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Mindful Balance Blog by Karl Duffy - 11h ago

The sun shines day after day without fail, yet if clouds appear to make the sky overcast, it can’t be seen. It still comes up in the east every morning and goes down in the west. The only difference is that you can’t see it because it’s hidden behind the clouds. The sun is your original mind, the clouds are your illusions. You are unaware of this mind because it’s covered by illusions and can’t be seen. But you never lose it,  not even when you go to sleep.

The unborn mind that your mothers have given you is thus always there, wonderfully clear and bright and illuminating.

Bankei Yōtaku (1622-1693), Rinzai Zen master, 

who emphasized our original nature or inner aliveness,  which he terms the Unborn 

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Mindful Balance Blog by Karl Duffy - 1d ago

The peace that we are looking for is not peace that crumbles as soon as there is difficulty or chaos. Whether we’re seeking inner peace or global peace or a combination of the two, the way to experience it is to build on the foundation of unconditional openness to all that arises.

Peace isn’t an experience free of challenges, free of rough and smooth, it’s an experience that’s expansive enough to include all that arises without feeling threatened.

Pema Chodron 

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Mindful Balance Blog by Karl Duffy - 2d ago

In silence there is eloquence.

Stop weaving and see how the pattern improves.

Rumi

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It’s true, I think, as Kenko says in his Idleness,
That all beauty depends upon disappearance,
The bitten edges of things,
the gradual sliding away
Into tissue and memory,
the uncertainty
And dazzling impermanence of days we beg our meanings from,
And their frayed loveliness.

Charles Wright, American poet, 1935 – , Lonesome Pine Special

(Kenko, 1284 – 1350, Buddhist monk, author of Essays in Idleness)

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Give up defining yourself – to yourself or to others. You won’t die. You will come to life. And don’t be concerned with how others define you. When they define you, they are limiting themselves, so it’s their problem. Whenever you interact with people, don’t be there primarily as a function or a role, but as the field of conscious Presence. You can only lose something that you have, but you cannot lose something that you are.

Eckhart Tolle

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Mindful Balance Blog by Karl Duffy - 5d ago

When we release that striving

for somewhere and something else,

we come home

Karen Maezen Miller

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Only one thing made him happy

and now that it was gone

everything made him happy.

Leonard Cohen

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Non-doing has nothing to do with being indolent or passive. Quite the contrary. It takes great courage and energy to cultivate non-doing, both in stillness and in activity. Nor is it easy to make a special time for non-doing and to keep at it in the face of everything in our lives which needs to be done.

Jon Kabat Zinn

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Mindful Balance Blog by Karl Duffy - 1w ago

The tree on the mountain height is its own enemy.

The grease that feeds the light devours itself.

The cinnamon tree is edible: so it is cut down! The lacquer tree is profitable: they maim it.

Every man knows how useful it is to be useful.

No one seems to know How useful it is to be useless.

Thomas Merton, The Way of Chuang Tzu

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Mindful Balance Blog by Karl Duffy - 1w ago

Once or twice a year the abbot at the San Francisco Zen Center, Tenshin Reb Anderson, comes to speak with the hospice volunteers.  

One night he gave a talk that included the best advice I’ve ever heard on caregiving.

 He said simply, “Stay close and do nothing.”

 That’s how we try to practice at Zen Hospice Project.

We stay close and do nothing. We sit still and listen to the stories.

Frank Ostaseski 

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