Loading...

Follow Abundance - Exploring how your money can build a b.. on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Pax is the latest housing offer on Abundance. Your investment goes straight to work completing the refurbishment and refinance of the Pax Apartments building so that it can soon become home to local people in need.

Much work has already taken place at the site. The photographs below were taken in April 2019 and show the thoughtful restoration and conversion of the building by Octevo.

Large windows let in plenty of light to the apartments. As a former warehouse in Liverpool’s historic Ropewalks district, the Pax Apartments building has many characterful features which Octevo has deliberately chosen to retain.

A couple of the completed bathrooms at Pax Apartments. Much of the building work has already been completed. Octevo is focused on finishing up Pax Apartments so that people can move in and so that the company can turn its attention to more social and affordable housing sites in its pipeline.

Light walkways and exposed brick add character to the communal parts.

The kitchens use high quality materials and appliances which are built to last. The appliances are all certified to the highest levels of efficiency rating, while the lightbulbs are all LEDs, which improves the overall environmental impact of the housing.

The 33 apartments will be one or two bedroom. They receive a lot of natural light and benefit from high ceilings, which increase the feeling of space.

The apartments are in the Ropewalks area, which is described as the city’s “bohemian heart”. It is within walking distance of the city centre and is surrounded by independent shops and restaurants.

Risk warning

As with any investment product there are risks. Part or all of your original invested capital may be at risk and any return on your investment depends on the success of the project invested in. You should be prepared to hold Abundance investments for their full term and investments may not be readily realisable. Estimated rates of return can be variable and estimates are no guarantee of actual return. Specific risks will apply in relation to each product. Consider all risks before investing and read the Offer Document for each investment.

Preview of Pax Apartments was originally published in Abundance Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
What is the cost of the housing crisis?Why the housing crisis is about more than a roof over your head.Image by Sebastian Wagner from Pixabay

Beyond soundbites about social housing stocks being depleted and the knowledge that we aren’t building enough new homes (let alone affordable ones), how many of us can truly say we understand the scale of the housing crisis or its myriad effects? And if not, how can we tackle it?

Seeing homeless people on the street is a stark reminder that not everybody has the security of somewhere safe to sleep, but the problem goes much deeper than that. Figures reveal that there is a class of hidden homeless who are suffering because the UK doesn’t have enough stock of affordable, long term rental homes. There a few figures that speak for themselves:

Source: DCLG Homelessness report

There are thus many people who may have a roof over their head, but not a warm and bright home of their own, or one that gives them any security of tenure for the long term. Poor living conditions and uncertainty has been shown to impact everything from attainment at school to long term mental health.

Source: Shelter

And it should be no surprise that private renters are the most vulnerable to homelessness, and thus less able to put down roots, when assured shorthold tenancies in England are leased on minimum fixed terms of 6 to 12 months with a 2 month notice period.

Factor in the cost of moving repeatedly and it quickly becomes easy to see how vulnerable renters are, despite most being in paid work.

In the last 5 years, 20% of all families renting privately had moved at least 3 times. Nearly half (44%) of renting parents worry that they are going to lose their current home.
Source: Putting Down Roots report, 2019. The Centre for Social Justice.
The housing crisis is more than bricks and mortar

As mentioned above, the cost of housing is not only borne out in financial terms. Our society bears an enormous cost from poor housing and homelessness. Problems with cold, damp (twice as common in private rental homes as in social or owner occupied homes), and overcrowding is estimated to cost the NHS £600 million a year. Children living in bad housing are almost twice as likely to suffer from poor health and have lower levels of academic achievement that cannot be explained by differences in ability.

Building more quality and affordable homes with long term security of tenure therefore has positive impacts far beyond giving people somewhere to live. For example, warmth and energy efficiency measures are proven to have a positive effect on mental health. And an improvement in mental health can have positive knock-on effects on physical health, attainment at work or school, and more.

The above are only a few examples but a cursory internet search reveals many more. If we can lift the worry of unpredictable rent rises or remove people from noisy, damp, or mouldy rooms we will truly be contributing to building a better world. There is overwhelming evidence that housing can play an important role in improving many aspects of our society.

Housing on Abundance

When we launched housing as an Impact sector on Abundance (alongside Green Energy and Transition) we were delighted that so many of our customers made an investment into Merseyside Assured Homes. It should perhaps have come as no surprise since 33% of UK adults say they would be happy to help finance more social and affordable housing, and we know that our customers want to do good things with their money.

We expect to launch a second housing investment very soon, and we hope that many of you will once more choose to put your money to work improving living standards for those in need. Keep an eye on your inbox for further information.

Risk warning

As with any investment product there are risks. Part or all of your original invested capital may be at risk and any return on your investment depends on the success of the project invested in. You should be prepared to hold Abundance investments for their full term and investments may not be readily realisable. Estimated rates of return can be variable and estimates are no guarantee of actual return. Specific risks will apply in relation to each product. Consider all risks before investing and read the Offer Document for each investment.

What is the housing crisis? was originally published in Abundance Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Image by Quinn Kampschroer from Pixabay

Most feel guilty when they pass a homeless person in the street and don’t do something, despite the fact that we care very much. Our sixth Great British Money Survey found that while most UK adults said they are concerned about homelessness — 72% to be precise — hardly anyone knows what they can do as an individual to help. Abundance is changing that with our housing impact sector.

Uncertainty reigns

A tiny 12% of people said they had found a way to change their purchasing habits to take action on homelessness, while 11% have signed a petition or taken some other form of social or political action, maybe by donating to a homeless charity (e.g. Crisis or Shelter). There are many who donate both money and time by participating in fundraisers, sporting events, or by volunteering at Christmas.

As of 2018 there’s another option. In the same way that you can invest in green energy to combat climate change, Abundance makes it possible to invest in building new affordable and social housing that can help some of those who are homeless get a warm, safe place to call home.

What’s the problem?

Figures show that since 2013 the number of rough sleepers has increased by around 15% each year. On top of this, there are almost 80,000 households in temporary accommodation because their local authority is unable to offer them a home.

In response we launched housing as an impact sector on Abundance in 2018. The aim was to give our customers the opportunity to broaden their impact by investing to create new homes with an explicit focus on giving more people access to genuinely affordable housing of a high quality.

The first homes funded by Abundance investors are already under construction. This update from Merseyside Assured Homes was provided to investors in January and there will be another in June.

Housing investments like Merseyside Assured Homes increase the number of homes available for supported living, quality temporary accommodation, or long term affordable rent. Some of the most vulnerable in our society, including those with physical disabilities and mental illness, qualify for this type of housing.

Making an impact in housing

If we can work together to begin filling the gap that councils, housing associations, and other developers are finding difficult to plug, together we will be making an almost immediate difference.

Just as with climate change and green energy, we could wait for government or business to step in and act but we don’t think that’s enough for you; it certainly isn’t for us. Now you can make a start and quickly see the impact for yourself.

In the same way that you have ditched takeaway coffee cups for a reusable one, consider investing as little as £5 in building more desperately needed social housing, because this is another problem our society faces that simply isn’t going to right itself.

Risk warning

As with any investment product there are risks. Part or all of your original invested capital may be at risk and any return on your investment depends on the success of the project invested in. You should be prepared to hold Abundance investments for their full term and investments may not be readily realisable. Estimated rates of return can be variable and estimates are no guarantee of actual return. Specific risks will apply in relation to each product. Consider all risks before investing and read the Offer Document for each investment.

What you can do about homelessness was originally published in Abundance Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Climate change has become a big part of our daily lives. We hear and see it everywhere; from starving polar bears in the Arctic to climate protests on Fridays. We are faced with taking action or watching our planet die — as there is no Planet B.

But what actually is climate change and what causes it? The answer is just as simple: we are. Our annual trips abroad, meat and dairy consumption, the energy needed to produce and transport all of it — this accumulates and releases large volumes of harmful emissions annually. So how can we be part of the change and put an end to it?

A single solution doesn’t exist, but as humans our strong survival instinct ensures we are prone to finding pragmatic solutions. Plastic pollution, waste, the burning of fossil fuels, homelessness; they are all part of the problem that is contributing to a new environmental anxiety. We cannot be certain about our future so we have to take action ourselves; little steps are what gets us there.

So, let’s talk waste; something we hardly think about, once we finish our daily recycling ritual.

Do we really know what happens once it leaves our house? Unsurprisingly, it is an invisible part of climate change. Whenever waste goes to landfill it does not just pollute our environment and take up space, but it also generates dangerous emissions which are harmful to our health. In the UK alone we throw away over 200 million tonnes of non-recyclable waste annually, the majority of which ends up in landfill and releases gases such as CO2 and methane, which are highly toxic and dangerous to biodiversity (based on research by the Health Protection Agency).

As per our independent research, we know that the British public does extremely or somewhat care about levels of waste (78%) as much as they extremely or somewhat care about reducing plastic use (81%), but caring alone won’t solve the problem. Thus, 47% of people have changed their purchasing habits to reduce their waste levels and 21% have tried but couldn’t find a way to do it. The practice of reducing, reusing and recycling is one of the eco-pragmatic solutions we have to help divert waste from going to landfill, reducing the possible harmful risks to the environment and the cost of dealing with it. However, this alone won’t solve the current problem. While not all solutions currently available to us are perfect, they are there, and we should use them for our benefit. So how can we use our waste to do something ‘good’?

Waste to energy, as well as energy recovery, has been a hot topic for some time now.

It is a term that covers solutions such as: regulated landfills, incineration and gasification technologies. There is a lot of confusion when it comes to the latter two. Gasification is often misunderstood and perceived as a way to ‘dress up’ incineration, even though the technologies used for both are very different.

Gasification is a method of recovering energy from a feedstock using an advanced thermal process (which does not burn waste at high temperatures), whereas incinerators use traditional mass burn combustion technology. There is a short explanation and comparison below.

Both technologies are efficient when compared to waste being sent to landfill, but when it comes to incineration, waste has to be used at all times to generate energy to be economically and environmentally efficient. It also releases far more emissions, whereas gasification only generates energy when feedstock is available, making it not only more efficient than incineration but also a cleaner source of energy, producing fewer emissions than the other.

Our recent investment opportunity CoGen offers gasification as a solution to the waste issue through the development of a system that is able to take a difficult, often hazardous waste stream and use it to generate energy. Their system is effective, efficient and environmentally friendly. It uses state of the art technology developed by a team who together have hundreds of years’ experience in dealing with such issues.

The aim is to create a greener future and a low carbon economy. CoGen’s plants will process 240,000 tonnes of waste annually, converting it into a greener fuel that could otherwise come from fossil fuels. It will also offset up to 104,000 tonnes of CO2 being released into the atmosphere, while substantial reductions of other gases should be seen in the longer term (when compared with landfills and incinerators).

The plants will produce at least 24 Megawatts of electricity, which is enough to power over 50,000 UK homes annually.

CoGen’s plants offer both short- and long-term benefits to the community as well. They create approximately 250 construction jobs, and 200 jobs associated in up and down-stream companies. In addition, 45 direct operational jobs have already been created and there is a significant capacity to roll out across Europe, in turn creating more job opportunities.

So, would you rather have your waste go to landfill, burning in incinerators or supplying gasification facilities? We don’t have solutions to all the big problems yet, but knowing that there is something we can do now, why not grab the chance to do so?

Risk warning

As with any investment product there are risks. Part or all of your original invested capital may be at risk and any return on your investment depends on the success of the project invested in. You should be prepared to hold Abundance investments for their full term and investments may not be readily realisable. Estimated rates of return can be variable and estimates are no guarantee of actual return. Specific risks will apply in relation to each product. Consider all risks before investing and read the Offer Document for each investment.

Getting one step ahead of climate change with our ‘dirty’ waste was originally published in Abundance Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

From the flower children of the 60s to the plastic-free Instagrammers of 2018, the trend for a youth subculture that champions the environment and closer harmony with nature has a long history. What’s different today is that it isn’t only earnest idealists, some still wet behind the ears, who are looking for ways to make a positive difference. It’s almost everybody.

The visuals of Blue Planet II combined with stark warnings from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have created a perfect storm of interest in the state of the planet and, ultimately, the future of humankind. We were sleepwalking into a crisis; we may have woken up just in time.

As a result, the past 18 months has seen people of all ages taking practical steps towards a better future. However recent research independently collated by OnePoll for Abundance has found that many Britons have tried to take action on a range of issues, from reducing plastic use to air pollution, but haven’t been able to find a way to.

The way our society is set up and the options available to us are limited to varying degrees by any number of factors. Where you live, your level of digital confidence, and the state of your health all play a role. Once you have a reusable coffee cup, switch your electricity supply to 100% renewable, and use a bag for life it gets much more difficult to make sustainable changes.

The reality is that life and circumstances get in the way of ideals.

Humans are pragmatic. We don’t stop wanting to do ‘good’ things for the planet, but when holding down a job, paying bills, and caring for children, elderly parents, even pets, there is significantly less time, money and brain space to devote to saving the planet.

In response we have noted the emergence of the eco pragmatist. Represented equally across gender, age, and geographical regions, eco pragmatists are in fact the majority of Britons. In highly divided times we are a nation united by our outlook on energy, waste, and protecting our planet.

Eco pragmatists are the 77% who agree that waste is a growing issue for the UK that won’t be solved with recycling alone. They are the 76% who support energy from waste as a form of renewable energy for providing electricity, fuel, and heat. In one of the most surprising findings from the Great British Money Survey 6, pragmatic energy solutions were rated more favourably than most ‘fully green’ forms of renewable energy.

Perhaps this should come as little surprise. It is clear that building more green energy doesn’t solve all our problems. Our oceans and rivers are awash with plastics, and insects and nature are in rapid decline. We need to be working equally as hard to protect our natural spaces, which is why Abundance is focused on transition investments as an exciting opportunity for our investors to make twice the difference.

Energy from waste is a prime example of eco pragmatism.

It simply isn’t feasible that we will become a zero waste society overnight, or any time soon. But if we can divert non recyclable waste from landfill, where it produces potent greenhouse gases, and use it to create lower carbon energy (as CoGen Limited will do), we’re taking a big step in the right direction.

After all, landfill also takes away from the natural environment. If we continue to dump millions of tonnes of rubbish a year we will eventually run out of space.

Instead of lambasting energy from waste for being anything other than pure green, eco pragmatists recognise that it is a worthy first step. It addresses two problems (lower carbon energy and growing mountains of waste) and is just one example of the creative solutions that we are seeing more and more.

Ranging from investments that accelerate the roll-out of electric vehicles to those that make our homes warm and light while reducing energy consumption, transition is the home of the pragmatist. The opportunity to invest gives us a choice about how we move forward, as well as making it easy to make an impact in a way that anyone can afford (because Abundance allows investment from just £5).

From the comfort of your own home you are changing the world for the better by taking responsibility and creating action. We all care about the world we live in, so it’s no surprise that the majority of us want to do more to protect it.

Find out more about the benefits of gasification here, and visit the CoGen Limited project page to make an investment here.

Risk warning

As with any investment product there are risks. Part or all of your original invested capital may be at risk and any return on your investment depends on the success of the project invested in. You should be prepared to hold Abundance investments for their full term and investments may not be readily realisable. Estimated rates of return can be variable and estimates are no guarantee of actual return. Specific risks will apply in relation to each product. Consider all risks before investing and read the Offer Document for each investment.

From idealists to realists: our changing relationship with energy and waste was originally published in Abundance Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
An update from the directors of United Downs Geothermal after your investment was repaid.

Since your investment was repaid in December 2018 work has continued at the United Downs Geothermal drilling site in Cornwall.

We are still drilling the first of two wells at the site. The original plan was to drill a 2.5km ‘shallow’ injection well, followed by a ‘deep’ 4.5km production well. Water is expected to move downwards through the fractures from the injection well into the production well, reducing the cost of this complete deep geothermal system compared to the standard approach of drilling two 4.5km deep wells.

As you may know, the start of the drilling process was delayed while we waited for the drilling rig to arrive, which meant we took the decision to make the first well the production well. This is the 4.5km ‘deep’ well. After another 3 weeks of delays over the Christmas and New Year period, we expect the target depth of 4.5km to be reached within the next two months. The depth is currently 3km.

The good news is that signs are that the temperature is as good as or better than expected. The crucial element we are still waiting for is the discovery of water at depth; the success of the whole project hinges on whether water can be produced from this ‘deep’ well during testing in the summer.

There is substantial research interest in the project, with 3 pan-European research projects focussing on the site. By autumn 2019 we will be able to quantify the amount of power that can be produced by the plant. As you may be aware, this is significantly later than we anticipated, which is why the decision was taken to ask your permission to return your capital. The delays would have cost the project heavily.

We are grateful for your investment, especially since your early support helped take our project from a possibility to reality. There is still a long way to go for it to be viable, and it is not without risk to investors. We hope that you are satisfied with the outcome of your investment. You have been instrumental in our success to date, and we sincerely hope to offer you another chance to support the development of geothermal power in the UK.

Best wishes from Dr Ryan Law and the Directors of United Downs Geothermal PLC.

United Downs Geothermal was originally published in Abundance Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The first update on the construction of new social and affordable housing in Liverpool.Footing excavation and initial blockwork taking place at Simonswood.

Having completed the financing activity and issued the debentures to Abundance investors in mid-October, work started at the sites in mid-November. Though very early in the construction phase, we are pleased to report that things have started well, and our building contractors are making good progress.

At the Simonswood site in Kirkby, foundations have been laid for some of the houses, drainage channels and gravel beds done, with initial blockwork now underway.

At the Sorrell Way site in St Helens, over 1,000 tonnes of material has been moved in preparing the site, which will later be used in landscaping. The entrance road has been formed and a platform established that enables piling for 12 houses.

The Brook Road, Liverpool site is at an earlier stage but site preparation is now underway.

Once again, thank you for your support of these worthwhile developments and we look forward to showing more progress in June, when the next interest payment is due.

Best wishes from all at Merseyside Assured Homes PLC.

The Simonswood construction site.

Construction update: Merseyside Assured Homes was originally published in Abundance Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
A blog by Abundance bookkeeper and finance manager Lara Trinder

Over the past few years we’ve begun working with a number of ‘green’ or ethical businesses; a caterer, a funeral company, an ethical investment company and a local solar installation company to name but a few and it got me thinking about my own green credentials as a business.

We do all the easy stuff; use recycled ink cartridges, we’ve bought software that will help us make the move towards paperlessness and one of our employees takes the shredding home to use as rabbit bedding, but we’re hardly saving the planet. I’ve seen the pictures of the emaciated polar bears on the shrinking ice caps and they break my heart.

I’m very fortunate. I have a purpose built office space at home. It has a glass back that looks out over the garden, it’s lovely but economical with our energy we are not. The whole thing is powered by electricity; the lights, the heating, all the computer equipment and the heat pad that keeps the elderly canine team members toasty. It costs a fortune!

As my electricity bill has crept inexorably upwards I’ve found myself feeling irritable when I arrive back at the office to find it’s hotter than Satan’s armpit. Would my employees crank the heating up to 11 if they were paying for It? Can’t they do a few star jumps or something when they feel cold?

The reality is that bookkeeping is a sedentary job and is fuelled mostly by tea. We sit, we work, we turn up the heating and we turn on the kettle. We burn electricity.

So, I made a decision, I spoke to my client, the solar installer. He did a site visit, measured my office roof, measured my electricity consumption, did some clever sums and announced that we could, potentially, become a carbon neutral business. He gave me a quote, HSBC gave me a loan and, during possibly the wettest, coldest, darkest month of the year the solar system has been installed.

Installation took about a week, was relatively free from disruption (just half a day with the power off in the office) and the panels themselves lie virtually flat to the office roof and are smart and unobtrusive. So far so good.

Let’s be clear though, solar needs sun. My consumption is at its highest in the winter when, even on a clear day we only get about 5 or 6 hours sunshine on our panels. Anything we don’t use can be stored in the battery and used to run the office, or the electricity in the house in the evenings, but let’s be honest in January and February that just isn’t going to happen.

I believe that over the course of the year , with a half reasonable summer I will offset all of my annual electricity consumption. The money I save (approximately 50% of my annual energy bill) will go towards the repaying the loan. Nevertheless it will take me 7 years to earn back the cost of the panels, therefore this had to be an ideological as well as an economical decision.

So is it worth It? Well perhaps if you measure your world in purely financial terms you will struggle to make the sums add up BUT if you care about the environment, climate change and your own sense of wellbeing, if the polar bear gets to you, then, yes, totally.

Let me tell you about the app. Every evening I log in and I can see how much power I have consumed, how much was generated by the panels, how much was pulled off the grid. I can see a linear graph and I can see the ‘spikes’ where our consumption has increased suddenly. I try to work out what we were doing when the spikes occurred (that damn kettle!). I turn off lights, I wear a jumper. It has REALLY made me think about my energy consumption, and, when I look at the app and I see that I have generated 37% my own energy and have, so far, ‘planted’ 1/10th of a tree, I feel brilliant.

Annually at New Year I make a list of things I want to achieve in the coming year. Last year, my goal was to study. It took me a whole year of blood, sweat and many tears to achieve my qualification. This year when people ask me what the year has in store, I can already say that I’ve become a green business, no blood, no sweat, no tears, just some sunshine. Hopefully.

Summing up Solar was originally published in Abundance Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Join us!The role

We are looking to hire an Operations Executive to join our operations team. You will be at the heart of Abundance, supporting everything that goes into running an investment platform. Whether you’re looking for your first role or looking to switch jobs and try something a bit different, we’d love to hear from you.

About Abundance

Abundance lets ordinary people invest in ethical projects and businesses, such as renewable energy and affordable housing, and earn a decent return on their money. Since Abundance launched in 2012, our customers have invested £80 million through our proprietary technology platform to help achieve their financial goals without compromising their social values.

Our company growth is taking us into new and exciting areas. We are looking at new sectors, such as social housing, health and education, as well as the new energy technologies that will build a truly better future. As well as that, we will be expanding our range of financial products to meet more of our customer’s money goals. This leads us to an exciting path with diverse opportunities for you to develop your career as we grow our business.

Abundance is a Certified B Corporation and is committed to the principle of equal employment opportunity for all people, and to providing a relaxed, grown-up, flexible working environment free from discrimination.

Who you’ll be working with

Abundance is built on the beliefs, curiosity and versatility of its people. We are a small team, respectful of ideas and diversity, and committed to mentoring and growing people from within. We are bold and creative in approach, but pragmatic in delivery. Above all, we stand behind Abundance’s mission to make money a force for the greater good, by taking on issues such as climate change, affordable housing and financial inequality.

You will work within the Operations Team, which is a full time three-person team with a breadth of experience and enthusiasm for the Abundance mission. As Operations is at the centre of everything Abundance does, you’ll also be working closely with all the teams at Abundance.

You are
  • A graduate with at least a 2:1 degree from a top university
  • Passionate about how finance can be done differently
  • Do not necessarily have a finance background but comfortable around numbers and spreadsheets
  • Have opinions, but are still great at listening and learning
  • High-reaching but also humble
  • You like to solve problems and are good at getting others to support your ideas
  • Able to handle changing priorities and varied responsibilities
  • Confident working in a dynamic and multi-tasking workplace
Your role
  • Administration of our investment platform and business
  • Handling ISA and pension applications and transfers
  • Talking to customers, helping resolve their queries and answering questions on investments
  • Organising and supporting our lively and friendly office
  • Building and optimising processes to support the company’s growth and expansion into new areas and products
  • Working closely with other teams to deliver new investments, new features and platform testing
Benefits
  • An opportunity to contribute to and gain experience in a leading ethical finance company
  • At Abundance we want to grow our team from within, we will therefore invest in your future with the hope that you will grow and develop with the business
  • A starting salary of between £21k-£23k, dependent on experience
  • Employee share option scheme
  • Private health insurance
  • Annual training budget
How to Apply

Please send your CV and a cover letter to careers@abundanceinvestment.com. Let us know what you think you can add to Abundance and what attracts you to join our team!

Abundance is hiring was originally published in Abundance Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
By Sophy Fearnley-Whittingstall

Many of us start the New Year full of good intentions when it comes to the environment. Mine include switching to solid shampoo bars, buying bamboo toothbrushes and remembering my reusable coffee cup when I’m out. But I’m only too aware that my noble efforts can only make a tiny impact on a mountain of rubbish.

Much has been written about the scourge of plastic waste in particular. As National Geographic describes, since plastic was invented 60 years ago, only 9% of it has ever been recycled, and 12% burned. The rest is languishing in landfill or, worse, as litter.

The “Blue Planet” effect means that at last the business world is waking up to the need to do something about plastic waste. As individuals, we also need to take responsibility. There is now plenty of advice out there about reducing your plastic footprint, from groups like WWF and other well-meaning experts, many of whom seem to have a big issue with chewing gum (who knew?). But it will take years, maybe generations, for our actions to have a meaningful impact.

I’ve already been a dedicated recycler and an expert waste-reducer for decades. I follow most of the WWF tips (although we’re too far off the beaten track to have a milkman). I also have a compost heap, grow most of our vegetables in the summer, shop very carefully to minimise food waste and have a dog who eats what the family doesn’t. We get a largely packaging-free organic veg box delivered weekly from Riverford, along with milk, bread and eggs. Despite these efforts our household of two adults, two teenagers, plus dog generates at least one black bin bag full of unrecyclable waste each week.

Like most people, I still need to shop at supermarkets regularly, where it is impossible to buy goods not encased in packaging. Keeping food fresh for longer and making it easier to transport are important functions that shouldn’t be overlooked.

Although I’ve been recycling for most of my adult life, I’m still learning new things about it: Wash stuff before it goes in the recycling bin. Remove the Sellotape from cardboard boxes. Don’t put black plastic in the blue bin because it can’t be recycled. My local (rural) council recently increased the range of recyclable plastic it collects from bottles to ‘pots, tubs and trays’. Great, but I’m still confused by the different numbers and symbols on the packaging (this blog should help) so I give everything a quick rinse then chuck it in the right bin hoping for the best.

So what happens to the stuff that’s left and that I can’t compost, my black-bag waste? While use of landfill has reduced, the UK still buries 12 million tonnes of Residual Municipal Solid Waste (as the industry calls black-bag waste) each year, with a further 3.6 million tonnes exported to European countries. (How’s that going to work after Brexit?) Landfill is also a big issue in my local community, with a large landfill site on the edge of the village generating lots of complaints about smells, flies, traffic and rubbish blowing around. It’s not a long-term solution.

If we can find a way of processing that non-recyclable waste to tackle another key environmental problem, recovering energy from it, that’s got to be a good thing, right? CoGen Limited was set up to find a solution to this dual conundrum. The company is the UK’s leading developer of waste gasification facilities, the most sustainable and lowest-carbon way available today to deal with what’s left after reuse and recycling. They divert waste from landfill, replace inefficient incineration and reduce waste exports by transforming it into reliable baseload energy.

While we should all be following the waste hierarchy — reduce–reuse-recycle — I don’t believe that as a consumer-driven society we can completely eliminate non-recyclable waste from our lives within the foreseeable future. No more than we can achieve a perfectly energy-efficient economy that requires no new sources of energy generation.

Rather like investing in renewable energy as a way of offsetting your personal carbon footprint, then investing in energy recovery could help offset your waste footprint. We need to continuing working on reducing and recycling as well, but until a much better solution can be found, then CoGen is a good place to start.

Risk warning

As with any investment product there are risks. Part or all of your original invested capital may be at risk and any return on your investment depends on the success of the project invested in. You should be prepared to hold Abundance investments for their full term and investments may not be readily realisable. Estimated rates of return can be variable and estimates are no guarantee of actual return. Specific risks will apply in relation to each product. Consider all risks before investing and read the Offer Document for each investment.

It isn’t always easy being Green… was originally published in Abundance Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview