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An interview with David Antoniu GP, after 4 years of living in Sweden

We asked David some questions about his experience  as a Family Doctor in Sweden, where he moved  in 2015 with the assistance from MediCarrera.

David Antoniu visited the primary care centre, in Tranås a town of 18 000 inhabitants, situated, in South Central Sweden, this was in spring 2014.

The visit, a study tour for three days,  is part of the first steps in the process, before you make the final decision to accept a new job offer. We arrange a meeting with the clinic and organize a visit to the city and region where the position is available in. There you get a chance to experience the town and the workplace. If you have children we take the opportunity to visit schools and daycares.  The trip is financed by the employer.

When the contract was signed, David started the language course in Calafell, where he studied from September to December 2014. Right before his employment started in January 2015.

The move to Sweden went smoothly with assistance from our relocation team.

He has now had his job for over 4 years and was happy to tell us that it was the best decision he made.

We asked him to answer a few questions to give us some insight about his experience in Sweden.

What is the thing you mostly like about Swedes?

Swedes believe in people, their relationships are based on trust and even if they don’t know you, the first premise will be to validate the other. On the other side, if you lose their confidence, it is lost forever. They are extremely happy to welcome new colleagues, they are very surprised that foreign people want to live in Sweden. You can find a huge variety of nationalities in Sweden and this contributes to creating an open society. From this point of view I compare Sweden with the new world, just like America was before.

What is the thing you are mostly satisfied and proud of?

After four years I managed to bring my child here. He is 17 years old, and last year in August he joined me in Sweden. He started high-school from the beginning, just like I had to start my position as a resident in family medicine four years ago.

I also managed to buy a house.

How is your work as a family doctor in Tranås?

In Tranås there are 18000 inhabitants and a net of public primary care centres.

In our primary care centre there are 10 GPs, and in total 60 medical staff among which nurses, psychologists, kinesiotherapists. The primary care centre has its own independent laboratory.

In the public healthcare they use their time and their resources very efficiently. The family doctor has an electronic agenda, which is organized in advance by the nurse, with 15 minutes per patient, so all the time is planned with maximum efficiency. Even the breaks are scheduled, twice per day.

Also, another example is that there is no situation in which a doctor and a nurse are together in an examination, each one of them attend different patients.

We have a schedule of 8 hours per day and two duties per month. The duties are at a nearby hospital. I travel to a hospital, 40 km away from Tranås. Normally a family doctor has 2-3 duties per month, from 17 to 22h.

After 22h, the on-call duties are scheduled. The nurses from the elderly homes can call on the phone and ask questions.

In Sweden the phone in the medical setting is very well used. I have approximately 5 phone-calls with patients every day. On the phone we can monitor the patient, do follow-ups and adjust the medicine.

How is the relationship doctor-patient?

The family doctors have the obligation to do follow-up before and after hospitalization. There are a lot of preventive check-ups. Whenever a patient gets out of the hospital there is a recovery plan and follow-up.

Also, the municipality is involved, there are nurses paid by the municipality to take care of the patients and they can call the family doctor and ask questions.

One of the most important activity of the GP is to fill in the electronic journal of the patient with all the clinical history, interventions, plan of treatment, etc.

The patients and all the colleagues have access to the electronic journal.

This puts a certain pressure on the doctor, he must be extremely attentive to plan and follow-up according to the rules. It can be stressful but it is in the best interest of the patient.

How is the collaboration with the colleagues?

I was very surprised to see how much help you get from colleagues.

The collaboration is very natural and consensus is very important.

The essence of the Swedish collaboration is the “fika”, I have two “fikas” per day, scheduled in my agenda. Everybody meets and takes a coffee while talking to colleagues.

We also have meetings every week with the whole team, to discuss about the patients.

Also Sweden is a society of consensus. All the team eats together, 30-40 people at the same table. You can have lunch every day with your boss and this shows that they give the same value to everyone. Also this contributes to the solidarity of the team.

How is the access to investigations and analytics?

There are rules and protocols for every diagnosis, elementary steps.

In these 5 years I never had any restrictions regarding additional analytics and examinations. Sometimes I asked very special analytics which were made only in two laboratories in Sweden. I didn’t have any commentary about this and the truth is that I never  felt a financial pressure regarding the medical investigations.

What are the opportunities for a family doctor in Sweden?

As a doctor you have incredible opportunities. Every week I receive job offers from Sweden, Norway or Denmark, on different channels, phone or social media. But I am so well integrated here and I feel so good that I wouldn’t like to leave for all the money in the world.

What is great about Sweden is that if you just do your job as a doctor, everything else falls into place. You don’t need to struggle about accomplishing things. You just need to focus on the patients and on your professional life.

At the bank they have an extraordinary trust if you are a doctor and you can have very good conditions.

The primary care centre invests in our training as doctors but also as persons. We have courses to improve our pedagogical capacities. We receive a lot of help when we come here and they expect us to help younger colleagues.

There is no difference between the level of the salary of a Swedish doctor and a foreign doctor. Every year they increase the salary and you can have a very good life as a doctor.

As a family doctor the primary care centre sends you to conferences and congresses or training courses.

Also 2 days per year are dedicated to news in the medical field. All the doctor in the region gather and have access to this information.

How is life in Tranås?

It’s an incredible life, I was wondering what do people do on holidays because in their spare time they have many leisure activities that I used to associate with holidays.

Many people have boats and when they finish working they go out with the boat. A colleague of mine, once, came swimming 4 km on a lake to the GP practice.

It is a peaceful place, with settled down people with families.

Even if Tranås is small, with only 18000 inhabitants, it is perfectly functional, it has 5 gyms, a pool, a 4 stars hotel, 20 restaurants, 6 general schools and a high-school, it is 3 hours away from Stockholm. Sometimes I consider that I live in a neighbourhood of Stockholm because in Bucharest, on traffic jams it was what took to get to my work.

How did the language course help you to adapt to Sweden?

It was the best period of my life. I had a very good level of Swedish when I arrived compared with other colleagues who were struggling with the language.

What are the major cultural differences?

Before I came to Sweden I thought it was hard to integrate in the Swedish society, especially in my case, being 40 years old.

But, right now I have 4 or 5 good friends in town.

It is perhaps hard to get in, but when you know a Swede you can have a friend for a life. You have to invest time and quality in the relationships.

How do you evaluate the whole process with MediCarrera?

It was fantastic, and I am very grateful to the whole MediCarrera team. It changed my life. The Swedish colleagues told me that sometimes it doesn’t go well for doctors from abroad, but they continue to invest in people and this is extraordinary.

Do you feel accomplished professionally?

What is great is that here you live with the feeling that very good times are still ahead, waiting for you.

It is very hard work, and this means that as a doctor coming from abroad you need to get out of your comfort zone, to experiment a bit of discomfort because you need to learn a lot of things.

The Swedish colleagues believe in you and they help you and if you do your job then things go up obligatory.

We at MediCarrera are very satisfied and happy that we could contribute to this career  change for David. We are also very happy that he now calls Sweden his home.

The post An interview with David Antoniu GP appeared first on MediCarrera.

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An interview with David Antoniu

A Romanian family doctor who moved to work in Sweden in 2015 with the assistance from MediCarrera.

David Antoniu visited the primary care centre, in Tranås a town of 18 000 inhabitants, situated, in South Central Sweden, this was in spring 2014.

The visit, a study tour for three days,  is part of the first steps in the process, before you make the final decision to accept a new job offer. We arrange a meeting with the clinic and organize a visit to the city and region where the position is available in. There you get a chance to experience the town and the workplace. If you have children we take the opportunity to visit schools and daycares.  The trip is financed by the employer.

When the contract was signed, David started the language course in Calafell, where he studied from September to December 2014. Right before his employment started in January 2015.

The move to Sweden went smoothly with assistance from our relocation team.

He has now had his job for over 4 years and was happy to tell us that it was the best decision he made.

We asked him to answer a few questions to give us some insight about his experience in Sweden.

What is the thing you mostly like about Swedes?

Swedes believe in people, their relationships are based on trust and even if they don’t know you, the first premise will be to validate the other. On the other side, if you lose their confidence, it is lost forever. They are extremely happy to welcome new colleagues, they are very surprised that foreign people want to live in Sweden. You can find a huge variety of nationalities in Sweden and this contributes to creating an open society. From this point of view I compare Sweden with the new world, just like America was before.

What is the thing you are mostly satisfied and proud of?

After four years I managed to bring my child here. He is 17 years old, and last year in August he joined me in Sweden. He started high-school from the beginning, just like I had to start my position as a resident in family medicine four years ago.

I also managed to buy a house.

How is your work as a family doctor in Tranås?

In Tranås there are 18000 inhabitants and a net of public primary care centres.

In our primary care centre there are 10 GPs, and in total 60 medical staff among which nurses, psychologists, kinesiotherapists. The primary care centre has its own independent laboratory.

In the public healthcare they use their time and their resources very efficiently. The family doctor has an electronic agenda, which is organized in advance by the nurse, with 15 minutes per patient, so all the time is planned with maximum efficiency. Even the breaks are scheduled, twice per day.

Also, another example is that there is no situation in which a doctor and a nurse are together in an examination, each one of them attend different patients.

We have a schedule of 8 hours per day and two duties per month. The duties are at a nearby hospital. I travel to a hospital, 40 km away from Tranås. Normally a family doctor has 2-3 duties per month, from 17 to 22h.

After 22h, the on-call duties are scheduled. The nurses from the elderly homes can call on the phone and ask questions.

In Sweden the phone in the medical setting is very well used. I have approximately 5 phone-calls with patients every day. On the phone we can monitor the patient, do follow-ups and adjust the medicine.

How is the relationship doctor-patient?

The family doctors have the obligation to do follow-up before and after hospitalization. There are a lot of preventive check-ups. Whenever a patient gets out of the hospital there is a recovery plan and follow-up.

Also, the municipality is involved, there are nurses paid by the municipality to take care of the patients and they can call the family doctor and ask questions.

One of the most important activity of the GP is to fill in the electronic journal of the patient with all the clinical history, interventions, plan of treatment, etc.

The patients and all the colleagues have access to the electronic journal.

This puts a certain pressure on the doctor, he must be extremely attentive to plan and follow-up according to the rules. It can be stressful but it is in the best interest of the patient.

How is the collaboration with the colleagues?

I was very surprised to see how much help you get from colleagues.

The collaboration is very natural and consensus is very important.

The essence of the Swedish collaboration is the “fika”, I have two “fikas” per day, scheduled in my agenda. Everybody meets and takes a coffee while talking to colleagues.

We also have meetings every week with the whole team, to discuss about the patients.

Also Sweden is a society of consensus. All the team eats together, 30-40 people at the same table. You can have lunch every day with your boss and this shows that they give the same value to everyone. Also this contributes to the solidarity of the team.

How is the access to investigations and analytics?

There are rules and protocols for every diagnosis, elementary steps.

In these 5 years I never had any restrictions regarding additional analytics and examinations. Sometimes I asked very special analytics which were made only in two laboratories in Sweden. I didn’t have any commentary about this and the truth is that I never  felt a financial pressure regarding the medical investigations.

What are the opportunities for a family doctor in Sweden?

As a doctor you have incredible opportunities. Every week I receive job offers from Sweden, Norway or Denmark, on different channels, phone or social media. But I am so well integrated here and I feel so good that I wouldn’t like to leave for all the money in the world.

What is great about Sweden is that if you just do your job as a doctor, everything else falls into place. You don’t need to struggle about accomplishing things. You just need to focus on the patients and on your professional life.

At the bank they have an extraordinary trust if you are a doctor and you can have very good conditions.

The primary care centre invests in our training as doctors but also as persons. We have courses to improve our pedagogical capacities. We receive a lot of help when we come here and they expect us to help younger colleagues.

There is no difference between the level of the salary of a Swedish doctor and a foreign doctor. Every year they increase the salary and you can have a very good life as a doctor.

As a family doctor the primary care centre sends you to conferences and congresses or training courses.

Also 2 days per year are dedicated to news in the medical field. All the doctor in the region gather and have access to this information.

How is life in Tranås?

It’s an incredible life, I was wondering what do people do on holidays because in their spare time they have many leisure activities that I used to associate with holidays.

Many people have boats and when they finish working they go out with the boat. A colleague of mine, once, came swimming 4 km on a lake to the GP practice.

It is a peaceful place, with settled down people with families.

Even if Tranås is small, with only 18000 inhabitants, it is perfectly functional, it has 5 gyms, a pool, a 4 stars hotel, 20 restaurants, 6 general schools and a high-school, it is 3 hours away from Stockholm. Sometimes I consider that I live in a neighbourhood of Stockholm because in Bucharest, on traffic jams it was what took to get to my work.

How did the language course help you to adapt to Sweden?

It was the best period of my life. I had a very good level of Swedish when I arrived compared with other colleagues who were struggling with the language.

What are the major cultural differences?

Before I came to Sweden I thought it was hard to integrate in the Swedish society, especially in my case, being 40 years old.

But, right now I have 4 or 5 good friends in town.

It is perhaps hard to get in, but when you know a Swede you can have a friend for a life. You have to invest time and quality in the relationships.

How do you evaluate the whole process with MediCarrera?

It was fantastic, and I am very grateful to the whole MediCarrera team. It changed my life. The Swedish colleagues told me that sometimes it doesn’t go well for doctors from abroad, but they continue to invest in people and this is extraordinary.

Do you feel accomplished professionally?

What is great is that here you live with the feeling that very good times are still ahead, waiting for you.

It is very hard work, and this means that as a doctor coming from abroad you need to get out of your comfort zone, to experiment a bit of discomfort because you need to learn a lot of things.

The Swedish colleagues believe in you and they help you and if you do your job then things go up obligatory.

We at MediCarrera are very satisfied and happy that we could contribute to this career  change for David. We are also very happy that he now calls Sweden his home.

The post An interview with Dr. David Antoniu appeared first on MediCarrera.

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Working Conditions for Medical Professionals in Denmark

BY: Nicole Danielsen, Account Manager Denmark at MediCarrera

Due to high living standards, a strong welfare system and a healthy balance between work and private life, Denmark is known as one of the happiest countries in the world. The workplace culture is very supportive of families and the technology used in healthcare is getting more and more advanced, especially with the development of new super hospitals.

Working in the Danish healthcare system revolves around the work-life balance, as people treasure their free time. This prevents potential burn-outs, which have negative consequences for both the patients and the doctors. It also ensures doctors and nurses have the energy and time to dedicate themselves to every single patient. Here’s what medical professionals can count on in Denmark:

1. Union agreements

Usually, wages and employment terms on the Danish labour market are regulated by collective labour agreements made by trade unions and employer associations.

Employees choose a union representative who undertakes local negotiations on wages and other work conditions with the employer. This union representative also functions as a person of trust. For example, if there is an issue with a trust related problem and a medical professional doesn’t want to speak to the immediate or direct supervisor they can confide in this contact person.

Depending on the type of employment, by law, there are three types of conversations for evaluating the workplace. The conversations are in regards to satisfaction, mid-term evaluations and further education.

2. The famous Danish work-life balance

The work-life balance in Denmark prevents potential burn-outs and gives medical professionals the energy to dedicate themselves to every single patient. There’s even a so-called 11-hour rule, which says you can never work more than 11 hours in one shift and everyone is entitled to a daily rest period of at least 11 consecutive hours.


In Denmark, all medical professionals have enough time to focus on their expertise, without losing time on other people’s responsibilities or coordinating tasks.

“One of the things I like most about working in Denmark is the well organized work-life balance. Thanks to that, I’m not stressed.”

Daniela, a specialist in oncology working in Denmark

3. Organized healthcare system

The Danish healthcare system is well known for being organized. There are work schedules to follow, so medical professionals have enough time for patients and can focus on solving their problems.

The medical professionals also act more responsibly in an organized healthcare system. Everybody arrives and leaves on time and gives their best during working hours. This type of organization results in an open atmosphere, where different specialists work together and benefit from each other’s experiences.

“Organization is the best quality of Danish healthcare. I can spend much more time giving professional attention to patients, and focus on solving their problems.”

Jurijs, a surgeon from Latvia working in Denmark

“The Danish healthcare system is well known for being organized. There are work schedules to follow, so medical professionals have enough time for patients and can focus on solving their problems.”

4. Professional growth and satisfaction

The flat hierarchy gives medical professionals a great opportunity for both growth and responsibility. It’s, therefore, necessary for each person to take his share of the workload, to be independent and make wise choices on their own. If you do so you will be rewarded and recognized.

Since the wages are good, no extra shifts have to be picked up to earn more money. This also leads to patients being treated better.

“I have time to consult books regarding theory, the internet and so forth. I never had time for that before. I have more time for patients, and I feel that I can be a better psychiatrist for them.”

Gustav, a psychiatrist from Slovakia working in Denmark

5. Team spirit and pleasant working environment

Denmark has a good working environment and more importantly, a great team spirit. Generally, colleagues are extremely friendly and happy to offer help if they can, and there is always a good atmosphere at meetings or any other encounters.

“There is always someone who brings tea and coffee. Generally, there is a good balance between professionalism and a friendly working environment.”

Dimitris, a psychiatrist from Greece working in Denmark

 If you’re a medical professional looking for work-life balance and professional growth register here and explore career opportunities in Denmark.

Interested?

REGISTER

The post Working Conditions for Medical Professionals in Denmark appeared first on MediCarrera.

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Why 2019 is the Best Year to Develop Your Medical Career in Scandinavia?
BY: Anda Stoicescu, Recruitment Team Leader & Psychologist at MediCarrera

Moving to another country can provide you and your family with outstanding opportunities for personal and professional development. Scandinavia is well-known as a family friendly society and for its advanced healthcare, which ensures both the medical professionals with good working conditions and patients with high-quality medical care. Here are some quick facts about Sweden, Denmark and Norway:

Sweden

  • 1611 hours – that’s how many (few) the average Swede works in a year
  • it’s a booming population in the last 100 years (more and more people choose Sweden as their home)
  • 54% of energy comes from renewables
  • parents have 480 days of parental leave
  • 99% of Sweden’s waste is recycled

Denmark

  • full-time workers devote 66% of their day to leisure, which is above the OECD average of 62%
  • over 20% of electricity comes from renewable energy; the goal is to reach 100% by 2050
  • the country scores well on the World Economic Forum’s gender equality index
  • only 2% of employees work long hours compared to the OECD average of 13 %
  • there is a sustainable bicycle culture

Norway

  • has one of the lowest income inequality according to OECD
  • the country will be carbon neutral by 2030
  • mothers can take 35 weeks at full pay or 45 weeks at 80% pay, and fathers can take between zero and 10 weeks depending on their wives’ income
  • education for all is the basic principle of the Norwegian education system
  • average workers tend to stay in the same job for years without any serious threat of losing their job

Let us help you work in advanced healthcare systems with modern hospital infrastructures, grow professionally and find a good work-life balance. Here’s why, without further delay, you should consider moving to Scandinavia and developing your medical career there in 2019:

1. Advanced healthcare systems

The healthcare systems in Scandinavian countries are among the best in the world. Sweden, Denmark and Norway are all ranking within the top 10 worldwide for healthcare. Most hospitals have modern equipment for medical professionals to work with, while the overall structure is very advanced. A lot of hospitals are equipped with high-end IT solutions that reduce the chance of errors. This innovative approach to IT makes it easier to treat each patient by knowing their entire health history.

2. Career development possibilities

Scandinavian countries are among the most developed ones when it comes to equality. The flat hierarchy gives medical professionals a great opportunity for both growth and responsibility. It’s necessary for each person to take his share of the workload, to be independent and make wise choices on their own. If they do so they will be rewarded and recognized.

Training is much more extensive in Scandinavia. It takes place while the doctors are working, so no time gets wasted, while they get the opportunity to grow professionally and learn new things. You can get support from your superiors for pursuing further training which results both in professional satisfaction and career development.

3. Good work-life balance

You have probably heard about the famous Scandinavian work-life balance. It means you work fewer hours and have more time for your private life and family. Life in Scandinavia is all about quality and family is high on their priority list.

This prevents potential burn-outs and gives medical professionals the energy to dedicate themselves to every single patient. Many of our successfully placed doctors emphasize the work-life balance when sharing their experience of relocating to Scandinavia.

You have probably heard about the famous Scandinavian work-life balance. It means you work fewer hours and have more time for your private life and family. Life in Scandinavia is all about quality and family is high on their priority list.
4. Family-friendly societies

Scandinavian societies have a positive attitude toward family life and family priority. Employers are very understanding if you have to pick up your children at 4 PM. This attitude allows parents to spend more time with their children which is a huge benefit for many considering the move.

Scandinavian countries rank highly for quality of life and family life indexes. Long parental leaves, free schooling and monthly allowances for children are just some of the benefits. Scandinavian societies really invest in its residents.

5. Financial security and a good working environment

Yes, the cost of living is high in Scandinavia, but the salaries in the healthcare sector make up for it as they are much higher than in the rest of Europe. If you’re a medical professional in Scandinavia you don’t have to worry about the salary, it’s perfectly sufficient.

Medical professionals work in organized, modern healthcare systems as a result of advanced technology, constant improvement and open-minded societies. The flat hierarchy in hospitals ensures a human approach. Even though everyone still has a superior, he/she will most likely informally speak to you. This type of organization results in a relaxed and open atmosphere, where different specialists work together and benefit from each other’s experiences.

If you’re interested in relocating to Scandinavia and developing your medical career, register here!

Interested? REGISTER

The post Why 2019 is the Best Year to Develop Your Medical Career in Scandinavia? appeared first on MediCarrera.

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Working Conditions for Medical Professionals in Sweden
BY: Anda Stoicescu, Recruitment Team Leader & Psychologist at MediCarrera

In order to do their jobs properly and fully dedicate themselves to patients, medical professionals require good working conditions. Not having enough time per patient, working long hours and inadequately equipped hospitals increase the possibility of burnout, a syndrome of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, which has negative consequences for both the patients and the medical professionals.

Sweden is known for its organised, modern healthcare system, which is a result of advanced technology, constant improvement and open-minded society. Here’s what medical professionals looking to relocate to Sweden can expect:

1. More time per patient

It is widely known that one of the biggest frustrations in primary care across the world is not enough time to consult with each patient. A recent study presented in the BMJ Open medical journal shows that Sweden ranks number one in GP consultation time per patient, with an average of 22.5 minutes per patient.

Having more time means that doctors know their patients better and can solve their problems more efficiently. 

“I have more time per patient because there are fewer patients per nurse. One nurse has four patients a day whereas in Holland you can have up to eight patients a day.”

Mirjam, a nurse from the Netherlands working in Sweden

2. Working hours that ensure good work-life balance

The work-life balance in Sweden is great as the family is very high on their priority list. The working schedule is fixed, and in case overtime is required, you are entitled to an additional payment. Life in Sweden is all about quality, which really makes the difference. Usually, a work week in a hospital consists out of five days with an average of 40 hours per week, which is less compared to other countries in Europe.

“In Sweden, my working hours are limited to the time between 7 am and 4 pm. You also have more resources, the salary is a lot better, and the working environment is very nice.”

Christian, a radiologist from Romania working in Sweden

The training takes place while the doctors are working so no time gets wasted, while they get the opportunity to grow professionally and learn new things. More competencies come with longer training.
3. Training and professional growth possibilities

In the Swedish healthcare system, there’s an emphasis on training and deep knowledge of diagnostics and treatment. The training takes place while the doctors are working, so no time gets wasted, while they get the opportunity to grow professionally and learn new things. More competencies come with longer training.

“The level of training is a lot higher in Sweden. We can work in our sub-specialities and get support from our superiors for pursuing further training. We also plan our development over the next two years with them. This makes us feel positive and see a bright future.”

Mercedes and Jorge, an ophthalmologist and a paediatrician from Spain working in Sweden

4. Equality and teamwork

Sweden is one of the most developed countries in Europe when it comes to equality. There is a non-hierarchical healthcare organisation in Sweden, which offers the opportunity to have significant professional status and enhance your professional growth.

Teamwork is essential in the Swedish healthcare system, so medical professionals stick up for each other and ask other specialists for advice. They share knowledge and contribute to the common goals in patient care. Inter-professional collaborations can improve healthcare processes and outcomes.

“In general, the work­place functions better. Here you work in a team with the attitude of sticking up for one other. The patients are also positive about doctors collab­orating with other experts and asking them for advice, whereas it was practically seen as a sign of incompetence back home.”

Agnes, a general practitioner from Hungary working in Sweden

5. A good salary

Doctors and nurses are well paid in Sweden. Most doctors in Sweden get paid between €6K and €6,5K per month.

“You don’t have to worry about the salary. It’s perfectly sufficient, although the cost of living is higher.”

Christian,  a radiologist from Romania working in Sweden

If you’re a medical professional looking for growth possibilities and work-life balance register here and explore career opportunities in Sweden.

Interested? REGISTER

The post Working Conditions for Medical Professionals in Sweden appeared first on MediCarrera.

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Working Conditions for Medical Professionals in Norway

BY: Ingve GrovenAccount Manager Norway at MediCarrera

Medical professionals are more prone to burnout, a syndrome of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization than any other profession. Factors such as increased workload, less time per patient, working long hours and inadequately equipped hospitals are the cause. The consequences include feelings of detachment and lack of empathy towards patients while some medical professionals suffer from anxiety and depression. Healthcare organisations have to improve working conditions and prevent that from happening.

The advanced healthcare system in Norway ensures both the medical professionals with good working conditions and patients with high-quality medical care. Here’s what the working conditions include:

1. Modern hospital infrastructure

Norway is one of the most advanced countries in digitalising its hospitals. All hospitals are equipped with high-end IT solutions that reduce the chance of errors. Moreover, the entire IT system of the hospitals in Norway is synchronised. This innovative approach to IT benefits both the doctors and patients as it emphasises the role that information sharing plays. Most hospitals in Norway have modern equipment for medical professionals to work with, while the overall structure is very advanced.

“I was positively surprised with the hospital’s equipment. Even though it’s a small hospital, they have everything they may need.”

                           Lukasz, a general surgeon from Poland working in Norway

2. Flat hierarchy in hospitals

More often than not, it’s the human approach that eases the pressure and prevents burnout. The Norwegian healthcare system opts for a flat hierarchy in the hospitals, which ensures that kind of approach. Even though everyone still has a superior, he/she will most likely informally speak to you.

“Right from the beginning, I felt very welcome at the hospital. My boss brought me to the police, tax office and so on, in order to get all the paperwork done.”

Amra, a radiologist from Slovenia working in Norway

More often than not, it’s the human approach that eases the pressure and prevents burnout. The Norwegian healthcare system opts for a flat hierarchy in the hospitals, which ensures that kind of approach.

3. Flexible working hours

Employers in Norway provide you with a flexible arrangement and are excessively patient with people and their families. You always have time for your family and their needs. If your child is sick, you can pick it up and easily log into the hospital system and complete admin tasks from home. Being entitled to a flexible working arrangement reduces both physical and mental stress.

“In Norway, you work fewer hours, and you don’t have that many patients, so you have more time to take care of each of them. In Mosjøen there’s more focus on balance between work and private life.”

Aloys, a neurologist from Belgium working in Norway

4. Not too many overtime hours

The working schedule in Norway is known to be less demanding than in other European countries. An average doctor in Norway works around eight hours a day, while the country is in the top three with the lowest working hours according to OECD. High demanding schedules make it impossible to spend enough time with a patient, and in Norway, the focus is always on the patient.

If your working hours exceed 40 hours per week, it’s considered overtime work, which can be conducted only if the need is exceptional and limited. You can choose whether you want to be paid for the overtime or take extra holidays.

“In Norway, you generally have more time for the patients and for discussing cases with your colleagues.”

Petra, a child psychiatrist from Slovenia working in Norway

5. Reasonably organised guard duties and team spirit

There’s no risk of being the only one who does the guard duties. The guards are divided between all the specialists in the department, independently of seniority. This is also a result of the non-hierarchical healthcare organisation. Furthermore, the team feeling, sticking up for each other and collaborating is very common in the Norwegian healthcare system.

“In the beginning, I had a colleague next to me, and someone always went through the descriptions I wrote in order to check that everything was correct.” 

Amra, a radiologist from Slovenia working in Norway

Are you a medical professional looking for better working conditions, flexibility and work-life balance? Register here and explore career opportunities in Norway.

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The post Working Conditions for Medical Professionals in Norway appeared first on MediCarrera.

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Helping Medical Professionals Relocate to Scandinavia

Even though moving to another country can provide you and your family with outstanding opportunities for personal and professional development, this process can be very stressful if not carefully managed. MediCarrera’s relocation team assists both you and your family during the relocation process and solves all the practical issues around the move, before and during the intensive language training. Find out what our relocation team can help you with if you decide to relocate to Sweden, Denmark or Norway:

1. Housing

Finding a home is one of the most important things when moving to another country. We make sure to find one that matches your and your family’s wishes. Since in the beginning, the candidates and their families don’t know the language they have to go through an intensive course for four to five months depending on the country. Not having to worry about finding a place to live and focusing exclusively on learning the language comes in handy. In Sweden, there is a shortage of apartments, so it’s particularly hard to find something on your own. We check the areas together with the employer and find something close to work or public transportation. What we look for also depends on your wishes; some people prefer to live outside of the city, while others want to live close to the centre.

2. School or daycare

Knowing that your children will be taken care of in the best possible way is crucial. We make sure that the children have a place in a school or daycare as soon as possible after arrival. When you go on a study tour, we show you the schools and daycare centres and tell you about the way things work in Scandinavia, such as the eating routines or that children spend a lot of time outside. Children that are a bit older also have to learn the language so they can start their new life in a regular class with other local children and integrate quickly.

3. Medical license

We help you with applying for authorizations and specialist certificates.  In Norway and Denmark our goal is that you have them before you leave our intensive course. These documents are essential because you cannot work without them. We handle everything that has to do with the National Board of Health in each country. We provide you with all the information on what documents you need from the beginning of the process. The only thing you have to do is send these documents to us, and we take it from there. We keep track of the applications and try to help in the best possible way.

MediCarrera has a lot of experience giving language training to healthcare professionals. It’s a very intensive course, but it’s also very effective.

4. The language course

MediCarrera has a lot of experience giving language training to healthcare professionals. It’s a very intensive course, but it’s also very effective. You will study in a course centre where it’s your full-time job to learn the language from our experienced teachers. You get an allowance and accommodation because you can’t work during this time. We take care of your children so that your partner can concentrate on the language course as well. In the beginning, there’s a preparing course, so you already know how to introduce yourself and speak a little bit when you start the language training.

5. The relocation logistics

When moving to another country elementary things that you have to do in the beginning might seem confusing. We assist you in filling in residency documents; help you with the transport and inform you about things like home insurance, the application for ID cards/social security/tax certificates. If you decide to move to Scandinavia with your own furniture, we help you organize the move. We arrange all the flight and train tickets and organize the keys pick up. We tell you how to register in each country, and give information about banks, phone numbers etc. Even though the services MediCarrera provides in the relocation process are the same for each country, there are some tiny differences between them.

Our mission is to help you set up a new life in Scandinavia and enable easier integration into a new country for you and your family. Whether it’s finding a home that matches your wishes, making sure your children are taken care of in the best possible way, helping you with paperwork and logistics or making sure you learn the language before you move, we guide you through the entire process and accompany you until the day you arrive in your new country and start to work.

If you’re a medical professional interested in career opportunities in Scandinavia register here.

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The post Helping Medical Professionals Relocate to Scandinavia appeared first on MediCarrera.

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Why Choose MediCarrera?

If you’re interested in a medical career in an advanced health care system, a good work-life balance and a family-friendly society, MediCarrera offers permanent positions in the public healthcare in Sweden, Norway and Denmark. We have more than 15 years of valuable experience, over 600 doctors and nurses have joined our program and 90% of them still work at the same place after two years. We also offer a free, intensive language course for the entire family to ensure quick integration into a new country, while our relocation team helps you with everything, from finding a new house, school and kindergarten to applying for authorizations and specialist certificates. Find out why to choose MediCarrera as a career advisor on your path to a medical career in Scandinavia:

1. We have a unique family concept

We see international recruitment as a family project. MediCarrera is the only company which includes the entire family in the intensive language course because the smooth integration of each family member is a key point in the process. If everyone speaks the language from day one, they will easily adapt to their new life in a new country. MediCarrera offers full-time language training to partners and children at school age. We also provide childcare for younger children to give both partners time to study.

“One thing was clear from the very beginning, each family member would be assisted throughout the whole process. We felt that, with MediCarrera’s family concept, it was the right choice for us.”

Lukasz, a general surgeon from Poland working in Norway

MediCarrera is the only company which includes the entire family in the intensive language course because the smooth integration of each family member is a key point in the process.
2. We get results

We make sure to find the best suited medical offer for your career while taking every aspect of your life into consideration and listening to your wishes carefully. The results? Approximately 90% of our candidates still work for the same employer after two years.

“I was looking for work abroad online, and MediCarrera got in touch with me. During the process, I had an interview in Sweden and a language course in Spain. I really liked MediCarrera’s staff; they helped me understand the entire process and each step in detail.”

Maria, a psychiatrist from Greece working in Sweden

3. Job offer and the invitation for a study tour

As soon as we have your CV we start to work actively to find a position for you. All your details are treated as confidential. We apply a rigorous selection process to match candidates, workplaces and regions. We organise a meeting so we can get to know each other better and hear about your expectations, motivation and professional experience. In order to present the most suitable job offer. When we found the right offer, you and your partner are invited on a study tour, where you have the interview with the future employer, see the clinic, meet the colleagues and explore the town and the region.

“The three-day study tour in Sweden was very challenging. I had to show how I would treat patients in different scenarios. The employer paid a lot of attention to my communication style and how I would handle the patients.”

Erika, a GP from Hungary working in Sweden

4. Intensive language training for the entire family

Our intensive language program is the most efficient one on the market. We have a team of teachers always working side by side so we can guarantee high standards. Our language courses last four to five months and welcome partners and children as well. We provide each family with their own apartment and an allowance to cover the costs of living. We take care of the children so that candidates can focus entirely on the language. The courses are held in Budapest, Bucharest and nearby Barcelona.

We firmly believe in the concept of ‘learning by doing’. During the course, it’s obligatory to only speak the language you are learning. This is really intense and challenging for most people but everyone is on the same level, so most of the participants feel comfortable speaking to each other. This concept is absolutely necessary to reach the language level required for the relocation.

“The language course was really structured. We had an amazing teacher, who I would like to thank for being so strict with us. It helped us a lot once we moved abroad.”

Miriam, a neurologist from Spain working in Denmark

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5. Relocation – we take care of all the details

We solve all practical issues, from the start of the selection process to finding an apartment and applying for schools and kindergarten. We help you with applying for authorizations and specialist certificates so that you have them before you leave our language course. We assist you in filling in residency documents; help you with the transport and inform you about things like home insurance, the application for ID cards/social security/tax certificates. We arrange all the flight and train tickets. We tell you how to get a personal number/register in each country, and give information about banks, phone numbers etc. While we take care of all the details, you and your family can entirely focus on learning the language to achieve quicker integration once you relocate to Scandinavia.

“MediCarrera is a reliable company. The relocation was very well organized and I would like to thank MediCarrera for all the help!”

Jurijs, a surgeon from Latvia working in Denmark

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Are you a motivated healthcare professional with a desire for change, learning and flexibility on a professional level? Register here and explore career opportunities for qualified doctors, dentists and nurses.

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The post Why Choose MediCarrera? appeared first on MediCarrera.

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Job Interview Tips for Our Medical Professionals

BY: Matina Koulourioti, Recruitment Consultant at MediCarrera

As soon as we have your CV, we start working actively to find a position for you among all work offers available. We present the currently open positions in your speciality in a Zoom or a telephone conversation and inform you about the selection process, the services and support MediCarerra offers to you and your family.

Make sure to have a CV that really expresses your motivation and represents your experience and knowledge. The employer will decide whether they are interested in you or not based solely on a piece of paper. Be as detailed as possible, show both your professional and personal side because this can make a huge difference. In order to present yourself in the best possible way, we offer a CV template and a CV guide that can help you fill it in.

The selected doctors, dentists and nurses first have an online interview with the future employer, before going on a study tour, which usually takes two or three days. Here are our tips for the interview with the employer, whether it’s online or in person during the study tour.

1. Prepare in advance

During the interview, the professionals from the hospital will have some questions for you related to your specialization, experience and training until now. It is also possible that they will make some tests on techniques or methods that you use as a specialist doctor.

Try to practise your answers before the interview. Speak clearly and enthusiastically about your experiences and skills. Don’t be afraid of short pauses. You may need a few seconds to formulate an answer. During the interview, you need to be professional but also yourself at the same time.

Try not to lose your enthusiasm and be positive. If you are asked about a low grade, a sudden job change, or a weakness in your background, don’t be defensive. Focus on the facts instead and emphasize what you learned from the experience.

2. Listen carefully

Listen very carefully to what the interviewer is asking and try to only address the questions being asked. Of course, you have to be prepared, but try to focus on what is being said at the moment and not only on what you’ve prepared.

Make sure you are not only listening but also reading between the lines. Sometimes what is not said is just as important as what is said. Don’t let outside influences distract you during the interview.

3. Ask questions

During the interview, you have the opportunity to find out important information that you need to know. Asking questions is also a way of showing interest and motivation for the job position. Keep in mind that the job interview is a two-way street. It’s an opportunity for you to sell yourself, but also to learn more about the workplace to see if the position and environment are a good fit for you.

Go in with a few questions, such as details about the type of work that the position entails, the corporate culture, and the typical career path of someone who holds the position. And don’t be scared to speak up: not asking questions can signal that you’re uninformed or uninterested.

“During the interview, you have the opportunity to find out important information that you need to know. Asking questions is also a way of showing interest and motivation for the job position.”

4. Online interview

If you’re having an online interview think about the location and the background. Set up a clean, neutral background with good lighting. Avoid sitting in front of a window and also in public spaces. Use your computer with a good internet connection, rather than the phone.

The dress code at the Swedish/Norwegian/Danish job interviews in health care is more business casual than business formal.

If you have a headphone set with a microphone, use it – especially if you’re in a public space. Your computer picks up a lot of background noise. By using a headset, they’ll be able to hear you more clearly and with less distracting background noises.

5. Have a positive attitude

A job interview can be a high-pressure situation, but freezing up and looking nervous will make you lose points in the few critical moments you have to shine. Smiling naturally will make you appear confident, friendly, and approachable. A smile conveys that you’re someone who can get along with fellow employees and patients.

Please remember that all three days of the study tour are part of the evaluation process and even the informal moments could influence the outcome of the interview. MediCarrera makes sure to support the candidates every step of the way. If you made your decision and want to become a part of the Scandinavian public healthcare register here.

Interested?

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The post Job Interview Tips for Our Medical Professionals appeared first on MediCarrera.

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5 Things That Make Denmark Family-Friendly
BY: Nicole Danielsen, Account Manager Denmark at MediCarrera

Besides being known as one of the happiest countries in the world, where full-time employees devote two-thirds of their day to personal care and leisure, Denmark is also a very family-friendly country. The workplace culture is very supportive of families, while the country has the lowest childhood inequality in the world. Here’s why Denmark is a great place for families:

1. Work-life balance

The work-life balance in Denmark is excellent. Doctors and nurses have great working hours, which means you could finish at 3 PM and have enough time to spend with your family.

Once you move to Denmark, you should find a hobby or a private interest. Since employees spend two-thirds of their day outside work, they should find something to spend their time on.

2. A positive attitude towards family life

The entire society has a positive attitude towards family life and family priority. Employers are very understanding if you have to pick up your children at 4 PM. You can schedule your meetings according to your family and your private schedule. The best thing is that you don’t have to feel bad about giving your family priority even in your work schedule.

There are a lot of opportunities and activities for families and children. There are a lot of parks and playgrounds in the cities, and adventure parks outside the cities. In Denmark, everything is family-friendly.

3. The daycare system

The daycare system in Denmark is well organised, the government takes care of it. Even though the maternity leave is not that long, most of the companies are willing to extend it to one year. At the age of one, children go to a nursery and at the age of three to a kindergarten. After that, they start school at the age of six or seven.

The kindergarten costs between €300 and €400 a month. However, the parents pay a small price, and the government pays for the rest. Kindergartens in Denmark also give priority to single parents.

“The entire society has a positive attitude towards family life and family priority. Employers are very understanding if you have to pick up your children at 4 PM.”

4. The government supports education

The Danish government supports students with a unique system. University is free; students don’t have to pay any tuition fee. They also get an allowance from the government, so if they leave their parents’ house, they can pay rent and food themselves. Maybe they’ll have to work 10-15 hours per week as well, but they don’t depend on their parents.

5. Equal opportunities

The system in Denmark makes it easier for women. They can continue working after a year of maternity leave like they did before. Everybody at work will understand that they have a child and more obligations now and will provide all the support possible. You don’t have to work crazy hours to make up for the time you spent on maternity leave, and your colleagues will help you get back on track.

If you’re a doctor or a nurse looking for career opportunities in a family-friendly country register here.

Interested?

REGISTER

The post 5 Things That Make Denmark Family-Friendly appeared first on MediCarrera.

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