Loading...

Follow Mississauga Handweavers and Spinners Guild on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

At the 2018 OHS Spinning Seminar, the spinners were challenged to create headwear from a bag containing 50 grams of white and 50 grams of grey Corriedale wool.  A package of Kool-aid was also included to dye the wool.  The finished hats were to be  displayed at the 2019 OHS Spinning Seminar.  The Spinners chose to make the same hat – the Merrie Dancers Torrie Hat by Elizabeth Johnson who developed it for the 2018 Shetland Wool Week.  SWW18-Leaflet-LR (click to see image of inspirational hat)

For our Guild challenge, each spinner was matched with a weaver.  The weavers were given the colours that their assigned spinners were using.  They could use these colours or some of them or use the designs in the Merrie Dancer Torrie Hat  as their inspiration.

A very interesting combination of hats and scarves were the end result.

All these lovely items were placed on display in a case in the Central Library in Mississauga.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Mississauga Handweavers and Spinners Gui.. by Mississaugaweaversandspinners - 5M ago

Our guild members have been trapped at home due to successive ice and snow storms.  Just stepping out your front door can be hazardous.  When poised with the question…What are you doing to offset winter cabin fever, I got some interesting replies.

Jill visited the RBG to study Snow Fleas.  No joke.  They really do exist!

Our spinners, Jessie and Pat, kept busy creating beautiful coloured yarn and of course knitting. Shawls, socks and mits will be the result.

Louise experimented with needle punch embroidery.

She was also inspired by a article in Handwoven… and is now winding a warp to create her version of the scarf using 2/60 bamboo silk.

Lynn, one of our past members now living out West, reports that she has just finished a quilt top for her sister’s wedding in September. The floral pattern is a great antidote for Cabin Fever.  She has also been weaving tea towels and stitching.

Barb and I have been experimenting with weave structures…..Boulevard Weave and Deflected Double Weave.  Both of us wondered what happened if you altered our tie ups.

Here is a detailed description of Barb’s Boulevard Weave study.  The results were well worth spending time under her loom to change the tie ups..

”Dr. William Bateman’s Boulevard Weave has been on my to-do list for a long time.  On Ravelry  a while ago I came across a photo and description of some Boulevard Weave tea towels that were very interesting.  The weaver had been inspired by drafts #606 and 607 in “A Weaver’s Book of 8-Shaft Patterns”, and so I decided to try it out for myself.  The warp and pattern wefts are 2/8 Cotton, and I used 2/16 for the tabby.  I followed draft #607 for the first two towels, which resulted in a 7-end float.  I wasn’t too concerned about the float length, as I figured it would only measure about ¼” after finishing (and I was right on), but decided anyway to try and change the tie-up to shorten the floats.  With the help of Fiberworks I was able to come up with an alternative which worked well.  On weaving the 3rd towel I noticed columns forming, which resulted in a different look, and so I used a solid colour next which emphasized the columns even more.

I had enough warp left for one more towel, and so got under the loom (again!) and tied up #606.  The black and white illustration in the book looked like birch trees to me, so I used charcoal for the pattern weft.  After finishing though I thought it looked more like stacked rocket ships or maybe even robots – shades of “Star Wars”.  If you squint properly, you can still see birch trees.”

My Deflected Double weave experiments were less dramatic.  I think if I tied on different colours the changes would stand out more.  The black square changed positions.  I did not change the treadling so possibly other patterns could result.  I am debating tieing on another warp….who knows what the results will be.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Inspired by Dianne Totten’s talk at the Association of Northwest Weaving Guilds Conference in the June of 2017, one of our guild members, Marian, decided to try a second pleated scarf to enter into our guild’s Bronze/Get Wired challenge.   Loom controlled Shibori is a method of placing weft pleater threads, similar to smocking threads, every few rows in a plain weave ground cloth.

The pleater threads should be strong and smooth for drawing up, flexible enough to knot and fine enough so that the holes don’t show once the thread is removed.  Polyester upholstery thread works well and fits easily into a shuttle.   A weave structure is chosen to allow the pleater threads to be placed in a pattern; diamonds for instance.  Twills work well.  Marian chose a simple overshot pattern which allowed the pleater threads, set every 6 rows, to form large diamonds. .

The ground cloth weft should be 50 -100% man made thermal reactive thread such as orlec or polyester. This ensures that the finished product, once steamed with the pleater threads drawn up will be permanently pleated. In this scarf orlec was used for the pleats and bamboo for softness and hand and they were woven pic-on pic.  (If the colours are close enough the thermal and the natural threads can alternate every 6 rows when a new pleater thread is added).  Pleating the scarf doubles the weight so using a fine weft such as 2/16 ensures a light weight scarf.

So here’s how it went.  After winding a 2/8 tencel warp using a couple of bronzes with a ‘duck egg’ blue accent at a weaving friend’s cottage on Georgian Bay this summer, Marian rented a nice Ashford table loom from the Greater Vancouver Weavers and Spinners Guild to use in her daughter’s garden during a visit out west.  After setting up the loom, Marian wove off and on while they all went off to work or daycare.  It was lovely.

One day close to the end of her stay, she took her work off the loom, finished the ends, pulled up and knotted the pleater threads and set it in a steamer on the stove for a couple of hours.  45 minutes is recommended but this was a small double boiler style steamer and she had to adjust the coils a few times to ensure every thing got thoroughly steamed.  …because, once you remove the threads, you either have pleats or you have flat cloth  …there is no going back.  And she got pleats!  Once the pleater threads were removed, the scarf was rinsed in luke warm water to remove the traces of any holes left by the pleaters   …and the pleats remained.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Mississauga Handweavers and Spinners Gui.. by Mississaugaweaversandspinners - 10M ago

It was a lovely fall day for the 2018 Five County Seminar hosted by the Guelph Guild at the Wellington County Museum.  The theme was GET WIRED.  Keynote speaker, Sayward Johnson, spoke in the morning about her journey into weaving with wire.  She was an excellent speaker and if you get the chance check out her work.   https://saywardjohnson.ca/

The afternoon program offered mini workshops and a tour of Wellington Fibres.  http://wellingtonfibres.on.ca

The Museum also held tours of their textile collection.

Seven guilds took the Get Wired Challenge.  The displays were awesome.  Such a lot of talent and creativity.  You would never know that most of the items were created  by seniors!  Each guild was given a metal to interpret either in fibre, wire, beads or felt.  The displays were inspiring.

Bronze was our guild’s challenge metal.  Our display had a variety of items.  Some were woven in bronze colours, some were created by crocheting, knitting or wrapping wire.  There were even baskets that incorporated wire and metal into their woven vessels.

Five guild members took on the challenge of warping a small table loom in wire and a long metal piece was woven using wire, beads, paper, fibre, and metal findings.  This piece proved to be the highlight of the show winning Best Weaving Award and the  Peoples Choice Award.  We were so surprised.

Here is a sampling of some of the other Guilds’ interpretation of the theme.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview