Loading...

Follow Mod Podge Rocks - Mod Podge Crafts and DIY on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

If you’ve never decoupaged before or just have some questions, use this resource to learn how to Mod Podge. Includes FAQs, videos, how-tos and more!

Do you want to learn how to decoupage? Here are my Mod Podge videos, and below that, a complete FAQ. I suggest printing this post and settling into a bubble bath – it’s lovely reading!

Notes on the videos:

  • If you are a beginning Mod Podger, GO HERE and watch all three beginner videos.
  • If you are having issues with bubbles and wrinkling, watch all three videos.
  • If you have a tacky project surface, spray it with clear acrylic sealer (several coats) and it will go away. Then watch all three videos.

If you can only watch one video, watch this one:

Learn How to Mod Podge

I’ve compiled a list of 101 Mod Podge uses that I think you have to see before you begin. It’s going to get you excited about the possibilities, and then you can keep these uses in mind as you go through the learning process! The FAQ is below.

About Mod Podge Is Mod Podge really Elmer’s glue?

No. MP can glue things down, but it is also a sealer and a finish.  It has “special” ingredients that school/craft glue doesn’t have. It’s much stronger than Elmer’s, especially over the long haul. Read this post about why you shouldn’t make your own Mod Podge.

Is Mod Podge waterproof when dry?

No.  it is waterbase and acrylic, which is great because that means it’s non-toxic.  You can use it with your children without fear. But all these things mean that it’s not totally waterproof.  Even the Outdoor formula is only highly water-resistant.

If you want to make your project waterproof, I recommend a clear, outdoor (or Enamel) acrylic sealer when your project is complete.  Make sure that the final layer of decoupage is completely dry before spraying.

I also want to add two things:

1) The Outdoor formula has been extensively tested and is very durable in outdoor conditions. It’s pretty close to waterproof, but you can’t throw an item with Outdoor on it into the pool and keep it there for three weeks without ruining the project. To be able to do so would make it waterproof.

2) If you get a few drops of water or moisture on a Mod Podged item, just wipe them off. You can also use a slightly damp cloth to clean a decoupaged item. Again, the formulas are very durable, just not waterproof.

What is cure time for Mod Podge (how long should I let it dry)?

It feels dry within an hour, but I wouldn’t hang up a project or use it until it’s been dry for 24 hours. For Hard Coat, the recommended dry time is 72 hours. Since Hard Coat is typically used on furniture, wait for 72 hours before putting anything on the furniture.

Does Mod Podge have a shelf life?

The experts have told me two years if unopened. If opened, it will be about six months to a year.

Is Mod Podge food safe? Can I use it on a plate?

No, it’s not food safe. It’s non-toxic, but becoming food safe requires a product to go through FDA approvals – not typical for art supplies. You should use decoupage on the back of a glass plate, and then you can put edible items on top.

You can put Mod Podge on the top of a plate, but you’ll need to put a clear glass plate over that before putting your food down.

I’ve heard you can make your own Mod Podge. Is this true?

No. I’ve had more than a few readers e-mail me with a ruined project, very disappointed after having used a homemade formula. Please read the article I wrote about it here.

Can I use Mod Podge with paint?

Absolutely – well mostly. You can use it with acrylic paint, and I highly recommend FolkArt Acrylic Paint as my brand of choice. These days I’m loving their multi-surface formula. I do not recommend using Mod Podge with latex paint.

I’ve never tried it, but I have more than a few reports telling me that decoupage medium makes the latex paint bubble up and causes a huge mess. So if in doubt, do a test.

Where can I buy Mod Podge? Where can I buy it internationally?

Mod Podge is available at AC Moore, Hobby Lobby, Jo-Ann, Michaels and WalMart. It is also available in smaller craft outlets and even online. I would call your local store to confirm stock, because inventory depends on the store. Also, if you are driving 50 miles to get some, you’ll want to make sure it’s in stock before you blow the gas money.

Plaidonline.com has a store locator, but this is for stores that carry any Plaid product. Call to confirm that the store carries the formula you are looking for.

Here’s a list of online retailers for Plaid product.

And lastly, if you are overseas, you’ll want the international distributor locator.

Where can I buy Mod Podge Dimensional Magic?

Dimensional Magic is sold at A.C. Moore, Hobby Lobby, Jo-Ann and Michaels. I would also recommend doing an online search if you can’t find it at your local store – there are plenty of online retailers. You can also purchase Dimensional Magic on Amazon.

Mod Podge Formulas What formula should I use for what project?

I wrote a formula guide that you can find here.

I’m on a budget and I can only afford one formula. Which one should I buy?

This is a very hard question for me to answer, because it really depends on the application. But if you have to get one formula, I would get original Gloss if you want a shiny finish or original Matte if you want a flat finish (no shine).

What formula is the most durable?

Hard Coat. I use it for all of my furniture projects.

What Mod Podge is best to use for an area of my home that will be exposed to moisture (bathroom, kitchen backsplash)?

You can use the Outdoor formula, but you’ll need a sealer to go over it because this particular formula can remain tacky. I recommend Minwax Polycrylic or another brush-on sealer. You don’t want to use a spray sealer indoors.

I want to make baby blocks that my baby/toddler can gnaw on. Which formula should I use?

None of the Mod Podge formulas are food safe, so they are not recommended to be in a toddler’s mouth. Mod Podge is non-toxic, but it’s better safe than sorry. I have not found an acrylic product that I would recommend for this use.

Is there such thing as colored Mod Podge? Can I tint Mod Podge with paint?

There is no such thing as colored Mod Podge, but you can tint it with paint. You can even create a stained glass look with it. I made these clings that you can peel and stick on glass.

Do I HAVE to use Fabric Mod Podge, or can I use the Original formula?

Fabric Mod Podge is really tough, very durable AND it’s washable. So I always use it for projects that need to be durable – like clothing, accessories and furniture.  If you are just Mod Podging fabric to letters and hanging them on the wall, you don’t need to use the Fabric formula.

If you are using Mod Podge on fabric-to-fabric (for instance, gluing a patch to a shirt) then yes, you should use the Fabric formula because it is washable.

Any tips for Mod Podging fabric/using Fabric Mod Podge?

I always “prepare” my fabric before Mod Podging it down. This means I brush medium coat on, let it dry and then cut it to fit the surface. Applying the Mod Podge not only prevents fraying, but also makes the fabric more flexible and easier to adhere to the surface smoothly.

Besides that, I treat fabric just like paper. The Fabric formula is a bit thicker than the Original formula, but used exactly the same way.

Is Mod Podge Outdoor waterproof?

You can’t submerge an item that’s been Podged with Outdoor for an extended period of time, so it’s not technically “waterproof.” But it’s really, really close.

How to Use Mod Podge What tips would you give to a beginner?
  1. Start with a simple project. Purchase a $1 frame and a cheap piece of scrapbook paper.
  2. Watch this video. It’s got all the tips and tricks you need.
  3. Have patience. Don’t rush the project. Put the kids down for a nap and take your time. You MUST allow for proper dry time to avoid wrinkles.
  4. Practice. Don’t expect your first project to turn out perfectly. Mine didn’t, and now I can Mod Podge like a pro. Be kind to yourself.
What is your Mod Podging process?  How can I get the best results?

You can watch this video, but here are my steps as well. I first prepare my surface by sanding wood, washing glass or tin, etc.  I paint the surface with several coats of acrylic paint (if desired).  Let that dry.  I cut my paper or fabric to fit the surface – I typically use a ruler and craft knife over scissors to get the most precise fit.

I apply a medium layer of my formula – enough so that it’s visible (white) on the surface. I apply Mod Podge to the surface as well as to the back of the paper or fabric.  I work quickly since Mod Podge dries quickly.  I smooth the paper or fabric onto the surface and roll out with a brayer.

I let that dry for 15 – 20 minutes, then I decoupage over the top. Let that dry and then give the whole project 2 – 3 more coats. Let dry before using.

How can I prevent wrinkles and bubbles?

This is the #1 question I get – and it’s such an important question that I made this video. The key is using enough Mod Podge during application, and allowing the Mod Podge to dry long enough between layers. Please watch the video for all the details.

PS – sometimes you’ll see wrinkles even if you follow my process, but many times they go away when the project is drying.

My Mod Podge project is tacky/sticky when dry. What can I do?

The Gloss formula is more likely to be tacky – the rule I’ve found is that the more glossy the formula, the more “tacky potential” it has. It really depends on the climate, drying time and a variety of factors.

If you find that your Mod Podged item is still tacky even after drying, just use a clear acrylic spray or brush-on sealer on top. Though Mod Podge is self-sealing, the sealer gives your project an added layer of protection.

Applying Mod Podge Do I need to prepare a surface before Mod Podging it?

Absolutely! Here you go:

  • Wood – Sand smooth with fine grit sandpaper, wipe off sawdust.
  • Glass – Thoroughly wash in warm, soapy water to remove dirt, dust, and grease film. Then rinse in warm water and let it dry.
  • Canvas – Wipe primed canvas clean; if unprimed, apply 2 coats of gesso primer or acrylic paint.
  • Plaster – Wipe clean with damp cloth.
  • Plastic – Clean with soap and water. You’ll need to test the surface though as Mod Podge doesn’t stick to all plastics (see the next question).
  • Papier-Mâché – Wipe clean with damp cloth.
  • Terra Cotta – Wipe clean with damp cloth.
  • Tin – Wash with soap and water, then wipe with a white vinegar dampened cloth if it’s really dirty.
What surfaces can I NOT Mod Podge on?

Plastics, items coated with polymers and felt. Continue reading for detail.

Plastics. You’ll need to test the plastic first with a small square of paper or fabric. Mod Podge the paper/fabric down and let it dry for 15 minutes. If it peels off really easily, it’s not going to work. If it is more difficult to peel off, then you should be safe to Mod Podge the item. You’ll still be able to peel off the Mod Podged paper/fabric, so don’t worry about ruining the surface.

Items coated with a polymer, like Teflon, are too slick.

Felt. It feels really rough when it’s Mod Podged, plus it soaks in and you have to glop a lot on. Touching Mod Podged felt gives me the yips! This is just personal though – you might not mind Mod Podged felt.

I want to decoupage photographs. What do I need to do?

I don’t use original photographs; rather, I make photocopies on a laserjet printer so that I can preserve the originals. The other reason I don’t use original photos is that they have some thickness to them as well as a coating – both things make them a little bit more difficult to Mod Podge. I like my Mod Podging as flat as possible.

If you want to go ahead and use photos, just make sure to use a lot of Mod Podge, because it takes more than normal. You’ll have to hold the photos in place for several minutes after you apply the Podge, so that they don’t come up.

If you want to make copies or computer printouts of your photos, see the next question.

I want to Mod Podge computer printouts – how do I handle inkjet versus laserjet prints?

Inkjet ink bleeds, laserjet doesn’t. Here’s what you need to know.

First of all, don’t print anything on photo paper. Regular printer paper is best because it doesn’t have a coating on it. I use 20 lb. paper, but you can go thicker if you need to.

Inkjet – Print the picture onto the paper and let it dry for at least ten minutes. Spray both sides of the paper with clear acrylic sealer (several coats) and let it dry.

Paint with a thin layer of Mod Podge on both sides, then let it dry. Then you can craft as normal. It sounds like a lot of steps, but it’s not that difficult – you just have to make sure it all dries.

Laserjet – no prep work necessary. I always user laserjet printouts, even if I have to go to an office supply store to get it done. Maybe I’m lazy?

How thick should each coat of Mod Podge be?

I use a “medium” coat when applying one surface to another. By medium, I mean that I can visibly see the white completely covering the surface. If it’s clear in some areas before you apply paper, it means the Mod Podge has already dried and the surface needs more.

You are better off applying too much than not enough, because you can always wipe away excess. Not enough will cause wrinkles. The coats to seal don’t need to be as thick. I would use a few thinner coats to seal your project.

How many coats should I apply?

I would use two – three coats to seal a project. You’ll want more coats depending on how much the project will be handled. If it’s a piece of furniture under heavy use, I’d even go up to five.

How many coats of Outdoor Mod Podge should I use?

I recommend four – five coats for a project that is going to be outdoors. If the project is going to go through some serious weather conditions, you should also purchase an outdoor sealer for added protection.

How should I smooth out paper?

I recommend a brayer and squeegee like in the Mod Podge tool set. The brayer is good for big, flat surfaces and the squeegee gets into corners.

Are there certain types of papers that don’t decoupage well?

So far the only items I haven’t been able to Mod Podge smoothly are tissue paper and napkins – but I have seen people decoupage these smoothly, so I know it can be done. I guess I just don’t have the finesse?

I would say that you should try it, and don’t be discouraged if you get wrinkles. They add character!

If you are a newbie, start with thicker scrapbook papers before moving to thinner. Once you get the hang of it, you will be able to move to the thinner papers.

Don’t forget to check out my video on eliminating wrinkles.

How should I handle Mod Podging edges of a project?

I always trim my paper or fabric to fit my surface exactly so that I don’t have to mess with overlap. It’s can be very difficult to trim edges of paper or fabric after a surface has been Mod Podged.

In terms of Mod Podging edges, just add more Podge around the edges and wipe away with a brush. It’s a good idea to do around the edge of any project to finish it, especially furniture.

How can I minimize/eliminate brush strokes?

Use a soft bristled brush and then sand between coats. To do this, apply the Mod Podge and let it dry an hour. Then use #0000 steel wool and lightly sand the entire surface. Do this between every coat. After the final coat, sand and then spray a clear acrylic sealer to finish.

Can I use a blow dryer on my project to speed up the drying process?

Yes, but keep the blow dryer back at least 12 inches and don’t use an uber-hot setting. You will definitely melt your project or the Podge if you get too close or use too hot of a setting.

Finishing Your Project Do I have to use a sealer to finish the project?

You don’t HAVE to use a sealer after Mod Podge (it’s self-sealing), but I always do, just for extra protection. Plus sometimes Mod Podge stays tacky in certain climates, so I spray it to prevent that.

Any clear acrylic spray sealer will do (the Mod Podge brand sealers are good) . . . though if an item is going to be exposed to water, you’ll need to use a waterproof/enamel sealer.

Wait about an hour for Mod Podge to dry before applying any additional sealer.

What sealer should I use with coasters or other items that need to be waterproof?

There are waterproof/enamel sealers on the market (ask at your local hardware store). I’ve also heard that Minwax Polycrylic is amazing for sealing and making Mod Podged items waterproof.

Do you know of a good non-toxic sealer I can use?

Most spray sealers have VOCs, which are fine if you aren’t spraying them into your mouth or nose. But if you want something super-duper safe with no VOCs, use this.

Mod Podge Tools

Get my list of essential decoupage supplies here.

What type of brush should I use to apply Mod Podge?

You can use regular taklon or natural bristle brushes found at your local craft retailer. I use a soft bristled, 1” brush in most instances. Sometimes I go smaller, but the 1” brush works for most of my projects.

A foam brush can also be used, but I find that my soft bristled brush minimizes brush strokes.

What brand do I personally use? FolkArt or Martha Stewart brushes. Great quality, great price.

What is the best way to clean brushes? Do I need to use a new one each time?

You should always wash brushes immediately after Mod Podging. Regular brush cleaner or non-abrasive soap works very well for cleaning brushes.  You don’t need to use a new one each time as long as you wash the brushes out thoroughly before anything dries.

What should I do if Mod Podge dries in my brush?

You can try soaking it in hot water to see if you can salvage it, but you’ll likely have to throw it away.

Why do I need a brayer/Mod Podge tool set?

I use a brayer for larger items – like tabletops. I can apply more force to smooth and work more quickly than if I just used my hands. The brayer just glides across the paper or fabric, so you can get everything flat before it dries.

Special Situations I need to send a Mod Podged project to someone – how do I pack it?

I recommend using Glad Press N’ Seal around the entire project before packing it. Wax paper also works, I just like Press N’ Seal because it’s easier to press around edges and round surfaces.

Mod Podge smears my marker/stamping ink. What can I do?

Spray both sides of the paper with workable fixatif (several coats) and let it dry. Paint with a thin layer of medium on both sides, let it dry. Then you can decoupage as normal. It sounds like a lot of steps, but it’s not that difficult – you just have to make sure it all dries.

I actually wrote an article about this very thing here – you need to check it out!

Decoupage smears my inkjet printouts. What can I do?

Spray both sides of the paper with clear acrylic sealer (several coats) and let it dry. Paint with a thin layer of your selected formula on both sides, let it dry. Then you can decoupage as normal. It sounds like a lot of steps, but it’s not that difficult – you just have to make sure it all dries.

What if I finished my project and sprayed with a sealer – only to realize I forgot to add something – can I decoupage on top of the sealed surface?

Yes, you can. But you will need to re-Podge the entire surface. Otherwise you’ll be able to see where it’s Mod Podged versus where it’s sealed.

Is it possible to ‘un-Mod Podge’ something once you have Mod Podged it?

If it’s completely dry, the answer is “sort of.” You are going to have to wet the Podge and scrape it off. Mod..

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Inspired by my childhood, I created a DIY bean bag toss game using clay saucers and a printable. This bean bag game is easy to assemble and you’ll have a blast!

Skills Required: Beginner. You’re going to paint, cut out a printable, and apply the printable to terra cotta pot saucers with adhesive. Very easy.

I grew up in a family of five children, and we used to get tossed outside in the summer. “Go play!” my mom would say . . . so we made up a lot of games, rode bikes, and took hikes by the lake. Which now that I think about, wasn’t actually a lake, but was a huge reservoir for runoff. It seemed big at the time :0

I always loved being outside with my brothers, and we had a few games that were our favorites. One of them was tossing tennis balls into buckets, and giving ourselves “points” depending on the bucket we were able to reach with the balls. Inspired by that childhood game, I created a DIY bean bag toss using clay pot saucers and a printable.

This bean bag game is SO easy to assemble and you’ll be having a blast in minutes! Children can help make this too, before they play.

You can play with as many people as you like, but I find this bean bag toss game is most fun playing with two people in rounds. You can do a tournament bracket if you like!

Make Your Own Bean Bags

I purchased bean bags because my sewing machine was in the shop at the time I wanted to complete my bean bag toss game. Had my sewing machine been available, I would’ve made them myself out of cotton duck material (available at Jo-Ann or a similar fabric store). The bean bags I purchased were 5″ x 5″ squares – though apparently “regulation” beanbags are 6″ x 6″ square.

One yard of cotton duck material makes about 20 bean bags at 6″ x 6″, and you’ll probably want to make a few different colors so scoring is easy to keep track of. You’ll cut out squares 1″ larger than you want your finished bags and use a double stitch or zigzag to reinforce them.

Each bag should contain approximately 1-3/4 cup of corn to weigh between 15-16 oz, which is regulation for cornhole. So yes, you can use these bean bags with cornhole as well!

Storing Your Bean Bag Game

This DIY bean bag toss game uses Mod Podge Outdoor. I mention in the instructions that it is the better bet if you want your bean bag game to last year after year.

The only issue is that I find that Mod Podge Outdoor sometimes stays tacky for quite awhile (because of cure time), especially in humid environments.

I recommend using a spray or brush on sealer over the top if you want the bean bag game to be able to be stacked for storage.

If you want to leave this game out in the sun, use Outdoor Mod Podge and then a UV resistant or brush on sealer. That way the sun won’t fade your project.

Are you ready to learn how to make this DIY bean bag toss game? Keep reading!

DIY Bean Bag Game

Gather These Supplies

  • Printer and paper
  • Bean bag toss printable – get it here
  • Clay pot saucers – 8”, get five or six (if you want to use the 100 point value!)
  • Spray paint – white
  • Scissors
  • Spray adhesive and/or Mod Podge Outdoor
  • Paintbrush
  • Beanbags in various colors (I purchased these)

Protect your work surface and place your clay saucers down. Spray them evenly with paint and let dry for at least 20 minutes. Turn over and repeat. Continue doing this until your saucers are evenly covered on both sides and dry. Always remember to spray in a well ventilated area!

Of course if you have acrylic paint on hand, you are welcome to use it to paint these saucers. Honestly I’m more of a painter than a spray painter. I don’t have the patience that comes with using spray paint, so acrylic paint it is! You can use a multisurface or outdoor version.

Tip: paint six saucers if you’d like to use the 100 point value in addition to the 10 – 50 option shown.

Print out the included bean bag toss printable on presentation paper (which is more durable), then cut out the circles using your scissors. I have provided point values of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 100.

Working one number and saucer at a time, coat the back of the paper with a light layer of spray adhesive.

Smooth your number down inside the saucer until it’s completely adhered. Repeat with the other numbers.

To make a more permanent DIY bean bag toss game that will last year after year, adhere your numbers to the saucers using Mod Podge Outdoor as I described. If you don’t care if the game lasts more than one season, regular Mod Podge or spray adhesive are fine to use.

Take your DIY bean bag toss game outside and set the saucers as far apart as you like – you’ll find that it’s quite a fun challenge to play, and you’ll have a blast. I played with my neighbors and we got quite a little competition going! It was hilarious.

If you create this bean bag game, let me know in the comments. Also don’t forget to let me know who won ;D

DIY Bean Bag Toss
Yield: 1 game
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Active Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Difficulty: Easy
Estimated Cost: $20

Inspired by my childhood, I created a DIY bean bag toss game using clay saucers and a printable. This bean bag game is easy to assemble and you’ll have a blast!

Print
Materials
Tools
  • Scissors
  • Paintbrush
Instructions
  1. Protect the work surface and place your clay saucers down. Spray them evenly with paint and let dry for at least 20 minutes. Turn over and repeat. Continue doing this until your saucers are evenly covered on both sides and dry.
  2. Print out the included bean bag toss printable on presentation paper (which is more durable), then cut out the circles using your scissors. I have provided point values of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 100.
  3. Working one number and saucer at a time, coat the back of the paper with a light layer of spray adhesive.
  4. Smooth your number down inside the saucer until it’s completely adhered. Repeat with the other numbers.
  5. Seal the numbers to the terra cotta pot saucers with Mod Podge Outdoor or another water-resistant sealer. Let dry for 24 hours before using.
Notes

Always remember to use spray paint in a well ventilated area! To play, let each person take a turn with all bean bags. Add up the total score. Player with the largest score wins.

© Amy Anderson
Project Type: Summer / Category: Holiday Crafts

The post DIY Bean Bag Toss: the Best Outdoor Games! appeared first on Mod Podge Rocks.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Do you want to learn how to decoupage the right way? This tutorial shows you the seven most important steps to Mod Podging correctly!

Don’t forget to scroll down to the bottom of the post to get a video that will show you the basics of applying paper to wood. It will help you start your decoupaging journey on the right foot.

Do you want to be a perfect Mod Podger? Who doesn’t want to learn how decoupage and be great at it, I ask! I’ve been decoupaging for a long time, and I’ve got a tried-and-true method that I wanted to share with you.

Here are the seven steps I always take to get perfect Mod Podging, every time. If you want to learn how to decoupage correctly, keep reading . . . and scroll to the bottom for a great video!

What is Decoupage?

Before you start, you might be wondering – what is decoupage? I use the word in two ways. I use it as a noun with the Wikipedia definition: “is the art of decorating an object by gluing colored paper cutouts onto it in combination with special paint effects, gold leaf and so on.” Mod Podge is a glue that you can decoupage with!

And I also use “decoupage” as a verb . . . such as, “to decoupage paper onto a surface.” With the Podge, of course!

How to Decoupage

STEP ONE: Prepare your surface. Almost any surface can be used to create a decoupage project. Suitable surfaces include wood, papier mache, terra cotta, tin, cardboard and glass.

Only SOME plastics are okay for decoupage – I recommend testing a small area before completing your entire project to make sure that the Mod Podge will adhere.

Optional: Basecoat your surface with acrylic paint. Many items need to be basecoated before decoupaging if your surface is unfinished. I recommend FolkArt, Apple Barrel, or Martha Stewart acrylic paints.

STEP TWO: Pick your Mod Podge formula. If you aren’t sure what to pick, that’s totally understandable  – that’s why I’ve written this Mod Podge formula guide that you should visit. It explains everything.

STEP THREE: Prepare Items to be Mod Podged. Here a few tips you should know before beginning.

  • Fabric – Wash and dry the fabric (do not use fabric softener). Iron (if necessary) and then lay out on a covered work surface. Wax paper is preferable for covering your table. Using a brush, paint a light coat of Fabric Mod Podge onto your fabric. Allow to dry. This will allow you to cut the fabric like paper without frayed edges.
  • Paper – Most items, especially thicker papers and scrapbook papers, are ready to be Mod Podged as is. If you are working with thinner sheets of scrapbook paper or inkjet printouts, it may help to spray your paper with a clear acrylic sealer before Mod Podging. Spray both sides and allow to dry before using.
  • Tissue Paper – There is nothing that you need to do to prepare tissue paper, but just be advised that because it is so thin, it is very difficult to Mod Podge without wrinkles. The good news is that wrinkles are typically part of the charm of using tissue paper and add a little character to your surface. Mod Podge tissue paper carefully so that it doesn’t tear.

Cut out your paper or whatever it is that you are planning to decoupage. Experiment with design elements to determine the layout of your piece.

Add interest to your design by using large and small pieces, layering and overlapping elements and coordinating colors.

STEP FOUR: Cut your items to fit your surface. Measure as necessary, with a ruler and a pencil, and trim your items to fit. You’ll be much happier if you cut everything to fit before Mod Podging as opposed to after.

STEP FIVE: Adhere each element with your Mod Podge. Always start with the underlying design elements and work your way upward (when layering). Apply a medium coat of Mod Podge to the surface.

Too little Mod Podge and you will get wrinkles – and you can always wipe away excess Mod Podge. Place your item(s) to be decoupaged on top of the Mod Podge and move onto step six.

STEP SIX: Smooth, Smooth, Smooth. Keep smoothing until all of the bubbles are removed. Then, AND THIS IS IMPORTANT, let your project dry for 15 – 20 minutes. Don’t put a top coat on right away.

Tip for working with large pieces: smooth from the center outward. Air bubbles can be removed with the Mod Podge Tool Set. Use the squeegee with smaller items such as trays – it was developed specifically for getting into corners. Use a brayer for larger items such as furniture.

STEP SEVEN: Add a protective coat of Mod Podge to your project using a sponge or flat brush. Allow to dry and then repeat. The number of coats you finish with is up to you, but we recommend at least two.

When you finish, if you experience any tackiness or just want to add durability, add a clear spray or brush-on sealer to the top. Let dry and you’re done!

EXTRA FINISHING TIP: For a very smooth finish, wet a piece of #400 grit sandpaper with water and sand lightly between coats. Wipe dry and polish with #0000 steel wool on the final coat.

For more information on how to decoupage and an FAQ, go here! And if you need over 400 decoupage projects to try, you can find my project gallery here.

How to Decoupage
Yield: 1 project
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Active Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Difficulty: Easy
Estimated Cost: $5

Do you want to learn how to decoupage the right way? This tutorial shows you the seven most important steps to Mod Podging correctly!

Print
Materials
  • Surface
  • Mod Podge
  • Scrapbook paper or fabric
  • Acrylic paint (optional)
Tools
  • Paintbrush
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Pencil
  • Craft knife and mat (optional)
Instructions
  1. Prepare your surface. Almost any surface can be used to create a decoupage project. Suitable surfaces include wood, papier mache, terra cotta, tin, cardboard and glass. Optional: basecoat your surface with acrylic paint.
  2. Pick your Mod Podge formula.
  3. Prepare Items to be Mod Podged. Cut out the paper or whatever it is that you are planning to decoupage. Experiment with design elements to determine the layout of the piece.
  4. Cut items to fit the surface. Measure as necessary, with a ruler and a pencil, and trim items to fit.
  5. Adhere each element with your Mod Podge. Always start with the underlying design elements and work upward (when layering). Apply a medium coat of Mod Podge to the surface.
  6. Smooth, Smooth, Smooth. Keep smoothing until all of the bubbles are removed. Then, AND THIS IS IMPORTANT, let the project dry for 15 – 20 minutes. Don't put a top coat on right away.
  7. Add a protective coat of Mod Podge to the project using a sponge or flat brush. Allow to dry and then repeat. Let dry before using.
Notes

Only SOME plastics are okay for decoupage – I recommend testing a small area before completing your entire project to make sure that the Mod Podge will adhere.

© Amy Anderson
Project Type: Tray / Category: Budget Crafts

Are you ready to get a visual on how to decoupage? Here are the basic steps of applying paper to wood using Mod Podge. Check it out! Just press “PLAY” in the center of the video.

The post How to Decoupage: 7 Steps to Perfect Mod Podging appeared first on Mod Podge Rocks.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Are you curious what the Mod Podge formulas look like when they are dry? Scroll down for a handy dandy guide! Very informative. Also get a video about the formulas at the end of the post.

I get A LOT of questions about using Mod Podge as a finish (learn to Mod Podge here!). After all, you can decoupage with it, but after you are done, you can use it as a finish! But how are the Mod Podge formulas going to look at the end of your project? Will they be shiny or what? That is one of the most common questions I get!

This visual guide is going to show you how each Mod Podge formula looks after you paint it onto your project and let it dry. I’ve also added a handy cheat sheet at the end that shows you all of the formulas in one graphic.

Three things you should do:

  1. Visit my Mod Podge formula guide to get more detailed information about these and additional Mod Podge formulas (these just happen to be the 10 most popular)
  2. To reduce brushstrokes from any of these formulas, use a soft bristled brush and then sand between coats. To do this, apply the Mod Podge and let it dry an hour. Then use #0000 steel wood and lightly sand the entire surface. Do this between every coat. After the final coat, sand and then spray a clear acrylic sealer to finish.
  3. Get a bonus video about the formulas by scrolling to the end of this post!
Mod Podge Finishes

You can see what each of the Mod Podge finishes look like when they are dry below!

Mod Podge Gloss – Shiny, glossy finish. This was one of the first Mod Podge formulas.

Mod Podge Matte – Flat finish with minimal shine

Mod Podge Hard Coat – Satin finish: somewhere in between a Gloss and a Matte (slightly shiny).


Outdoor Mod Podge – Shiny finish: even shinier than original Gloss

Fabric Mod Podge – Shiny finish: very similar to Outdoor

Antique Matte Mod Podge – Flat finish with a brown tint

Mod Podge Glow in the Dark – Shiny finish that glows in the dark when charged with light

Extreme Glitter Mod Podge – very sparkly finish! Tons of glitter. Even more than Sparkle Mod Podge

Mod Podge Super Gloss – HIGH gloss finish. This formula is a finish only – don’t use it to decoupage down paper

Brushstroke Mod Podge – textured finish: it’s designed for adding texture to a decoupage surface

Are you ready to see a video about the Mod Podge formulas? My friends Cathie and Steve will guide you:

Also, I’d love it if you would pin this graphic below!

Thanks for reading and let me know if you have any questions in the comments.

The post Mod Podge Formulas: What the Finishes Look Like appeared first on Mod Podge Rocks.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Get over 400 projects – all the Mod Podge crafts you'll ever need! Decoupage ideas with napkins, photos, on furniture, on canvas, paper, with glitter, fabric, and more. You'll love these projects!

When I started with Mod Podge over eight years ago, I was amazed by all of the Mod Podge crafts that were out there. Since that time I've done hundreds of projects using the world's best decoupage medium, and this is the library where I keep everything I've accomplished (plus projects from my contributors and guest bloggers, too!).

Mod Podge Crafts

If you're wanting to get started with decoupage and Mod Podge, this is the first place to begin. This collection of projects chronicles my decoupage journey over the past 8 years – all of my experiments and the various ideas I've tried. I also update this collection regularly with some of my new projects.

You know you want to be a part of all of the Mod Podge fun, right? If you have never used it before or used it for years, you'll find something here.

This collection of Mod Podge crafts amazing! It's all the Mod Podge projects you could ever want! As of the last count, our list of project tutorials was 400+ . . . and that's a lot. These are in order of popularity.

Before Beginning Your Mod Podge Projects

I also want to share a few instructional tools that might help you once you decide which project you are going to do. Check out my 7 steps to perfect Mod Podging and my learn how to Mod Podge guide (with frequently asked questions).

If you use all the resources together I promise you'll have success. I also would love for you to sign up for my weekly newsletter for even more projects and updates (plus you get a free e-book!).

Before you jump in, I wanted to make sure to share an important video with you – my tips and tricks for successful decoupage with no wrinkles. Check it out by pressing “PLAY” in the middle of the video.

Scroll down to get the entire list of Mod Podge crafts. Have fun decoupaging!

Mod Podge Crafts
Personalized Mod Podge Coasters with Photos

Make a DIY Desk Organizer from Recycled Materials

EASY Egg Carton Art on Canvas (for Kids)

Easy Easter Garland Made with Yarn

Comic Book Craft: DIY Superhero Canvas

Easy Initial Wall Art on a Budget

Mother's Day Photo Vases from PVC Pipe

Make Baseball Bookends (and Hit a Home Run)

Easy DIY Window Clings Using Mod Podge

Easy Kids' Handprint Art for Mother's Day

Vintage Magnets: Easy Butterfly Decorations

DIY Screen Printing with Mod Podge

DIY Paperweights from Glass Candle Holders

Pretty Painted Acorns for a Fall Display

DIY iPad Case Made for a Dollar

Crafts for Men: Comic Book Coasters

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Use old cereal boxes and toilet paper rolls to create a unique DIY desk organizer! This craft organizer is perfect if you're on a budget.

Scroll down to the bottom of the post to see a video of how to make a recycled desk organizer of your very own. You'll also get two bonus projects in the video: a drawer organizer and a magazine holder!

I've been saving some cereal boxes and toilet paper/paper towel rolls for awhile. I'm not just some weird hoarder – I had a purpose.

My goal was to recycle these items in a Mod Podge project. I thought, if everyone else can use these items for crafts, I can too. So I challenged myself! It's kind of fun to do that sometimes to see what you come up with.

DIY Desk Organizer

Based on what I had in my stash, I created this DIY desk organizer, aka the perfect recycled craft. I just used what was on hand so I didn't even spend one dollar for this.

I won't say it's totally free because you might have to buy some supplies . . . but you should challenge yourself to see how cheaply you can make it by rooting through the recycling bin.

Before we jump into the project, I want to share some things about this desk organizer you should keep in mind while you're making it. I hope these help!

Paper for Your Craft Organizer

I used a few large pieces of scrapbook paper to make my desk organizer. You can use nearly any paper for this project, but you should keep a few things in mind.

You'll want the paper to be thick enough so that you don't see the labels from the boxes through the paper. Therefore papers like tissue paper, wrapping paper, and napkins might be too thin.

There is a way around that though. You can always paint the boxes with a white acrylic paint or primer after cutting them into the desired sizes so that the labels don't show through. It's an added step to paint, but it will make your craft organizer look so much better when it's finished.

Plaques to Buy

The fun thing about this craft organizer is that you can use any size or style of wood plaque to make it! The wood plaque that I chose was an 11″ x 14″ oval that I purchased from Michaels.

I encourage you to try this in a different shape if you want to. I think even the natural wood slice would look cool for this DIY desk organizer – and you could leave it natural if you so choose.

Formula to Use

I used Mod Podge Satin for this project, but you could use Gloss, Matte, or Hard Coat. You can even add glitter here and there with a little Sparkle or Extreme Glitter Mod Podge. Give the craft organizer several coats of whatever decoupage formula you choose so that it is durable.

You want the toilet paper rolls in particular to stand up to constant putting things in and pulling things out – so I'd say use at least three coats of the formula you select.

Are you ready to dive into the project? Here's how I made my craft organizer using Mod Podge!

Make a Craft Organizer

Gather These Supplies

Here are my supplies. I wasn't quite sure how I was going to turn this pile o' stuff into a desk organizer, but hey, it was a challenge. Right?

I had no idea how to measure the cereal box for my bins, I'm going to be honest with you. So I just cut 1/4th of the box off of the bottom and then proceeded to cut the rest of the boxes in that same manner. I knew I would have a front row and a back row, so I made the “back row” of boxes taller than the front row.

So here is a finished bin. I also made two smaller compartments by cutting the larger compartments down and taping them on the outside. Don't worry – you'll cover over that tape with Mod Podge and paper.

I'm completely exhausted at this point. But I have a structure for my desk organizer! If you like, trim the TP/paper towel tubes to different heights to add interest.

I needed to take a break from cutting cereal boxes, so I painted my plaque. Choose colors that coordinate with your paper; paint the whole plaque and then let dry.

Now this is an optional step . . . but I used some white paint on the edges of my cereal boxes and tubes. Sometimes my paper doesn't match EXACTLY and I didn't want the brown of the tubes or the colors of the box to show (since they didn't match). If you are particular, you might want to do this. If not, don't worry about it.

Now that everything is painted and ready, time to trace. Take a pencil or pen and trace each compartment on your scrapbook paper. Keep in mind that for the larger compartments (i.e., the cereal boxes), you might need to trace and cut multiple pieces of paper to completely cover them.

Cut everything out.

Add Mod Podge to the backs of all of the papers . . .

And then proceed to decoupage your compartments with paper and Mod Podge. Hold everything down until it sticks, smooth, and let dry 15 – 20 minutes. Then give it a top coat.

Don't forget to Mod Podge your plaque as well, just to seal.

Add ribbon to the top edge of each compartment with the craft glue. I did it on the edges of the toilet paper/paper towel rolls as well.

Glue each compartment down to the plaque using craft glue. You'll see white around the edges, but it will dry clear.

What do you think – are you up for making a DIY desk organizer of your own? Let me know in the comments!

If you want to see a video of how the project is made (plus two bonus projects), just click play below:

There's also a printable how-to card here:

DIY Desk Organizer
Yield: 1 desk organizer
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Active Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Difficulty: Easy
Estimated Cost: $10

Use old cereal boxes and toilet paper rolls to create a unique DIY desk organizer! This craft organizer is perfect if you're on a budget.

Print
Materials
  • Cereal boxes and toilet paper rolls
  • Wood plaque
  • Mod Podge Satin
  • Acrylic paint in the colors of your choice (white is optional)
  • Scrapbook paper
  • Ribbon in coordinating colors
  • Craft glue
  • Tape
Tools
Instructions
  1. Cut up cereal boxes and toilet paper rolls to create the compartments for your organizer. I used two cereal boxes to make a front row and a back row of boxes, with the back row being taller.
  2. Make the smaller compartments by cutting the larger compartments down and taping them on the outside. The tape will be covered by paper eventually.
  3. Trim the TP/paper towel tubes to different heights to add interest.
  4. Paint the plaque. Choose colors that coordinate with your paper; paint the whole plaque and then let dry.
  5. Optional: if your paper is thin, you may want to paint over the designs on the cereal boxes using white acrylic paint.
  6. Use a pencil or pen to trace each compartment on your scrapbook paper. For the larger compartments (i.e., the cereal boxes), you might need to trace and cut multiple pieces of paper to completely cover them.
  7. Cut everything out.
  8. Add Mod Podge to the backs of all of the papers - then proceed to decoupage your compartments with paper and Mod Podge. Hold everything down until it sticks, smooth, and let dry 15 – 20 minutes. Then give it a top coat.
  9. Mod Podge the plaque as well, just to seal. Let dry.
  10. Add ribbon to the top edge of each compartment with craft glue.
  11. Glue each compartment down to the plaque using craft glue. The white around the edges will dry clear.
  12. Let dry 24 hours before using.
Recommended Products

As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

© Amy Anderson
Project Type: Organization / Category: Budget Crafts

If you want to check out more recycled crafts, here's another post that might interest you!

20 awesome Mod Podge recycled crafts

The post Make a DIY Desk Organizer from Recycled Materials appeared first on Mod Podge Rocks.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

These are the top 10 Mod Podge crafts on Mod Podge Rocks, a blog all about decoupage – the most popular according to 10 years of blog views!

I've been running this blog for over eight years now. Can you believe it? Over eight years of Mod Podge crafts for your viewing pleasure . . . and my crafting pleasure as well.

If you're new to the site or even a long time reader, you might be wondering what the top decoupage crafts of all time are. Before I jump into those projects, I want to make sure you see the following posts:

Wherever you are in your Mod Podge, journey, I want to make sure you have the right resources before you dive in!

Let's check out the crafts.

Mod Podge Craft Ideas

I'm excited to share that list with you today! I'm counting down the top projects (by views) from the past starting with #10. I can't wait to hear which ones are your favorites.

This Easter egg garland has been pinned 100,000 times! It might be Easter related, but you can use the same technique to make a general party garland. Pin it here.

Everyone loves Mod Podge coasters. These were made using photos as a gift for grandpa – so cute! If you think you might *ever* make coasters, I highly recommend that you pin them here.

Yes, you can make a vase out of a PVC pipe. Isn't this cool? David made it for Mother's Day – you can adapt it for any occasion. Pin it here.

Mod Podge is not just for decoupage! You can use it to make glass clings as well. This is a fun one for adults or kids. Pin it here.

This egg carton art is another one that's been pinned a lot – 130,000 times! Pull those egg cartons out of the recycle bin and get the kids crafting! Pin it here.

These baseball bookends are perfect for a kids' room, a man cave, or a gift for Father's Day. Pin them here.

Learn how to transfer photos to wood in three simple steps! All you need for this photo transfer to wood is your favorite image and a medium. It's easy! Photo transfers are my favorite. Pin it here.

Have you ever screenprinted with Mod Podge? It's really easy and fun. I did this tutorial almost seven years ago – wow! It's still one of my favorites. Pin it here.

Are you ready to get organized? Do it with this recycled craft organizer – that I made from cereal boxes and toilet paper tubes! Customize with the colors of your choice. Pin it here.

Are you ready for the #1 Mod Podge craft of all time??

It's comic book coasters! And because David is a super genius, he made them using outlet covers! Everyone loves comic book projects, and I hope you do too. Pin them here.

Now that you've viewed the top 10 Mod Podge crafts above, I'd love for you to check out all the rest of the crafts we have on the site. See them HERE! Happy Mod Podging . . .

The post Top 10 Mod Podge Crafts of All Time appeared first on Mod Podge Rocks.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Are you wondering what it means to “decoupage?” I run a Mod Podge blog and I'm here to explain everything. Click through to learn more!

As the purveyor of a Mod Podge blog, you can imagine I get asked one very important question ALL the time:

What is Decoupage?

I'll admit that decoupage seems like a more complicated concept than it really is because the word sounds fancy. “Decoupage” actually comes from the French word “decouper,” which means to cut out or cut from something else.

If you are a decoupager, that means that you engage in the artistic pursuit of gluing items to a surface. Which – although it might sound like something kids do in kindergarten – is absolutely NOT THAT AT ALL.

Decoupage is an Art Form

Decoupage truly is an art form. Sure, you can make it more basic if you like (and I do), but many a fine artist has used a decoupage medium to create a unique piece. Projects are enhanced not only with papers and fabric, but with painting effects, gold leaf, ink, embellishments, and even other mediums.

I'm constantly amazed at what people are doing with Mod Podge in my Facebook group, and generally impressed with the level of talent. It's not just a craft.

Decoupage with Mod Podge

As for me, I typically use the word in two ways. I use it as a noun with the Wikipedia definition: “the art of decorating an object by gluing colored paper cutouts onto it.” I also use it as a verb . . . such as, “to decoupage paper onto a surface.” And of course I do this all with Mod Podge!

The Basics of Mod Podge

If you want to engage in the art of decoupage, it's very easy to get started. You'll pick a surface, prepare it, and then decorate with paint or other effects (you can also leave it bare if you like that look). Here are common surfaces:

  • Wood
  • Tin
  • Glass
  • Ceramic
  • Metal
  • Fabric (including clothing and shoes)
  • Terra Cotta

Once you decide on a surface, you'll pick something you want to adhere to the surface:

  • Paper
  • Fabric
  • Tissue Paper
  • Napkins
  • Stickers
  • Wrapping Paper

THEN you'll choose your medium to bring it all together. Many believe that a decoupage medium is simply school glue or a vinegar/water/corn starch, but that is not the case (learn more here).

What is Mod Podge?

My medium of choice is Mod Podge, and it is a glue, sealer, and finish all in one. Mod Podge has ingredients and properties that a regular school/craft glue doesn't have, and that is why Mod Podge projects that were created 40+ years ago are still around.

I've seen projects made by the original inventor of Mod Podge, Jan Wetstone, with my own eyes – and they are in perfect condition. That is what a good decoupage medium does for you!

If you are wondering which Mod Podge to use (there are quite a few), I've written a formula guide to help you select the appropriate type. You can access it for free by clicking the link below:

How to Start Decoupaging

Decoupaging isn't hard, but it does take practice. What I LOVE about it is that you won't need to make a huge investment to get started, and you don't have to be an expert crafter to try it. I'll never forget when I started knitting at 15 years old; there was a huge learning curve. This is nothing like that!

My #1 piece of advice when starting just about anything, but particularly this new hobby, is to dive in. Start with something easy (I have 20 Mod Podge crafts for beginners here) and expect to fail a few times. Go to the dollar store to purchase surfaces or buy a few $1 plaques at the craft store, and practice, practice, practice!

My first project was a tray loaded with bubbles and wrinkles and ended up in the garbage. Before long, I was decoupaging with ease, and now there's nothing I can't do!

Are you ready to get started with decoupage? I have one more article to share with you. My 7 steps to perfect Mod Podging are below; just click on the image. Let me know what your first project is and how it went in the comments, or share with my Facebook group here. Happy decoupaging!

The post What is Decoupage? Learn from an Expert! appeared first on Mod Podge Rocks.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Are you curious about the Mod Podge formulas? Do you want to learn what each one does, how to use them, and get sample crafts? You'll want to bookmark this amazing post!

Also, scroll to the bottom of this post to watch a short video about the formulas.

So quite awhile ago, I wrote a Mod Podge formula guide. I also wrote a post on learning to Mod Podge with an FAQ. While both of those posts were a labor of love, I still don't think they were enough to quench the knowledge thirst of you serious Mod Podgers.

And I get it . . . because while those posts are actioned pack with tons of information, they don't include a lot of detailed information on each formula.

This is because if I wrote a post and included a lengthy description with FAQs and project samples . . . . it would be WAAYY too long! So long that it would be difficult to find your formula of interest just by scrolling, and you wouldn't want to read it.

Mod Podge Formulas

I decided to break out each into its own post – completely dedicated to EACH formula and just that formula! Instead of having to sift through information, you can learn exactly what you want about your Mod Podge formula of interest simply by clicking through the link below.

Two things:

  1. I'll be adding a new formula each week to the linky below, until it's complete with all formulas. So bookmark and come back if you don't see your formula yet!
  2.  As questions are asked in the comments, I'll be updating the posts with answers and more information. My goal is to make each post a complete reference for you,

Are you ready to learn? Click on the bottle image below to learn more! They are in alphabetical order for your reference.

Mod Podge Formulas
Brushstroke Mod Podge

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Dishwasher Safe Mod Podge

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Mod Podge Extreme Glitter

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Fabric Mod Podge

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Furniture Mod Podge

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Glow in the Dark Mod Podge

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Mod Podge Gloss

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Mod Podge Hard Coat

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Mod Podge Matte

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Mod Podge Outdoor

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Mod Podge Satin

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Sparkle Mod Podge

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Ultra Matte Chalk Mod Podge

Continue Reading Continue Reading
Mod Podge Ultra

Continue Reading Continue Reading

Are you interested in seeing a quick video about the formulas? The video below has useful information about the 8 original Mod Podge formulas – check it out:

The post Every Single Mod Podge Formula – Explained! appeared first on Mod Podge Rocks.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview