’s passion for success means that he exceeds QA expectations with a consistency that would make 6.67408 × 10-11 m3 kg-1 s-2 (the gravitational constant of the universe) seem variable in comparison. As an aside, I think the physics reference is apt, since I am talking about a truly stellar Mod!

“Robert is always seeking out new ways to improve and isn’t someone that just wants to achieve the highest standards of customer service. Rather, he wants his towering standards to redefine what we should expect from a truly great customer service experience.”
— Joseph Moore, Project Manager

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Eyes on glass. In corporate terms, it means the continuous monitoring of a system. But put it into the aviation spectrum, and one envisions air-traffic controllers huddled intently over radar screens, keeping constant vigilance to safeguard all passengers under their watch.

Apply that concept to the airport’s social media presence. Travelers have become savvy enough to post or tweet at airports’ customer service operations for speedy resolutions to their queries. Without constant eyes on glass, or someone monitoring those channels, one would be left with unanswered questions and frustrated customers. That’s why more airports are turning to partners like ModSquad to provide that augmented support. Having a team of global agents (or, as we call them, “Mods”) to cover an airport’s social networks frees up the airport’s team to cover additional tasks.

As experts in social media monitoring for the stringent airport industry, ModSquad has the back of airport staffers and passengers alike. Just look at the work we’ve done for Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (read our DFW case study), which illustrates the value in augmenting an in-house team with social media support from ModSquad. The Mods monitor all social channels and direct messages and respond in real time. Case in point is an incident where a phone call alerted the airport to a potential security situation in the parking lot. ModSquad immediately went into overdrive, monitoring everything from social comments to direct messages to ensure that the airport team had complete visibility, and responded as quickly as possible. With a constant watch on social media, the Mods will at times see things from customers before the airport’s security team. In this case, the report fortunately turned out to be a false alarm, but it underscored the importance of ModSquad’s continuous eyes on glass.

At other times, ModSquad’s presence can help improve the passenger experience at an airport. Take, for example, the Paralympian with a large social following who came through DFW in a wheelchair. A placard on the mirror in the restroom was placed at her eye level and blocked her view. ModSquad saw her comments on social media and responded immediately. DFW’s customer experience team removed those placards from the mirrors, which the Paralympian noted on social on her next trip. Staying on top of passengers’ social comments can help quickly turn a situation from negative to positive.

ModSquad also leads the way in establishing and maintaining a support infrastructure that alleviates some of the burden for airport staff. At Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, ModSquad helped PHX establish a Zendesk support system that assists more than 100,000 daily customers. Read the PHX case study to learn more.

With interactions such as these happening on a regular basis, it’s easy to see how augmenting their social teams assists airports in supporting and protecting their passengers and their brand. ModSquad helps airports offer superior traveler experiences by improving:

Social channel monitoring — Constant coverage alerts airports to any problematic digital content and offers rapid response to on-the-go travelers.

Passenger experience — Outsourced agents can meet customers where and how they choose to communicate, whether on social media, email, chat, phone, or in-app, 24/7/365.

Many of the Mods are travel enthusiasts themselves. Having that passion for the air travel industry ingrained in them, it’s second nature for the Mods to provide spot-on support to airport customers. With that kind of specialized service, airports worldwide can set their course for first-class passenger engagement.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Most businesses will experience seasonal trends. It’s only natural for a surf shop by the beach to peak in the summer, while an online toy store will flourish on the run up to Christmas. On the flip side of the busy season are the quieter periods. During these lulls, creating the perfect brand content can feel like a stretch, but not to worry! There are creative ways to keep the flow throughout the year.

So what can you say when it seems like there’s nothing to say?

Keep It Meaningful

The most important thing to remember when creating content during any time of year is to stay on brand and connect to your intended audience. It may increase your brand exposure to jump onto a trending hashtag, but you should always consider *why* it makes sense for you to take part. Digital mediums allow you to tell your story in diverse and authentic ways, meaning that during quieter periods, you have more time to invest in developing your assets.

Leverage Your Community

Engaging with the community is a great way to expand your creative limits and generate new and interesting content for your brand channels. Finding unique ways to leverage customer feedback and user generated content can keep your photos and stories fresh. Spend the time engaging with your customers: Check out the feedback you’ve received across review sites (think testimonials!) and invite videos, photos, and stories about your products in action.

Expand Your Calendar

All hail the “quirky calendar”! Thanks to internet holidays, there is reason to celebrate most days (I’m looking at you, Crossword Puzzle Day). Keeping up to date with the newest internet holidays and finding creative ways to celebrate your brand message is a wonderful way to expand your calendar. This also includes highlighting important milestones that matter to your business, such as an anniversary or a new team member’s first day. Think about the things that matter most to you and your brand, and seek out relevant connections throughout the year.

Developing and delivering relevant content is all about finding ways to connect with your community in an authentic and meaningful way. With thoughtful planning, and a bit of creativity, you can keep your content on point and on message, no matter the season.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The first thing consumers experience after an interaction with a brand representative is usually an emotion, whether it’s good or bad. That’s why exit surveys exist: to get a read on which emotion was elicited by an interaction with a given company. But now more than ever, we need to focus on that exit-emotion. The digital age has given companies an invaluable marketing and service opportunity — to be connected with their customers on a much more personal level.

By establishing an open dialogue with your audience and opening up as an entity (and not a faceless brand), you’ll be seen as a trusted, empathetic, and understanding presence. This process takes place when consumers and brands (through social or a real-world agent) interact.

The consumer’s goals are universal: acknowledgement, resolution, and maybe something a bit extra.

  • Consumers gravitate toward the things that are relatable, things with which they can empathize. This is the only reason the share, like, favorite, retweet, reblog, and love options exist on social media. It’s a way of broadcasting, “I agree with this! Do you?”
  • People like to be engaged, informed, and knowledgeable. So when we open that chat box or start that email thread, it’s important that whoever is on the other side treats the consumer as someone who has a goal. If they’ve reached out, chances are high that they need you to provide something.
  • Feeling valued leaves a great impression, and consumers might even bring up their experience to friends: “I spoke with their customer service. They’re great. I’d definitely recommend them.”
  • The bulk of customer sentiment comes from how things are handled rather than why we got in touch. Even if the agent at the other end of that chat wasn’t able to help you meet your goal, the customer will appreciate that they did everything in their power to help.

The brand strives to create a genuine interaction between company and consumer.

  • When a brand’s tone of voice meets the expectation of the consumer, they’re more likely to engage, whether that means sharing your articles or opening discourse on your content. If they see you more as a kindred spirit rather than a company, you’ve established a special connection with the consumer.
  • The rise of Stories on both Facebook and Instagram has enabled consumers to interact not just with friends and families, but with their favorite brand as well. It’s a behind-the-scenes invitation from companies to their ardent followers, and it creates a feeling of mutual connection between brand and consumer.
  • Understand that if someone reaches out to you, that means they want to speak to you. While bots are a great way to rule out any recurring issues and get a quick fix, bots often lack the emotional understanding that comes from a real person. Bots are programmed to assume; humans are programmed to understand. Providing real agents for your audience to speak is an investment in your own time that demonstrates your respect for your customer’s time.

The agent is face and voice of the brand.

  • Customers may jump from channel to channel expecting the same results across all platforms; companies need to ensure that their agents are fully prepared to offer them that level of service. Chat agents need to understand, for example, that response times and spacing out replies are necessary to make it feel like a chat. You can’t paste paragraphs of content in a chat and expect it to look natural to the consumer, just as you can’t ask “What can we help with?” as a standalone email.
  • Give the consumer the proper style of service on each platform, and back it up with a professional, empathetic listener at your end of the conversation.

In this digital age, there are more opportunities than ever before to leverage an emotional connection with customers. ModSquad can help with implementing a workforce that can really understand your story and help share it with the people that matter: your audience.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview